Sydney School of Education and Social Work events – 2014 Archive

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Changing contexts in comparative education

GEOPOLITCAL SHIFTS AND AUSTRALIAN ENGAGEMENT

27 October 2014

Participate in discussions and hear about new research engagement in international and comparative education from school members and our guest speakers Dr Christine Fox – an expert in narrative methodologies, postcolonial theory, intercultural and feminist perspectives, and human rights – and Dr Rose Amazan from the University of New England whose research expertise encompasses issues of belonging, diaspora mobility and knowledge transfer.

Abstract for keynote address – "Australian research engagement: partners and protagonists in comparative and international education"

Australian research engagement is a global enterprise for the majority of comparativists in education. Although we take as given that our geopolitical context is increasingly focused on the Asia-Pacific region, arguably we are still tied to influences from the US, Europe and China. Further, we talk of, and create, a plethora of partnerships with our geographic neighbours, albeit somewhat flimsy ones when we examine more closely what might be implied by that term "partnership".

Second, I use the word "protagonist" in my  title from two perspectives. The first is from the original Greek derivation, meaning  "leading character" in a play or event. The other is the more modern interpretation: they who espouse or champion a cause, idea or theory. Over the past 50 years or so, we can name quite a few of our leaders, or main characters, in comparative and international education research and practice. And all of us espouse or champion the concepts of equity, social justice, and other basic human rights. These concepts are written into the statutes of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES), as indeed they appear in the constitution of ANZCIES, our own regional constituent member society of WCCES. As a comparativist for more than 25 years, my personal theory-building is based in critical postcolonial, intercultural and feminist theories, all of which feed into an overarching paradigm of human rights.

The third part of my presentation will draw on a number of approaches that can be taken when contemplating future prospects for comparative and international education research engagement, particularly in relation to the newly formed Sydney University research network, CoInEd. How do we represent ourselves on the shifting geopolitical stage, and how do we collaborate with others?

— Dr Christine Fox




Lunch and refreshments provided. Full programme to be released soon.


Event details

  • When: 9.30am–4pm

  • Where: Room 331, Old Teachers College A22, Manning Rd, University of Sydney
    Education Building A35
    Click image for interactive map.

  • Cost: FREE

  • Contacts:

    Dr Alexandra McCormick
    Co-convenor, Comparative and International Education Research Network
    T: +61 2 9351 6215 | E: alexandra.mccormick@sydney.edu.au

    Dr Arathi Sriprakash
    Co-convenor, Comparative and International Education Research Network
    T: +61 2 9351 3793 | E: arathi.sriprakash@sydney.edu.au

  • Speakers: Dr Christine Fox was a senior academic and teacher educator in the Faculty of Education, University of Wollongong (1991-2009). She gained her Masters degree in educational planning and development at the University of London, based on research carried out in Peru; in her PhD at Sydney University she developed a critical theory of intercultural communication, based on fieldwork in Samoa. Her consultancy and published academic work related to narrative methodologies, postcolonial theory, intercultural and feminist perspectives, and human rights. Between 1994 and 2006, Dr Fox led various international consultancies in Lao PDR, Indonesia, Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Samoa and Sri Lanka, producing numerous reports and articles on this work. Christine was twice President of the Australian and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society (ANZCIES), was a Vice President of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES), and is past Secretary-General of the WCCES (2005-2012). Since January 2014 Dr Fox has been a volunteer for Amnesty International Australia at the Sydney national office.

    Dr Rose Amazan is a lecturer in contextual studies at the University of New England's School of Education. Her research and teaching is in the area of international and developmental education. She has conducted research on the Ethiopian skilled diaspora with a strong focus on skilled female diasporas. Dr Amazan's current research project explores the issues surrounding the position of women in Ethiopian society, particularly in relation to their demonstrable increased participation as students and teachers in higher education. She is also working with colleagues from the University of Sydney on an Australian Development Research Awards Scheme (ADRAS) project, examining the outcomes of Australian scholarships for Africans including re-integration and development of networks of practice among returnees.


Changing contexts in comparative education: geopolitical shifts and Australian engagement

Where

Room 331, Old Teachers College A22, Manning Rd, University of Sydney
Education Building A35
Click image for interactive map.

When

27 October 2014


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