Units of study

AFNR5107 Principles of Biochemical Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalind Deaker (Coordinator), Prof Les Copeland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 22 hrs of lectures and 32 hrs of laboratory during the semester Prohibitions: AGCH4007 Assessment: Assessment may include attendance and participation in lectures, quizzes, reports and problem based learning. Each module will comprise 25% of the final assessment mark and satisfactory progress in all modules is required from the successful completion of this unit. (4x25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to expose students to the principles and practice of a diverse range of analytical methods used in agricultural and environmental science. The unit of study will be presented in four modules including: materials and sampling techniques; separation techniques (chromatographic and electrophoretic); instrumentation and measurement techniques (spectral, enzymic and imaging); and microbiological and molecular biology techniques. Each module will be a combination of lectures and practical classes that will analyse common agricultural or biochemical commodities to illustrate the practical aspects of the theory. Students will also gain skills in data analysis relevant to the respective techniques.
At the completion of these modules, students will be familiar with the operation of a number of laboratory instruments, the theory that underpins their operation, be confident in the analysis of data, and be able to choose the most appropriate sampling strategy and analytical technique to perform high quality research.
AFNR5110 Crop Improvement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor R Trethowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: The equivalent of 3 lectures and 3hrs practical work per week Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of plant genetics and breeding, similar to that covered by GENE4012 and GENE4013. Assessment: one 2hr exam (50%), essay/assignment (20%), practical reports (20%), presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Lectures, practical work and field trip(s) covering advanced aspects of the theory, philosophy and practice of plant breeding. Included are extended discussions of screening techniques (in the field, glasshouse and laboratory), conservation and exploitation of diversity, disease resistance, tissue culture, plant cytogenetics of relevance to pre-breeding and breeding. Also considered are the role of biotechnology processes and products in plant breeding; genetic engineering and the use of molecular marker technologies. This course will use examples from the full range of crops; broad-acre cereals and legumes, pastures, turf and horticultural crops, both perennial and annual. The main base of the course may vary between the ATP and Camden campuses. Field trips (mainly to the IA Watson Grains Research Centre, Narrabri) will be used especially to examine trial procedures and field-based operations, and to interact with commercial plant breeding.
AFNR5201 Crop Agronomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lindsay Campbell Visiting lecturers, Dr. Natasha Teakle, Dr. Lachlan Ingram Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x4-h lectures/weeks 1,2,9,10; 2x2h lectures 3,4,7,8, 1x full day field practical in week 11 (subject to weather); Field excursions: week 0 and 6 (subject to weather) Prerequisites: AGRO3004 and (PLNT2003 or PLNT2903) and SOIL2003 Assessment: 1x2h exam (45%) and 2x reports on excursions (2x18.5%) and 2000wd field report (18%) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit examines agronomy as the discipline that underpins agricultural production. Two industries are studied to gain appreciation of the main agronomic principles of crop production. Most principles can be applied to dryland crops even though the emphasis in this unit is on irrigated crops. As a case study, the cotton industry is examined in detail to understand the end-user and social demands on agricultural production, the technical issues that challenge the farmer and the diversity of other specialist information from relevant disciplines such as entomology, pathology and soil science that must be integrated into the farming system. Likewise the rice industry provides a contrasting farming system as another case study. The unit includes a one-week excursion to cotton growing areas in northern NSW, specialist intensive instruction provided by the Cotton CRC and a series of workshops) tutorials that provides analysis and synthesis of the major farming systems in this industry.
AFNR5307 Crop Protection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Mansfield Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hr lecture, 4 hr independent study/week Assessment: case study (60%), seminar (20%), online and in-class discussion (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The focus of this unit is the development and adoption of integrated pest management to control weeds, insects and plant pathogens. The advantages and disadvantages of biological, cultural and chemical control methods are described using examples from agro-ecosystems. Students will develop a comparative case study of IPM for a particular crop that considers all three pest groups and present a seminar about this case study.
Textbooks
Pedigo LP & Rice ME. 2009. Entomology and Pest Management. 6th edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
AFNR5210 Sustainable Horticultural Cropping

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Robyn McConchie Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr Lecture/week, 2hr tutorial/excursions for case study, and on-line discussions Assessment: On-line discussions (10%), Group presentation (10%), Project report (30%), 2 hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit builds on knowledge gained in undergraduate plant and crop science units to develop an understanding of horticultural cropping systems management. Particular focus will be on intensive production systems and will provide them with a broad overview of current issues affecting the horticultural industries. Emphasis is on minimising the environmental impact of horticultural enterprises and introduces students to current themes and thinking in sustainable practices in horticultural science, such as efficient water management, sustainable use of fertilizers, salinity, integrated pest management and organic practices. Students also select an industry based case study analysis of a horticultural production system, designed to provide them with skills in data analysis and interpretation, problem identification and problem solving.
AFNR5502 Remote Sensing, GIS and Land Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Inakwu Odeh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week weeks 1-6, 1x1 project weeks 7-11, 1x1-½ hour presentation scheduled for week s12 and 13, 1x3-hr practical weeks 1-6 Prerequisites: Consent of the unit coordinator. Recommended units include GEOS2111/GEOS2911 (Natural Hazards: a GIS approach), ENVX3001 (Environmental GIS), SOIL 3004 (The Soil Resource), GEOS3014 (GIS in Coastal Management) Assessment: 1x 20 min presentation (10%), laboratory work reports (30%), Group assignment (10%), 1x3000w project report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is aimed at advanced techniques in Remote Sensing (RS), linked with Geographical Information Systems (GIS), as applied to land management problems. We will review the basic principles of GIS and then focus on advanced RS principles and techniques used for land resource assessment and management. This will be followed by practical training in RS techniques, augmented by land management project development and implementation based on integration of GIS and RS tools. The unit thus consists of three separate but overlapping parts: 1) a short theoretical part which focuses on the concepts of RS; 2) a practical part which aims at developing hands-on skills in using RS tools, and 3) an application-focused module in which students will learn the skills of how to design a land management project and actualise it using integrated GIS and RS techniques.
Syllabus summary: Lectures will cover: Overview of the basic principles of Geographical Information Science (GISc), Advanced principles of remote sensing, Land resource information and data capture using RS, Digital elevation modelling and terrain analysis using remote sensing; Image enhancement and visualization; Image classification and interpretation; RS data interpretation for land resource inventory; RS and GIS for land use and land cover change analysis; Coupling of models of land resource assessment with GIS and RS. Fifty percent of learning time will be devoted to the design and implementation of projects, which can be selected from GIS and RS applications in: agricultural land management, vegetation studies, water and catchment (hydrological) studies; land-cover and land-use change modelling, pesticide and herbicide environmental risk assessment, environmental impact analysis, land degradation modelling including soil salinity, soil erosion, etc.
Textbooks
van Dijk, A. and Bos, M.G. 2001. GIS and remote sensing techniques in land- and water-management. Kluwer Academic Publisher, Dordrecht.
AFNR5510 The Soil at Work

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alex McBratney (coordinator), A/Prof Balwant Singh, A/Prof Stephen Cattle (facilitators), plus research-only academics Session: Semester 2 Classes: Problem-based unit: each student completes 2 problems; 4 x 3 hr workshops per problem (each student attends 8 workshops in total) Assessment: For each of two scenarios: Statement of the problem report (2x12.5%) - shared information, two team reports How to tackle problem seminar (2x12.5%) - team seminars, before fieldwork, analyses done Results seminar (2x12.5%) - team seminars Final report (2x12.5%) - individual work. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is a problem-based applied soil science unit. It is designed to allow students to identify soil-related problems in the real-world and by working in a group and with an end-user to suggest short and long-term solutions to such problems. It utilises and reinforces soil-science knowledge and problem-solving skills gained during the program. This unit will address real-world scenarios which involve soil-related problems such as carbon management, structural decline, acidification, salinisation and contamination. Students will gain some understanding of the concept of sustainability, and will be able to identify the causes of problems by reference to the literature, discussion with landusers and by the design and execution of key experiments and surveys. They will gain a focused knowledge of the key soil drivers to environmental problems and will have some understanding on the constraints surrounding potential solutions. By designing and administering strategies to tackle real-world soil issues students will develop their research and inquiry skills and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and seminars that enables understanding by an end-user students will improve the breadth of their communication skills.
Textbooks
I.W.Heathcote 1997. Environmental Problem Solving: A Case Study Approach. McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, USA.
AFNR5511 Soil Processes, Assessment & Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 Lec, 2 tutorials/wk, case study & on-line discussions. Assessment: Key soil processes essay (20%), On-line discussions (10%), Case study report (50%), Group presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Soils support agricultural and natural ecosystems and regulate environmental interactions between the hydrosphere and atmosphere. It is the quality of our soils that affect productivity, the environment, health and ultimately sustainability. However, challenges such as those presented by lack of plant nutrient supply, soil acidification, physical degradation, soil contamination, and loss of soil biodiversity are problems at a global scale that threaten the sustainability of the environment and society. As well as the threats the importance of maintaining a quality soil that regulates environmental interactions will be explored, such as soil as a sink for carbon affecting climate interactions or understanding how a rich soil biodiversity can contribute to food production affecting food security. To do this, this unit of study is concerned with exploring the key pedology, soil chemistry, soil physical and soil biological processes that drive these challenges to soil quality. Time will be spent investigating how the quality of the soil can be assessed, using the indicators of the mentioned soil processes, and how the resulting data can be aggregated and communicated in a meaningful way. Working with case studies, the students will identify problems that are assessed using soil quality or function analysis with the aim of identifying management options. The management options will be evaluated to determine their adoptability and implement ability. By investigating the case studies using soil quality or function analysis students will develop their research and enquiry skills. Assessing and developing adoptable management strategies the students will develop their skills in synthesising material from multiple sources and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and presenting seminars the students will develop their communication skills.
Textbooks
D. Hillel, 2004. Introduction to Environmental Soil Physics, Elsevier Science, San Diego, CA USA.
AFNR5512 Water Management and Variable Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr workshop/week, online practical work, project work Assumed knowledge: UG Maths or Physics or Hydrology Assessment: Online quizzes (20%), project report (30%), 2 hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit builds on knowledge gained in undergraduate soil science and crop science units to develop an understanding of field level management. Particular focus will be on the effect of climate variability and change on water management decisions at the field and farm scale in relation to farm output and externalities (Salinity, nutrient losses). At the completion of this unit student would be able to: Identify which climate variables will be most affected by climate change and variability; Evaluate which field and farm scale outputs will be most affected by climate change and variability; Develop scenarios based on distributions of climate variability; and Calculate the likely impacts of climate variability and change on crop production and externalities in irrigated systems using Monte Carlo techniques.
The open source software package R (www.r-project.org) will be used for most analysis and other open source software will be used for crop modelling.
Textbooks
Beven, K.J. Rainfall-Runoff modeling, The Primer, John Wiley and Sons, Chichester, 2001Kumagai. M. and Warwick, W. F. 2003. Freshwater management: Global versus local perspectives, Springer-Verlag, Tokyo.
AFNR5701 Plants and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Margaret Barbour Session: Semester 1 Classes: 24 hrs lectures and in-class discussion, 36 hours practical Assessment: one 2hr exam (40%), in-class discussion (10%), research manuscript (25%), either research proposal or research manuscript (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The focus of this unit is the response of plants to the environment, drawing examples from both managed and natural ecosystems. Students will develop advanced-level understanding of plant-environment interaction at scales from leaves to whole ecosystems through presentation and discussion of current research papers. Practical sessions will provide students with hands-on experience of state-of-the-art measurement techniques. Understanding of basic biophysical processes will be applied to inform discussion about the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystem services, including crop productivity.
Textbooks
Copies of research papers for each lecture/discussion will be provided, as will review papers where appropriate.
AFNR5705 Australian Forest Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Merchant Session: Semester 2 Classes: 28.5 hrs lecture/tutorial, 30 hrs fieldwork Assumed knowledge: A broad understanding of plant physiological and ecological concepts Assessment: one 2hr exam (20%), two reports (2x25%), two oral presentations (2x10%) and one field report (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to enable students to participate in and improve the management of Australian forest ecosystems. Beginning with an introduction to the unique chemical, physical and ecological characteristics of Australian forests, this unit focuses on policy development and management prescriptions driven by fundamental processes of ecosystem function. Topics will encompass both tropical and temperate ecosystems with students given the opportunity to gain first hand observation of subtropical forest management practices by participating in a 4 day field exercise. At the end of this unit, students will be able to articulate strengths, weaknesses and improvements to the management of Australian forests for the purposes of production, conservation and climate change adaptation. Students will gain first-hand experience of land management practices as they pertain to Australian forest systems and communicate with industry and governmental groups.
Textbooks
Reading material will be drawn upon from current literature in the field
AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Franks, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: 18 hrs lecture/tutorial, 12 hrs practical/field classes, 9 hrs field trip preparation Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: 2hr exam (40%), tutorials (20%), practical report from field exercise (manuscript format) (40%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales.
This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites managed by the University of Sydney where students will be introduced to cutting edge, ongoing climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
AFNR5901 Research Review

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 Lectures in semester + regular meetings with Supervisor Corequisites: AFNR5904 Assessment: Research Review (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
This aims to develop a student's ability to review the literature with the view of developing a major research project in an area of specialization. The student will work with an academic advisor on a mutually agreed topic for research to be undertaken and the subsequent writing of a literature review. The literature review will advance the student's ability to identify existing knowledge, define research problems, demonstrate a sound grasp for presenting a research question, and begin to define a research strategy. Students will develop their research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of literature and improve their written communication skills.
AFNR5904 Research Proposal and Approach

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr Lecture and 1 workshop per week + regular meetings with Supervisor Corequisites: AFNR5901 Assessment: Written Research Proposal (60%); Oral Presentation (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study aims to develop a student's ability to write a detailed research proposal and develop a strategy combined with the appropriate methodology to execute their research. Working with their academic advisor students will prepare a proposal describing; the background and aims, its significance and innovation, the justification of the methodology, the national benefit, and considerations of the required budget and project timeline. This unit will enable students to develop their ability to define a research project to be managed within a suitable research framework. Students will develop their skills in solving research problems and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy through managing a research program.
AFNR5905 Research Paper

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 Lectures in semester + regular meetings with Supervisor Prerequisites: AFNR5901 and AFNR5904 Corequisites: AFNR5906 Assessment: Research Paper (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit of study builds on the major research project proposed in AFNR5904. Working with their academic advisor students will execute their research strategy that provides data and subsequent data analysis towards solving the research question. The results and analysis will be presented in a format suitable for submission as a research paper to a relevant journal. Students will build their research skills, develop a strong analytical capacity, demonstrate a sound grasp of the topic, and ability to interpret results in a broad framework. Students will demonstrate their ability to draw reliable conclusions and identify future areas of research. Students will continue to develop their skills in solving research problems and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of managing a research program. Students will improve their communication skills through presentation of the research paper.
AFNR5906 Research Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1hr Lec, 1 x workshop per week plus regular meetings with Supervisor Prerequisites: AFNR5901 and AFNR5904 Corequisites: AFNR5905 Assessment: Popular Article (20%), Poster (40%), Oral Presentation (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study provides the students with the opportunity to present the research findings of their major research project using several communication media appropriate for different audiences, for example, external stakeholders and /or popular media. Using poster and oral presentations students will communicate their research to the academic community in a professional conference environment. Students will also be required to attend the Faculty's seminar program that is relevant to their research topic. Students will build on their skills to use several modes of communication to demonstrate their ability to produce high quality results, draw reliable conclusions and identify future areas of research.
AGEC5401 Agricultural Marketing Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Elizabeth Nolan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, commencing week 1 Assessment: Problem sets (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x5000wd essay (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to provide an understanding of the underlying forces driving agricultural markets. Its content is analytical, and draws heavily on applied microeconomics. The unit addresses price analysis and pricing efficiency, including aspects of form, time and space in agricultural marketing; information and contracts; changing consumer concerns (food safety, ethical production); futures market and other risk sharing devices. The main learning aims of the unit are development of student skills in understanding the fundamental concepts in marketing theory and applying them to the agribusiness industry, and further development of students' analytical abilities in the context of agricultural marketing. Extensive reading will be required.
Textbooks
To be advised
AGEC5402 Agricultural Development Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Shyamal Chowdhury Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Assessment: 1x2000 wd problem set (20%), 1x1000 wd review (10%), 1x15min presentation (5%), 1x1page evaluation of a peer (5%), and 1x2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit focuses on the microeconomic analysis of development, with a special emphasis on the importance of market failures in financial markets as origin of persistent poverty. The unit also addresses policy interventions to overcome such failures and the challenges in their evaluation. A special emphasis is put in the discussion of the role of agriculture in development, and the evidence supporting its importance in poverty reduction.
Textbooks
Debraj Ray, Development Economics, Princeton University Press.
AGEC5403 Agricultural Trade

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: (AGEC2001 or AGEC2101) and (AGEC2003 or AGEC2103) Prohibitions: AGEC4003 Assessment: 1x1hr exam (25%),1x essay (15%) and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this unit of study the basic economic principles underlying international trade in agricultural and resource commodities and the policies involved will be presented. Issues related to trade and development will also be considered. The main topics covered will include: trends in agricultural and resources trade; economics and politics of protection, economic integration and impacts on international commodity trade; international trade policy making. An understanding of globalisation, including foreign direct investment, will also be required. Extensive reading will be required.
Textbooks
Krugman and Obstfeld. International Economics: Theory and Policy, 9th Ed. (Pearson Addison Wesley), New York.
AGEC5404 Industrial Organization of Agribusiness

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Ubilava Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Assessment: 1x2000 wd assignment (20%), 1x1000 wd review (10%), 1x15min presentation (5%), 1x1page evaluation of a peer (5%), and 1x2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit focuses on applications of economic theory and methods in agribusiness decision making. It provides advanced treatment of the industrial organisation of agribusiness firms. Case studies will be used to examine the economic complexities of global agribusiness systems. Extensive readings make up the central component of the unit.
Textbooks
Collections of readings.
AGEC5405 Quantitative Planning Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2x1hr lec & 1x2 tut/lab session)/week, commencing week 1 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (70%) and 2 assignments (better done one [18%], other [12%]) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit examines the use of mathematical methods and models in planning at both the individual firm level and the sector level. While the principal focus is on formal optimization, simulation and Monte Carlo methods are also discussed. Topics include non-linear programming, stochastic programming, elements of input-output analysis, computable general equilibrium analysis, dynamic problems and methods (e.g. dynamic programming and optimal control). Sectoral level planning applications considered include transportation and plant location studies; spatial equilibrium; and resource utilization across time. Firm level applications may include multi-period planning, queuing problems, inventory analysis, and replacement problems. Extensive use is made of computer-based optimization.
AGEC5406 Agricultural Finance and Risk

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2x1hr lec & 1x2hr tut/lab session)/wk, commencing week 1. Assessment: 1x2hr exam (70%) and 2 assignments (better done one (18%), other (12%)) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
"This unit has two related components. One component concerns risk and risk management in agriculture; the other deals with issues of agricultural producer finance. Risk topics include: risk measurement, subjective probability, adjusting beliefs as a result of new information; risk attitudes; decision making under risk; expected utility theory; valuing information; generalizations of expected utility theory; E-V analysis; stochastic dominance; internal measures to cope with risk including diversification and flexibility; insurance, futures, options and other market instruments for managing risk. Finance topics include the implications of capital market imperfections and consequential differences between corporate and small business finance; financial relationships between debt/equity levels and risk, optimal debt levels; cost of capital; short term working capital management; and longer term capital (investment) budgeting. Techniques of valuation of projects in risk-free and risk situations are examined.
The unit includes material dealt with at the advanced undergraduate level. Additional workshops, seminars, tutorials, assignments and/or assessment are provided as appropriate to the postgraduate program."
RSEC5431 Benefit Cost Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2 hr lecture/wk, commencing week 1, 1x1hr tutorial/wk, commencing week 2 Assessment: 1 x oral presentation (5%), 1 x written individual essay (20%), 1 x 1hr mid-semester exam (25%), 1 x 2hr final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides a detailed treatment of benefit-cost analysis and its use in public sector decision making and project evaluation. The underpinning concepts in welfare economics are analysed in detail, such as economic efficiency, criteria for assessing social welfare improvements, and economic surplus measures. Procedures of undertaking a benefit-cost analysis are presented, and tools of non-market valuation for environmental assets are covered in detail. These techniques include both stated and revealed preference techniques, including contingent valuation, choice modeling, hedonic pricing and travel cost methods.
RSEC5432 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week commencing week 1, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Assessment: Report and presentation from the practical experience in environmental economics (20%), one (1 hr.) mid-term exam (30%), and two hour (2 hr.) final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit provides theoretical and empirical background necessary for a resource economist to be able to successfully function when faced with various environmental problems. The unit investigates economic aspects of a range of environmental issues. The studied concepts are exemplified with environmental problems related to agriculture (soil salinity, algal blooms, overgrazing etc.) as well as with environmental problems typical to Australia. The guiding economic themes are: competing uses of the environment / externalities, market failure, the importance of property rights, optimal allocation of pollution abatement, and the processes for making choices relating to non-market goods. Some social issues with environmental impacts are studied through exploration of the problems of population size and distribution, economic growth, and environmental regulation.
Textbooks
Perman, R., Y. Ma, J. McGilvray and M. Common. Natural Resource and Environmental Economics. Pearson, 3rd Ed. 2003
RSEC5433 Economics of Mineral & Energy Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2 lec, 1 tut)/wk Assessment: excursion attendance and report (25%); one (1 hr.) mid-term exam (30%) and one (2 hr.); two hour (2 hr.) final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit provides theoretical and empirical background on the economics of minerals exploration, extraction and marketing and on the economics of energy generation, distribution and use. The economics of minerals and energy commodity markets will be discussed and analysed. The interactions of mineral extraction and energy generation activities with other natural resources and the environment will be of particular interest (e.g. mine site remediation, land use conflicts). Sustainability and prospects for long term efficient use of these resources, as well as the development and use of alternative technologies will also be discussed. In addition, institutional and policy issues (e.g. regulatory reform), will be analysed. The unit will discuss the main aspects of the markets for minerals and energy, market structure, business environment and price movements. The unit will also provide an introductory discussion on the markets for derivatives (options, futures, forward, swaps) on minerals and energy commodities.
Textbooks
T. J. Brennan, L. K. Palmer, and A. S. Martinez, Alternating Currents: Electricity Markets and Public Policy, Resources for the Future Press, Washington D.C., 2002.
RSEC5434 Economics of Water and Bio-resources

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week commencing week 1, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Assessment: one essay (35%); one (1 hr.) mid-term exam (25%); two hour (2 hr.) final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The main objective of the economics of biological resources will be to introduce students to the bio-economic modeling of the resources that experience biological growth. The unit consists of two complementary parts: water economics and economics of biological resources (fisheries, forestry, other wildlife). The main objective of the water economic component is to investigate the economic aspects of water use and water quality. In particular approaches toward efficient use of the water resource over time, optimal allocation of water among competing uses and achievement of the socially optimal level of water quality will be discussed. The demand for water from various sectors will be analysed in both static and dynamic settings. Issues considered include the selection and construction of water storages, aquifer water extraction and alternative water sources. The issues of waste water disposal and water quality, changing water technologies, and water pollution will be also discussed. The unit will also discuss the economics of wildlife preservation and protection, as well as the economics of biodiversity. Particular attention will be devoted to the economic mechanisms for managing the water resources including property rights, water allocation and water markets. The key policy instruments (taxes, quotas, standards) in these areas are analyzed and discussed. The institutional and policy aspects will also be considered through analysis of water policy reform in Australia and elsewhere.
Textbooks
Bergstrom, Boule and Poe (Eds.), The Economic Value of Water Quality, Edward Elgar Pub., 2001.