Arts, English and Literacy Education Research Network members

The AELE Research Network comprises a number of academic staff from the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney, as well as honorary members from government institutions and other educational bodies.


Faculty members

Network Convenor

Associate Professor Jacqueline Manuel

Other faculty

Dr John A Hughes

Dr Marianne Hulbosch

Professor Robyn Ewing

Janet Dutton

Kathleen Rushton

Dr Robyn Gibson

Dr Jon Callow

Dr Jen Scott Curwood

Associate Professor Michael Anderson

Associate Professor Alyson Simpson

 Dr Kelly Freebody

Alison O'Grady



Honorary members

Professor Paul Brock AM

Don Carter

Dr Kerry-Ann O'Sullivan

Dr Jennifer Simons

Professor Roslyn Arnold

Margaret Cossey

Dr Simon Haines

Michael Freundt

John Dixon

Sue Brindley

Professor Jonothan Neelands

Dr Sarah Golsby-Smith

Jennifer Healy Carter

Noel Jordan

Dr Bethan Marshall

Tommy Murphy

Bill Spence

Karen Stapleton

Professor Jeanne M
Gerlach

Professor
Terry Locke

Associate Professor
Jeffrey Wilhelm

Associate Professor
Libby Gleeson

Associate Professor
Peter O'Connor

Professor Will Christie

Member Biography

Professor Paul Brock
Professor Paul Brock AM

Paul Brock AM FACE FACEL, is the Director of Learning and Development Research in the Office of the Secretary (formerly known as the Director-General), NSW Department of Education and Communities, an Adjunct Professor in the University of Sydney's Faculty of Education and Social Work, as well as an Honorary Associate in the Centre for Values Ethics and Law in Medicine within the University's Faculty of Medicine. He is also an Honorary Research Fellow of the University of New England.

Dr Brock is Vice Patron of the Motor Neurone Disease Association, NSW. He is a Life Member of both the English Teachers Association NSW and the Primary English Teachers Association Australia, and he is the inaugural Honorary Life Member of the NSW Secondary Principals Council. He is a Fellow of both the Australian College of Educators and the Australian Council of Educational Leaders.

Throughout his 47 year career in education he has been a school teacher, a deputy principal, an academic who has worked in Australian, British and North American universities, a policy advisor to Commonwealth governments, an author, editor and public speaker. He has researched and published extensively, particularly in the field of English literature, language and literacy, but also in the areas of professional teaching standards and in the history of educational policy and practice. His more than 130 publications include single-authored, co-authored and co-edited books; monographs; chapters in books; refereed journal articles; and poetry. He has also delivered nearly 200 academic and professional papers to international and Australian conferences.

Professor Will Christie

 

A graduate of the universities of Sydney and Oxford, Will Christie holds a personal chair in English Literature at the University of Sydney and is founding President of the Romantic Studies Association of Australasia (http://www.rsaa.net.au/). His scholarly work in Romantic studies has been widely published and his Samuel Taylor Coleridge: A Literary Life (2006) awarded the NSW Premier’s Biennial Prize for Literary Scholarship in 2008. Editor of The Letters of Francis Jeffrey to Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle (2008) and author of The Edinburgh Review in the Literary Culture of Romantic Britain: Mammoth and Megalonyx (2009), he is currently researching a critical biography of the Scottish critic, politician, and judge, Francis Jeffrey, and a major study of the early nineteenth-century Edinburgh Review with the aid of Discovery grants from the Australian Research Council.

For many years president of the Dylan Thomas Society of Australia and an active member of a number of literary societies outside the university, Will is also the author of Under Mulga Wood (2004), an award-winning play for voices that has enjoyed performances in the Australian capital cities and around country NSW.

Dr Jennifer Simons
Dr Jennifer Simons

Jennifer Simons has recently retired after 20 years teaching in NSW schools and another 20 years as a tertiary educator, primarily at the University of Sydney, where she is an honorary senior lecturer. Jennifer has lectured in both English and drama, and has published research into these areas in several national and international journals and books, including Beyond the Script: Take Two; Drama in the Classroom, which she co-authored with Professor Robyn Ewing.

Professor Simon Haines
Dr Simon Haines

Simon Haines is Chair and Professor of English and Deputy Director of the Research Centre for Human Values at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

From 2005-7 he was Head of the School of Humanities at the Australian National University. His research interests include Romantic and post-Romantic literature and philosophy; the self in poetry and philosophy; and 17th-century English poetry and philosophy. Professor Haines’s sole-authored publications include Poetry and Philosophy from Homer to Rousseau: Romantic Souls, Realist Lives (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005), and Shelley's Poetry: The Divided Self (Macmillan, 1997). He is co-editor of A Reader in European Romanticism (Continuum, spring 2010, forthcoming). Current projects include the monograph Romanticism and the Making of the Post-Christian Imagination (Baylor UP, fall 2010).

Sue Brindley
Sue Brindley

Sue Brindley, BA Hons (Eng) MA (EngLit) MA (CurricStuds) PGCE, is a senior lecturer in education and coordinates the MEd (Researching Practice) at Cambridge University, where she is developing a distance-learning route in English, in which her current work is with Shakespeare's Globe on a module titled 'Understanding Shakespeare through performance'.

Sue is researching the impact of ICT on teaching and learning and secondary English teaching and on the acquisition and legitimisation of teacher-professional knowledge. She is general editor of a series (Open University Press) on teaching and ICT and of a forthcoming series (Continuum) on learning with digital technologies.

Jennifer Healy Carter
Jennifer healy-Carter

Jennifer Healy Carter, DipMusEd, AMusA, LTCL, LMusA, has been chief examiner (Music 2, 2008) and assistant supervisor of marking (written) for the NSW HSC in music as well as being chair of the NSW Chapter of the Australian Society for Music Education. She has more than 30 years' teaching experience in metropolitan and regional NSW schools as a classroom teacher and as a head teacher in creative and performing arts.

Jennifer has taught music and English Years 7–12 and has worked with final-year tertiary music students. She has directed numerous school bands, choirs, vocal ensembles and chamber ensembles at local, regional and state levels and has also directed school and community musical productions.

Tommy Murphy
Tommy Murphy

Tommy Murphy is a playwright, graduate of the directors course at the National Institute of Dramatic Art, and former writer in residence at Griffin Theatre Company Sydney. In 2007 his play Holding The Man won the NSW Premier's Literary Award for Best Play after its sell-out season at Sydney Opera House. In winning the award, Tony became the only recipient to win in successive years, having been the ever youngest recipient for Strangers in Between in 2006. Both plays are published by Currency Press.

Productions of Tommy's plays are scheduled in New York, San Francisco, Auckland and for a national tour of Australia. He has taught script writing in Hong Kong, PNG and across Australia. After tutoring at this year's Interplay International Festival of Young Playwrights, he will travel to the Pilbara to develop a project in a remote Indigenous community with NIDA's Open Program.

Professor Jeanne M Gerlach
Professor Jeanne M Gerlach

Jeanne Marcum Gerlach is Associate Vice-President for K–16 initiatives and dean of the College of Education at the University of Texas, Arlington. Her research focuses on urban education, partnerships between business and higher education, issues in English education, writing as learning, women in leadership roles, collaborative learning, and governance in higher education. She is the co-editor of Missing Chapters: Ten Pioneering Women in NCTE and English Education and co-author of the book Questions of English: Ethics, Aesthetics, Rhetoric, and the Formation of the Subject in England, Australia and the United States.

Jeanne has taught in England, New Zealand, France, Germany, Thailand, and Australia. Her awards include the National Council Teachers of English 'Outstanding Woman In English Education' and the University of North Texas and West Virginia University's 'Outstanding Alumni Award'. She received the Fort Worth Business Press 'Great Women of Texas Most Influential Woman Award' in 2002.

Associate Professor Libby Gleeson
Adjunct Associate Professor Libby Gleeson

Libby Glesson, an adjunct Associate Professor with the Faculty of Education and Social Woork at the University of Sydney, is an established children's author who was born in Young, in south western NSW, the third of six children. Her father was a school teacher who moved to Glen innes, then Dubbo, taking his family with him, while Libby was still a child.

After completing high school, Libby studied at the University of Sydney – mainly history – where she was influenced by the contemporary social issues of the time: the anti-Vietnam war and women's movements.

Libby taught for two years in Picton, outside of Sydney before heading overseas to travel in 1976, basing herself first in Italy (teaching English), then London, where she started writing her first novel, Eleanor, Elizabeth. She returned to Sydney in 1980 and took a teaching post a the University of NSW but now writes full time, having penned about 30 books, including picture books, and novels for children across a range of ages.

Don Carter
Don Carter

Don Carter, BA Dip Ed MEd Hons, is Inspector at the NSW Board of Studies, and has extensive experience in the teaching of English as a Head teacher in both government and non-government schools. Don has worked as a K–12 English as a Second Language/Multicultural Education Consultant for the NSW Department of Education and Training. He has been a senior marker and an assessor of English examinations for the NSW HSC.

Don was also a local interest group coordinator for the introduction of the new HSC and chaired the English Professional Development Committee for the Association of Independent Schools. He has presented widely in schools and at conferences on an extensive range of topics relating to English and has facilitated the development of curriculum materials for English in NSW.

Professor Roslyn Arnold
Professor Roslyn Arnold

Roslyn Arnold has been Dean and Head of School in the Faculty of Education at the University of Tasmania. Prior to that she was head of school and pro-dean in the University of Sydney's Faculty of Education and Social Work, and deputy chair of the Academic Board at the University of Sydney where she spent most of her academic career. Currently she is an honorary professor at the universities of Sydney and Tasmania.

Her publications include Timely Voices, Writing Development: Magic in the Brain and Empathic Intelligence: Teaching, Learning, Relating. Her research interests include interpersonal dynamics, English Education, drama in education and the teaching of literature. She is completing an MBA in higher education at the Institute of Education, University of London.

Michael Freundt
Michael Freundt

Michael Freundt has been involved in literature and the arts for most of his working life: an actor with the State Theatre Company of South Australia in the late 70s; a script writer for television and arts administrator in the early 80s; producer and director in the 90s and currently a writer of student study guides for novels, films and plays for a Melbourne education publisher.

Professor Jonothan Neelands
Professor Jonothan Neelands

Jonothan Neelands is Chair of Drama and Theatre Education at the University of Warwick, UK, where he is also director of Graduate Studies in the Institute of Education. He has worked as an LEA adviser for dance and drama and advisory teacher for drama and English. Jonothan is an experienced trainer and workshop leader with a national and international reputation for delivering high quality professional training and development opportunities. He is the author of several texts for teachers and students, which have influenced the development of drama in recent years. His latest publication is Improving Your Primary School Through Drama.

Noel Jordan

Noel Jordan

Noel Jordan has extensive professional experience as an educator, artist in residence, actor-devisor, writer, director and producer. He is currently working as Producer, Young Audiences at the Sydney Opera House, where he curates the 'House:ed' and 'Kids at the House' annual programs.

Previously he has been artistic director of the Woolly Jumpers theatre company, renowned for creating theatre of excellence for young people. As an actor and director Noel has worked with Playbox Theatre, Salamanca Theatre, Back to Back Theatre and Arena Theatre.

Up until 2003 Noel worked as a drama lecturer in arts education at the University of Melbourne where he completed his MEd, investigating the role of a director. Noel has contributed several articles and curriculum documents to NJ, ADEM and Metro and Mask magazines.

Bill Spence
Bill Spence

Bill Spence is manager of schools products and services, Learning Design and Services, at the Centre for Learning Innovation. He is a past president of the Primary English Teaching Association and is an adjunct senior lecturer in the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney.

Bill has a wealth of experience across a variety of education contexts and has taught in primary schools, TAFEs and at universities. He has taught in a number of primary schools in the western suburbs of Sydney and has held a number of regional and state office positions with the NSW Department of Education and Training.

Bill has worked as a regional K–12 English consultant and a district literacy consultant, and has managed the State Literacy Strategy and implementation of the NSW Quality Teaching Framework.

Professor Terry Locke
Associate Professor Terry Locke

Terry Locke is Chair of the Arts and Language Education Department in the School of Education at the University of Waikato. His research interests include the nature and impact of educational reform, teacher professionalism, questions of metalanguage, constructions of English, the pedagogies of literature and argument, and the relationship between technology and literate practice.

Terry's recent books include: Resisting Qualifications Reforms in New Zealand: The English Study Design as Constructive Dissent (Sense Publishers: 2007) and Critical Discourse Analysis (Continuum: 2004). He is coordinating editor of the peer reviewed, online journal English Teaching: Practice and Critique.

Associate Professor Peter O'Connor
Adjunct Associate Professor Peter O'Connor

Peter O'Connor, an adjunct associate professor with the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Sydney, is a co-director of Applied Theatre Consultants Ltd in NZ. Previously he was the national facilitator for drama with the NZ Ministry of Education, overseeing the introduction of a compulsory drama curriculum.

Formerly president of the NZ Foundation for Peace Studies, Peter's company has contracts using the arts as a tool for social change, through which it has been instrumental in national programs to prevent family violence, child abuse and youth suicide. Peter is the author of numerous teacher texts, and articles and chapters on drama education.

Dr Kerry-Ann O'Sullivan
Dr Kerry-Ann O'Sullivan

Kerry-Ann O'Sullivan is a senior lecturer in the School of Education at the Australian Centre for Educational Studies at Macquarie University. She is coordinator of the Secondary English and Drama Teacher Education Program. Her areas of research interest and publication include pedagogies for new technologies and media; secondary English and curriculum decision-making, implementation, and change; English teachers' discourses, identities, and practices; and gender issues in relation to English curriculum and assessment.

Kerry-Ann is education adviser to the Centre for the Macquarie Pen Anthology of Australian Literature. She is the recipient of a Macquarie University Award for Outstanding Teaching, the Vice Chancellor's Commendation for a doctoral thesis of exceptional merit, and a NSW Institute for Educational Research Award for excellence in educational research.

Margaret Cossey

Margaret Cossey

Margaret Cossey is a non-Indigenous Australian who is now widely recognised as one of Australia's most important figures in encouraging Aboriginal writers to write for young Australians. For the past 15 years she has led a remarkable innovation in Australian publication through the publishing company which she founded, Indij Readers Ltd. Almost all of the 50 or so Indigenous authors published by Indij Readers had not been previously published. Margaret Cossey established a series of processes and protocols to assist those previously unpublished authors to become published writers. In addition to publishing these stories, Indij Readers has also published AV materials, lesson notes and professional development materials for teachers.

Her current project with Indij Readers is the development, publication and rollout of a Community Writers' Kit, to enable schools and communities to make and desktop publish their local stories.

Margaret was previously a special-needs literacy teacher in both Government and Catholic schools.

John Dixon

John Dixon

John Dixon was a pivotal figure in establishing and promulgating the 'New English' which emerged from the famous Dartmouth Conference in New Hampshire, 1966. In 1965 he and his colleagues Leslie Stratta and Simon Clements had published their seminal Reflections – An English Course for Students Aged 14-18, which had impact well beyond the shores of England.

His Growth Through English, based on the deliberations of the Dartmouth Conference and his significant contribution to it, was published in 1967, revised in 1969, reprinted in 1970, 1971, and 1972, and further revised in 1975. That book was the most important single generator of the renaissance in English that flourished in most school-education systems in the English-speaking world from the late 1960s to the 1980s. It retains its energy and salience today.

Among many accomplishments, John served as chair of the English Committee for England and Wales, director of the National Project on English, and director of the Language Development Unit at Bretton Hall College.

Today, John and his wife Jen are heavily involved in the University of the Third Age. He retains a keen interest in education and the contribution that an educated citizenry needs to make to a world increasingly threatened by forces inimical to those ideals and values he has championed throughout his professional life.

Dr Sarah Golsby-Smith
Dr Sarah Golsby-Smith

Sarah Golsby-Smith is a high school English teacher. Her research has pursued ways that the new rhetoric – or conversation – can provide fresh and fertile ways of conceiving of subject English. Her doctorate investigates rhetoric as a pedagogical and hermeneutical alternative to critical literacy, suggesting that models of learning and reading that promote conversation must also be open to otherness in their pedagogy.  She has published articles in English in Australia, Changing English and Zadok, and has a chapter forthcoming in a book on Shakespeare and pedagogy. She has also published articles in professional teaching journals. She is currently teaching in Sydney, Australia and is an Affiliate of the University of Sydney.

Dr Bethan Marshall
Dr Bethan Marshall

Bethan Marshall taught in London comprehensives for nine years before taking up her current post as a lecturer in education at King's College London, where she is co-director for the Centre for Media and Literacy. The centre has undertaken several research studies on the relationship between print literacy and moving image media.

For five years she combined her work at King's with that of English, drama and media studies adviser for the London Borough of Ealing. Her book English Teachers, the Unofficial Guide, looks at the subject philosophies of English teachers and she has contributed to a number of edited works on the issue of the English curriculum including Literacy is not Enough, Creativity in Education and Reshaping the School Curriculum.

In addition to her work on the English curriculum, Bethan has undertaken research with the assessment team at King's College London into formative assessment, the findings of which are discussed in the jointly authored book Assessment for Learning. She was the co-director of an ESRC-funded project into children learning to learn and has recently jointly published a book on the research, titled Learning How to Learn. She writes regularly about educational issues for the Times Educational Supplement and Independent.

Karen Stapleton
Karen Stapleton

Karen Stapleton (BA, Dip Ed, Grad Dip Asian Studies, M.Litt) has more than 25 years' professional experience in education, having worked in a number of independent schools in NSW. She is currently the secondary English consultant at the Association of Independent Schools of NSWA and works substantially in the areas of differentiation, assessment, pedagogy and English-literary studies.

Karen has been a classroom teacher, head of department and deputy principal. As senior curriculum officer in English at the Office of the Board of Studies, Karen was part of the project team responsible for developing the English Years 7–10 syllabus and a wide range of curriculum-support documents. She was also project manager for English Stage 6 Prescriptions (2004–08) and was a member of the advisory committee responsible for drafting the 2008–12 prescriptions list.

Professor Jeffrey Wilhelm

Associate Professor Jeffrey Wilhelm

Jeff Wilhelm is Professor of English at Boise State University BSU, US, where he teaches courses in middle- and secondary-level literacy. He works in local schools as part of the Adolescent Literacy Project and a new professional development network. Jeff is currently engaged in founding a new National Writing Project site at BSU. He taught reading and the language arts at middle and secondary school levels for 15 years.

Jeff's book Standards in Practice: Grades 6–8 was released by both NCTE and IRA as an addendum to the national standards and has proven to be a best seller. He received the NCTE Promising Researcher Award in 1995 for his dissertation entitled Developing Readers: Teaching Engaged and Reflective Reading with Adolescents. Two books for teachers, based on this research, have been published: You Gotta BE the Book (Teachers College Press and NCTE) and Imagining to Learn: Drama Across the Curriculum (Heinemann), which he co-authored with Brian Edmiston. Hyperlearning: Where Inquiry, Literacy and Technology Meet (Stenhouse), was published in the summer of 1998.

Jeff recently completed a major study on boys and literacy with Michael Smith, which has won the David H. Russell Award for Distinguished Research in English Education. Their provocative findings are published in Reading Don't Fix No Chevys: the Role of Literacy in the Lives of Young Men (Heinemann). Jeff is now writing a series of books for Scholastic that explore the teaching implications of his various studies on reading.