Bachelor of Environmental Systems

Units of study

Year 1

Year 1 will have the following 48 credit point structure:
AGEN1001 Shaping our Landscapes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Peter Ampt (Coordinator), Dr Elizabeth Nolan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lect, 1x2hr tut, 4x1day (6.5hr) field (ave 2hrs/week) Prohibitions: AFNR1001 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (40%), Field class reports (10%), Group work participation and reflection (10%), Tutorial group journal (20%), Problem based learning project (20%) Practical field work: Preparation, revision and private study 3hrs/week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to help students develop understanding of our non-urban landscapes and the physical, biological, economic and cultural factors that have shaped them, with particular emphasis on the interaction between production and environment. It is a core first year unit for students in BScAgr, BEnvSys, BResEc, BAgEc and BAnVetBioSc from the Vet Faculty.
The unit begins with a review of the current global issues around population, food, agriculture and environment and the place of Australia in this global context. Australia's current production (plant and animal based) and environmental systems and landscapes are described with an emphasis on the physical, biological, economic and cultural factors that have shaped them, concluding with an account of future production and environment scenarios.
At the end of this unit, students should be able to describe global production and environment issues and key Australian landscapes and production systems, explain the factors that have shaped them and apply this understanding to a specific location and production system. They should analyse the situation of natural resource managers and evaluate the options available to them to maintain or improve profitable production and achieve sustainability.
The students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, tutorial discussions and presentations and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups and individually.
Textbooks
To be advised during semester.
BIOL1001 Concepts in Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL1911, BIOL1991 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments tests and lab quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Concepts in Biology is an introduction to the major themes of modern biology. The unit covers fundamental cell biology, with a particular emphasis on cell structure and function; the foundations of molecular biology from the role of DNA in protein synthesis to the genetics of organisms; and the theory of evolution and principles of phylogenetic analysis, including how these are used to interpret the origins of the diversity of extant organisms. Practical classes focus on students designing experiments, making and recording their observations and communicating their findings. The unit emphasises how biologists carry out scientific investigations, from the molecular and cellular level to the level of ecosystems. This unit of study provides a good foundation for intermediate biology units of study.
Textbooks
Knox R B et al. Biology, An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010
or
BIOL1911 Concepts in Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 80+ in HSC 2-unit Biology (or equivalent) or Distinction or better in a University level Biology unit, or an ATAR of 95 or greater Prohibitions: BIOL1001, BIOL1991. Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, tests, lab quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Concepts in Biology (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1001 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1901 participate in alternative components, which include a separate lecture and practical stream from BIOL1001. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
As for BIOL1001.
CHEM1001 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1101, CHEM1109, CHEM1901, CHEM1903 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study, but students who have not undertaken an HSC chemistry course are strongly advised to complete a chemistry bridging course before lectures commence. Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignments (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of the unit of study is to provide those students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent) with a good grounding in fundamental chemical principles together with an overview of the relevance of chemistry. There is no prerequisite or assumed knowledge for entry to this unit of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1101 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Corequisites: Recommended concurrent units of study: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics Prohibitions: CHEM1001, CHEM1109, CHEM1901, CHEM1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Mathematics Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Chemistry 1A is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC Chemistry course. Chemistry 1A covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1901 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week; one 3-hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prerequisites: ATAR of at least 95 and HSC Chemistry result in band 5 or 6, or by invitation. Corequisites: Recommended concurrent unit of study: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics Prohibitions: CHEM1001, CHEM1101, CHEM1109, CHEM1903 Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry 1A (Advanced) is available to students with a very good HSC performance as well as a very good school record in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do Chemistry 1A (Advanced) rather than Chemistry 1A.
The theory and practical work syllabuses for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) are similar, though the level of treatment in the latter unit of study is more advanced, presupposing a very good grounding in the subject at secondary level. Chemistry 1A (Advanced) covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of about 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
ENVX1001 Introductory Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prohibitions: MATH1111, MATH1011, MATH1001, MATH1901, MATH1906, MATH1015, MATH1005, MATH1905, BIOM1003, ECMT1010, BUSS1020, STAT1021, STAT1022 Assumed knowledge: 70 or more in HSC Mathematics Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x10%), practical exam (20%), theory exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is a core first year unit for the BEnvSys, BScAgr and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It provides the foundation quantitative skills that are needed in other units in the degrees and for further study in applied statistics. In the first half of the unit the emphasis is on statistics, topics covered include: describing data and its variability, probability, sampling and estimation, framing scientific hypotheses; estimating a single treatment mean via a confidence interval and testing for a particular mean via a z-test or t-test; estimating or testing the difference between two treatment means. In the second half of the unit the focus is on calculus, the topics being differentiation and integration in single and multiple dimensions. A particular emphasis is on the use of calculus for modelling biological and environmental data, for example the use of linear and non-linear functions. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the spreadsheet package Excel and the statistical package Genstat.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
AGEC1102 Agricultural and Resource Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prohibitions: AGEC1002 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: 1x1hr exam (25%), 1xassignment (15%) and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit applies the principles studied in introductory microeconomics to the agricultural and resource sectors. Some descriptive content regarding Australia's agricultural markets, natural resource assets and industries is included. The first part of the unit is focused on basic concepts of supply, demand, equilibrium in agricultural and resource markets, and how markets can be modeled mathematically. Subsequent parts of the unit are focused on introductory production economics and natural resource management (under conditions of market failure, and as dynamic processes). Sources of risk in agriculture and resource markets, alternative management strategies, and basic techniques of decision making in the face of risk are explored.
AGEN1002 Sustaining our Landscapes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Mark Adams (Coordinator), A/Professor Budiman Minasny, Dr Niggol Seo, Dr Andrew Merchant, Dr Tarryn Turnbull, Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x lectures + 1 x tutorial / wk, 1 x 4 day field trip Assumed knowledge: School Year 12 level knowledge of mathematics, some biology and chemistry. Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (50%), 4 x tutorial papers (24%) (Draft tutorial papers to submitted for editing by academic staff), 1 x field trip report (26%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The quest for sustainability is integral to all land management. The earth's natural systems - especially cycles of water, carbon and nutrients - are critical to economic, social and many other aspects of the world in which we live. As a country dependent on export of commodities, Australia must contend with very significant external forces that shape how we manage land.
This unit of study provides students with critical knowledge and understanding of the economic, biophysical, and chemical principles that must be considered in assessing sustainability, and applies that knowledge to assessing how current Australian landscapes might be managed in the future. Beginning with an exploration of the meaning of sustainability and how scientific and economic methodology is applied to its study, students will progressively engage with more complex and challenging content. By the end of the unit, students will have explored major elements of sustainability and be able to apply their understanding to articulate critical questions that need to be asked when presented with simplistic approaches or ideas. A major field trip will focus on introducing students to quantitative measurement of key processes and developing a greater depth of knowledge of sustainability "in the field". A range of typical Australian landscapes will be considered, ranging from the high country and forests to intensive irrigated agriculture. The field trip and tutorial exercises are intended to help students gain skills in rigorous analysis of the relevant literature and in preparing short pieces of writing. Students direct experience of and exposure to the science and economics of ecological sustainability. Students will work in small groups during field and tutorial sessions.
Textbooks
A Critique for Ecology R.H. Peters, 1991, Cambridge University Press
AGEN1004 Applied Biology for Ag and Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones (Coordinator) Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial/week; 8 practicals; 4 field trips. Prerequisites: BIOL1001, CHEM1001 Corequisites: AGEN1006 Prohibitions: BIOL1002 Assessment: 1 x 2 hour exam (50%); 4 practical reports (26%); 2 field trip reports (24%). Practical field work: Practical and field report preparation. Class preparation, material revision/private study Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Building on the fundamentals of biology introduced in the first semester, this unit runs alongside the 2nd semester biological chemistry unit where students learn the fundamentals of organic chemistry and the major biomolecules. In this unit, students will put this knowledge into context. They will be introduced to the major plant and animal systems, how they interact, and how an understanding of environment influences is key to effective and sustainable management. Topics will be introduced that will emphasise the specific importance of the major biological systems. Through lectures, tutorials, pracs and field trips, students will gain a more in-depth understanding of basic plant and animal physiology, biochemistry, energy flows, and biological interactions, and the importance of these factors in determining the resilience of organisms, communities and ecosystems. Students will be able to apply this knowledge to determine appropriate management strategies for productivity and the conservation and rehabilitation of natural systems.
Textbooks
Sadava D, Hillis D, Heller C, Berenbaum M 2009, Life: the science of biology, 9th edition, WH Freeman and Co, Gordonsville VA.; Recommended reading: Lindenmayer D, Burgman M 2005, Practical Conservation Biology, CSIRO Publishing. C.A. Offord, P.F Meagher Eds. 2009 Plant Germplasm Conservation in Australia. Strategies and Guidelines for Developing, Managing and Utilising Ex Situ Collections. Australian Network for Plant Conservation Inc.
AGEN1006 Biological Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Roberts (Coordinator), Associate Professor Balwant Singh, Dr Feike Dijkstra Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/wk, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk 1 x 3-hr practical/wk Prerequisites: CHEM1001 or equivalent content Prohibitions: CHEM1002 Assessment: Three quizzes (3x5%), 1 x Problem solving exercise (15%), Mid-semester exam (20%), Final exam (30%), Laboratory attendance and participation (5%), Laboratory log book (10%), Laboratory skills (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study expands on the basic chemical concepts taught in first semester (CHEM1001) and extends these into the chemistry of organic compounds. Emphasizing the chemistry of biologically important molecules, the unit will introduce students to the structures and reactions of organic compounds and major biological macromolecules (e.g. nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids). Examples and applications used in the unit will be those directly related to aspects of biology that impact decision making in natural and managed systems. In weeks 1-6, lectures and laboratory work are conducted in co-operation with the School of Chemistry, Faculty of Science. In weeks 7-13, lectures and laboratory work will be undertaken in the Faculty of Agriculture and Environment. Tutorials are conducted by Faculty of Agriculture and Environment staff throughout the semester. Lectures, laboratory work and tutorials are integrated, providing students with a theoretical and practical basis for further studies in the management of biological systems. This 6 credit point unit consists of approximately 80 hours directed learning.
Textbooks
Chemistry and SI Chemical Data (package), 2nd Edition, 2012 (John Wiley) ISBN:

Year 2

Year 2 will have the following structure: 36 credit points of core units including:
AGEN2001 Plant Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Bell (Coordinator), Dr Thomas Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures, 1x 3-hr practical per week Prerequisites: BIOL1001, CHEM1001, CHEM1002 or Units of Study with equivalent content Assumed knowledge: Junior level biology and chemistry Assessment: 1x 1hr mid-semester exam (20%), 1x 2hr final exam (40%), 1000w essay (10%), Five practical reports (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In AGEN2001 - Plant Function, students will investigate the structure of cells, tissues and organs of plants and relate them to associated molecular processes critical in plant biology. The unit begins with a detailed description of plant cell structures and tissues and progresses to the biochemical pathways important in physiological processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, nutrient uptake and production of secondary metabolites. Basic anatomical, morphological and biochemical responses of plants to abiotic stresses such as drought, fire and salinity and longer-term adaptations to environmental change will also be addressed. Laboratory exercises demonstrating plant anatomical features and biochemical processes and techniques are well integrated with lecture material. Attention will be given to important agricultural and horticultural plants as well as Australian native plant species. Plant Function gives students a strong grounding in plant anatomy and molecular processes, building upon concepts introduced in junior-level chemistry and plant biology.
Textbooks
Taiz L, Zeiger E (2010) Plant Physiology 5th ed.
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prerequisites: ENVX1001 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 and MATH1015 Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x10%), practical exam (20%), theory exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is a core 2nd year unit for students in the BEnvSys, BScAgr and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It consists of three parts. In the first part students will investigate how to use an ANOVA to analyse experiments with more than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part an introduction to a branch of mathematics called linear algebra is given with an emphasis on the applications to statistics and modelling. In the final part students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression. During the practicals two software packages; Genstat and Excel, will be used to analyse real datasets. At the end of this unit, students will have learnt how to analyse data using ANOVA and regression, the basic methods needed for their future studies and careers. The students will gain research and inquiry skills through completion of weekly computer work and assessable exercises. Information literacy and communication skills will be developed through weekly computer work.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
ENVX3001 Environmental GIS

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Inakwu Odeh Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three-day field trip, (2 lec & 2 prac/wk). Assumed knowledge: least 48 credit points in second year agriculture/science units. Assessment: One 15 min presentation (10%), 3500w prac report (35%), 1500w report on trip excur (15%), 2 hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is designed to impart knowledge and skills in spatial analysis and geographical information science (GISc) for decision-making in an environmental context. The lecture material will present several themes: principles of GISc, geospatial data sources and acquisition methods, processing of geospatial data and spatial statistics. Practical exercises will focus on learning geographical information systems (GIS) and how to apply them to land resource assessment, including digital terrain modelling, land-cover assessment, sub-catchment modelling, ecological applications, and soil quality assessment for decisions regarding sustainable land use and management. A 3 day field excursion during the mid-semester break will involve a day of GPS fieldwork at Arthursleigh University farm and two days in Canberra visiting various government agencies which research and maintain GIS coverages for Australia. By the end of this UoS, students should be able to: differentiate between spatial data and spatial information; source geospatial data from government and private agencies; apply conceptual models of spatial phenomena for practical decision-making in an environmental context; apply critical analysis of situations to apply the concepts of spatial analysis to solving environmental and land resource problems; communicate effectively results of GIS investigations through various means- oral, written and essay formats; and use a major GIS software package such as ArcGIS.
Textbooks
Burrough, P.A. and McDonnell, R.A. 1998. Principles of Geographic Information Systems. Oxford University Press: Oxford.
SOIL2003 Soil Properties and Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Balwant Singh (Coordinator), Prof Alex McBratney, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures and 1x3hr practical/week, commencing week 1, and a compulsory field excursion to be held on the Thursday and Friday in the week preceding the first semester. Assessment: Soil description report (10%), Quizzes (or Essay) (15%), Practical exercise book (20%), Practical exam (15%) and Written exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts within pedology, soil physics and soil chemistry. These concepts are part of the grounding principles that underpin crop and animal production, nutrient and water cycling, and environmental sustainability taught by other units of study in the Faculty. Students will participate in a two-day field excursion in the first week of semester to examine some common soils of the Sydney Basin, they will also learn to describe soil, and measure soil chemical and physical properties in the field. Referring to common soil profiles of the Sydney Basin, students will concentrate on factors affecting soil formation, the rudiments of soil description, and analysis of soil properties that are used in soil classification. Students will also develop knowledge of the physics of water and gas movement, soil strength, soil chemical properties, inorganic and organic components, nutrient cycles and soil acidity in an agricultural context. At the end of this unit students will become familiar with the factors that determine a soil's composition and behaviour, and will have an understanding of the most important soil physical and chemical properties. Students will develop communication skills through essay, report and practical exercises. The final report and laboratory exercise questions are designed to develop team work and collaborative efforts.
Textbooks
Campbell, K.O. & Bowyer, J.W. (eds) (1988). The Scientific Basis of Modern Agriculture. Sydney University Press.
AGEN2005 Plant Systems Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Merchant (Coordinator), Dr Thomas Buckley Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures, 1x1-hr tutorial, per week 4x 3-hr practicals plus 1 x 4 day field trip Prerequisites: BIOL1001, CHEM1001 Assumed knowledge: Junior chemistry and intermediate level biology Assessment: 1x 2hr final exam (50%), 1000w essay (30%), 1x practical report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study will provide students with an understanding of the plant metabolic network, its regulation and how metabolic control is integral to an ability to adapt to environmental change. It is a core unit for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Agricultural Science and Bachelor of Environmental Systems. From the perspective of energy flows, this unit will outline a framework for the plant metabolic network at the physiological, chemical and molecular levels. Students will become familiar with network complexity and its regulation through the use of the latest bioinformatics and analytical tools. Students will gain first-hand experience in the assessment of plant health and management of resource availability in both cropping and natural systems by participating in two x 2-day field trips to research institutes and field stations in rural Australia. Information will be captured and interpreted at a range of scales from the cellular to the whole plant, demonstrating the importance of metabolism to plants and to broader biospheric processes. At the completion of this unit, students will be able to articulate the major components of the plant metabolic network, its regulation in response to changes in resource availability and to make informed management decisions for the optimization of the productivity and resilience of Australian ecosystems.
LWSC2002 Introductory Hydrology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lec 2hr/wk; practical: 3hr/wk; field work: 25hr/wk (for 1 wk only) Assumed knowledge: SOIL2003 and [(AFNR1001 and AFNR1002) or ENSY1001 or (AGEN1001 and AGEN1002)] and (BIOM1001 or ENVX1001). Assessment: One 2hr exam (50%), laboratory and practical reports (15%), field trip report (35%). Practical field work: 1 week field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces students to hydrology and water management in the context of Australian integrated catchment management. It particularly focuses on the water balances, rainfall runoff modeling, analysis and prediction of streamflow and environmental flows, water quality and sustainable practices in water management. Through theoretical work and case studies, the students will engage with problems related water quantity and quality in Australia and the world. The unit builds on knowledge gained in AGEN 1001, AGEN 1002, and SOIL2003 and establishes the foundation for later units in the hydrology and water area. The unit provides one of the essential building blocks for a career related to water management and hydrology. The unit consists of two parts; the first part will involve a series of lectures, tutorials, practical exercises and case studies. The second part of the unit consists of field excursions to parts of NSW. During the field excursions, students will engage with current water problems and engage in basic hydrometric and water quality data collection. The data will be used later to analyse catchment condition and water quantity issues.
After completion of this unit, you should be able to:
Explain the different processes in the hydrological cycle;
Measure and interpret hydrometric and basic water quality data;
Elucidate the processes involved in generation of streamflow from rainfall;
Distinguish the link between water quantity and water quality and its implications for water management;
Demonstrate a deeper understanding of the unique nature of Australian Hydrology
Textbooks
Ladson (2007) Hydrology an Australian Introduction. Oxford University press. Chapters 1 - 6
And 12 credit points of elective units.
AGEC2103 Production Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: ECON1001 or AGEC1006 or (AGEC1003 and AGEC1004) or RESEC1031 Prohibitions: AGEC2003 Assessment: 2 x assignments (40%) and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit builds on microeconomic principles studied in first year and applies them to the analysis of firms' decisions. Emphasis is put on the formalization of the firm's problem and in the use of duality. The topics include: production functions (single and multi-output); distance functions and their use in the measurement of productivity; the decomposition of productivity and productivity changes; production under risk; cost and profit functions.
N.B. Available to 2nd year students in the Faculty of Economics and Business
Textbooks
Collection of readings
GENE2001 Agricultural Genetics 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1 Classes: (3 lec, 3 prac/problem set)/wk Prerequisites: At least one of (BIOL1001, BIOL1002, BIOL1101, BIOL1901, BIOL1911) Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (60%) and 1x assignment of problem-type questions (20%) 4x on-line quizzes (4x5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This lecture and practical unit of study provides an introduction to the genetics and breeding of plants and animals. It provides an understanding for parallel and following courses. Lectures cover the basics of gene transmission and interaction, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, population and quantitative genetics, as well as the more applied aspects of plant and animal breeding and biotechnology. Practicals emphasise, with agricultural examples, the procedures of genetic and cytogenetic analysis, and the use of computers in simulation procedures in population genetics, quantitative inheritance and selection programs, and provide exposure to current plant and animal breeding and biotechnology.
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jody Webster, A/Prof Bill Pritchard, Prof Jonathan Aitchison, Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1901, GEOG1001, GEOG1002, GEOL1001, GEOL1002, GEOL1902, ENSY1001 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, 2000 word essay, field and prac reports (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the system of global environmental change, specifically addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating how changes take place, the rate at which they occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
AGEC2101 Market and Price Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Shyamal Chowdhury Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: AGEC1006 or (AGEC1003 and AGEC1004) or AGEC1002 or AGEC1102 or RSEC1031 or AGEC1031 Prohibitions: AGEC2001 Assessment: 1x1hr in-class mid-term exam (20%), 1x3000wd assignment (20%), 1x2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit focuses on the nature of agricultural and resource commodity markets, market demand relationships, market supply relationships, price determination under alternative market structures, marketing margin relationships, derived demand for inputs, spatially and temporally related markets, market dynamics, price expectations, commodity futures markets and other pertinent topics. Applied examples from the agricultural and resource industries and the overall economy will be used throughout the semester as illustrations of the principles involved.
N.B. Available to 2nd year students in Faculty of Economics and Business.
Advised prerequisite: AGEC2105 or ECMT2110
AGRO3004 Managing Agro-Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Tan (coordinator), Dr Lindsay Campbell, Dr Lachlan Ingram, Dr Brett Whelan. Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture/wk; 1x 3hr tutorial/practical each week. Full-day practical at Camden campus during week 3 (no lecture or tutorial that week). Week 7 trip to national crops competition (optional). Prerequisites: AFNR1001, AFNR1002, PLNT2003, SOIL2003 and (BIOM2001 or ENVX2001) Assessment: 5x quizzes (30%), in-class crops competition test (20%), 1x 2hr exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to provide a solid introductory understanding of the biology and management of cropping systems, with a focus on major Australian broad acre crops. The course examines a typical crop cycle, with an emphasis on cereals, especially wheat. An overview of the main crops grown in Australia is presented. The relationship between crop growth and soil and aerial environments is discussed, and the importance of water and water-use efficiency is highlighted. The physiology of crops--including germination, photosynthesis, vegetative and reproductive growth and development, transpiration, photosynthate partitioning, and mineral nutrient acquisition and use--is studied as the basis of crop yield and production. Biological processes associated with seed (grain) development are described. Weed management, pasture management, and precision agriculture are discussed in theoretical and practical terms, and an introduction to crop adaptation and breeding is presented. Successful students will attain the ability to appreciate and analyze some of the most important limitations to crop yield and production in Australia and how those limitations can be minimized or overcome through science-based planning and management practices.
Textbooks
Recommended Reading; Connor DJ, Loomis RS, Cassman KG (2011) Crop Ecology: Productivity and Management in Agricultural Systems, 2nd Ed. Cambridge Univ Press, Cambridge.
ENTO2001 Introductory Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Mansfield Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2x1hour lecture, 1x3hour practical, 1x1hour insect collection)/week, commencing week 1. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of first year biology Prohibitions: BIOL2017, BIOL2917 Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (50%), lab quizzes and manual (20%), 1 x insect collection (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is an introduction to insects, the most abundant group of organisms. The course begins with insect external and internal anatomy, feeding modes, life cycles and behaviour. Real world examples are used to demonstrate the ecological roles insects play in natural and agricultural ecosystems (e.g. pollinators, herbivores, predators, parasitoids, disease vectors). This knowledge is then linked to aspects of applied entomology: insecticides, biological control, habitat manipulation, integrated pest management, medical entomology and insect conservation. Practical sessions focus on insect morphology and taxonomy, so that students learn to identify common insect orders and families. Students must make a representative insect collection. This course forms the basis of students' entomological knowledge for BScAgr and BHortSc degrees and lays the foundation for future study in entomology.
Textbooks
Required: Zborowski, P. & Storey, R. 1995. A field guide to insects in Australia. Reed New Holland, Sydney. 207 pp.
MICR2024 Microbes in the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2 lec, 3h prac)/wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points of first year Biology Prohibitions: MICR2001, MICR2901, MICR2003, MICR2007, MICR2011, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2909 Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (60%), 4 x quizzes (15%), lab skills assessment (5%) and 1 x lab project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces the diversity of microbes found in soil, water, air, plants and animal environments. Through an examination of their physiology and genetics it explores their interactions with plants, animals and each other, and their roles as decomposers and recyclers in the environment. The soil is a rich microbial environment, and the concept of soil health and its relationship to plant growth is discussed. Practical classes introduce techniques and skills in isolating, quantifying and culturing microbes, designing and interpreting experiments to study microbial growth, and in preparing and presenting data.
Textbooks
Willey et al. 2007. Prescott/Harley/Klein's Microbiology 8th ed. McGraw-Hill
BIOL2024 Ecology and Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Banks Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12cp Junior BIOL; or 6cp Junior BIOL and (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901). Prohibitions: BIOL2924 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1002 or BIOL1902 Assessment: Practical reports/presentations (50%), one 2-hour exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study examines the ecological principles driving the major ecosystems of the world and ecological processes behind the world's major conservation issues. It aims to develop in students the core foundations for an understanding of Ecology and its application in conservation. Lectures will focus on the ecology of the major terrestrial and marine biomes of the world. Application of ecological theory and methods to practical conservation problems will be integrated throughout the unit of study. Practical sessions will provide hands-on experience in ecological sampling and data handling to understand the ecology of marine and terrestrial environments, as well as ecological simulations to understand processes. This unit of study provides a suitable foundation for senior biology units of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Essentials of Ecology 3rd edition (2008). Townsend, CR, Begon, M, Harper, JL . John
RSEC2031 Resource Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x 1hr lectures/week, 1x1 hr tutorial/week commencing week 2. Prohibitions: AGEC1031, RSEC1031 Assessment: 1x 1hr mid semester exam (25%), 1x assignment (15%), 1 x 2 hr end of semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit builds on the unit Agricultural and Resource Economics. Particular concepts in economics are used to provide insights into efficient and sustainable resource management. The primary focus of this unit is analytical. Emphasis is placed on the importance of property rights structures, cost-effective regulations and dynamic considerations in managing natural resource stocks and environmental assets. Some material on economic valuation of environmental assets and benefit cost analysis is included.
SOIL2004 The Soil Resource

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle (Coordinator), Prof Alex McBratney, A/Prof Balwant Singh Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2x1 hr lec, 1x2hr pracs)/wk, 24 hr (5 days) field work out of semester time Assessment: Fieldtrip participation (5%), soil survey mapping report (30%), laboratory report and poster presentation (25%), three group tutorials (20%), viva voce exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will familiarize students with the description and mapping of soil types in the Australian landscape, with common analytical methods for soil and with the various forms of degradation that may alter the quality and function of soil. It is an applied soil science unit which builds on the fundamental soil science concepts learned in the SOIL2003 unit. The first practical component of the unit, a five-day soil survey, will give students experience in soil description and classification in the field, and soil samples collected during this survey will be subsequently analysed for a variety of attributes by the students in laboratory practicals. In the lecture series, topics including soil type distribution, soil quality, soil function, soil fertility and soil degradation will be discussed and linked to practical sessions. By the end of this unit, students will be able to construct maps of soil properties and soil type distribution, describe primary soil functions, soil attributes and types of soil degradation in an agricultural context, and be able to recognize and communicate the ability of a soil profile to sustain plant growth. Students will gain research and inquiry skills by collecting, analyzing and interpreting soil survey data, and will gain communication skills by having to prepare and present a poster.
Textbooks
Brady NC & Weil RR. (2002) The Nature and Properties of Soils. 13th ed. (or any later edition) Prentice Hall, New Jersey.

Year 3

Year 3 will have the following structure: 24 credit points of core units including:
SOIL3009 Contemporary Field and Lab Soil Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alex McBratney (coordinator), A/Prof Balwant Singh, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle, A/Prof Budiman Minasny Session: Semester 1 Classes: (2 lec, 2 prac)/wk, 6-day field excursion Prerequisites: SOIL2003 Assessment: 1 x viva voce exam (40%), pedology written assessments (15%), soil physics written assessments (15%), soil chemistry written assessments (15%), 1 x group presentation (5%), 1 x synthesis paper (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is a theoretical and empirical unit providing specialised training in three important areas of contemporary soil science, namely pedology, soil chemistry and soil physics. The key concepts of these sub-disciplines will be outlined and strengthened by hands-on training in essential field and laboratory techniques. All of this is synthesized by placing it in the context of soil distribution and use in North-Western New South Wales. The unit is motivated by the teaching team's research in this locale. It builds on students existing soil science knowledge gained in SOIL2003. After completion of the unit, students should be able to articulate the advantages and disadvantages of current field & laboratory techniques for gathering necessary soil information, and simultaneously recognise key concepts and principles that guide contemporary thought in soil science. Students will be able to synthesise soil information from a multiplicity of sources and have an appreciation of the cutting edge areas of soil research. By investigating the contemporary nature of key concepts, students will develop their skills in research and inquiry. Students will develop their communication skills through report writing and oral presentations and will also articulate an openness to new ways of thinking which augments intellectual autonomy. Teamwork and collaborative efforts are encouraged in this unit.
Textbooks
D. Hillel. 2004. Introduction to Environmental Soil Physics. Elsevier Science, San Diego, CA, USA
LWSC3007 Advanced Hydrology and Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hr lectures/ week, 1 hr on-line and 2 hr practical/week Prerequisites: LWSC2002 Assessment: Practical reports (50%), take-home exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to allow students to examine advanced hydrological modeling and sampling designs focusing on catchment level responses and uncertainty.
This unit builds on the theoretical knowledge gained in LWSC2002 and possibly GEOG2321. Students will learn how to develop their own simulation model of catchment hydrological processes in R and review the possibilities and impossibilities of using simulation models for catchment management. Students will further investigate optimal sampling techniques for water quality data based on understanding the variability in hydrological responses. At the end of this unit, students will be able to build their own catchment model and calibrate this model, articulate advantages and disadvantages of using simulation models for catchment management, justify the choice of a simulation model for a particular catchment management problem, identify issues in relation to uncertainty in water quality and quantity, develop an optimal water quality sampling scheme. The students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, laboratory reports and a presentation and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups.
Textbooks
Beven, K.J. Rainfall-Runoff modeling, The Primer, John Wiley and Sons, Chichester, 2001
ENSY3001 Biosphere-Atmosphere Interactions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Margaret Barbour Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2h lecture/discussion per week, 5 x 5h practicals alternate weeks, 1 x 2-day fieldtrip. Assumed knowledge: SOIL2003, LWSC2002, LWSC3007, PLNT2003, ENSY2001 Assessment: One oral presentation (15%), one 2000w essay (20%), one practical report (30%), one model and report (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: It is strongly advised that PLNT3001 or PLNT3901 are taken concurrently
This unit of study is designed to allow students to examine the exchange of carbon, water, energy and greenhouse gases between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere, with particular focus on environmental and land use change. It is a core unit for students in BEnvSys and builds on knowledge gained in ENSY2001, SOIL2003, LWSC2002 and PLNT2003. Students will develop an integrative understanding of the physical, chemical and biological processes that govern interactions between terrestrial landscapes and the atmosphere, drawing on examples from both managed and natural ecosystems. Students will apply state-of-the-art measurement techniques to quantify and interpret regulation of exchange processes, and develop a simple environmentally-driven, process-based model of exchange. At the end of this unit, students will be able to 1) evaluate the effects of land use change and environmental change on processes regulating the exchange of greenhouse gases between the biosphere and atmosphere; 2) perform a controlled-environment experiment to demonstrate links between carbon and water cycles, then analyse and interpret results; 3) design and implement a process-based model of exchange of carbon, water and energy between the biosphere and atmosphere to predict ecosystem response to environmental change by integrating environmental data, mathematical models and model parameters. The students will gain research and inquiry skills through a practical group project, communication skills through workshops, group discussions and an oral presentation, and information literacy through web-based literature searches and computer model development.
Textbooks
Students will be drawing on current research literature for content.
PLNT3001 Plant, Cell and Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops and discussions 2 hr/wk; laboratories: alternate weeks 30 hr total (6 pracs; 5 hr each) Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology, Plant Science, Molecular Biology and Genetics Prohibitions: PLNT3901 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (40%), 2x reports (30%), 1x essay (15%), 1x group presentation (15%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study of comprises lectures/workshops and practical sessions that will explore how plants function and interact with their environment. Classes will examine the mechanisms plants have evolved to adapt and acclimate to varied and variable environments. We will address how plants adapt to their light environment and how they respond to common abiotic stresses (e.g. drought, salinity) and biotic stresses (herbivory) and how they interact with other organisms. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales. You will need to draw on knowledge from intermediate units of study and explore the published literature to successfully integrate information from areas unfamiliar to yourself. The purpose of this Unit of Study is to develop an understanding of current directions in Plant Science at an advanced level. When you have successfully completed this unit of study, you should be able to: be familiar with modern approaches of physiology, biophysics and molecular biology in the study of plant function; understand how domains of knowledge interact to describe plant function; understand how plants function in stressful environments; carry out a small research project; draft a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.
Textbooks
Students will be drawing on the current research literature for content. A Study Guide for the unit will be available for purchase during the first week of semester from the Copy Centre at a cost to be advised.
And 24 credit points from either Table AS2 or Table NTS2.

Table AS2 Agricultural Systems Stream

two of:
AFNR3001 Agro-ecosystems in Developing Countries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x18 days fieldtrip before start of semester 1 Assessment: Project Proposal (10%), Project Report (60%), Project Presentation (30%)( Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides students with a direct contact with the agricultural reality of a developing country through a fieldtrip. Active learning in the field through contacts with farmers, public servants, cooperatives, private firms and NGOs should then motivate a critical reflection on the constraints to agricultural development in these environments.
The fieldtrip will be organized around central themes (for example, technology adoption, sustainable use of resources, access to credit, land use change) that will be introduced in a short series of seminars (held on main campus ahead of the departure and intended to provide a first introduction to some of the questions that are expected to be addressed in the field) and will constitute the focus of group work once back to main campus.
Although there are no formal prerequisites, the unit is directed to students that have completed most of the second year units in their degrees.
N.B. Department permission required for enrolment. Please note that, in practice, this unit will run prior to the start of semester 1 with all classes and the fieldtrip being scheduled during that period.
AGRO4003 Crop and Pasture Agronomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x4-h lectures/weeks 1,2,9,10; 2x2h lectures 3,4,7,8, 1x full day field practical in week 11 (subject to weather); Field excursions: week 0 and 6 (subject to weather) Prerequisites: AGRO3004 Assessment: 1x2h exam (45%) and 2x reports on excursions (2x18.5%) and 2000wd field report (18%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit examines agronomy as the discipline that underpins agricultural production. As a case study, the cotton industry is examined in detail to understand the end-user and social demands on agricultural production, the technical issues that challenge the farmer and the diversity of other specialist information from relevant disciplines such as entomology, pathology and soil science that must be integrated into the farming system. Likewise the rice and/or pastoral industries provide a contrasting farming system as another case study. The unit includes a one-week excursion to cotton growing areas in northern NSW and Qld, specialist intensive instruction provided by the Cotton CRC and a series of workshops, tutorials that provides analysis and synthesis of the major farming systems in this industry. Pasture production is also considered in the context of farming systems.
AGRO4004 Sustainable Farming Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Negotiated practicals and workshops (63h) Prerequisites: AGRO3004 Assessment: Written report on the field/glasshouse experiment(s) (33%), oral debates/discussions on sustainable systems (33%), essay on sustainable agriculture (34%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is designed to provide students with training in the professional skills required to practice agronomy. The unit principally builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained in second year plant physiology (PLNT2003) and third year agronomy (AGRO3004). In this unit students will integrate their knowledge of plant physiology, soil science, experimental design, and biometry to address applied problems in agronomy, namely the issue of sustainability. Students will develop their ability to establish conclusions towards making recommendations for long term sustainability of crop and pasture systems. By implementing and managing a major field and/or glasshouse experiment(s) students will develop their research and inquiry skills. Team work is strongly encouraged in this unit and the integration and reporting of research findings will facilitate critical thinking and development of written communication skills. After completing this unit, students should be able to confidently design and manage a glasshouse/field experiment, and interpret and communicate their findings, by integrating knowledge from across disciplinary boundaries.
ENVI3111 Environmental Law and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of intermediate units of study Prohibitions: ENVI3911 Assessment: Essays, tutorials (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is co-taught by the School of Geosciences and the Unit for the History and Philosophy of Science. The unit is divided into two parts: (1) environmental law and governance and (2) environmental ethics. Environmental regulation and governance plays an important role in regulating human impacts on the environment. The law and governance part of this unit provides an introduction and overview to environmental regulation. We look at key environmental issues through an examination of legal policies, legislation and case law at a variety of scales (international, national and state/local). This unit also highlights the ways in which environmental law and governance is increasingly interconnected to other areas of environmental studies. The ethics component helps students develop thoughtful and informed positions on issues in environmental ethics using arguments derived from traditional ethics as well as environmentally specific theories. Ethical conflicts are often inevitable and difficult to resolve but using the resources of philosophical ethics and regular reference to case studies, students can learn to recognize the values and considerations at stake in such conflicts, acknowledge differing viewpoints and defend their own well considered positions.
ENVX3002 Statistics in the Natural Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop, Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1×2 hr workshop/wk, 1×3 hr computer practical/wk Prerequisites: ENVX2001 or STAT2012 or STAT2912 or BIOL2022 or BIOL2922 Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x15%), practical exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the analysis of data they may face in their future careers, in particular data that are not well behaved, they may be non-normal, there may be missing observations or they may be correlated in space and time. In the first part, students will learn how to analyse and design experiments based on the general linear model. In the second part, they will learn about the generalisation of the general linear model to accommodate non-normal data with a particular emphasis on the binomial and poisson distributions. In the third part linear mixed models will be introduced which provide the means to analyse datasets that do not meet the assumptions of independent and equal errors. At the end of this unit, students will have learnt a range of advanced statistical methods and be equipped to apply this knowledge to analyse data that they may encounter in their future studies and careers. The students will gain research and inquiry skills through completion of assessment tasks. Information literacy and communication skills will be developed through weekly computer work.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
MICR3125 Microbial Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lec, 1 x 3hr prac/wk Prerequisites: MICR2022 or MICR2024 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of molecular biology Assessment: One 2 hour exam (60%), One group presentation (10%), Continuous Practical assessment (protocol design, attendance and participation, experimental reports) (10%), Practical project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study will focus on the microbial communities that dominate soil, animal, marine and freshwater environments, and on functional interactions between the organisms that make up these communities. Students will investigate how the development of molecular methods in environmental microbiology and molecular ecology has provided new insights into the function of microbial communities in the environment. The course material will build on knowledge gained in MICR2024, and will particularly emphasize the importance of complex microbial communities in processes such as nutrient cycling and species interactions. At the end of this unit, students will be able to describe modern methods of molecular microbial ecology, outline the diversity and dynamics of cultured and uncultured aquatic, human and soil microbial communities, and will understand how the interactions between the organisms in these communities govern nutrient cycling in soil and water environments. They will develop their analytical inquiry skills through the critical analysis of research papers in the field of microbial ecology, gathering and evaluating information concerning microbial communities in the environment, and practice collaboration and discussion skills through group presentations.
Textbooks
The course will be taught largely from recent research publications in leading journals, which will be provided in the lectures and in online material to accompany the unit of study.
PPAT4005 Soil Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Guest Session: Semester 1 Classes: (2 tut, 3 hrs prac)/wk Prerequisites: MICR2024 or 6cp intermediate microbiology Assessment: Tutorial papers (30%), project proposal (10%), project report (50%), peer review (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit investigates the diversity of organisms living in the soil, their biology, interactions and ecology, and their roles in maintaining and improving soil function. The unit is an elective for BScAgr, BHortSc and BSc students. It builds on the material introduced in MICR2024, PPAT3003 and BIOL3017. Undertaking this unit will develop skills in monitoring soil microbes, designing, conducting and analysing experiments. At the completion of this unit, students will be able to exercise problem-solving skills (developed through practical experiments, projects and tutorial discussions), think critically, and organise knowledge (from consideration of the lecture material and preparation of project reports), and expand from theoretical principles to practical explanations (through observing and reporting on project work). Students will consolidate their teamworking skills, develop self-directed study skills and plan effective work schedules, use statistical analysis in research, keep appropriate records of laboratory research, work safely in a research laboratory and operate a range of scientific equipment. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through group research projects, information literacy and communication skills through assessment tasks and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups.
Textbooks
Sylvia et al. 2005. Principles and Applications of Soil Microbiology 2nd ed. Pearson.
RSEC4131 Benefit-Cost Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2 hr lecture/wk commencing week 1 & 1x1 hr tut/wk, commencing week 2. Prerequisites: (ECON2001 or ECOS2001) and (AGEC2103 or AGEC2003) Prohibitions: AGEC4037 Assessment: 1 x oral presentation (5%), 1 x written group-work essay (20%), 1 x 1hr mid-semester exam (25%), 1 x 2hr final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides a detailed treatment of benefit-cost analysis and its use in public sector decision making and project evaluation. The underpinning concepts in welfare economics are analysed in detail, such as economic efficiency, criteria for assessing social welfare improvements, and economic surplus measures. Procedures of undertaking a benefit-cost analysis are presented, and tools of non-market valuation for environmental assets are covered in detail. These techniques include both stated and revealed preference techniques, including contingent valuation, choice modeling, hedonic pricing and travel cost methods.
and two of
AGCH3033 Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Feike Dijkstra (Coordinator); Dr. Claudia Keitel; Dr. Malcolm Possell A/Prof. Balwant Singh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec & 3hr prac/wk Prohibitions: CHEM2404 Assumed knowledge: SOIL2003, LWSC2002 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (50%), prac reports and essay (40%), oral presentation (10%). Practical field work: Practical reports and essay writing. Preparation reading for practical or field trips, preparation for group presentation, exam preparation. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This course provides basic concepts in environmental chemistry underpinning many of the environmental problems humans are faced with, with a focus on agricultural and natural ecosystems.

AGCH3033 is a core unit for the BEnvSys degree and an elective unit suitable for the BScAgr, BResEc and BAnVetBioSc degrees, building on intermediate units in chemistry and biology.
Sources, reactions and fate of chemical species will be investigated in air, water, soil and biota. Case studies about human impacts on the environment will be integrated in the lectures, laboratory classes and field trip.
At the end students have an understanding of chemical concepts that are at the root of many environmental problems in agricultural and natural ecosystems. This unit will provide students with tools to identify and assess the chemistry behind environmental problems and will guide students in developing methods to manage these problems.
Students will enhance their skills in problem definition, assessing sources of information, team-work and effectively communicating environmental issues from a chemical perspective through laboratory reports and oral presentation.
Textbooks
Andrews et al. 2004. An Introduction to Environmental Chemistry.
ENTO4003 Integrated Pest Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Mansfield Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture, 1x3hr practical/week, commencing week 1. Prerequisites: ENTO2001 or ENTO2002 or BIOL2017 or BIOL2917 (Note: BIOL2017/BIOL2917 are only for BSc students who elect to take this UoS) Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1xcase study (20%), 1xgroup assignment (20%), 1xinsect collection (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The focus of this unit is the development and adoption of integrated pest management (IPM) within Australian agriculture. It builds on the knowledge gained in second year entomology (BScAgr and BHortSc) and is a core unit for the entomology specialty (BScAgr). Applied entomology deals with the control of insect pests and the use of beneficial insects. The biology of major pest (herbivores and disease vectors) and beneficial (predators, parasitoids, pollinators) insect groups is covered in depth. Students will compare the advantages and disadvantages of different pest control strategies and evaluate the importance of insect ecology, control methods and socio-economic factors to successful adoption of integrated pest management. Field trips will demonstrate the practical application of IPM concepts presented in lectures. Research, inquiry and information literacy skills will be improved through critical review of current literature and compilation of a case study. Students will practice their communication skills and develop personal and intellectual autonomy through a group project, in-class discussion and a self-directed insect collection.
Textbooks
Required: Bailey, PT (Ed.) 2007. Pests of field crops and pastures. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, Vic. 520 pp.
ENVX4001 GIS, Remote Sensing and Land Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Inakwu Odeh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week weeks 1-6, 1x1 project weeks 7-11, 1x1-½ hour presentation scheduled for weeks 12 and 13, 1x3-hr practical weeks 1-6 Assumed knowledge: Recommended units include GEOS2111/GEOS2911 (Natural Hazards: a GIS approach), ENVX3001 (Environmental GIS), SOIL3004 (The Soil Resource), GEOS3014/GEOS3914 (GIS in Coastal Management) Assessment: 1x 20 min presentation (10%), laboratory work reports (30%), Group assignment (10%), 1x 3000w project report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Consent of the unit coordinator required.
This unit of study is aimed at advanced techniques in Remote Sensing (RS), linked with Geographical Information Systems (GIS), as applied to land management problems. The unit consists of three separate but overlapping parts: 1) a short theoretical part which focuses on the concepts of RS; 2) a practical part which aims at developing hands-on skills in using RS and GIS tools, and 3) an application-focused module in which students will learn the skills of how to design a land management project and actualise it using integrated GIS and RS techniques. At the completion of this unit students will have grasp the theories and concepts of GIS and acquired research skills in the application of advanced remote sensing and GIS algorithms to provide evidence-based solutions to natural resource management and environmental problems. Communication skills and critical thinking for solving land resources problems are encouraged through class discussions, group work and tutorial presentations.
Textbooks
van Dijk, A. and Bos, M.G. 2001. GIS and remote sensing techniques in land- and water-management. Kluwer Academic Publisher, Dordrecht.
PLNT3002 Plant Growth and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jan Marc (Executive Officer), Prof Robyn Overall, Prof David Guest, Dr Penny Smith, A/Prof Robyn McConchie, Dr Brian Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec per wk, one 4 hr practical on alternate weeks (6 weeks only), one 3 hr presentation of research project in week 13. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of intermediate PLNT, BIOL, AGCH or CROP units of study including at least one of PLNT2001, PLNT2901, PLNT2003, PLNT2903, BIOL2016, BIOL2916, BIOL2003, BIOL2903, BIOL2006, BIOL2906, CROP2001, AGCH2002 Prohibitions: PLNT3902, BIOL3021, BIOL3931 Assessment: 1x 2 hr exam (60%), project presentation and report (20%), laboratory quizzes, report and book (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit explores the mechanisms underlying plant growth and development from seed to maturity. It covers the process of building the plant body from embryogenesis, development and operation of meristems, polarity, patterning, controls of flowering and fruit development to programmed cell death and senescence. It includes the role of signals such as plant hormones in coordinating plant growth and development and the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying plant responses to environmental signals such as gravity and light. There is a focus on recent plant molecular biology that has been critical in enhancing our current understanding of plant growth and development. The unit uses examples from crop, horticultural and native plants as well as the model plant Arabidopsis. Lectures are augmented by experimental work, including and independent research project. The laboratory work will include plant tissue culture, protoplast production and modern cell biological techniques used to study plant development. This unit of study complements other senior units of study in the Plant Science Major and is essential for those seeking a career in plant molecular biology.
Textbooks
Taiz L, Zeiger E (2010) Plant Physiology 5th ed. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Massachusetts Recommended reading: Atwell B, Kriedemann P, Turnbull C (1999) Plants in Action. Macmillan, South Yarra. Buchanan BB, Gruissem W, Jones RL (2000) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plants, ASPP, Rockville, Maryland. A Study Guide for the unit will be available for purchase from the Copy Centre during the first week of semester.
SOIL3010 The Soil at Work

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alex McBratney (coordinator) A/Prof Balwant Singh, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle (facilitators) plus research-only academics Session: Semester 2 Classes: Problem-based unit: each student completes 2 problems; 4 x 3 hr workshops per problem (each student attends 8 workshops in total) Prerequisites: SOIL2003 or SOIL2004 Assessment: For each of two scenarios: Statement of the problem report (2x12.5%) - shared info, but two team reports; How to tackle problem seminar (2x12.5%) - team seminars, before fieldwork, analyses done; Results seminar (2x12.5%) - team seminars; Final report (2x12.5%) - individual work. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is a problem-based applied soil science unit. It is designed to allow students to identify soil-related problems in the real-world and by working in a group and with an end-user to suggest short and long-term solutions to such problems. This is a core unit for students majoring or specializing in soil science and an elective unit for those wishing to gain an understanding of environmental problem-solving. It utilises and reinforces soil-science knowledge gained in SOIL2003 and/or SOIL2004 and problem-solving skills gained during the degree program. This unit will address real-world scenarios which involve soil-related problems such as carbon management, structural decline, acidification, salinisation and contamination. Students will gain some understanding of the concept of sustainability, and will be able to identify the causes of problems by reference to the literature, discussion with landusers and by the design and execution of key experiments and surveys. They will gain a focused knowledge of the key soil drivers to environmental problems and will have some understanding on the constraints surrounding potential solutions. By designing and administering strategies to tackle real-world soil issues students will develop their research and inquiry skills and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and seminars that enables understanding by an end-user students will improve the breadth of their communication skills.
Textbooks
I.W.Heathcote 1997. Environmental Problem Solving: A Case Study Approach. McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, USA.
The following unit will be available in 2013, but NOT in 2014
RSEC4134 Economics of Water & Bio-resources

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week commencing week 1, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: (ECON2001 or ECOS2001) and (AGEC2103 or AGEC2003) Prohibitions: ECON3013 Assumed knowledge: (ECON2002 or ECOS2002), AGEC3001, AGEC2101, AGEC2105 Assessment: 1xessay (35%); 1x1hr mid-term exam (25%); 1x2hr final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit consists of two complementary parts: water economics and economics of biological resources (fisheries, forestry, other wildlife). The main objective of the water economic component is to investigate the economic aspects of water use and water quality. In particular approaches toward efficient use of the water resource over time, optimal allocation of water among competing uses and achievement of the socially optimal level of water quality will be discussed. The demand for water from various sectors will be analysed in both static and dynamic settings. Issues considered include the selection and construction of water storages, aquifer water extraction and alternative water sources. The issues of waste water disposal and water quality, changing water technologies, and water pollution will be also discussed. There will be particular emphasis on the economic mechanisms for managing the water resources including property rights, water allocation and water markets. The key policy instruments (taxes, quotas, standards) in these areas will be analyzed and discussed. The institutional and policy aspects will also be considered through analysis of water policy reform in Australia and elsewhere. The main objective of the economics of biological resources will be to introduce students to the bio-economic modelling of the resources that experience biological growth. This will be prominently exemplified through various aspects of fishery economics. The unit will also discuss the economics of forestry.
Textbooks
Bergstrom, Boule and Poe (Eds.), The Economic Value of Water Quality, Edward Elgar Pub., 2001.

Table NTS2 Natural Terrestrial Systems Stream

two of
ENSY3002 Fire in Australian Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Bell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures, 1x3hr practical/wk Assumed knowledge: Junior level biology and chemistry Assessment: 1x 2h exam (40%), 1x 2000-2500w essay (20%), 3x practical reports (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is intended to describe fundamental scientific knowledge relating to fire behaviour and ecological and social effects of bushfire in Australian ecosystems. The student will gain a greater understanding of how fire has shaped the landscape and the people. It is an elective unit that builds on basic knowledge gained in junior-level biology and chemistry and intermediate-level plant biology and soil science subjects. Firstly, fire behaviour including the elements of weather, fuel and landscape will be explained and examined in relation to predictive modelling and climate change. Secondly, the fire response of flora, fauna, fungi and microorganisms will be described at a range of different scales and analysed against a background of current land management practices in Australia. Social aspects of bushfire will be discussed and analysed according to contemporary policies and practices. At the end of this unit, students will be able to apply fire behaviour and ecological principles for planning purposes and to integrate scientific information from a range of sources to assess fire impacts on the environment and human communities. The students will gain research, literacy and communication skills through field-based data collection, essay and report writing and oral presentations.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
ENVI3111 Environmental Law and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of intermediate units of study Prohibitions: ENVI3911 Assessment: Essays, tutorials (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is co-taught by the School of Geosciences and the Unit for the History and Philosophy of Science. The unit is divided into two parts: (1) environmental law and governance and (2) environmental ethics. Environmental regulation and governance plays an important role in regulating human impacts on the environment. The law and governance part of this unit provides an introduction and overview to environmental regulation. We look at key environmental issues through an examination of legal policies, legislation and case law at a variety of scales (international, national and state/local). This unit also highlights the ways in which environmental law and governance is increasingly interconnected to other areas of environmental studies. The ethics component helps students develop thoughtful and informed positions on issues in environmental ethics using arguments derived from traditional ethics as well as environmentally specific theories. Ethical conflicts are often inevitable and difficult to resolve but using the resources of philosophical ethics and regular reference to case studies, students can learn to recognize the values and considerations at stake in such conflicts, acknowledge differing viewpoints and defend their own well considered positions.
ENVX3002 Statistics in the Natural Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop, Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1×2 hr workshop/wk, 1×3 hr computer practical/wk Prerequisites: ENVX2001 or STAT2012 or STAT2912 or BIOL2022 or BIOL2922 Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x15%), practical exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the analysis of data they may face in their future careers, in particular data that are not well behaved, they may be non-normal, there may be missing observations or they may be correlated in space and time. In the first part, students will learn how to analyse and design experiments based on the general linear model. In the second part, they will learn about the generalisation of the general linear model to accommodate non-normal data with a particular emphasis on the binomial and poisson distributions. In the third part linear mixed models will be introduced which provide the means to analyse datasets that do not meet the assumptions of independent and equal errors. At the end of this unit, students will have learnt a range of advanced statistical methods and be equipped to apply this knowledge to analyse data that they may encounter in their future studies and careers. The students will gain research and inquiry skills through completion of assessment tasks. Information literacy and communication skills will be developed through weekly computer work.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
MICR3125 Microbial Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lec, 1 x 3hr prac/wk Prerequisites: MICR2022 or MICR2024 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of molecular biology Assessment: One 2 hour exam (60%), One group presentation (10%), Continuous Practical assessment (protocol design, attendance and participation, experimental reports) (10%), Practical project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study will focus on the microbial communities that dominate soil, animal, marine and freshwater environments, and on functional interactions between the organisms that make up these communities. Students will investigate how the development of molecular methods in environmental microbiology and molecular ecology has provided new insights into the function of microbial communities in the environment. The course material will build on knowledge gained in MICR2024, and will particularly emphasize the importance of complex microbial communities in processes such as nutrient cycling and species interactions. At the end of this unit, students will be able to describe modern methods of molecular microbial ecology, outline the diversity and dynamics of cultured and uncultured aquatic, human and soil microbial communities, and will understand how the interactions between the organisms in these communities govern nutrient cycling in soil and water environments. They will develop their analytical inquiry skills through the critical analysis of research papers in the field of microbial ecology, gathering and evaluating information concerning microbial communities in the environment, and practice collaboration and discussion skills through group presentations.
Textbooks
The course will be taught largely from recent research publications in leading journals, which will be provided in the lectures and in online material to accompany the unit of study.
PLNT3003 Systematics and Evolution of Plants

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Murray Henwood Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x3 hr practical/week, 2-day field-trip during semester. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of any Intermediate unit of study from BIOL, PLNT, LWSC, HORT, GEOS, GEOG, ENVI, SOIL. Prohibitions: PLNT3903 Assessment: 1x2 hr take-home exam (45%), oral presentation (5%), nomenclature exercise (15%), research project (35%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study introduces students to the practical aspects of Plant Systematics and Evolution. Students will gain a working knowledge of the general techniques and approaches used in Plant Systematics (including an understanding of plant taxonomy, phylogenetics and evolutionary processes). A range of data sources (nucleotide sequences and morphology) will be used to address questions concerning the evolution, classification and historical biogeography of various plant groups. A two-day field trip will provide tuition in plant identification and an opportunity to acquire skills in field-botany . This unit of study is recommended for students with an interest in the areas of: botany, plant science, horticulture, fungal biology (including plant pathology), environmental science, bioinformatics and ecology. It is often combined with units of study offered through the School of Biological Sciences and the Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.
Textbooks
Jud, WS, Campbell, CS, Kellog, EA, Stevens, PF and Donohuge, MJ. 2002. Plant Systematics: A Phylogenetic Approach.
PPAT4005 Soil Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Guest Session: Semester 1 Classes: (2 tut, 3 hrs prac)/wk Prerequisites: MICR2024 or 6cp intermediate microbiology Assessment: Tutorial papers (30%), project proposal (10%), project report (50%), peer review (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit investigates the diversity of organisms living in the soil, their biology, interactions and ecology, and their roles in maintaining and improving soil function. The unit is an elective for BScAgr, BHortSc and BSc students. It builds on the material introduced in MICR2024, PPAT3003 and BIOL3017. Undertaking this unit will develop skills in monitoring soil microbes, designing, conducting and analysing experiments. At the completion of this unit, students will be able to exercise problem-solving skills (developed through practical experiments, projects and tutorial discussions), think critically, and organise knowledge (from consideration of the lecture material and preparation of project reports), and expand from theoretical principles to practical explanations (through observing and reporting on project work). Students will consolidate their teamworking skills, develop self-directed study skills and plan effective work schedules, use statistical analysis in research, keep appropriate records of laboratory research, work safely in a research laboratory and operate a range of scientific equipment. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through group research projects, information literacy and communication skills through assessment tasks and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups.
Textbooks
Sylvia et al. 2005. Principles and Applications of Soil Microbiology 2nd ed. Pearson.
and two of
AGCH3033 Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Feike Dijkstra (Coordinator); Dr. Claudia Keitel; Dr. Malcolm Possell A/Prof. Balwant Singh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec & 3hr prac/wk Prohibitions: CHEM2404 Assumed knowledge: SOIL2003, LWSC2002 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (50%), prac reports and essay (40%), oral presentation (10%). Practical field work: Practical reports and essay writing. Preparation reading for practical or field trips, preparation for group presentation, exam preparation. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This course provides basic concepts in environmental chemistry underpinning many of the environmental problems humans are faced with, with a focus on agricultural and natural ecosystems.

AGCH3033 is a core unit for the BEnvSys degree and an elective unit suitable for the BScAgr, BResEc and BAnVetBioSc degrees, building on intermediate units in chemistry and biology.
Sources, reactions and fate of chemical species will be investigated in air, water, soil and biota. Case studies about human impacts on the environment will be integrated in the lectures, laboratory classes and field trip.
At the end students have an understanding of chemical concepts that are at the root of many environmental problems in agricultural and natural ecosystems. This unit will provide students with tools to identify and assess the chemistry behind environmental problems and will guide students in developing methods to manage these problems.
Students will enhance their skills in problem definition, assessing sources of information, team-work and effectively communicating environmental issues from a chemical perspective through laboratory reports and oral presentation.
Textbooks
Andrews et al. 2004. An Introduction to Environmental Chemistry.
BIOL3007 Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dieter Hochuli Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3907 Assessment: One 2-hour exam, group presentations, one essay, one project report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit explores the dynamics of ecological systems, and considers the interactions between individual organisms and populations, organisms and the environment, and ecological processes. Lectures are grouped around four dominant themes: Interactions, Evolutionary Ecology, The Nature of Communities, and Conservation and Management. Emphasis is placed throughout on the importance of quantitative methods in ecology, including sound planning and experimental designs, and on the role of ecological science in the conservation, management, exploitation and control of populations. Relevant case studies and examples of ecological processes are drawn from marine, freshwater and terrestrial systems, with plants, animals, fungi and other life forms considered as required. Students will have some opportunity to undertake short term ecological projects, and to take part in discussions of important and emerging ideas in the ecological literature.
Textbooks
Begon M, Townsend CR, Harper JL (2005) Ecology, From individuals to ecosystems. Wiley-Blackwell.
BIOL3009 Terrestrial Field Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glenda Wardle Session: Int August Classes: Note: One 6-day field trip held in the pre-semester break (July 20 - July 25 inclusive) and four 4-hour practical classes during weeks 1-4 of semester 2. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate BIOL; or 6 credit points of Intermediate BIOL and (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972). Prohibitions: BIOL3909. BIOL2009, BIOL2909. Assessment: Discussions and quiz (10%), research project proposal and brief presentation (10%), sampling project report (20%), specimen collection (10%), research project report (50%). Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit cannot be combined with more than one other BIOL field unit during the degree. Departmental permission is required for entry into this unit of study. Entry into the unit is based on placement availability and selection is competitive based on academic performance in the pre-requisite units of study. Academic performance in any Senior BIOL units of study may also be considered. This unit is only available in EVEN numbered years (e.g. 2014, 2016...), but students are offered alternative Senior field units in ODD numbered years.
This field course provides practical experience in terrestrial ecology suited to a broad range of careers in ecology, environmental consulting and wildlife management. Students learn a broad range of ecological sampling techniques and develop a detailed understanding of the logical requirements necessary for manipulative ecological field experiments. The field work incorporates survey techniques for plants, small mammals and invertebrates and thus provides a good background for ecological consulting work. Students attend a week-long field course and participate in a large-scale research project as well as conducting their own research project. Invited experts contribute to the lectures and discussions on issues relating to the ecology, conservation and management of Australia's terrestrial flora and fauna.
ENSY3003 Forest Ecosystem Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Merchant Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec, 1 tut/fortnight, 2 field excursions Prerequisites: One of: PLNT2002, PLNT2003 or ENVI2111 Assumed knowledge: Students will require an understanding of plant growth and nutrient acquisition. A general understanding of Australian plant diversity and general concepts of ecology will also be an advantage. Assessment: One 2hr exam (40%), one 2000w essay (40%), one field report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study enables students to understand the management and conservation of trees and forests in a changing climate. It is an elective unit for students enrolled in advanced topics for the Bachelor of Environmental Systems course program. Beginning with an introduction to the unique chemical, physical and ecological characteristics of trees, this unit then focuses on policy development and management prescriptions driven by fundamental processes of ecosystem function. At the end of this unit students will be able to articulate critical evaluations of scientific and policy based documents in relation to research and management of trees in the Australian landscape. Students will be given the opportunity to gain firsthand knowledge of Australian forest management by participating in a 4 day field excursion combined with industry, government, research and conservation groups. At the end of this unit, students will be able to articulate strengths, weaknesses and improvements to the management of Australian forests for the purposes of production, conservation and climate change adaptation. Students will gain an intricate knowledge of tree function and be able to relate this understanding to the management of trees and forests in a changing environment. Students will develop skills to enable effective communication with industry, conservation and governmental groups.
ENVI3112 Environmental Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Phil McManus Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2-hour lecture per week and one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: (GEOS2121 or GEOS2921) and 6 additional credit points of intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3002, ENVI3004, ENVI3912 Assessment: Literature review, individual report, presentation (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study focuses on environmental impact assessment as part of environmental planning. It seeks to establish a critical understanding of environmental planning and the tools available to improve environmental outcomes. The unit of study addresses the theory and practice of environmental impact statements (EIS) and environmental impact assessment processes (EIA) from scientific, economic, social and cultural value perspectives. Emphasis is placed on gaining skills in group work and in writing and producing an assessment report, which contains logically ordered and tightly structured argumentation that can stand rigorous scrutiny by political processes, the judiciary, the public and the media.
PLNT3002 Plant Growth and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jan Marc (Executive Officer), Prof Robyn Overall, Prof David Guest, Dr Penny Smith, A/Prof Robyn McConchie, Dr Brian Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec per wk, one 4 hr practical on alternate weeks (6 weeks only), one 3 hr presentation of research project in week 13. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of intermediate PLNT, BIOL, AGCH or CROP units of study including at least one of PLNT2001, PLNT2901, PLNT2003, PLNT2903, BIOL2016, BIOL2916, BIOL2003, BIOL2903, BIOL2006, BIOL2906, CROP2001, AGCH2002 Prohibitions: PLNT3902, BIOL3021, BIOL3931 Assessment: 1x 2 hr exam (60%), project presentation and report (20%), laboratory quizzes, report and book (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit explores the mechanisms underlying plant growth and development from seed to maturity. It covers the process of building the plant body from embryogenesis, development and operation of meristems, polarity, patterning, controls of flowering and fruit development to programmed cell death and senescence. It includes the role of signals such as plant hormones in coordinating plant growth and development and the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying plant responses to environmental signals such as gravity and light. There is a focus on recent plant molecular biology that has been critical in enhancing our current understanding of plant growth and development. The unit uses examples from crop, horticultural and native plants as well as the model plant Arabidopsis. Lectures are augmented by experimental work, including and independent research project. The laboratory work will include plant tissue culture, protoplast production and modern cell biological techniques used to study plant development. This unit of study complements other senior units of study in the Plant Science Major and is essential for those seeking a career in plant molecular biology.
Textbooks
Taiz L, Zeiger E (2010) Plant Physiology 5th ed. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, Massachusetts Recommended reading: Atwell B, Kriedemann P, Turnbull C (1999) Plants in Action. Macmillan, South Yarra. Buchanan BB, Gruissem W, Jones RL (2000) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Plants, ASPP, Rockville, Maryland. A Study Guide for the unit will be available for purchase from the Copy Centre during the first week of semester.

Honours

The Honours Year will have the following 48 credit point structure:
AFNR4101 Research Project A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 1 Classes: No formal classes, approx 18h per week Prerequisites: 144 credit points of level 1000-3000 units of study Assessment: Research proposal, literature review. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to develop a student's ability to undertake a major research project in an area of specialization. The unit builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. This unit is a corequisite with AFNR4102 and each student will work with an academic supervisor in an area of specialization and develop a well defined research project to be executed. The research project is undertaken to advance the students ability to build well-developed research skills, a strong analytical capacity, and the ability to provide high quality research results demonstrating a sound grasp of the research question. Working with an academic supervisor students will develop their ability to define a research project including the producing of testable hypotheses, identifying existing knowledge from reviewing the literature and the design and execution of a research strategy towards solving the research question. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the development of experimental programs. Students will improve their written and planning skills by composing a research project proposal and the writing of a comprehensive literature review.
ENSY4001 Scientific Method and Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 Lec/wk, 1 (3hr) Workshop/wk Corequisites: AFNR4101 Prohibitions: AFNR5904, AFNR5901 Assessment: Submission of 4 written Workshop reports (Deconstructing a research proposal, Critique of Scientific and Popular Article, From research to publication, Scientific Poster (Draft)) (4x25%) Practical field work: 60 hrs preparation for workshops and revision. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study aims to develop a student's ideas about the nature of scientific research, and how it is achieved and the findings communicated. Through attending lectures and workshops students will consider what research is and how it is directed through knowing the scientific method, achieved through good experimental design, and interpreted using critical evaluation. Students will be required to deconstruct and evaluate their research proposals, know what it means to write for the sciences, and how research findings are communicated to the scientific community and wider public. This unit will develop skills in reading scientific literature and the need for a well defines research question and suitable research framework. Students will enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy through evaluating and preparing critiques of research writing and communication.
Textbooks
Bjorn Gustavii, HOW TO WRITE AND ILLUSTRATE A SCIENTIFIC PAPER, 2008, Cambridge
AFNR4102 Research Project B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: No formal classes, approx 18h per week Prerequisites: AFNR4101 Assessment: Oral presentation, research paper, poster. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is a continuation of the major research project initiated in AFNR4101 and continues to build on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. Working with their academic supervisor in the area of specialization the student will continue to pursue the defined research project towards presenting final results and conclusions. The research results are presented in a format of a research paper as submitted to a research journal. The research paper and corrected literature review is combined and presented together as a thesis. Students will continue to build their research skills, develop strong analytical capacity, demonstrate a sound grasp of the topic, and an ability to interpret results in a broad framework. Working with an academic supervisor students will develop their ability to produce results of high quality, draw reliable conclusions and identify future areas avenues of research. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the managing the research program. Students will improve their communication skills through oral presentation of their research findings, the production of a poster detailing their research findings and the writing of a research paper.
And 18 credit points of Year 3 Bachelor of Environmental Systems core units, and elective units from either Table ATS2 or Table NTS2 which have not been previously completed by the candidate and or any other Level 4XXX unit offered by the Faculty subject to Department permission.