Program and Speakers


DAY 1
Monday, 14 January

 8.30am

Registration

 9.00am

Welcome to country

 9.10am

Conference opening and vision

  • Professor Robert Tierney

    Professor Rob Tierney is Dean and Professor of the Sydney School of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. Previously he was Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia (2000-2010) and has been a faculty member at Ohio State University, University of Illinois, University of Arizona, Harvard University and University of California-Berkeley.

    He was former President of the Association of Canadian Deans of Education and the Literacy Research Association.

    He has served on national boards in North America, Australia and internationally and has pursued projects in the US, Canada, Australia and China and for UNESCO in Africa, Children’s Television Workshop, George Lucas Foundation and Apple Computer. He has researched and published extensively on literacy education, learner-centered assessment, teacher development, program evaluation and educational reform.

    His work as an editor has included Reading Research Quarterly, the British Journal for Educational Research, American Educational Research Journal and Educational Research. He received the prestigious W.S. Gray for contribution to Literary Research and Practice, American Council of Teacher Education for his formative teacher research, is a member of the International Reading Hall of Fame and was awarded lifetime membership in the Association of Canadian Deans of Education.

  • Dr Phil Lambert

    Dr Phil Lambert PSM is Regional Director, Sydney, NSW Department of Education and Communities, Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Sydney and Adjunct Professor, Nanjing Normal University, China. Phil Lambert has extensive experience in education as a principal, inspector, policy director, Assistant Director-General and Regional Director.

    Phil has overseen a number of major policy initiatives in NSW in early childhood, primary education, rural education and Aboriginal education. These initiatives include the delivery of distance education to isolated students using satellite computer-based technologies, the NSW review of Aboriginal Education, the expansion of preschools in government schools and the class size reduction program.

    Phil has been awarded by the NSW Primary Principals’ Association for his outstanding contribution to primary education and in 2010 was the inaugural recipient of the Regional Director/School Education Director of the Year Award presented by the Federation of Parents and Citizens Associations of NSW. Since his appointment as Regional Director, Sydney Region has recorded significant increases in student enrolments and retention, record performances in external examinations and outstanding achievements in the arts and sport.

 9.35am

Keynote: Leaders and Standards

details

Keynote: Leaders and Standards

Edmund Misson will discuss the incoming National Professional Standards for Teachers (NPST). With a view to enhancing the potential for the development of sound, effective learning programs, this session will address the latest developments in AITSL including the self-assessment tool for teachers, the online approach to professional learning and implications for leaders in the school.

  • Edmund Misson General Manager, Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL).

    Edmund Misson is General Manager at the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL). In this role, his responsibilities include the national approach to accreditation of initial teacher education, work towards nationally consistent teacher registration, certification of Highly Accomplished and Lead teachers, teacher performance and development, and assessment of overseas teaching qualifications.

    Prior to joining AITSL in January 2011, Edmund was General Manager, Youth Transitions in the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. He advised the Victorian Government on a range of education, training and other social policy issues for fifteen years. Edmund has a Master's degree in public administration.

  • Chair: Professor Robert Tierney Dean, Sydney School of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney.

    Professor Rob Tierney is Dean and Professor of the Sydney School of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. Previously he was Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia (2000-2010) and has been a faculty member at Ohio State University, University of Illinois, University of Arizona, Harvard University and University of California-Berkeley.

    He was former President of the Association of Canadian Deans of Education and the Literacy Research Association.

    He has served on national boards in North America, Australia and internationally and has pursued projects in the US, Canada, Australia and China and for UNESCO in Africa, Children’s Television Workshop, George Lucas Foundation and Apple Computer. He has researched and published extensively on literacy education, learner-centered assessment, teacher development, program evaluation and educational reform.

    His work as an editor has included Reading Research Quarterly, the British Journal for Educational Research, American Educational Research Journal and Educational Research. He received the prestigious W.S. Gray for contribution to Literary Research and Practice, American Council of Teacher Education for his formative teacher research, is a member of the International Reading Hall of Fame and was awarded lifetime membership in the Association of Canadian Deans of Education.

10.35am

MORNING TEA

11.05am

Keynote: Curriculum and Reporting

details

Keynote: Curriculum and Reporting

This keynote presentation will focus on the propositions that were made for the Australian Curriculum several years ago and how they are being realised across Australia. This session will include discussion about work that is being done and will be done to support school leaders and teachers to provide quality learning opportunities for students across Foundation to Year 12. Particular emphasis will be on the implications for school leadership in the first phase of the new curriculum; meeting the learning needs of all students across the curriculum; school reporting; and compliance and accountability.

  • Robert Randall CEO, Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority.

    Robert Randall is CEO of the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. He is substantive Deputy CEO and General Manager, Curriculum, and was previously General Manager of the Interim National Curriculum Board.

    Robert has significant experience and success in curriculum, assessment and reporting projects, from design through to implementation, at both state and national levels. His most recent achievement has been to lead the development of the K-10 Australian Curriculum in English, Mathematics, Science and History.

    Robert has held a range of positions within and beyond schools in Western Australia, including Project Leader, Monitoring Standards in Education, Manager, Assessment and Reporting with the Education Department and Principal Consultant with the Interim Curriculum Council of Western Australia.

    In 1996 Robert was appointed Director, Curriculum, with the NSW Board of Studies and in 2001 took up the position of Director of Curriculum K-12 with the NSW Department of Education and Training. In 2008 Robert was appointed General Manager of the interim National Curriculum Board.

  • Chair: Professor Peter Freebody, University of Sydney.

    Peter Freebody (Professorial Research Fellow, The University of Sydney; Fellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences, Australia) has expertise on literacy education, educational disadvantage, classroom interaction and research methodology.

    He has authored or edited 10 books and over 20 research reports to government. He has published in international journals such as Harvard Educational Review, American Educational Research Journal and the International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education and in many international handbooks and encyclopedias on literacy, critical literacy, and research methodology.

    Peter has served on Australian state and national advisory groups for literacy education and curriculum design. He was evaluator of the Australian national on-line curriculum initiative conducted by the Australian Curriculum Corporation, a co-founder of the Centre for Research in Pedagogy and Practice at the National Institute of Education, Singapore, and lead consultant in the development of the Australian English Curriculum.

    His memberships include the NSW Ministerial Advisory Group on Literacy and Numeracy, and the National Literacy and Numeracy Expert Group (as the Federal Government’s nominee).

12.05pm

CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS 1

1 Delegates select one workshop per session (2 workshops on Day 1 and 2 workshops on Day 2)

Leadership and Curriculum

details

Leadership and Curriculum

This workshop will be structured around the case study analysis of exemplary curriculum and community-of-schools initiatives. Each of the examined initiatives has successfully attracted either state or national professional education awards. The workshop will explore elements of leadership from classroom to senior executive and principal levels. The facilitator for this session, Honorary Associate Professor David Smith, was the Academic Partner to each of these initiatives and has worked with the case study schools for over five years. Written case studies will be provided to the participants prior to the session.

  • Honorary Associate Professor David Smith, University of Sydney.

    Honorary Professor David Smith (University of Sydney) is an education consultant with expertise in quality teaching and assessment, issues of and strategies for the middle years of schooling, school self-evaluation, strategic planning and the management of effective school-based change.

    He as been involved in various projects with state, Catholic and independent school systems, universities and private tertiary institutions.

    David has held the full range of academic and administrative positions at the University of Sydney – including Associate Dean Postgraduate Research – and today remains an honorary Associate Professor with the Faculty of Education & Social Work.

    During his academic career, David was the author, co-author and/or editor for 14 published books and over 100 journal and conference papers and numerous reports. He also worked as a visiting scholar or educational consultant in Australia, UK, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden, Norway and Finland.

Leadership and Improvement

details

Leadership and Improvement

Much has been written about the need to build capacity and the relentless focus on student achievement. This workshop explores the links between distributed leadership and school improvement and considers the key drivers which influence school effectiveness. This workshop will help you talk the language of school leaders by drawing on contemporary studies of school leadership and school improvement, and the ways in which distributed leadership contributes to improved student learning outcomes. Through a thoughtful inquiry approach we will identify strategies that enable the implementation of a School Improvement Plan by considering the following questions:

  • How are we reaching our student learning achievement goals?
  • What instructional leadership do you need to ensure takes place?
  • What is the quantitative and qualitative evidence that supports this thinking?
  • What actions will we take to ensure improvement is continuous?

  • Virginia Elliott, Chief Education Officer DEC, Sydney Region.

    Virginia Elliott has held many executive roles before becoming School Development Officer with the Department of Education and Communities in 2011. These roles have included Manager Professional Learning and Leadership, Deputy Principal, Principal and Project Manager with the NSW Board of Studies.

    Virginia has extensive experience teaching in suburban Sydney schools in both Sydney region and in South West Sydney in several low SES schools and was Principal of Sylvania High School.

    Her work in schools and for the Department on building leadership capacity at all levels, has given her considerable expertise and a deep knowledge of research about best practice in this area.

    Virginia is committed to succession planning which builds highly effective leaders. Her successful management of professional learning initiatives has included Executive Induction, Executive Leadership Development, and Principal Induction programs, and Team Leadership for School Improvement K-12 as a trained facilitator.

    Virginia has considerable experience in leading innovation and change through sustained school improvement.

Leadership and Equity

details

Leadership and Equity

Based upon the mean performances of countries participating in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) conducted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development(OECD), Australia produces high average performances but low equity outcomes. This situation presents educational leaders with the challenge of disrupting the tight grip that social background has on mediating educational performance. At the local level of schooling, this might require challenging deeply entrenched deficit views about families living in the margins, creating flexible pathways for young people with a diverse range of needs and interests, and supporting teachers to develop innovative pedagogical practices.

In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to consider the experiences of families living in poverty, and how schools might better support their children to succeed at school. Measures for identifying an assessing community needs will be discussed, along with a range of models of school-community engagement. The importance of pedagogical leadership and some of its forms will be examined. The workshop leaders will provide both practical advice and knowledge drawn from educational research.

  • Associate Professor Debra Hayes, University of Sydney.

    Dr Debra Hayes, BSc (Sydney), DipEd (Newcastle), MA (Macquarie), PhD (Newcastle), is an Associate Professor in the Sydney School of Education and Social Work, at the University of Sydney. She has previously held posts at Griffith University and the University of Technology, Sydney.

    Her teaching fields include sociology of education, research methods, pedagogy and school leadership. Debra’s research is located in contexts where there are high levels of poverty and difference. She draws upon systems of thinking that focus on the effects of disadvantage to examine how these are constituted by schooling discourses and teaching practices.

    Debra works closely with school and system-based educators in the public system, as well as community-based service providers. Debra is a former secondary school science teacher.

  • Dr Dorothy Bottrell, University of Sydney.

    Dr Dorothy Bottrell teaches in the Master of Teaching and B.Ed (Secondary) programs with a focus on social justice practices in schools, pedagogies for resilience and school-community relationships.

    In both teaching and research her work centres on young people's perspectives, understanding their experience in social and institutional contexts and how practices may contribute to addressing disadvantage.

    Dorothy's background is in secondary teaching, juvenile justice, youth and community work. She is particularly interested in advocacy based research on the experiences of marginalised young people and how these connect with social processes and policy.

    Resilience, resistance and identity work are central themes of her research. She is convenor of the University of Sydney Network for Childhood and Youth Research. She was recently a Visiting Scholar working with Distinguished Professor Michelle Fine at the City University of New York; and with Professor Michael Ungar at the Resilience Research Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Leadership and IT

details

Leadership and IT

While provision of IT resources in a school is important, it's what is done with them that makes the difference. Having confidence to lead using IT involves getting your hands "virtually dirty" - posting on blogs, using digital cameras, creating digital stories and animations. This hands-on workshop will involve viewing, responding and creating a number of digital texts, as well as reflecting on how these types of tools might best serve learners. What innovative ways might we use technology across all the key learning areas, whether we have one smart phone or a class of iPads? Reflect on this TED video as part of preparing for this workshop - video.

Bring your android, iPhone or Ipad to the workshop if you have one.

  • Dr Jon Callow, University of Sydney.

    Professor Jon Callow (University of Sydney) is an experienced teacher, having worked in primary schools, universities and in professional development for teachers.

    He has been teaching tertiary classes in the areas of primary English and multiliteracies, as well as areas of pedagogy and social justice.

    As a professional literacy consultant, he has worked alongside teachers in their classrooms, in Australia and the US. He is passionate about engaging and equitable education for all his students.

 1.05pm

LUNCH

 2.05pm

CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

Leadership and Curriculum

details

Leadership and Curriculum

This workshop will be structured around the case study analysis of exemplary curriculum and community-of-schools initiatives. Each of the examined initiatives has successfully attracted either state or national professional education awards. The workshop will explore elements of leadership from classroom to senior executive and principal levels. The facilitator for this session, Honorary Associate Professor David Smith, was the Academic Partner to each of these initiatives and has worked with the case study schools for over five years. Written case studies will be provided to the participants prior to the session.

  • Honorary Associate Professor David Smith, University of Sydney.

    Honorary Professor David Smith (University of Sydney) is an education consultant with expertise in quality teaching and assessment, issues of and strategies for the middle years of schooling, school self-evaluation, strategic planning and the management of effective school-based change.

    He as been involved in various projects with state, Catholic and independent school systems, universities and private tertiary institutions.

    David has held the full range of academic and administrative positions at the University of Sydney – including Associate Dean Postgraduate Research – and today remains an honorary Associate Professor with the Faculty of Education & Social Work.

    During his academic career, David was the author, co-author and/or editor for 14 published books and over 100 journal and conference papers and numerous reports. He also worked as a visiting scholar or educational consultant in Australia, UK, Canada, New Zealand, Sweden, Norway and Finland.

Leadership and Improvement

details

Leadership and Improvement

Much has been written about the need to build capacity and the relentless focus on student achievement. This workshop explores the links between distributed leadership and school improvement and considers the key drivers which influence school effectiveness. This workshop will help you talk the language of school leaders by drawing on contemporary studies of school leadership and school improvement, and the ways in which distributed leadership contributes to improved student learning outcomes. Through a thoughtful inquiry approach we will identify strategies that enable the implementation of a School Improvement Plan by considering the following questions:

  • How are we reaching our student learning achievement goals?
  • What instructional leadership do you need to ensure takes place?
  • What is the quantitative and qualitative evidence that supports this thinking?
  • What actions will we take to ensure improvement is continuous?

  • Virginia Elliott, Chief Education Officer DEC, Sydney Region.

    Virginia Elliott has held many executive roles before becoming School Development Officer with the Department of Education and Communities in 2011. These roles have included Manager Professional Learning and Leadership, Deputy Principal, Principal and Project Manager with the NSW Board of Studies.

    Virginia has extensive experience teaching in suburban Sydney schools in both Sydney region and in South West Sydney in several low SES schools and was Principal of Sylvania High School.

    Her work in schools and for the Department on building leadership capacity at all levels, has given her considerable expertise and a deep knowledge of research about best practice in this area.

    Virginia is committed to succession planning which builds highly effective leaders. Her successful management of professional learning initiatives has included Executive Induction, Executive Leadership Development, and Principal Induction programs, and Team Leadership for School Improvement K-12 as a trained facilitator.

    Virginia has considerable experience in leading innovation and change through sustained school improvement.

Leadership and Equity

details

Leadership and Equity

Based upon the mean performances of countries participating in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) conducted by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development(OECD), Australia produces high average performances but low equity outcomes. This situation presents educational leaders with the challenge of disrupting the tight grip that social background has on mediating educational performance. At the local level of schooling, this might require challenging deeply entrenched deficit views about families living in the margins, creating flexible pathways for young people with a diverse range of needs and interests, and supporting teachers to develop innovative pedagogical practices.

In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to consider the experiences of families living in poverty, and how schools might better support their children to succeed at school. Measures for identifying an assessing community needs will be discussed, along with a range of models of school-community engagement. The importance of pedagogical leadership and some of its forms will be examined. The workshop leaders will provide both practical advice and knowledge drawn from educational research.

  • Associate Professor Debra Hayes, University of Sydney.

    Dr Debra Hayes, BSc (Sydney), DipEd (Newcastle), MA (Macquarie), PhD (Newcastle), is an Associate Professor in the Sydney School of Education and Social Work, at the University of Sydney. She has previously held posts at Griffith University and the University of Technology, Sydney.

    Her teaching fields include sociology of education, research methods, pedagogy and school leadership. Debra’s research is located in contexts where there are high levels of poverty and difference. She draws upon systems of thinking that focus on the effects of disadvantage to examine how these are constituted by schooling discourses and teaching practices.

    Debra works closely with school and system-based educators in the public system, as well as community-based service providers. Debra is a former secondary school science teacher.

  • Dr Dorothy Bottrell, University of Sydney.

    Dr Dorothy Bottrell teaches in the Master of Teaching and B.Ed (Secondary) programs with a focus on social justice practices in schools, pedagogies for resilience and school-community relationships.

    In both teaching and research her work centres on young people's perspectives, understanding their experience in social and institutional contexts and how practices may contribute to addressing disadvantage.

    Dorothy's background is in secondary teaching, juvenile justice, youth and community work. She is particularly interested in advocacy based research on the experiences of marginalised young people and how these connect with social processes and policy.

    Resilience, resistance and identity work are central themes of her research. She is convenor of the University of Sydney Network for Childhood and Youth Research. She was recently a Visiting Scholar working with Distinguished Professor Michelle Fine at the City University of New York; and with Professor Michael Ungar at the Resilience Research Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Leadership and IT

details

Leadership and IT

While provision of IT resources in a school is important, it's what is done with them that makes the difference. Having confidence to lead using IT involves getting your hands "virtually dirty" - posting on blogs, using digital cameras, creating digital stories and animations. This hands-on workshop will involve viewing, responding and creating a number of digital texts, as well as reflecting on how these types of tools might best serve learners. What innovative ways might we use technology across all the key learning areas, whether we have one smart phone or a class of iPads? Reflect on this TED video as part of preparing for this workshop - video.

Bring your android, iPhone or Ipad to the workshop if you have one.

  • Dr Jon Callow, University of Sydney.

    Professor Jon Callow (University of Sydney) is an experienced teacher, having worked in primary schools, universities and in professional development for teachers.

    He has been teaching tertiary classes in the areas of primary English and multiliteracies, as well as areas of pedagogy and social justice.

    As a professional literacy consultant, he has worked alongside teachers in their classrooms, in Australia and the US. He is passionate about engaging and equitable education for all his students.

 3.05pm

Leadership: Current theories, research, practice and future directions

details

Leadership: Current theories, research, practice and future directions

Leadership theories have shaped the practical application of leadership in the past and the present; and they will certainly shape leadership practice in the future. However, many leadership development programmes lack a clearly articulated perspective on leadership beyond a competence, behaviour and values approach. Early leadership theories focused on what qualities distinguished between leaders and followers, while subsequent theories looked at other variables such as situational factors and relationships. Leadership today is a lot more complicated.

This workshop will examine recent theoretical and empirical developments in the leadership literature including topics that are currently receiving attention in terms of research, theory, and practice.

  • Dr George Odhiambo

    Dr George Odhiambo is the Coordinator of the MEd (Educational Management and Leadership) programme at the Sydney School of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney.

    His work has evolved into a programme of research and publication that engages with issues in school and higher education leadership and management.

    George has extensive research expertise and a continuing active interest in the areas of leadership in organisations, organisational change and culture, school effectiveness and improvement, staff development, quality assurance for education, and staff/teacher appraisal.

    He is a graduate of the University of Stirling, Scotland, University of Oxford, England and University of New England, Australia.

 4.00pm

AFTERNOON TEA

 4.30pm

Plenary session

  • Professor Robert Tierney

    Professor Rob Tierney is Dean and Professor of the Sydney School of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. Previously he was Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia (2000-2010) and has been a faculty member at Ohio State University, University of Illinois, University of Arizona, Harvard University and University of California-Berkeley.

    He was former President of the Association of Canadian Deans of Education and the Literacy Research Association.

    He has served on national boards in North America, Australia and internationally and has pursued projects in the US, Canada, Australia and China and for UNESCO in Africa, Children’s Television Workshop, George Lucas Foundation and Apple Computer. He has researched and published extensively on literacy education, learner-centered assessment, teacher development, program evaluation and educational reform.

    His work as an editor has included Reading Research Quarterly, the British Journal for Educational Research, American Educational Research Journal and Educational Research. He received the prestigious W.S. Gray for contribution to Literary Research and Practice, American Council of Teacher Education for his formative teacher research, is a member of the International Reading Hall of Fame and was awarded lifetime membership in the Association of Canadian Deans of Education.

  • Dr Phil Lambert

    Dr Phil Lambert PSM is Regional Director, Sydney, NSW Department of Education and Communities, Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Sydney and Adjunct Professor, Nanjing Normal University, China. Phil Lambert has extensive experience in education as a principal, inspector, policy director, Assistant Director-General and Regional Director.

    Phil has overseen a number of major policy initiatives in NSW in early childhood, primary education, rural education and Aboriginal education. These initiatives include the delivery of distance education to isolated students using satellite computer-based technologies, the NSW review of Aboriginal Education, the expansion of preschools in government schools and the class size reduction program.

    Phil has been awarded by the NSW Primary Principals’ Association for his outstanding contribution to primary education and in 2010 was the inaugural recipient of the Regional Director/School Education Director of the Year Award presented by the Federation of Parents and Citizens Associations of NSW. Since his appointment as Regional Director, Sydney Region has recorded significant increases in student enrolments and retention, record performances in external examinations and outstanding achievements in the arts and sport.

 5.00pm

Reflection tool Part 1

  • Virginia Elliott, Chief Education Officer DEC, Sydney Region.

    Virginia Elliott has held many executive roles before becoming School Development Officer with the Department of Education and Communities in 2011. These roles have included Manager Professional Learning and Leadership, Deputy Principal, Principal and Project Manager with the NSW Board of Studies.

    Virginia has extensive experience teaching in suburban Sydney schools in both Sydney region and in South West Sydney in several low SES schools and was Principal of Sylvania High School.

    Her work in schools and for the Department on building leadership capacity at all levels, has given her considerable expertise and a deep knowledge of research about best practice in this area.

    Virginia is committed to succession planning which builds highly effective leaders. Her successful management of professional learning initiatives has included Executive Induction, Executive Leadership Development, and Principal Induction programs, and Team Leadership for School Improvement K-12 as a trained facilitator.

    Virginia has considerable experience in leading innovation and change through sustained school improvement.

1 Delegates select one workshop per session (2 workshops on Day 1 and 2 workshops on Day 2)





DAY 2
Tuesday, 15 January

 9.00am

Welcome to Day 2
Reflection tool Part 2

  • Professor Robyn Ewing

    Robyn Ewing is Professor of Teacher Education and the Arts at the University of Sydney. In the areas of English and the arts, Robyn's research has particularly focused on the use of drama as quality pedagogy with authentic texts to develop students' critical literacies.

    Robyn is a recipient of a NSW Minister’s/Australian College of Educators Quality Teaching Award, the University of Sydney’s Excellence in Teaching Award (1999), the Director-General’s Award for Outstanding Service to Public Education (2002), the Sydney School of Education and Social Work’s Teaching Excellence Award (2004) and the Vice Chancellor’s Award for Higher Degree Research Supervision (2007).

    Robyn was President of the Primary English Teachers Association from 2001-2006. She has authored or co-authored four books, including Curriculum and Assessment: A Narrative Approach; Action Learning: Reframing Teacher Professional Development with Peter Aubusson and Garry Hoban and Beyond the script Take 2: Drama in the classroom with Jennifer Simons.

    She co-edited Teaching and Communicating: Rethinking Professional Experiences with Tom Lowrie and Joy Higgs and edited Beyond the Reading Wars: Towards a balanced approach to helping children learn to read.

  • Virginia Elliott, Chief Education Officer DEC, Sydney Region.

    Virginia Elliott has held many executive roles before becoming School Development Officer with the Department of Education and Communities in 2011. These roles have included Manager Professional Learning and Leadership, Deputy Principal, Principal and Project Manager with the NSW Board of Studies.

    Virginia has extensive experience teaching in suburban Sydney schools in both Sydney region and in South West Sydney in several low SES schools and was Principal of Sylvania High School.

    Her work in schools and for the Department on building leadership capacity at all levels, has given her considerable expertise and a deep knowledge of research about best practice in this area.

    Virginia is committed to succession planning which builds highly effective leaders. Her successful management of professional learning initiatives has included Executive Induction, Executive Leadership Development, and Principal Induction programs, and Team Leadership for School Improvement K-12 as a trained facilitator.

    Virginia has considerable experience in leading innovation and change through sustained school improvement.

 9.15am

Making a difference: Leadership in action

details

Making a difference: Leadership in action

Four highly successful school principals and former school principals will share their skill, knowledge and understandings around creative leadership. They will also discuss strategies that can strengthen teaching practices to raise the performance and achievement levels of students. Key practices common to the case studies will be identified and explored. These are: clear communication to the school community of the need for significant change; consistent focus on improving teaching quality; recognition and celebration of successes; implementation of performance data to monitor teaching practice and the effectiveness of programs; changes to organisational structures to support student achievement and engagement and priority given to teachers professional development.

  • Vicki Pogulis, Principal Glebe Public School.

    Vicki Pogulis is the Principal of Glebe Public School and has been in this position for the last nine years. Prior to this, she was a Literacy Consultant K-8 and Training and Development Coordinator in the Sydney Region, based in the St Peters Office.

    Glebe Public School is a small inner city school with a diverse student population. During Vicki’s time as Principal the students have achieved improved literacy and numeracy results as indicated by NAPLAN and school assessment results. The staff is dedicated and committed to collaborative planning and quality teaching programs which are supported by strong community partnerships. The parent body wants its children to be successful and there has been increased interest and involvement from parents and families.

    Following on from attaining the 2010 Director General’s Award for Outstanding School Achievement, 2011 saw Vicki receive a Sydney Region Meritorious Award for Service to Public Education.

  • Jason King, Principal Botany Public School

    Jason King is the Principal of Botany Public School, situated in the eastern suburbs of Sydney. He has worked as an educator for over 18 years across many areas of Sydney. Jason has a strong success rate in lifting educational outcomes for students from a range of school settings.

    He has been in leadership positions within schools for over 12 years, and is a member of the Learning Innovations state reference group.

    Jason has presented at a variety of conferences on leading and embedding quality practice, and in 2011 he and his staff presented at the National Literacy and Numeracy Partnerships forum for their work in implementing and embedding the Focus on Reading program within the school.

  • Carol Spittles, Principal Georges River College.
  • Helen Wyatt, School Education Director, Sydney DEC.

    Helen Wyatt is School Education Director for Port Hacking Network of Schools.

    Formally Principal of Kingsgrove North High School (2004-2010), Helen has held senior leadership positions in the Office of the Board of Studies (development of New HSC) and in the NSW Department of Education and Communities in schools and, most recently in the Sydney Region office. In all these positions, she has reflected deeply on the nature of effective leadership.

    She was particularly challenged on this journey when faced as a new Principal, with leading a large high school in crisis. The success achieved at that school was the result of a strong values base being made to live in the hearts and minds of the community.

    Helen took part in the Leading Australia’s Schools program, which provided key insights about leadership. More recently, as School Education Director, Helen has had the privilege of working closely with Principals.

    Helen says, “I have learnt to maintain a sense of high standards, but to temper my drive to achieve perfection by developing those around me to make the difference we recognise needs to be made”.

  • Chair: Dr Phil Lambert, Director, Sydney Region DEC.

    Dr Phil Lambert PSM is Regional Director, Sydney, NSW Department of Education and Communities, Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Sydney and Adjunct Professor, Nanjing Normal University, China. Phil Lambert has extensive experience in education as a principal, inspector, policy director, Assistant Director-General and Regional Director.

    Phil has overseen a number of major policy initiatives in NSW in early childhood, primary education, rural education and Aboriginal education. These initiatives include the delivery of distance education to isolated students using satellite computer-based technologies, the NSW review of Aboriginal Education, the expansion of preschools in government schools and the class size reduction program.

    Phil has been awarded by the NSW Primary Principals’ Association for his outstanding contribution to primary education and in 2010 was the inaugural recipient of the Regional Director/School Education Director of the Year Award presented by the Federation of Parents and Citizens Associations of NSW. Since his appointment as Regional Director, Sydney Region has recorded significant increases in student enrolments and retention, record performances in external examinations and outstanding achievements in the arts and sport.

10.30am

Making a difference: A response

details

Making a difference: A response

In her response, Susan Groundwater-Smith will address the role of student voices and student participation in school leadership and how effective, respectful management of student groupings and their learning environment can enhance outcomes for all students.

  • Honorary Professor Susan Groundwater-Smith

    Susan Groundwater-Smith is an Honorary Professor in the Sydney School of Education and Social Work and an Adjunct Professor at the University of Waikato, New Zealand.

    In recent years she has worked extensively in two areas: Teacher professional learning and action research (see Groundwater-Smith, S. & Mockler N. 2011) Teacher Professional Learning in an Age of Compliance. Rotterdam: Springer and Groundwater-Smith, S. et al (2013) Facilitating Practitioner Research, London: Routledge) and collaborative research with young people that enables them to have a sense of agency in relation to decisions that affect them.

    Susan convenes the Coalition of Knowledge Building Schools, a hybrid community of schools that has worked successfully over many years with each other and sites for learning outside the classroom including The Australian Museum, The State Library and Taronga Zoo Education.

11.00am

MORNING TEA

11.30am

CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS 2

2 Delegates select one workshop per session (2 workshops on Day 1 and 2 workshops on Day 2)

Leadership and Special Education

Leadership Metrics: How to motivate and engage your staff

details

Leadership Metrics: How to motivate and engage your staff

In this workshop Professor Andrew Martin outlines the key parts of motivation and engagement in the workplace. He then presents latest motivation and engagement research on staff in schools, including gender, age, and seniority effects. Following this, some evidence-based strategies for motivating and engaging employees in the workplace are described. Here, factors such as employees' self-efficacy, persistence, and sense of control, are addressed. Also discussed are strategies to enhance employees' resilience in the workplace. Underpinning these strategies is the need to develop good relationships in the workplace and ways to do this are also discussed.

  • Professor Andrew Martin, University of Sydney.

    Professor Andrew Martin PhD, is Professorial Research Fellow and Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the University of Sydney specialising in motivation and engagement in the classroom and the workplace. He is also an Enducational Psychologist, Honorary Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education, University of Oxford and President Elect, International Association of Applied Psychology.

    Andrew is in the Top 25 of International Rankings of the Most Productive Educational Psychologists (Jones et al., Contemporary Educational Psychology, 2010.) He has written over 250 peer reviewed journal articles, chapters and papers in published conference proceedings. He is Associate Editor of British Journal of Educational Psychology and immediate-past Associate Editor of Journal of Educational Psychology.

Leadership and Professional Development

  • Associate Professor Dianne Bloomfield

    Associate Professor Dianne Bloomfield. As a Director of Professional Experience for 17 years Dianne Bloomfield has been actively involved in the development of relevant curriculum and pedagogy as well as the administration of Professional Experience components within pre-service teacher education at both the University of New England and the University of Sydney.

    Dianne is currently involved in the design and delivery of teacher professional learning modules in schools linked to teachers’ work in our Professional Experience programs, and the developments arising from national teacher accreditation initiatives and the Professional Teaching Standards.

    Her research interests focus on the collaborative contributions schools and universities can make to the complex work involved in supporting pre-service and in-service teachers’ professional learning within fast changing education contexts.

Focusing principal leadership to develop teachers' collective responsibility for student learning

details

Focusing principal leadership to develop teachers' collective responsibility for student learning

This workshop examines teachers' collective responsibility for student learning and the role of pedagogical leadership and its development in support of school reform. The research discussed in this paper, which is part of a larger study comprising four Australian school case studies, focuses on pedagogical leadership as a factor in the development of school-wide collective responsibility. A model for the development of collective responsibility, which includes pedagogical leadership as one of five dimensions, will be explored in terms of the central role principal leadership plays in each dimension. Case studies will be used to facilitate discussion and understanding about pedagogical leadership that supports the development of collective responsibility. Actions and implications for taking pedagogical leadership into practice will be explored through participants' current educational contexts.

  • Dr Frances Whalan, University of Newcastle.

    Frances Whalan has led nationally funded projects focused on large-scale, school-based professional learning to address the challenges of improving the quality of teachers’ classroom practice. She has had an extensive career as an educational administrator and consultant.

    Her leadership roles have included supporting the growth of school cultures to achieve school goals for improved teacher and student learning. By combining a career in school education with academic study, Frances has made a significant contribution to the way schools, educational sectors and academics engage in a collective struggle that speaks to their complex problems of reform and to the core principles of developing collective responsibility.

    Frances’ career achievements have been shaped by her passion and determination to empower schools, school leaders and teachers to take responsibility for and guide their own actions towards school reform and organisational change.

    Her doctoral research investigated the development of teachers’ collective responsibility for student learning, which is the theme of her recent publication, Collective Responsibility: Redefining what falls between the cracks for school reform (2012, Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers).

12.30pm

CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS

Leadership and Special Education

Leadership Metrics: How to motivate and engage your staff

details

Leadership Metrics: How to motivate and engage your staff

In this workshop Professor Andrew Martin outlines the key parts of motivation and engagement in the workplace. He then presents latest motivation and engagement research on staff in schools, including gender, age, and seniority effects. Following this, some evidence-based strategies for motivating and engaging employees in the workplace are described. Here, factors such as employees' self-efficacy, persistence, and sense of control, are addressed. Also discussed are strategies to enhance employees' resilience in the workplace. Underpinning these strategies is the need to develop good relationships in the workplace and ways to do this are also discussed.

  • Professor Andrew Martin, University of Sydney.

    Professor Andrew Martin PhD, is Professorial Research Fellow and Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the University of Sydney specialising in motivation and engagement in the classroom and the workplace. He is also an Enducational Psychologist, Honorary Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Education, University of Oxford and President Elect, International Association of Applied Psychology.

    Andrew is in the Top 25 of International Rankings of the Most Productive Educational Psychologists (Jones et al., Contemporary Educational Psychology, 2010.) He has written over 250 peer reviewed journal articles, chapters and papers in published conference proceedings. He is Associate Editor of British Journal of Educational Psychology and immediate-past Associate Editor of Journal of Educational Psychology.

Leadership and Professional Development

  • Associate Professor Dianne Bloomfield

    Associate Professor Dianne Bloomfield. As a Director of Professional Experience for 17 years Dianne Bloomfield has been actively involved in the development of relevant curriculum and pedagogy as well as the administration of Professional Experience components within pre-service teacher education at both the University of New England and the University of Sydney.

    Dianne is currently involved in the design and delivery of teacher professional learning modules in schools linked to teachers’ work in our Professional Experience programs, and the developments arising from national teacher accreditation initiatives and the Professional Teaching Standards.

    Her research interests focus on the collaborative contributions schools and universities can make to the complex work involved in supporting pre-service and in-service teachers’ professional learning within fast changing education contexts.

Focusing principal leadership to develop teachers' collective responsibility for student learning

details

Focusing principal leadership to develop teachers' collective responsibility for student learning

This workshop examines teachers' collective responsibility for student learning and the role of pedagogical leadership and its development in support of school reform. The research discussed in this paper, which is part of a larger study comprising four Australian school case studies, focuses on pedagogical leadership as a factor in the development of school-wide collective responsibility. A model for the development of collective responsibility, which includes pedagogical leadership as one of five dimensions, will be explored in terms of the central role principal leadership plays in each dimension. Case studies will be used to facilitate discussion and understanding about pedagogical leadership that supports the development of collective responsibility. Actions and implications for taking pedagogical leadership into practice will be explored through participants' current educational contexts.

  • Dr Frances Whalan, University of Newcastle.

    Frances Whalan has led nationally funded projects focused on large-scale, school-based professional learning to address the challenges of improving the quality of teachers’ classroom practice. She has had an extensive career as an educational administrator and consultant.

    Her leadership roles have included supporting the growth of school cultures to achieve school goals for improved teacher and student learning. By combining a career in school education with academic study, Frances has made a significant contribution to the way schools, educational sectors and academics engage in a collective struggle that speaks to their complex problems of reform and to the core principles of developing collective responsibility.

    Frances’ career achievements have been shaped by her passion and determination to empower schools, school leaders and teachers to take responsibility for and guide their own actions towards school reform and organisational change.

    Her doctoral research investigated the development of teachers’ collective responsibility for student learning, which is the theme of her recent publication, Collective Responsibility: Redefining what falls between the cracks for school reform (2012, Rotterdam, Boston, Taipei: Sense Publishers).

 1.30pm

LUNCH

 2.30pm

Making a difference: Aboriginal Education

  • Brian Debus, Principal Menindee Central School

    Brian Debus Served as principal in small and large primary and central schools between 1974 to 2002. In 2005 Brian returned from retirement to become Principal of Menindee Central School.

    He has been the recipient of numerous scholarships and awards, including the Frank Farrell scholarship in 2008 to study indigenous education in the United States and Canada and the 2012 Social Justice and Equity award by the NSW Primary Principals Association.

    Brian's focus has always been on working and teaching in low socio economic schools. His passion in teaching Aboriginal students has led him to the remote NSW Aboriginal communities of Wilcannia and Menindee. His inspiration and passion was provided by Professor Colin Tatz during three years studying politics and education as part of his Arts degree.

  • Bob Morgan

    Dr Bob Morgan. Dr RV (Bob) Morgan (Gumilaroi) is a highly respected and acknowledged Aboriginal educator/researcher who has worked extensively throughout Australia and internationally in the field of Aboriginal knowledge and learning for more than 35
 years.

    Bob has an indivisible commitment to the principles of Aboriginal self-determination and social and restorative justice.
 Bob is particularly interested in
 and advocates the need for the development of culturally contextual and affirming education for Aboriginal students.

    His involvement and experience with Aboriginal education is shaped and influenced by his many years of senior leadership at the state, national and international levels of Aboriginal/ Indigenous education policy and programme development.

  • Chair: Professor Graham Hingangaroa Smith

    Professor Graham Hingangora Smith is an internationally renowned Māori educationalist and advocate. He is the Faculty’s first Principal International Research Fellow.

    Graham’s academic background is within the disciplines of education, social anthropology, and cultural and policy studies. More specifically, his academic work has centered on developing theoretically informed transformative strategies which intend to intervene in the high and disproportionate levels of Indigenous Māori cultural, political, social, educational and economic underdevelopment.

    Graham was formerly a Professor of Education at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. In 1998, he became Pro Vice Chancellor Māori and an elected Professorial member of the University of Auckland Council.

    He has also worked with the University of British Columbia in Canada and was CEO and Vice-Chancellor of Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi Indigenous University – a Maori tertiary institution with students from certificate to PhD.

 3.30pm

Plenary

  • Professor Robert Tierney

    Professor Rob Tierney is Dean and Professor of the Sydney School of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. Previously he was Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia (2000-2010) and has been a faculty member at Ohio State University, University of Illinois, University of Arizona, Harvard University and University of California-Berkeley.

    He was former President of the Association of Canadian Deans of Education and the Literacy Research Association.

    He has served on national boards in North America, Australia and internationally and has pursued projects in the US, Canada, Australia and China and for UNESCO in Africa, Children’s Television Workshop, George Lucas Foundation and Apple Computer. He has researched and published extensively on literacy education, learner-centered assessment, teacher development, program evaluation and educational reform.

    His work as an editor has included Reading Research Quarterly, the British Journal for Educational Research, American Educational Research Journal and Educational Research. He received the prestigious W.S. Gray for contribution to Literary Research and Practice, American Council of Teacher Education for his formative teacher research, is a member of the International Reading Hall of Fame and was awarded lifetime membership in the Association of Canadian Deans of Education.

  • Dr Phil Lambert

    Dr Phil Lambert PSM is Regional Director, Sydney, NSW Department of Education and Communities, Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Sydney and Adjunct Professor, Nanjing Normal University, China. Phil Lambert has extensive experience in education as a principal, inspector, policy director, Assistant Director-General and Regional Director.

    Phil has overseen a number of major policy initiatives in NSW in early childhood, primary education, rural education and Aboriginal education. These initiatives include the delivery of distance education to isolated students using satellite computer-based technologies, the NSW review of Aboriginal Education, the expansion of preschools in government schools and the class size reduction program.

    Phil has been awarded by the NSW Primary Principals’ Association for his outstanding contribution to primary education and in 2010 was the inaugural recipient of the Regional Director/School Education Director of the Year Award presented by the Federation of Parents and Citizens Associations of NSW. Since his appointment as Regional Director, Sydney Region has recorded significant increases in student enrolments and retention, record performances in external examinations and outstanding achievements in the arts and sport.

 7.00pm

Conference Banquet

2 Delegates select one workshop per session (2 workshops on Day 1 and 2 workshops on Day 2)





DAY 3
Wednesday, 16 January

 9.00am

Teacher and Leader Effectiveness in High-Performing Education Systems

details

Teacher and Leader Effectiveness in High-Performing Education Systems

Professor Darling-Hammond's session will discuss the findings from recent comparative research on the school systems in Singapore, Finland and Ontario. Commissioned by the Alliance for Excellent Education (Washington D.C.) and the Stanford Centre for Opportunity Policy in Education (Standford University), this comparative study focused on teacher effectiveness polices with the aim to expand the range policy choices available to schools and to show how ideas work in practice at the system level. The three case study countries in this research largely attributed their education success to their efforts to recruit, prepare, develop and retain a strong educator workforce. This will be discussed in detail and the implications for Australian school leaders will be examined.

The published report, Teacher and Leader Effectiveness in High-Performing Education Systems would be sent in advance to all conference delegates.

  • Dr Linda Darling-Hammond in a live video hookup with Stanford University.

    Dr Linda Darling-Hammond (Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education at Stanford University), launched the Standford Educational Leadership Institute and the School of Redesign Network, and has served as faculty sponsor for the Stanford Teacher Education Program.

    She is a former president of the American Educational Research Association and member of the National Academy of Education.

    Her research, teaching, and policy work focus on issues of school restructuring, teacher quality and educational equity.

    She was education adviser to Barack Obama's first presidential campaign and was reportedly among candidates for Secretary of Education in the Obama administration.

    From 1994 - 2001, she served as executive director of the National Commission on Teaching and America's Future, a blue-ribbon panel whose 1996 report led to sweeping policy changes in US education.

10.00am

Plenary

  • Professor Robert Tierney

    Professor Rob Tierney is Dean and Professor of the Sydney School of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. Previously he was Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia (2000-2010) and has been a faculty member at Ohio State University, University of Illinois, University of Arizona, Harvard University and University of California-Berkeley.

    He was former President of the Association of Canadian Deans of Education and the Literacy Research Association.

    He has served on national boards in North America, Australia and internationally and has pursued projects in the US, Canada, Australia and China and for UNESCO in Africa, Children’s Television Workshop, George Lucas Foundation and Apple Computer. He has researched and published extensively on literacy education, learner-centered assessment, teacher development, program evaluation and educational reform.

    His work as an editor has included Reading Research Quarterly, the British Journal for Educational Research, American Educational Research Journal and Educational Research. He received the prestigious W.S. Gray for contribution to Literary Research and Practice, American Council of Teacher Education for his formative teacher research, is a member of the International Reading Hall of Fame and was awarded lifetime membership in the Association of Canadian Deans of Education.

  • Dr Phil Lambert

    Dr Phil Lambert PSM is Regional Director, Sydney, NSW Department of Education and Communities, Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Sydney and Adjunct Professor, Nanjing Normal University, China. Phil Lambert has extensive experience in education as a principal, inspector, policy director, Assistant Director-General and Regional Director.

    Phil has overseen a number of major policy initiatives in NSW in early childhood, primary education, rural education and Aboriginal education. These initiatives include the delivery of distance education to isolated students using satellite computer-based technologies, the NSW review of Aboriginal Education, the expansion of preschools in government schools and the class size reduction program.

    Phil has been awarded by the NSW Primary Principals’ Association for his outstanding contribution to primary education and in 2010 was the inaugural recipient of the Regional Director/School Education Director of the Year Award presented by the Federation of Parents and Citizens Associations of NSW. Since his appointment as Regional Director, Sydney Region has recorded significant increases in student enrolments and retention, record performances in external examinations and outstanding achievements in the arts and sport.

10.20am

Education policy: unfinished business

details

Education policy: unfinished business

This session will explore federal and state policy developments from a range of perspectives - the historical antecedents and the projected outcomes including the implications for various stakeholders, but especially teachers and school leaders. The positive and negative features of school reform policies will be addressed.

  • Dr Paul Brock AM

    Paul Brock, PhD, AM, FACE, is the Director of Learning and Development Research in the NSW Department of Education and Communities, and an Adjunct Professor at The University of Sydney. He has a distinguished career as an academic in Australia, UK and the US and as an education policy advisor for State and National governments.

    Paul has received many awards for his outstanding contribution to education. These awards include the 2002 Australian College of Educators Sir Harold Wyndham Medal in 2002; 2006 Meritorious Service Award and Medal for Service to Public Education in NSW: the highest award that is given within NSW public education; the 2006 Professional Teachers’ Council of NSW Exceptional Service Award, the 2010 inaugural Dorothy Hoddinott Medal for Outstanding Lifetime Achievement and the 2012 NSW ACEL Patrick Duignan Award.

    His most recent publication is Towards Schooling in the 21st Century: ‘Back to Basics’ or ‘Forward to Fundamentals’, ACEL Monograph Series 49, 2011.

    In 2006 Paul was inducted as a General Member in the Order of Australia for service to public education and to people with Motor Neurone Disease.

  • Honorary Associate Professor Lyndsay Connors

  • Dorothy Hoddinott

    Dorothy Hoddinott, AO, MA DipEd Sydney, FACE FACEL has been the Principal of Holroyd High School in Greystanes since 1995. 
She has long been a strong public advocate for the human rights of refugees and, as Principal, has led her school in addressing the needs of an expanding enrolment of refugee students.

    Her conspicuous and continued involvement in the education of immigrant and refugee students has significantly enlarged educational opportunities among persons who would otherwise have had limited prospects of entering the University.

    The title of Honorary Fellow of the University of Sydney was conferred upon Mrs Hoddinott at the Sydney School of Education and Social Work in 2006.

    In 2008, Mrs Hoddinott was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia for her career-long commitment to social justice and humanitarian issues, her teaching of English as a second language (ESL) and her contribution to leadership and professional teachers' associations.

    She is a Fellow of Senate of the University of Sydney and a member of the Board of Studies, NSW.

  • Honorary Professor Tony Vinson

    Tony Vinson AM is Honorary Professor (University of Sydney) and Emeritus Professor (UNSW). His professional career has alternated between academic appointments and government and community positions.

    He was professor in Behavioural Science in Medicine at the University of Newcastle and Social Work at the University of NSW and has held visiting professorships in Sweden and Holland. He was Foundation Director of the Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (NSW Department of Attorney General and Justice).

    He headed the NSW Department of Corrective Services 1979-1981 during a period of intense reform following a Royal Commission into the state's prison system.

    In 2001 he chaired the Inquiry into Public Education in NSW, for which he received an inaugural NSW Government Award for Meritorious Services to Public Education.

    Tony has undertaken studies of the geographic distribution of social disadvantage and in 2007 authored a national study of the distribution of disadvantage, Dropping off the Edge.

    In 2008 Tony was admitted to membership of the Order of Australia and made a member of the Australian Social Inclusion Board.

  • Chair: Professor Robert Tierney

    Professor Rob Tierney is Dean and Professor of the Sydney School of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. Previously he was Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia (2000-2010) and has been a faculty member at Ohio State University, University of Illinois, University of Arizona, Harvard University and University of California-Berkeley.

    He was former President of the Association of Canadian Deans of Education and the Literacy Research Association.

    He has served on national boards in North America, Australia and internationally and has pursued projects in the US, Canada, Australia and China and for UNESCO in Africa, Children’s Television Workshop, George Lucas Foundation and Apple Computer. He has researched and published extensively on literacy education, learner-centered assessment, teacher development, program evaluation and educational reform.

    His work as an editor has included Reading Research Quarterly, the British Journal for Educational Research, American Educational Research Journal and Educational Research. He received the prestigious W.S. Gray for contribution to Literary Research and Practice, American Council of Teacher Education for his formative teacher research, is a member of the International Reading Hall of Fame and was awarded lifetime membership in the Association of Canadian Deans of Education.

11.30am

THE LAST MORNING TEA

 Noon

An education in Arts and Creativity

details

An education in Arts and Creativity

This session will consider the imperative of an arts rich and transformative education for all Australian children, and how to embed this within and across the curriculum to enhance student learning. The session will examine how to develop ideas and tools based in the creative arts, which are designed to assist in the engagement and learning of students. The session will also look more broadly at how arts practices can be used to inform teaching and how to encourage the professional development of teachers in areas of arts practice.

  • Honorary Associate Professor Libby Gleeson

    Professor Libby Gleeson AM, graduated from the University of Sydney in 1974 with an honours degree in history and a Diploma of Education. She has taught in secondary schools, universities and tertiary colleges in Australia, Italy and London.

    In 1984 her first book: Eleanor, Elizabeth, won the Angus & Robertson New Writers for the Young Fellowship and was Highly Commended in the Australian Children's Book Council Book of the Year Awards.

    Since then, Libby has written more than 30 titles for children and young people. She has been shortlisted for or has won every major literary award in Australia for childrens literature, and is widely published overseas.

    Libby has been chair for the Australian Society of Authors, the Literature and History Committee of the NSW Ministry for the Arts, and is currently chair of the advisory board for the establishment of a Childrens and Youth Literatutre Centre in Western Sydney.

    In 2005 Libby received the NSW Minister for Education Medal for Meritorious Service to Public Education. In 2007, Libby was awarded a Medal in the Order of Australia (AM) for her services to literature and literacy learning.

  • Chair: Professor Robyn Ewing

    Robyn Ewing is Professor of Teacher Education and the Arts at the University of Sydney. In the areas of English and the arts, Robyn's research has particularly focused on the use of drama as quality pedagogy with authentic texts to develop students' critical literacies.

    Robyn is a recipient of a NSW Minister’s/Australian College of Educators Quality Teaching Award, the University of Sydney’s Excellence in Teaching Award (1999), the Director-General’s Award for Outstanding Service to Public Education (2002), the Sydney School of Education and Social Work’s Teaching Excellence Award (2004) and the Vice Chancellor’s Award for Higher Degree Research Supervision (2007).

    Robyn was President of the Primary English Teachers Association from 2001-2006. She has authored or co-authored four books, including Curriculum and Assessment: A Narrative Approach; Action Learning: Reframing Teacher Professional Development with Peter Aubusson and Garry Hoban and Beyond the script Take 2: Drama in the classroom with Jennifer Simons.

    She co-edited Teaching and Communicating: Rethinking Professional Experiences with Tom Lowrie and Joy Higgs and edited Beyond the Reading Wars: Towards a balanced approach to helping children learn to read.

 1.00pm

Finale: Where to from here

  • Professor Robert Tierney

    Professor Rob Tierney is Dean and Professor of the Sydney School of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney. Previously he was Dean of the Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia (2000-2010) and has been a faculty member at Ohio State University, University of Illinois, University of Arizona, Harvard University and University of California-Berkeley.

    He was former President of the Association of Canadian Deans of Education and the Literacy Research Association.

    He has served on national boards in North America, Australia and internationally and has pursued projects in the US, Canada, Australia and China and for UNESCO in Africa, Children’s Television Workshop, George Lucas Foundation and Apple Computer. He has researched and published extensively on literacy education, learner-centered assessment, teacher development, program evaluation and educational reform.

    His work as an editor has included Reading Research Quarterly, the British Journal for Educational Research, American Educational Research Journal and Educational Research. He received the prestigious W.S. Gray for contribution to Literary Research and Practice, American Council of Teacher Education for his formative teacher research, is a member of the International Reading Hall of Fame and was awarded lifetime membership in the Association of Canadian Deans of Education.

  • Dr Phil Lambert

    Dr Phil Lambert PSM is Regional Director, Sydney, NSW Department of Education and Communities, Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Sydney and Adjunct Professor, Nanjing Normal University, China. Phil Lambert has extensive experience in education as a principal, inspector, policy director, Assistant Director-General and Regional Director.

    Phil has overseen a number of major policy initiatives in NSW in early childhood, primary education, rural education and Aboriginal education. These initiatives include the delivery of distance education to isolated students using satellite computer-based technologies, the NSW review of Aboriginal Education, the expansion of preschools in government schools and the class size reduction program.

    Phil has been awarded by the NSW Primary Principals’ Association for his outstanding contribution to primary education and in 2010 was the inaugural recipient of the Regional Director/School Education Director of the Year Award presented by the Federation of Parents and Citizens Associations of NSW. Since his appointment as Regional Director, Sydney Region has recorded significant increases in student enrolments and retention, record performances in external examinations and outstanding achievements in the arts and sport.