Research Seminar Series

Please contact the Seminar Series Coordinators if you have any queries regarding any upcoming events.

Audrey Luiz, Room 413,

Carbon and Graphene-based Materials for Energy-relevant Electrocatalytic Processes

Professor Shi-Zhang Qiao
Venue: Level 3, Lecture Theatre 2, Chemical Engineering Building
Date: Thursday 24 July 2014
Time: 11am
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About the Speaker

Prof. Shi-Zhang Qiao received his PhD degree in chemical engineering from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2000, and is currently a professor (Chair of Nanotechnology) at School of Chemical Engineering of the University of Adelaide, and an Honorary Professor at The University of Queensland, Australia. His research expertise is in nanomaterials and nanoporous materials for drug/gene delivery and new energy technologies. He has co-authored more than 190 papers in refereed journals (8200 citations with h-index 47), including Nature, Nature Communications, J. Am. Chem. Soc, Angew. Chem., Adv. Mater., and has filed several patents on novel nanomaterials that are promising for drug/gene delivery, fuel cells, photocatalysis and lithium ion battery.
Prof. Qiao was honoured with a prestigious ARC Discovery Outstanding Researcher Award (DORA, 2013), a Emerging Researcher Award (2013, ENFL Division of the American Chemical Society) and a UQ Foundation Research Excellence Award (2008). He has also been awarded an ARC ARF Fellowship, an ARC APD Fellowship and an inaugural UQ Mid-Career Research Fellowship. Professor Qiao is currently an Associate Editor of Journal of Materials Chemistry A and appointed to ARC College of Experts.

Details

Replacement of precious metal catalysts by commercially available alternatives is of great importance among both fundamental and practical catalysis research. Nanostructured carbon and graphene-based materials demonstrated promising catalytic properties in a wide range of energy generation/storage applications. Specifically engineering graphene and porous carbon with guest atoms can improve its catalytic activity for electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), thus can be considered as potential substitutes for the expensive Pt/C catalyst in fuel cells or metal-air batteries. In this presentation, we will talk about the synthesis of metal free elements-doped graphene (B,N-graphene, S,N-graphene) and 3-D porous g-C3N4@Carbon materials, and their application on electrocatalysis. The excellent ORR and OER performance (high catalytic activity and efficiency) and reliable stability (much better than the commercial Pt/C) indicate that new materials are promising candidates for the next generation of highly efficient electrocatalysts.
We will also briefly introduce our work on the synthesis of other carbon-based materials and their applications on energy storage and conversion.


Planning a Transmission Power System with High-penetration of renewable energy sources and energy storage systems

David Conroy
Venue: Level 3, Lecture Theatre 2, Chemical Engineering Building
Date: Friday 25 July 2014
Time: 11am
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About the Speaker

Mr David Conroy received his B.E degree from University of Technology, Sydney in 1987, M.E degree from the University of Technology in 1994 and Grad. Diploma of Management in 1998 from Deakin University, Victoria. He joined TransGrid (previously part of the Electricity Commission of NSW) in 1987 and worked as the Main System Planning Manager for the NSW electricity transmission jurisdiction from 2009 to Jan 2014. Currently working as Principal Engineer in the TransGrid’s Market Modelling Group. His main responsibilities are to ensure adequate transmission from generation to major load centres, reactive planning, and optimisation and development of high voltage interconnections with other states. He has been involved in various power system studies including power system simulation, composite load model development, AVR and stabiliser control system design, system stability, development of limit equations for stability and for thermal constraints, and electromagnetic transient studies. Previously, he worked as the Pricing Systems Manager and the Market Compliance Manager and as a project manager for the 5-year Revenue Regulatory Determination.

Details

There are a number of challenges in operating and planning electricity systems due to wider development of renewable energy sources and smaller distributed solar energy sources. Historically, system operators and planners have always needed to contend with the uncertainties that arise from variations in load demands, changes to network topology, and planned and unplanned outage of generators. However, the uncertainties are now greater as the generation contributions from wind and solar sources add an additional layer of complexity. This motivated researchers to develop more sophisticated methods to account for the increased impact of these random variables. One area of development within the Group is in the area of high capacity storage systems (batteries) to assist in capturing renewable energy from wind farms at times its available but not required by the power system, and in discharging this energy for multiple applications at the same time. The stored energy can be used to minimise power output uncertainty, to economically optimise the revenue of the plant, and for congestion management. The focus of this research is to develop a system that can be used to model these applications.