Seminar series for early-career researchers

Getting credit for research work –

publishing from your thesis at the very moment you don’t feel like it!

For:

School higher-degree-research students and recent graduates of higher-degree-research programs

Date:

Friday, October 2, 2009

Time:

2–3.30pm (followed by afternoon tea)

Presenter:

Professor Peter Freebody, Professorial Research Fellow

Venue:

Education Seminar Room 418, Education Building A35

RSVP:

by Friday 25 September to reception@edfac.usyd.edu.au (be sure to include details of the event in your RSVP)


This workshop will discuss some aspects of publishing from research thesis work during and after completion, drawing on examples from participants’ work to illustrate some traps and opportunities. The hope is that participants will gain an improved knowledge of some of the practical aspects of publishing from thesis work and an appreciation of the advantages of devoting energy to it.


Building a research profile and track record – part 1

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For:

These workshops are especially designed for early-career researchers, 'research-only' staff, and doctoral students who are close to completion and who expect to remain research-active after completion, however, anyone who is interested is welcome to attend.

Date:

Friday, October 9

Time:

10.30am–1.30pm (includes lunch)

Presenter:

Professor Phillip Jones

Venue:

Darlington Centre Room 21, Darlington Centre H02

RSVP:

email Patrick Brownlee by Friday, September 18


Together, part 1 and part 2 of this workshop will provide ways of thinking about your program of work over the next 3–5 years, and how it might be broken down into practical and deliverable components. In this session, the elements of a research plan and its benefits will be considered and guidance on developing a research plan will be offered.


Hey teacher, who are you?

For:

School staff and higher-degree-research students

Date:

Friday, October 9

Time:

2.30–4pm (including afternoon tea) – NOTE TIME CHANGED FROM 2pm START

Presenter:

Dr Denise Stanley

Venue:

Education Seminar Room 458, Education Building A35

RSVP:

email reception@edfac.usyd.edu.au by October 6 (be sure to include details of the event in your RSVP)


This seminar is part of the Office of Research's series of seminars at which early-career researchers will present a paper and receive feedback and mentoring to assist them submit the paper for publication within six months. Dr Stanley is developing a book proposal under this title, and is very keen to share her ideas and to receive feedback from colleagues interested in teacher professional identity, teacher professional learning and arts-informed inquiry. The book is an arts-based, action-oriented textbook that utilises an arts-informed-inquiry approach to guide early-career and preservice teachers in identifying their teacher and teaching identities.


Introducing statistics into your research – a jump-start for beginners

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For:

University staff and higher-degree-research students

Date:

Tuesday, October 13

Time:

3pm

Facilitator:

Dr Salvatore Babones, Department of Sociology and Social Policy,
University of Sydney

Venue:

Institute of Social Sciences Board Room, Room 310, Old Teachers' College A22

RSVP:

Places are limited, so RSVP is essential. Email Zoe Morrison, including the title of the seminar in your email.


The workshop will involve instruction and a talk followed by a question-and-answer session.


Level of engagement in self-assessment and its relation to progression in writing and problem-solving skills, and overall achievement

For:

School staff and higher-degree-research students

Date:

Friday 30 October 2009 – NOTE THERE ARE TWO PRESENTATIONS ON THIS DATE

Time:

2–3pm (followed by afternoon tea)

Presenter:

Dr Kathryn Bartimote-Aufflick

Venue:

Education Seminar Room 458, Education Building A35

RSVP:

email reception@edfac.usyd.edu.au by October 6 (be sure to include details of the event in your RSVP)


This seminar is part of the Office of Research's series of seminars at which early-career researchers will present a paper and receive feedback and mentoring to assist them submit the paper for publication within six months. Specifically, this seminar describes an initiative designed to promote ongoing university student autonomy. Two cohorts (2005, 2006) of applied-science students (n=168) in an applied-statistics subject completed a self-assessment of 12 generic skills at the beginning and end of semester. It was found that skills were rated more highly at the end than the beginning, and the hierarchy of skills did not change. Female students’ ratings of themselves were higher than males; however grade had no association with skill ratings. Further, three rating groupings of skills were found (high, medium and low). A separation in the ratings of “self” versus “non-self” skills was also evident. As part of the end assessment, students gave reasons for a change (or no change) in rating from their first estimate to their second. Students commonly mentioned activities within the subject that influenced their skill level (and hence rating). Only students with an increase in rating noted external activities contributing to their change in skill (and rating). Further themes to emerge were an understanding of the continuity of self, and an appreciation of standards. Under investigation currently is whether the level at which students engaged in this self-assessment process (from non-participation through degrees of completion of the task) was related to progression (as assessed by teachers) in writing skill and/or problem solving, or overall achievement in the unit of study.


Producing the self-managing girl-citizen in a climate of ‘healthy’ living

image of yoga pose

For:

School staff and higher-degree-research students

Date:

Friday, October 30

Time:

3.30–4.30pm (3pm afternoon tea)

Presenters:

Dr Kellie Burns and Dr Kate Russell

Venue:

Education Seminar Room 458, Education Building A35

RSVP:

email reception@edfac.usyd.edu.au by October 23
(be sure to include details of the event in your RSVP)


From 2007 to 2009 the Australian government funded a new vaccine called Gardasil®, which protects against four strands of the human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted viral infection linked to 70 per cent of cervical cancer cases in Australia. Secondary schools have become one of the key organisational and administrative sites for the voluntary vaccination of girls aged 12–18. This paper provides some early reflections on a qualitative case study investigating the impact school-based vaccination programs have had on the types of knowledge young people are receiving about HPV, cervical cancer and about the vaccine itself. Providing a close reading of the national program’s promotional campaign, the paper locates the vaccination program within a broader set of technologies of health that define girls’ and women’s bodies as risky and in need of (self-)management and erase boys and men from pedagogies of sexual and reproductive health. The paper also offers suggestions for how health and physical education classrooms might become places that challenge and critique the increasingly neoliberal mandates of health policy and discourse.


Building a research profile and track record – part 2

For:

Early-career researchers, 'research-only' staff, and doctoral students who have drafted a research plan after the first workshop on October 9.

Date:

Friday, November 6

Time:

10.30am–1.30pm (includes lunch)

Presenter:

Professor Phillip Jones

Venue:

Education Seminar Room 419, Education Building A35

RSVP:

email Patrick Brownlee by Friday, September 18


Together, part 1 and part 2 of this workshop will provide ways of thinking about your program of work over the next 3–5 years, and how it might be broken down into practical and deliverable components. This session is for participants in part 1 who have since developed a draft research plan. Participants will have the opportunity (if they wish) to present their plans to the group and receive feedback.


Can Multiple Intelligence Theory give insight into a student’s propensity to study science or pursue a career in science?

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For:

School staff and higher-degree-research students

Date:

Friday November 27

Time:

2–3.30pm (including afternoon tea)

Presenter:

Alex Hugman

Venue:

Education Seminar Room 323, Education Building A35

RSVP:

email reception@edfac.usyd.edu.au by November 20
(be sure to include details of the event in your RSVP)


This seminar is part of the Office of Research's series of seminars at which early-career researchers will present a paper and receive feedback and mentoring to assist them submit the paper for publication within six months.

Research over the past 20 years has identified an international concern about the declining proportion of school students choosing to study science subjects at a higher level, and consequently reducing their choice of science as a possible career path. As part of a small-scale, longitudinal study of Australian senior school students, studying science within two parallel curricula in one school, 38 students completed a Multiple Intelligences questionnaire designed to reveal their strengths.

Supported by focus group discussions and interviews held with the students, this paper summarises the findings and reveals insights suggesting that further research in this field may reveal valuable information for education policy makers.