Health and safety

Doctors

Students sitting on grass

If you need to see a doctor (also known as a GP/general practitioner), you will usually need to make an appointment to visit them in their private practice or a medical centre.

Part or most of the fee will be covered by your health insurance (a requirement of having a student visa). Some GPs will request full payment at the time of consultation and you’ll need to get a receipt to claim the money back from your health cover provider.

The University also has an on-campus medical service on campus: the University Health Service, located in the Wentworth Building on the Darlington Campus and the Holme Building on the Camperdown Campus. Your health insurance entitles you to visit these centres free of charge.

Hospitals

In Australia there are both public and private hospitals. Waiting times in hospitals can be very long, and are based on a triage system (a process of prioritising patients based on the severity of their condition).

Private hospitals are very expensive for treatment and hospitalisation. Your health insurance will cover some of the cost of some private hospitals, but you will have to pay the difference.

Your safety and security

The University of Sydney is committed to your safety. We want you to have the best possible experience during your studies here, and we’re proud to have an excellent record of student safety on our campuses.

To ensure your own personal safety, firstly familiarise yourself with our Student Safety Tips, available in eight languages. Also take a look at the crime prevention website produced by the City of Sydney Council.

Above all, please follow these simple tips:

  • Contact Campus Security Services if you are on campus and feel unsafe or under threat at any time, by calling 9351 3333. Keep this number in your mobile phone.
  • Put the emergency number for police, fire and ambulance into the speed dial function of your mobile phone and home phone (landline). The number is 112 for mobiles, and 000 from landlines.
  • Write down the number of your local police station, and keep it near your home telephone. Do not hesitate to ring the police if necessary.
  • If you are walking home alone, at night or during the day, walk quickly and purposefully. If you have late lectures, arrange to walk to the bus stop, station, or home with other people, or contact Campus Security Services and ask for a security escort.
  • In the evenings, use the free campus security shuttle bus to get from campus to the nearest public transport.
  • Stay together with your group in social situations. Do not leave with strangers.
  • Stay in well-lit areas around campus, and choose brightly lit streets with lots of other people if you have to walk alone at night.
  • Be alert and stay aware of what is happening around you. If you feel someone is following you or behaving in a way that seems suspicious, move to a safe area such as a shop.
  • Trust your intuition in any situation. If you feel that something is not right, take immediate steps to remove yourself from that situation.
  • If you are attacked, shout, "Call 000! Someone is attacking me!" This gives people 'permission' to call 000 (112 for mobile phones).
  • Plan your transport before you leave home.
  • Sit in the aisle seat on the train if you are traveling late at night. Use the train carriage marked with a blue light, as this one has a security guard on board.
  • Give up your bag if someone tries to snatch it. Try not to carry items or documents that cannot easily be replaced, such as your passport. Leave them in a safe place at home. If you must carry them, make sure you have a photocopy at home.
  • Always keep doors and windows locked at home. Leave windows open only if they are fitted with security bars. If you have a security door, keep it locked at all times. Do not open your door to strangers.
  • At a bar or club, always buy your own drinks and never leave your drink unattended, to avoid your drinks being spiked.
  • When you’re at the beach, always swim between the red and yellow flags, where surf lifesavers can see you.