Master of Philosophy (MPhil)

Education or Social Work

The Master of Philosophy (MPhil) involves research and advanced coursework. Students undertaking this degree are assigned a supervisor and, usually, an associate supervisor.

The degree is available either full-time or part-time. Full-time candidature is usually completed in two years, part-time candidates are permitted to take up to four years.

MPhil students are required to complete a probationary year and produce an extended research plan at the end of that year. Examination is by presentation of a thesis of approximately 30,000 words.


Entry requirements

Applicants must hold or have completed the requirements for:

MPhil in Education

  • a bachelor’s degree with honours in an appropriate area of study from the University of Sydney, or equivalent qualification; or
  • a Master of Education by coursework from the University of Sydney with a weighted average mark of at least 75 percent, or equivalent qualification.

MPhil in Social Work

  • a Bachelor of Social Work with first or second class honours from the University of Sydney, or equivalent qualification; or
  • a Master of Social Work from the University of Sydney with a weighted average mark of at least 70 percent, or equivalent qualification

and

  • at least one year of full-time employment in the field of social work.

Course structure

MPhil candidates are required to complete:

  • one core unit of study (6 credit points);
  • one elective unit of study (6 credit points) as recommended by the supervisor; and
  • a thesis of approximately 30,000 words.

Core units of study

Education: Developing a Research Project (EDPK5003)

Social Work: Social Research (SCWK6902)

Elective units of study


Continuing to higher research

MPhil candidates will be permitted to transfer to a PhD provided:

  • their extended research plan is approved; and
  • they complete at least part of the research they proposed for their MPhil, including analysing data and writing up the results into a doctoral-qualifying paper that is reviewed and approved by their thesis-proposal committee.