Bachelor of Science in Agriculture

Units of study

Year 1

Year 1 will have the following 48 credit point structure:
AGEN1001 Shaping our Landscapes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Peter Ampt (Coordinator), Dr Elizabeth Nolan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lect, 1x2hr tut, 4x1day (6.5hr) field (ave 2hrs/week) Prohibitions: AFNR1001 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (40%), Field class reports (10%), Group work participation and reflection (10%), Tutorial group journal (20%), Problem based learning project (20%) Practical field work: Preparation, revision and private study 3hrs/week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to help students develop understanding of our non-urban landscapes and the physical, biological, economic and cultural factors that have shaped them, with particular emphasis on the interaction between production and environment. It is a core first year unit for students in BScAgr, BEnvSys, BResEc, BAgEc and BAnVetBioSc from the Vet Faculty.
The unit begins with a review of the current global issues around population, food, agriculture and environment and the place of Australia in this global context. Australia's current production (plant and animal based) and environmental systems and landscapes are described with an emphasis on the physical, biological, economic and cultural factors that have shaped them, concluding with an account of future production and environment scenarios.
At the end of this unit, students should be able to describe global production and environment issues and key Australian landscapes and production systems, explain the factors that have shaped them and apply this understanding to a specific location and production system. They should analyse the situation of natural resource managers and evaluate the options available to them to maintain or improve profitable production and achieve sustainability.
The students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through on-line discussion postings, tutorial discussions and presentations and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups and individually.
Textbooks
To be advised during semester.
BIOL1001 Concepts in Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prohibitions: BIOL1911, BIOL1991 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments tests and lab quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Concepts in Biology is an introduction to the major themes of modern biology. The unit covers fundamental cell biology, with a particular emphasis on cell structure and function; the foundations of molecular biology from the role of DNA in protein synthesis to the genetics of organisms; and the theory of evolution and principles of phylogenetic analysis, including how these are used to interpret the origins of the diversity of extant organisms. Practical classes focus on students designing experiments, making and recording their observations and communicating their findings. The unit emphasises how biologists carry out scientific investigations, from the molecular and cellular level to the level of ecosystems. This unit of study provides a good foundation for intermediate biology units of study.
Textbooks
Knox R B et al. Biology, An Australian Focus. 4th ed. McGraw-Hill. 2010
or
BIOL1911 Concepts in Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: 80+ in HSC 2-unit Biology (or equivalent) or Distinction or better in a University level Biology unit, or an ATAR of 95 or greater Prohibitions: BIOL1001, BIOL1991. Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignments, tests, lab quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Concepts in Biology (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1001 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1901 participate in alternative components, which include a separate lecture and practical stream from BIOL1001. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
As for BIOL1001.
CHEM1001 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1101, CHEM1109, CHEM1901, CHEM1903 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study, but students who have not undertaken an HSC chemistry course are strongly advised to complete a chemistry bridging course before lectures commence. Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignments (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of the unit of study is to provide those students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent) with a good grounding in fundamental chemical principles together with an overview of the relevance of chemistry. There is no prerequisite or assumed knowledge for entry to this unit of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1101 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Corequisites: Recommended concurrent units of study: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics Prohibitions: CHEM1001, CHEM1109, CHEM1901, CHEM1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Mathematics Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Chemistry 1A is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC Chemistry course. Chemistry 1A covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1901 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week; one 3-hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prerequisites: ATAR of at least 95 and HSC Chemistry result in band 5 or 6, or by invitation. Corequisites: Recommended concurrent unit of study: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics Prohibitions: CHEM1001, CHEM1101, CHEM1109, CHEM1903 Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry 1A (Advanced) is available to students with a very good HSC performance as well as a very good school record in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do Chemistry 1A (Advanced) rather than Chemistry 1A.
The theory and practical work syllabuses for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) are similar, though the level of treatment in the latter unit of study is more advanced, presupposing a very good grounding in the subject at secondary level. Chemistry 1A (Advanced) covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of about 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
ENVX1001 Introductory Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prohibitions: MATH1111, MATH1011, MATH1001, MATH1901, MATH1906, MATH1015, MATH1005, MATH1905, BIOM1003, ECMT1010, BUSS1020, STAT1021, STAT1022 Assumed knowledge: 70 or more in HSC Mathematics Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x10%), practical exam (20%), theory exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is a core first year unit for the BEnvSys, BScAgr and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It provides the foundation quantitative skills that are needed in other units in the degrees and for further study in applied statistics. In the first half of the unit the emphasis is on statistics, topics covered include: describing data and its variability, probability, sampling and estimation, framing scientific hypotheses; estimating a single treatment mean via a confidence interval and testing for a particular mean via a z-test or t-test; estimating or testing the difference between two treatment means. In the second half of the unit the focus is on calculus, the topics being differentiation and integration in single and multiple dimensions. A particular emphasis is on the use of calculus for modelling biological and environmental data, for example the use of linear and non-linear functions. In the practicals the emphasis is on applying theory to analysing real datasets using the spreadsheet package Excel and the statistical package Genstat.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
AGEN1002 Sustaining our Landscapes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Mark Adams (Coordinator), A/Professor Budiman Minasny, Dr Niggol Seo, Dr Andrew Merchant, Dr Tarryn Turnbull, Dr Tihomir Ancev Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x lectures + 1 x tutorial / wk, 1 x 4 day field trip Assumed knowledge: School Year 12 level knowledge of mathematics, some biology and chemistry. Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (50%), 4 x tutorial papers (24%) (Draft tutorial papers to submitted for editing by academic staff), 1 x field trip report (26%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The quest for sustainability is integral to all land management. The earth's natural systems - especially cycles of water, carbon and nutrients - are critical to economic, social and many other aspects of the world in which we live. As a country dependent on export of commodities, Australia must contend with very significant external forces that shape how we manage land.
This unit of study provides students with critical knowledge and understanding of the economic, biophysical, and chemical principles that must be considered in assessing sustainability, and applies that knowledge to assessing how current Australian landscapes might be managed in the future. Beginning with an exploration of the meaning of sustainability and how scientific and economic methodology is applied to its study, students will progressively engage with more complex and challenging content. By the end of the unit, students will have explored major elements of sustainability and be able to apply their understanding to articulate critical questions that need to be asked when presented with simplistic approaches or ideas. A major field trip will focus on introducing students to quantitative measurement of key processes and developing a greater depth of knowledge of sustainability "in the field". A range of typical Australian landscapes will be considered, ranging from the high country and forests to intensive irrigated agriculture. The field trip and tutorial exercises are intended to help students gain skills in rigorous analysis of the relevant literature and in preparing short pieces of writing. Students direct experience of and exposure to the science and economics of ecological sustainability. Students will work in small groups during field and tutorial sessions.
Textbooks
A Critique for Ecology R.H. Peters, 1991, Cambridge University Press
AGEC1006 Economic Environment of Agriculture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prohibitions: AGEC1003, AGEC1004 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: 1x2hr exam (55%) and 1x50 min mid-semester exam (25%) and workshop papers (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
To give students an overview of the structure, viability and importance of the agricultural sector in the Australian economy. It is a core unit of study in the BScAgr, BHortSc and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It is designed to give an understanding of the basic economic principles and how they relate to Australian agriculture. Students will look at basic economic theory and concepts and then apply these concepts to solve simplified versions of real problems faced by the agriculture and resource sectors. Students will look at the relationship between these concepts and the concepts learnt within their science related courses. Students will be able to analyse economic concepts and apply these concepts to real world scenarios. They will be able to synthesis and comprehend the relationship between the economic and science disciplines. The students will gain skills through workshop based tasks, information literacy and communication skills through the presentation of the workshop reports and discussion throughout the workshop.
Textbooks
HE Drummond and JW Goodwin, Agricultural Economics, 3rd edn (Prentice-Hall, 2011)
AGEN1004 Applied Biology for Ag and Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones (Coordinator) Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lectures, 1 tutorial/week; 8 practicals; 4 field trips. Prerequisites: BIOL1001, CHEM1001 Corequisites: AGEN1006 Prohibitions: BIOL1002 Assessment: 1 x 2 hour exam (50%); 4 practical reports (26%); 2 field trip reports (24%). Practical field work: Practical and field report preparation. Class preparation, material revision/private study Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Building on the fundamentals of biology introduced in the first semester, this unit runs alongside the 2nd semester biological chemistry unit where students learn the fundamentals of organic chemistry and the major biomolecules. In this unit, students will put this knowledge into context. They will be introduced to the major plant and animal systems, how they interact, and how an understanding of environment influences is key to effective and sustainable management. Topics will be introduced that will emphasise the specific importance of the major biological systems. Through lectures, tutorials, pracs and field trips, students will gain a more in-depth understanding of basic plant and animal physiology, biochemistry, energy flows, and biological interactions, and the importance of these factors in determining the resilience of organisms, communities and ecosystems. Students will be able to apply this knowledge to determine appropriate management strategies for productivity and the conservation and rehabilitation of natural systems.
Textbooks
Sadava D, Hillis D, Heller C, Berenbaum M 2009, Life: the science of biology, 9th edition, WH Freeman and Co, Gordonsville VA.; Recommended reading: Lindenmayer D, Burgman M 2005, Practical Conservation Biology, CSIRO Publishing. C.A. Offord, P.F Meagher Eds. 2009 Plant Germplasm Conservation in Australia. Strategies and Guidelines for Developing, Managing and Utilising Ex Situ Collections. Australian Network for Plant Conservation Inc.
AGEN1006 Biological Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Roberts (Coordinator), Associate Professor Balwant Singh, Dr Feike Dijkstra Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/wk, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk 1 x 3-hr practical/wk Prerequisites: CHEM1001 or equivalent content Prohibitions: CHEM1002 Assessment: Three quizzes (3x5%), 1 x Problem solving exercise (15%), Mid-semester exam (20%), Final exam (30%), Laboratory attendance and participation (5%), Laboratory log book (10%), Laboratory skills (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study expands on the basic chemical concepts taught in first semester (CHEM1001) and extends these into the chemistry of organic compounds. Emphasizing the chemistry of biologically important molecules, the unit will introduce students to the structures and reactions of organic compounds and major biological macromolecules (e.g. nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids). Examples and applications used in the unit will be those directly related to aspects of biology that impact decision making in natural and managed systems. In weeks 1-6, lectures and laboratory work are conducted in co-operation with the School of Chemistry, Faculty of Science. In weeks 7-13, lectures and laboratory work will be undertaken in the Faculty of Agriculture and Environment. Tutorials are conducted by Faculty of Agriculture and Environment staff throughout the semester. Lectures, laboratory work and tutorials are integrated, providing students with a theoretical and practical basis for further studies in the management of biological systems. This 6 credit point unit consists of approximately 80 hours directed learning.
Textbooks
Chemistry and SI Chemical Data (package), 2nd Edition, 2012 (John Wiley) ISBN:

Year 2

Year 2 will have the following 48 credit point structure:
ENVX2001 Applied Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop (Coordinator), Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hr lectures/wk, 1x1 hr tutorial/wk, 1x2 hr computer practical/wk Prerequisites: ENVX1001 or BIOM1003 or MATH1011 and MATH1015 Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x10%), practical exam (20%), theory exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is a core 2nd year unit for students in the BEnvSys, BScAgr and BAnVetBioSc degrees. It consists of three parts. In the first part students will investigate how to use an ANOVA to analyse experiments with more than 2 treatment levels, multiple factors and different blocking designs. In the second part an introduction to a branch of mathematics called linear algebra is given with an emphasis on the applications to statistics and modelling. In the final part students will learn to model relationships between response and predictor variables using regression. During the practicals two software packages; Genstat and Excel, will be used to analyse real datasets. At the end of this unit, students will have learnt how to analyse data using ANOVA and regression, the basic methods needed for their future studies and careers. The students will gain research and inquiry skills through completion of weekly computer work and assessable exercises. Information literacy and communication skills will be developed through weekly computer work.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
GENE2001 Agricultural Genetics 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1 Classes: (3 lec, 3 prac/problem set)/wk Prerequisites: At least one of (BIOL1001, BIOL1002, BIOL1101, BIOL1901, BIOL1911) Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (60%) and 1x assignment of problem-type questions (20%) 4x on-line quizzes (4x5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This lecture and practical unit of study provides an introduction to the genetics and breeding of plants and animals. It provides an understanding for parallel and following courses. Lectures cover the basics of gene transmission and interaction, cytogenetics, molecular genetics, population and quantitative genetics, as well as the more applied aspects of plant and animal breeding and biotechnology. Practicals emphasise, with agricultural examples, the procedures of genetic and cytogenetic analysis, and the use of computers in simulation procedures in population genetics, quantitative inheritance and selection programs, and provide exposure to current plant and animal breeding and biotechnology.
AGEN2001 Plant Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Bell (Coordinator), Dr Thomas Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures, 1x 3-hr practical per week Prerequisites: BIOL1001, CHEM1001, CHEM1002 or Units of Study with equivalent content Assumed knowledge: Junior level biology and chemistry Assessment: 1x 1hr mid-semester exam (20%), 1x 2hr final exam (40%), 1000w essay (10%), Five practical reports (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In AGEN2001 - Plant Function, students will investigate the structure of cells, tissues and organs of plants and relate them to associated molecular processes critical in plant biology. The unit begins with a detailed description of plant cell structures and tissues and progresses to the biochemical pathways important in physiological processes such as photosynthesis, respiration, nutrient uptake and production of secondary metabolites. Basic anatomical, morphological and biochemical responses of plants to abiotic stresses such as drought, fire and salinity and longer-term adaptations to environmental change will also be addressed. Laboratory exercises demonstrating plant anatomical features and biochemical processes and techniques are well integrated with lecture material. Attention will be given to important agricultural and horticultural plants as well as Australian native plant species. Plant Function gives students a strong grounding in plant anatomy and molecular processes, building upon concepts introduced in junior-level chemistry and plant biology.
Textbooks
Taiz L, Zeiger E (2010) Plant Physiology 5th ed.
SOIL2003 Soil Properties and Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Balwant Singh (Coordinator), Prof Alex McBratney, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures and 1x3hr practical/week, commencing week 1, and a compulsory field excursion to be held on the Thursday and Friday in the week preceding the first semester. Assessment: Soil description report (10%), Quizzes (or Essay) (15%), Practical exercise book (20%), Practical exam (15%) and Written exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts within pedology, soil physics and soil chemistry. These concepts are part of the grounding principles that underpin crop and animal production, nutrient and water cycling, and environmental sustainability taught by other units of study in the Faculty. Students will participate in a two-day field excursion in the first week of semester to examine some common soils of the Sydney Basin, they will also learn to describe soil, and measure soil chemical and physical properties in the field. Referring to common soil profiles of the Sydney Basin, students will concentrate on factors affecting soil formation, the rudiments of soil description, and analysis of soil properties that are used in soil classification. Students will also develop knowledge of the physics of water and gas movement, soil strength, soil chemical properties, inorganic and organic components, nutrient cycles and soil acidity in an agricultural context. At the end of this unit students will become familiar with the factors that determine a soil's composition and behaviour, and will have an understanding of the most important soil physical and chemical properties. Students will develop communication skills through essay, report and practical exercises. The final report and laboratory exercise questions are designed to develop team work and collaborative efforts.
Textbooks
Campbell, K.O. & Bowyer, J.W. (eds) (1988). The Scientific Basis of Modern Agriculture. Sydney University Press.
AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Irene Van Ekris Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/week (lectures and practicals) Prerequisites: 6 credit points of junior Biology Assessment: practical skills assessment (30%), written assignment (20%), quizzes (50%) Practical field work: There will be several whole day practical classes at the Camden campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will explore the management of animals in natural and man-made environments. At the end of this unit of study, students will understand: the characteristics of the management systems of the major domestic species used for production in Australia and in a world wide context; the characteristics and principles underpinning sustainable management of native animals in natural and man-made environments; an appreciation of the dependence of living organisms upon their environment; an appreciation of the husbandry practices and innovations that have been adopted by the production industries to retain their competitive advantage; a demonstrated capability in handling and husbandry of the major domestic production animal species, and an appreciation of the application of these skills to non-domestic species; a demonstrated understanding of the importance of high standards of animal welfare practice in the management of animals.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the unit content and for this reason no formal text is required. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course.
ENTO2001 Introductory Entomology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Mansfield Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2x1hour lecture, 1x3hour practical, 1x1hour insect collection)/week, commencing week 1. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of first year biology Prohibitions: BIOL2017, BIOL2917 Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (50%), lab quizzes and manual (20%), 1 x insect collection (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is an introduction to insects, the most abundant group of organisms. The course begins with insect external and internal anatomy, feeding modes, life cycles and behaviour. Real world examples are used to demonstrate the ecological roles insects play in natural and agricultural ecosystems (e.g. pollinators, herbivores, predators, parasitoids, disease vectors). This knowledge is then linked to aspects of applied entomology: insecticides, biological control, habitat manipulation, integrated pest management, medical entomology and insect conservation. Practical sessions focus on insect morphology and taxonomy, so that students learn to identify common insect orders and families. Students must make a representative insect collection. This course forms the basis of students' entomological knowledge for BScAgr and BHortSc degrees and lays the foundation for future study in entomology.
Textbooks
Required: Zborowski, P. & Storey, R. 1995. A field guide to insects in Australia. Reed New Holland, Sydney. 207 pp.
MICR2024 Microbes in the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2 lec, 3h prac)/wk Prerequisites: 12 credit points of first year Biology Prohibitions: MICR2001, MICR2901, MICR2003, MICR2007, MICR2011, MICR2021, MICR2921, MICR2909 Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (60%), 4 x quizzes (15%), lab skills assessment (5%) and 1 x lab project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces the diversity of microbes found in soil, water, air, plants and animal environments. Through an examination of their physiology and genetics it explores their interactions with plants, animals and each other, and their roles as decomposers and recyclers in the environment. The soil is a rich microbial environment, and the concept of soil health and its relationship to plant growth is discussed. Practical classes introduce techniques and skills in isolating, quantifying and culturing microbes, designing and interpreting experiments to study microbial growth, and in preparing and presenting data.
Textbooks
Willey et al. 2007. Prescott/Harley/Klein's Microbiology 8th ed. McGraw-Hill
AGEN2005 Plant Systems Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Merchant (Coordinator), Dr Thomas Buckley Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures, 1x1-hr tutorial, per week 4x 3-hr practicals plus 1 x 4 day field trip Prerequisites: BIOL1001, CHEM1001 Assumed knowledge: Junior chemistry and intermediate level biology Assessment: 1x 2hr final exam (50%), 1000w essay (30%), 1x practical report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study will provide students with an understanding of the plant metabolic network, its regulation and how metabolic control is integral to an ability to adapt to environmental change. It is a core unit for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Agricultural Science and Bachelor of Environmental Systems. From the perspective of energy flows, this unit will outline a framework for the plant metabolic network at the physiological, chemical and molecular levels. Students will become familiar with network complexity and its regulation through the use of the latest bioinformatics and analytical tools. Students will gain first-hand experience in the assessment of plant health and management of resource availability in both cropping and natural systems by participating in two x 2-day field trips to research institutes and field stations in rural Australia. Information will be captured and interpreted at a range of scales from the cellular to the whole plant, demonstrating the importance of metabolism to plants and to broader biospheric processes. At the completion of this unit, students will be able to articulate the major components of the plant metabolic network, its regulation in response to changes in resource availability and to make informed management decisions for the optimization of the productivity and resilience of Australian ecosystems.

Year 3*

Year 3 will have the following structure: a core (24 credit points) of
AGCH3025 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Foods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Roberts Prof Les Copeland, Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x4-hr practical fortnightly Prerequisites: AGCH2004 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or 6 credit points of Intermediate units in Chemistry Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%) and lab reports (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study aims to give students an understanding of the properties of food constituents, and the interactions between these constituents during food processing, storage and digestion. The unit will develop an understanding of the relationship between form and functionality of constituents and the concept of fitness-for-purpose (ie, quality) in converting agricultural products into foods. Students will gain an appreciation of the relationship between chemical composition and properties of macroconstituents (carbohydrates, proteins, lipids) and microconstituents (vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, flavour and anti-nutritional chemicals) and their functions in plant and animal based foods. The material presented in lectures and practical classes will enable students to develop research and inquiry skills and an analytical approach in understanding the biochemistry of foods, food processing and storage. On completing this unit, students will be able to describe the chemical and biochemical properties of major food constituents, and demonstrate an understanding of the functionality of these constituents in food processing and nutrition. Students will have gained experience in laboratory techniques used in industry for the analysis of some food products, and information literacy and communication skills from the preparation of practical reports.
Textbooks
Laboratory notes will be available for purchase from the Copy Centre in the first week of semester and lecture notes and readings will be made available through WebCT. There is no recommended textbook.
PPAT3003 Plant Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Guest Session: Semester 1 Classes: (2 lec, 3h prac)/wk Prerequisites: MICR2024 Assessment: One 2h end of semester exam (60%), one prac exam (25%), six take-home quizzes (15%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces plant disease and the pathogens that limit agricultural and horticultural production. The unit is core to the BScAgr and BHortSc degrees and is available as an elective to BLWS and BSc students. It builds on the material introduced in MICR2024. The lecture component of the unit discusses the aetiology of plant disease and symptom development; diagnosis of plant disease; the biology, epidemiology and management of fungi and other microbes that cause plant disease; breeding for disease resistance; plant-parasite relationships; and disease resistance in plants. The practical component introduces techniques used in handling and identifying fungi and in studying plant disease, and develops skills in experimental design, execution and interpretation of experimental data. At the completion of this unit, students will be able to exercise problem-solving skills (developed through practical experiments and lecture discussions), think critically, and organise knowledge (from consideration of the lecture material and preparation of practical reports), expand from theoretical principles to practical explanations (through observing and reporting on practical work), use certain computer software for analysing data and reporting on laboratory projects. Students learn to work in a research team, plan effective work schedules (to meet deadlines for submission of assessable work), use statistical analysis in research, keep appropriate records of laboratory research, work safely in a research laboratory and operate a range of scientific equipment. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through research based group projects, information literacy and communication skills through assessment tasks and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups.
Textbooks
Schumann GL & Darcy CJ 2006. Essential Plant Pathology. APS Press, St Paul, Minn., USA.
AGRO3004 Managing Agro-Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Tan (coordinator), Dr Lindsay Campbell, Dr Lachlan Ingram, Dr Brett Whelan. Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture/wk; 1x 3hr tutorial/practical each week. Full-day practical at Camden campus during week 3 (no lecture or tutorial that week). Week 7 trip to national crops competition (optional). Prerequisites: AFNR1001, AFNR1002, PLNT2003, SOIL2003 and (BIOM2001 or ENVX2001) Assessment: 5x quizzes (30%), in-class crops competition test (20%), 1x 2hr exam (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to provide a solid introductory understanding of the biology and management of cropping systems, with a focus on major Australian broad acre crops. The course examines a typical crop cycle, with an emphasis on cereals, especially wheat. An overview of the main crops grown in Australia is presented. The relationship between crop growth and soil and aerial environments is discussed, and the importance of water and water-use efficiency is highlighted. The physiology of crops--including germination, photosynthesis, vegetative and reproductive growth and development, transpiration, photosynthate partitioning, and mineral nutrient acquisition and use--is studied as the basis of crop yield and production. Biological processes associated with seed (grain) development are described. Weed management, pasture management, and precision agriculture are discussed in theoretical and practical terms, and an introduction to crop adaptation and breeding is presented. Successful students will attain the ability to appreciate and analyze some of the most important limitations to crop yield and production in Australia and how those limitations can be minimized or overcome through science-based planning and management practices.
Textbooks
Recommended Reading; Connor DJ, Loomis RS, Cassman KG (2011) Crop Ecology: Productivity and Management in Agricultural Systems, 2nd Ed. Cambridge Univ Press, Cambridge.
SOIL2004 The Soil Resource

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle (Coordinator), Prof Alex McBratney, A/Prof Balwant Singh Session: Semester 2 Classes: (2x1 hr lec, 1x2hr pracs)/wk, 24 hr (5 days) field work out of semester time Assessment: Fieldtrip participation (5%), soil survey mapping report (30%), laboratory report and poster presentation (25%), three group tutorials (20%), viva voce exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will familiarize students with the description and mapping of soil types in the Australian landscape, with common analytical methods for soil and with the various forms of degradation that may alter the quality and function of soil. It is an applied soil science unit which builds on the fundamental soil science concepts learned in the SOIL2003 unit. The first practical component of the unit, a five-day soil survey, will give students experience in soil description and classification in the field, and soil samples collected during this survey will be subsequently analysed for a variety of attributes by the students in laboratory practicals. In the lecture series, topics including soil type distribution, soil quality, soil function, soil fertility and soil degradation will be discussed and linked to practical sessions. By the end of this unit, students will be able to construct maps of soil properties and soil type distribution, describe primary soil functions, soil attributes and types of soil degradation in an agricultural context, and be able to recognize and communicate the ability of a soil profile to sustain plant growth. Students will gain research and inquiry skills by collecting, analyzing and interpreting soil survey data, and will gain communication skills by having to prepare and present a poster.
Textbooks
Brady NC & Weil RR. (2002) The Nature and Properties of Soils. 13th ed. (or any later edition) Prentice Hall, New Jersey.
And 24 credit points from Table D.

Table D - Year 3 Electives

AFNR3001 Agro-ecosystems in Developing Countries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x18 days fieldtrip before start of semester 1 Assessment: Project Proposal (10%), Project Report (60%), Project Presentation (30%)( Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides students with a direct contact with the agricultural reality of a developing country through a fieldtrip. Active learning in the field through contacts with farmers, public servants, cooperatives, private firms and NGOs should then motivate a critical reflection on the constraints to agricultural development in these environments.
The fieldtrip will be organized around central themes (for example, technology adoption, sustainable use of resources, access to credit, land use change) that will be introduced in a short series of seminars (held on main campus ahead of the departure and intended to provide a first introduction to some of the questions that are expected to be addressed in the field) and will constitute the focus of group work once back to main campus.
Although there are no formal prerequisites, the unit is directed to students that have completed most of the second year units in their degrees.
N.B. Department permission required for enrolment. Please note that, in practice, this unit will run prior to the start of semester 1 with all classes and the fieldtrip being scheduled during that period.
Agricultural Chemistry
AGCH3033 Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Feike Dijkstra (Coordinator); Dr. Claudia Keitel; Dr. Malcolm Possell A/Prof. Balwant Singh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec & 3hr prac/wk Prohibitions: CHEM2404 Assumed knowledge: SOIL2003, LWSC2002 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (50%), prac reports and essay (40%), oral presentation (10%). Practical field work: Practical reports and essay writing. Preparation reading for practical or field trips, preparation for group presentation, exam preparation. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This course provides basic concepts in environmental chemistry underpinning many of the environmental problems humans are faced with, with a focus on agricultural and natural ecosystems.

AGCH3033 is a core unit for the BEnvSys degree and an elective unit suitable for the BScAgr, BResEc and BAnVetBioSc degrees, building on intermediate units in chemistry and biology.
Sources, reactions and fate of chemical species will be investigated in air, water, soil and biota. Case studies about human impacts on the environment will be integrated in the lectures, laboratory classes and field trip.
At the end students have an understanding of chemical concepts that are at the root of many environmental problems in agricultural and natural ecosystems. This unit will provide students with tools to identify and assess the chemistry behind environmental problems and will guide students in developing methods to manage these problems.
Students will enhance their skills in problem definition, assessing sources of information, team-work and effectively communicating environmental issues from a chemical perspective through laboratory reports and oral presentation.
Textbooks
Andrews et al. 2004. An Introduction to Environmental Chemistry.
AGCH3400 Agricultural Plant-Microbe Interactions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalind Deaker (unit coordinator) A/Prof Michael Kertesz Dr Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lecture pw, 1 x 3 hr practical pw Prerequisites: MICR2024, PLNT2001 Assumed knowledge: General microbiology, chemistry, agricultural chemistry or biochemistry Assessment: 2 x Practical reports (2x25%) 2 x Essays (2x20%), 1 x Oral presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Can we effectively harness the potential of plant-growth promoting microorganisms to reduce dependence on chemical inputs and enhance sustainable agricultural crop production? This unit of study is designed to introduce students to important interactions between plants and microorganisms that are fundamental to nutrient cycling, nutrient-use efficiency and sustainability of resources and the environment. Disciplinary areas of study include agricultural chemistry, microbiology, plant physiology and molecular biology and will build on theoretical knowledge gained in MICR2024 and PLNT2001. There is a particular focus on beneficial plant-growth promoting microorganisms that are increasingly exploited as crop inoculants to improve soil health and reduce dependence on chemical fertilizers. This unit explores current research on beneficial plant-microbe interactions and provides a theoretical framework with which to evaluate their positive contribution to plant cultivation systems and the environment. Mechanisms of plant-growth promotion studied will include biological nitrogen fixation, nutrient (P, S, Fe) mobilization, phytohormone production and biocontrol. The unit intends to highlight the necessarily close connection between science and industry in order to realize the full potential of benefits from inoculation. In this regard, issues relating to inoculant production, quality control and application will be explored. Students will interact with inoculant industry personnel and some opportunities for work experience will be available. The unit will provide students with technical skills of value to the microbial inoculant and related industries as well as developing relevant research skills to enable participation in the rapidly evolving program of research on microbial inoculants.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of journal articles, book chapters and selected text books.
Agricultural Economics
AGEC2102 Agribusiness Marketing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Ubilava Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk in weeks 6-10 Prerequisites: AGEC1006 or AGEC1102 or RSEC1031 Assessment: Group presentation (15%), 1x2000wd case study (25%), and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to provide an introductory understanding of agribusiness marketing in a modern context. The unit will provide students in the Sciences degrees with an understanding of how the economic theory taught in first year in AGEC1006 can be treated in an applied context. For BAgrEc students, it is an intermediate level unit in the Agribusiness major.
Students will study the theory relating to the firm-level marketing mix and marketing strategy. The emphasis will be on the organisation and trends of agribusiness marketing including value-adding and market power in the supply chain, market efficiency and international marketing by agribusiness firms.
The unit content is analytical, and draws on applied microeconomics to demonstrate how marketing decisions are made along the marketing chain. At the end of this unit students will be able to use marketing theory to analyse the steps in the marketing chain and be aware of the forces for change within that chain.
By completing this unit, students should have improved their ability to master key theories, identify and frame problems, organise knowledge, carry out individual and group research, and synthesise information. They should also have improved their information literacy skills, and communication skills through group presentations and individual research.
AGEC2103 Production Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: ECON1001 or AGEC1006 or (AGEC1003 and AGEC1004) or RESEC1031 Prohibitions: AGEC2003 Assessment: 2 x assignments (40%) and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit builds on microeconomic principles studied in first year and applies them to the analysis of firms' decisions. Emphasis is put on the formalization of the firm's problem and in the use of duality. The topics include: production functions (single and multi-output); distance functions and their use in the measurement of productivity; the decomposition of productivity and productivity changes; production under risk; cost and profit functions.
N.B. Available to 2nd year students in the Faculty of Economics and Business
Textbooks
Collection of readings
AGEC2105 Applied Econometric Modelling 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: (ECMT1010 or MATH1905 or MATH1005 or MATH1015) and ECMT1020 Prohibitions: ECMT2110 Assessment: 1x1hr exam (25%), 1xassignment (15%) and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Applied Econometric Modelling is designed to provide students with a sound understanding of the application of applied econometric methods to the agricultural and resource sectors. Topics covered will include: single and multiple regression, forecasting, dummy variables, violations of OLS assumptions, dynamics, binary choice models, and an introduction to cointegration. Emphasis will be placed on developing the ability to estimate and interpret economic relationships. The computing side of the unit involves the use of the statistical package EVIEWS.
This unit of study is designed to develop student understanding and capability in applied regression analysis.
It is a core unit for students in BAgrEc and BResEc, students and a non core unit for BScAgr students.
Students will become familiar with exploring data sets and estimating, interpreting, and assessing regressions that represent economic relationships.
At the end of this unit, students will be able to understand the major concepts and principles of applied regression analysis, estimate simple regressions in EVIEWS and interpret the output, and be able to read, understand, and possibly replicate recent literature in agricultural and resource economics journals that apply econometric methods.
The students will gain research and computing skills.
Textbooks
D.N. Gujarati & D.C. Porter, Basic Econometrics, 5th Ed. (McGraw-Hill Irwin), New York.
Department Permission required for enrolment
AGEC3101 Agribusiness Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: AGEC2103 or AGEC2003 or AGEC1006 Prohibitions: AGEC3103, AGEC3001 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%) and 1x50 min mid-semester exam (15%) and 1 assignment (25%) and workshop reports (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to introduce decision making problems encountered by firms and agribusiness firms and general methods of solving microeconomic decision making problems. It is unit of study that builds on knowledge gained in junior units of study in particular AGEC1006, AGEC2103 and AGEC2102. Students will review production economics and activity analysis and show how budgeting methods can be used to relate them. They will extend these budgeting techniques to problems of time and risk, using capital and parametric budgeting. Students will also be introduced to linear programming and show how this tool is a practical method of solving decision making problems. Students will learn to consider methods for solving decision making problems where the outcomes are not known with certainty. The students will gain skills through workshop based tasks, an assignment, information literacy and communication skills through the presentation of the workshop reports and discussion throughout the workshop.
AGEC3103 Applied Optimisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: (2x1hr lec & 1x2hr tut/lab session)/wk, commencing week 1 Prerequisites: (AGEC2001 or AGEC2101) and (AGEC2003 or AGEC2103) Prohibitions: AGEC3101 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (70%) and 2 assignments (better done one (18%), other (12%)) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study deals with constrained optimization problems in which one or more constraints are inequalities. Such problems are explored/solved by "mathematical programming" techniques. The main focus of the unit is on linear programming (LP) problems, viz. problems in which the objective function and the constraint functions are all linear, and the application of LP in agricultural and other planning contexts. Topics include graphical and mathematical representation of LP problems, solution methods, solution information, stability of optimal solutions, primal and dual formulations and parametric programming. After covering the essentials of LP and its extension to integer LP, the focus shifts to modelling real world scenarios as optimization problems. Students are streamed: one group deals with specialized LP formulations (e.g. transportation model, stochastic programming). The other examines dynamic optimization for problems that involve inter-temporal resource allocation. Students develop experience and confidence in the use of spreadsheet-based optimizer routines, and with specialised optimization packages (e.g. LINDO).
Department Permission required for enrolment
AGEC2101 Market and Price Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Shyamal Chowdhury Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: AGEC1006 or (AGEC1003 and AGEC1004) or AGEC1002 or AGEC1102 or RSEC1031 or AGEC1031 Prohibitions: AGEC2001 Assessment: 1x1hr in-class mid-term exam (20%), 1x3000wd assignment (20%), 1x2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit focuses on the nature of agricultural and resource commodity markets, market demand relationships, market supply relationships, price determination under alternative market structures, marketing margin relationships, derived demand for inputs, spatially and temporally related markets, market dynamics, price expectations, commodity futures markets and other pertinent topics. Applied examples from the agricultural and resource industries and the overall economy will be used throughout the semester as illustrations of the principles involved.
N.B. Available to 2nd year students in Faculty of Economics and Business.
Advised prerequisite: AGEC2105 or ECMT2110
AGEC3102 Agricultural and Resource Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture + 1x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: (AGEC2001 or AGEC2101) and (AGEC2003 or AGEC2103) Prohibitions: AGEC3002 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (70%) and 3x1 problem sets (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit covers the theoretical framework for economic analysis of policy interventions (welfare economics and public choice theory). Emphasis is put on building the skills needed to analyze the incidence of economic policy and on the design of policies under asymmetric information. An understanding of the institutional structure of agricultural and resource policy in Australia is promoted through the direct contact with policy makers, public agencies and lobbying groups.
N.B. Available to 3rd year students in the Faculty of Economics and Business
Textbooks
To be advised
Department Permission required for enrolment
Animal Science
ANSC3102 Animal Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simon de Graaf Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 2 hrs/week, tutorials 1 hr/week, practicals 3 hrs/week Assumed knowledge: ANSC3104 Assessment: written and oral assignments (30%), mid-semester written exam (10%), end of semester written exam (60%) Practical field work: There will be several half day practical classes held at the Camden Campus Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive programme on basic and applied aspects of male and female reproductive biology, with particular emphasis on livestock and domestic animals. The fundamental topics include reproductive cycles, sexual differentiation, gametogenesis, fertilization, embryo development, gestation and parturition. An understanding of the applications of advanced reproductive technologies is developed through lectures, tutorials and the assignments. In addition, practical instruction is given on semen collection and processing, manipulation of the reproductive cycle, artificial insemination, and pregnancy diagnosis in sheep and pigs. Classes are held at the Camperdown Campus in Sydney and at the Camden Campus Animal Reproduction Unit and Mayfarm piggery.
Textbooks
Senger, PL 2013, Pathways to pregnancy & parturition 3rd ed., Current Conceptions Inc
ANSC3103 Animal Structure and Function A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter White Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 3hrs/wk (note these will vary depending upon the week) Prerequisites: 12 credit points of junior Biology Assumed knowledge: AVBS1002 Assessment: assignments/presentations/online quiz (50%) and examinations (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Animal Structure and Function A will develop an understanding of the role of the body systems in maintaining homeostasis in an animal's internal environment. In ASFA the structure and function of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, central nervous and integumentary systems of the body are explored in depth particularly with reference to the maintenance of homeostasis and an animal's perception of, and response to, its environment. The developed understanding of the normal functioning of these systems allows identification of the impact on the animal of abnormal function of these systems. A study of the structure and function of muscle will include its role in movement and as meat in a production setting. The overall goals of the Unit are (i) to enable students to develop a rich understanding of the relationships between body systems and structures (to be continued in ASFB). (ii) to develop generic skills particularly in group work and oral presentation,(iii) to develop an appreciation of the links between structure and function and their relevance to animal disease and production that will be further developed in Veterinary Pathogenesis as well as in advanced, applied studies in Behaviour in third year and in 4th year Animal Production.
ANSC3101 Animal Nutrition 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alex V. Chaves Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2 h/week, lecture recording 1h/week and in situ and/or online laboratories 2-3 h/week Prerequisites: AVBS1002, (VETS1032 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901) Corequisites: AVBS2001 or MICR2024 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of Biochemistry Assessment: Assignments, including 5 individual reports from problem based learning (30%), 1 online middle term exam (35%), 1 oral or video presentation (25%), and 1 online end of term exam (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This Unit of Study builds upon principles discussed in AVBS1002 Concepts of Animal Management. The Unit is broadly divided into four sections, namely: estimating the nutritive characteristics of feeds; defining the nutrient requirements of animals; diet formulation; errors in feeding. The focus is on coming to an understanding of the assessment of nutritional adequacy and the avoidance and solving of nutritional problems, with a particular emphasis on animals used in agricultural production systems and wildlife. The principles discussed in this course will be expanded in the following year, in which species-specific systems will be described. The basis of successful feeding management is an understanding of the following: the composition of feeds; the digestibility and efficiency of utilisation of nutrients by the animal; the nutrient requirements of the animal; interactions between nutrients that influence health and production. And following from this, students will have the ability to formulate diets to meet animal requirements for a variety of purposes and under a variety of constraints; identify deficiencies, excesses and imbalances in diets and so avoid a decline in productive efficiency and/or a decline in health.
Textbooks
Students are encouraged to have an individual tablet PC or laptop with wireless connectivity (e.g.: ipad; Galaxy Note, etc.) during all classes. There is no required text for the course. A number of textbooks are available on reserve at the library. These include: 1 - Animal Nutrition by McDonald, P., Edwards, R.A., Greenhalgh, J.F.D. and Morgan, C.A. (2002) 6th ed. Pearson Education Limited, Harlow UK. Badham Library Call # 636.0852 3 E 2 - Feeds and Feeding (5th Edition) (Hardcover) by Tilden Wayne Perry, Arthur E. Cullison, Robert S. Lowrey (Authors). Publisher: Prentice Hall; 5 edition (November 19, 1998). Badham Library Call # 636.084 9 B 3 - Animal Feeds, Feeding and Nutrition, and Ration Evaluation CD-ROM (Hardcover) by David Tisch (Author). Publisher: Delmar Cengage Learning; 1 edition (October 5, 2005). Badham Library Call # 636.08557 5 4 - Animal Nutrition Science (Paperback) by G. Dryden (Author) Publisher: CABI; 1 edition (October 5, 2008). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 66 5 - Tables of Composition and Nutritional Value of Feed Materials Pigs, Poultry, Cattle, Sheep, Goats, Rabbits, Horses, Fish By Daniel Sauvant, Jean-Marc Perez, Gilles Tran Publisher: INRA (January, 2004). Badham Library Call # 636.0852 60 National Research Council (NRC) publications describing nutrient requirements of various species may also provide useful information; these publications can all be accessed online and are available on reserve at the library: - Nutrient Requirements of Poultry (NRC, 1994). Badham or Camden 636.50852 4 F - Nutrient Requirements of Swine (NRC, 1998). Badham or Camden 636.40852 7 G - Nutrient Requirements of Dairy Cattle (NRC, 2001). Badham or Camden 636.214 17D - Nutrient Requirements of Beef Cattle (NRC, 2000). Badham 636.213 27 G - Nutrient Requirements of Horses (NRC, 2007). Badham or Camden 636.10852 5 F There will be copies of this text on reserve and for purchase in the bookstore. Again, it is not essential to buy these text books. All the material required for the course will be presented in lecture and in the lecture notes, but the text may prove useful in understanding the lecture material.
ANSC3104 Animal Structure and Function B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cathy Herbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 3 hrs/wk, laboratories/tutorials 3 hrs/wk, activities will vary on a weekly basis Prerequisites: ANSC3103 Assumed knowledge: AVBS1002 Assessment: anatomy dissection project (20%), topic test (10%), assignment (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this Unit students will complete the study of the structure and function of organ systems in animals started in ANSC3103. The role of hormones and the immune systems will be investigated in relation to maintenance of internal homeostasis. An introduction to digestion and male and female reproductive anatomy and physiology will form the basis for further applied studies in these areas in third year Units of Study in Animal Nutrition and Animal Reproduction. There will be development of the generic skills of critically reading and writing.
Textbooks
For Animal Structure:
Biotechnology
BIOL3018 Gene Technology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Neville Firth Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3918 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
A unit of study with lectures, practicals and tutorials on the application of recombinant DNA technology and the genetic manipulation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Lectures cover the applications of molecular genetics in biotechnology and consider the impact and implications of genetic engineering and genomics. Topics include biological sequence data and databases, comparative genomics, the cloning and expression of foreign genes in bacteria, yeast, animal and plant cells, novel human and animal therapeutics and vaccines, new diagnostic techniques for human and veterinary disease, the transformation of animal and plant cells, the genetic engineering of animals and plants, and the environmental release of genetically-modified (transgenic) organisms. Practical work may include nucleic acid isolation and manipulation, gene cloning and PCR amplification, DNA sequencing and bioinformatics, immunological detection of proteins, and the genetic transformation and assay of plants.
Department Permission required for enrolment
or
BIOL3918 Gene Technology and Genomics Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Neville Firth Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972) and 6cp from either (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or Intermediate BIOL. Prohibitions: BIOL3018 Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), assignments (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Qualified students will participate in alternative components of BIOL3018 Gene Technology & Genomics. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Department Permission required for enrolment
Hydrology
LWSC2002 Introductory Hydrology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lec 2hr/wk; practical: 3hr/wk; field work: 25hr/wk (for 1 wk only) Assumed knowledge: SOIL2003 and [(AFNR1001 and AFNR1002) or ENSY1001 or (AGEN1001 and AGEN1002)] and (BIOM1001 or ENVX1001). Assessment: One 2hr exam (50%), laboratory and practical reports (15%), field trip report (35%). Practical field work: 1 week field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces students to hydrology and water management in the context of Australian integrated catchment management. It particularly focuses on the water balances, rainfall runoff modeling, analysis and prediction of streamflow and environmental flows, water quality and sustainable practices in water management. Through theoretical work and case studies, the students will engage with problems related water quantity and quality in Australia and the world. The unit builds on knowledge gained in AGEN 1001, AGEN 1002, and SOIL2003 and establishes the foundation for later units in the hydrology and water area. The unit provides one of the essential building blocks for a career related to water management and hydrology. The unit consists of two parts; the first part will involve a series of lectures, tutorials, practical exercises and case studies. The second part of the unit consists of field excursions to parts of NSW. During the field excursions, students will engage with current water problems and engage in basic hydrometric and water quality data collection. The data will be used later to analyse catchment condition and water quantity issues.
After completion of this unit, you should be able to:
Explain the different processes in the hydrological cycle;
Measure and interpret hydrometric and basic water quality data;
Elucidate the processes involved in generation of streamflow from rainfall;
Distinguish the link between water quantity and water quality and its implications for water management;
Demonstrate a deeper understanding of the unique nature of Australian Hydrology
Textbooks
Ladson (2007) Hydrology an Australian Introduction. Oxford University press. Chapters 1 - 6
Environmetrics
ENVX3001 Environmental GIS

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Inakwu Odeh Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three-day field trip, (2 lec & 2 prac/wk). Assumed knowledge: least 48 credit points in second year agriculture/science units. Assessment: One 15 min presentation (10%), 3500w prac report (35%), 1500w report on trip excur (15%), 2 hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is designed to impart knowledge and skills in spatial analysis and geographical information science (GISc) for decision-making in an environmental context. The lecture material will present several themes: principles of GISc, geospatial data sources and acquisition methods, processing of geospatial data and spatial statistics. Practical exercises will focus on learning geographical information systems (GIS) and how to apply them to land resource assessment, including digital terrain modelling, land-cover assessment, sub-catchment modelling, ecological applications, and soil quality assessment for decisions regarding sustainable land use and management. A 3 day field excursion during the mid-semester break will involve a day of GPS fieldwork at Arthursleigh University farm and two days in Canberra visiting various government agencies which research and maintain GIS coverages for Australia. By the end of this UoS, students should be able to: differentiate between spatial data and spatial information; source geospatial data from government and private agencies; apply conceptual models of spatial phenomena for practical decision-making in an environmental context; apply critical analysis of situations to apply the concepts of spatial analysis to solving environmental and land resource problems; communicate effectively results of GIS investigations through various means- oral, written and essay formats; and use a major GIS software package such as ArcGIS.
Textbooks
Burrough, P.A. and McDonnell, R.A. 1998. Principles of Geographic Information Systems. Oxford University Press: Oxford.
ENVX3002 Statistics in the Natural Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop, Dr Floris Van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1×2 hr workshop/wk, 1×3 hr computer practical/wk Prerequisites: ENVX2001 or STAT2012 or STAT2912 or BIOL2022 or BIOL2922 Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x15%), practical exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the analysis of data they may face in their future careers, in particular data that are not well behaved, they may be non-normal, there may be missing observations or they may be correlated in space and time. In the first part, students will learn how to analyse and design experiments based on the general linear model. In the second part, they will learn about the generalisation of the general linear model to accommodate non-normal data with a particular emphasis on the binomial and poisson distributions. In the third part linear mixed models will be introduced which provide the means to analyse datasets that do not meet the assumptions of independent and equal errors. At the end of this unit, students will have learnt a range of advanced statistical methods and be equipped to apply this knowledge to analyse data that they may encounter in their future studies and careers. The students will gain research and inquiry skills through completion of assessment tasks. Information literacy and communication skills will be developed through weekly computer work.
Textbooks
No textbooks are recommended but useful reference books are:
Horticulture
HORT3005 Production Horticulture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Robyn McConchie Session: Semester 1 Classes: (2x1hr lec; 1x3hr prac/workshop)/wk Prerequisites: Two of PLNT2001, PLNT2901, PLNT2002, PLNT2902, PLNT2003, PLNT2903 Assumed knowledge: AFNR1001 and AFNR1002 Assessment: One 3 hr exam (55%), three assignments (45%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study covers topics on the production of perennial fruit crops, wine grapes, the sustainable production of vegetables and it also covers the key aspects of the postharvest handling and quality assurance of fresh produce. At the end of this unit students are expected to have a detailed understanding of these areas of horticulture and be able to discuss related literature and the physiological principles underlying the commercial success of these horticultural enterprises. Students will also gain research and enquiry skills through research based practical sessions and assignments.
Textbooks
Recommended reading:
Microbiology
MICR3125 Microbial Ecology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kertesz Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lec, 1 x 3hr prac/wk Prerequisites: MICR2022 or MICR2024 Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of molecular biology Assessment: One 2 hour exam (60%), One group presentation (10%), Continuous Practical assessment (protocol design, attendance and participation, experimental reports) (10%), Practical project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study will focus on the microbial communities that dominate soil, animal, marine and freshwater environments, and on functional interactions between the organisms that make up these communities. Students will investigate how the development of molecular methods in environmental microbiology and molecular ecology has provided new insights into the function of microbial communities in the environment. The course material will build on knowledge gained in MICR2024, and will particularly emphasize the importance of complex microbial communities in processes such as nutrient cycling and species interactions. At the end of this unit, students will be able to describe modern methods of molecular microbial ecology, outline the diversity and dynamics of cultured and uncultured aquatic, human and soil microbial communities, and will understand how the interactions between the organisms in these communities govern nutrient cycling in soil and water environments. They will develop their analytical inquiry skills through the critical analysis of research papers in the field of microbial ecology, gathering and evaluating information concerning microbial communities in the environment, and practice collaboration and discussion skills through group presentations.
Textbooks
The course will be taught largely from recent research publications in leading journals, which will be provided in the lectures and in online material to accompany the unit of study.
Plant Science
PLNT3001 Plant, Cell and Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops and discussions 2 hr/wk; laboratories: alternate weeks 30 hr total (6 pracs; 5 hr each) Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology, Plant Science, Molecular Biology and Genetics Prohibitions: PLNT3901 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (40%), 2x reports (30%), 1x essay (15%), 1x group presentation (15%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study of comprises lectures/workshops and practical sessions that will explore how plants function and interact with their environment. Classes will examine the mechanisms plants have evolved to adapt and acclimate to varied and variable environments. We will address how plants adapt to their light environment and how they respond to common abiotic stresses (e.g. drought, salinity) and biotic stresses (herbivory) and how they interact with other organisms. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales. You will need to draw on knowledge from intermediate units of study and explore the published literature to successfully integrate information from areas unfamiliar to yourself. The purpose of this Unit of Study is to develop an understanding of current directions in Plant Science at an advanced level. When you have successfully completed this unit of study, you should be able to: be familiar with modern approaches of physiology, biophysics and molecular biology in the study of plant function; understand how domains of knowledge interact to describe plant function; understand how plants function in stressful environments; carry out a small research project; draft a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.
Textbooks
Students will be drawing on the current research literature for content. A Study Guide for the unit will be available for purchase during the first week of semester from the Copy Centre at a cost to be advised.
or
PLNT3901 Plant, Cell and Environment (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops and discussions 2 hr/wk; laboratories: alternate weeks 30 hr total (6 pracs; 5 hr each) Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate Biology, Plant Science, Molecular Biology and Genetics Prohibitions: PLNT3001 Assessment: 1x 2hr exam (40%), 2x reports (30%), 1x essay (15%), 1x group presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study of comprises lectures/workshops and practical sessions that will explore how plants function and interact with their environment. Classes will examine the mechanisms plants have evolved to adapt and acclimate to varied and variable environments. We will address how plants adapt to their light environment and how they respond to common abiotic stresses (e.g. drought, salinity) and biotic stresses (herbivory) and how they interact with other organisms. Emphasis will be placed on integration of plant responses from molecular through to whole plant scales. You will need to draw on knowledge from intermediate units of study and explore the published literature to successfully integrate information from areas unfamiliar to yourself. The purpose of this Unit of Study is to develop an understanding of current directions in Plant Science at an advanced level. When you have successfully completed this unit of study, you should be able to: be familiar with modern approaches of physiology, biophysics and molecular biology in the study of plant function; understand how domains of knowledge interact to describe plant function; understand how plants function in stressful environments; carry out a small research project; draft a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.
Textbooks
Students will be drawing on the current research literature for content. A Study Guide for the unit will be available for purchase during the first week of semester from the Copy Centre at a cost to be advised.

Year 4*^

In semester one Year 4 students will complete:
AFNR4101 Research Project A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 1 Classes: No formal classes, approx 18h per week Prerequisites: 144 credit points of level 1000-3000 units of study Assessment: Research proposal, literature review. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to develop a student's ability to undertake a major research project in an area of specialization. The unit builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. This unit is a corequisite with AFNR4102 and each student will work with an academic supervisor in an area of specialization and develop a well defined research project to be executed. The research project is undertaken to advance the students ability to build well-developed research skills, a strong analytical capacity, and the ability to provide high quality research results demonstrating a sound grasp of the research question. Working with an academic supervisor students will develop their ability to define a research project including the producing of testable hypotheses, identifying existing knowledge from reviewing the literature and the design and execution of a research strategy towards solving the research question. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the development of experimental programs. Students will improve their written and planning skills by composing a research project proposal and the writing of a comprehensive literature review.
AFNR4001 Professional Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops over four years Prohibitions: AGRF4000 Assessment: 1x blog posting (10%), 1x on-line (multi-media) (30%) and 1x portfolio (60%) Practical field work: 40 days of professional experience, 1 week long excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is designed to allow students to critically reflect on the relationship between the rural enterprise and environment and how they can contribute to the future decisions and management affecting the rural community. It is a core unit of study in 4th year for the BAgrEc, BScAgr, BLWSc, BResEc, BHortSc which requires students to complete 40 days of professional experience with the expectation that students will examine the nature of facts from their degree in this environment. A minimum of 15 days must be completed on-farm/field. The remaining days may be at the student's discretion. The unit will be counted towards 4th year, but professional experience placements will normally be undertaken throughout the degree. In the early stages of the Professional Development program students participate in Faculty excursions that have been developed so they can experience a range of activities, such as research, extension, on-farm and industry both in the rural and urban environment to complement their learning within their individual degree programs. Building on this various workshops have been developed to assist students to identify a rural environment theme or issue of their interest with the specific emphasis being placed on them reflecting on how their new understandings of their theme of interest affects their personal and professional development. To complete this unit students will present a portfolio of their theme including critical reflection on the pivotal relationships between the academic degree, rural environment, professional experience, and beliefs and values if the rural community. Through developing these pivotal relationships, students will be able to use their new understandings to support and guide the future developments in the rural enterprise and environment. By developing and presenting the portfolio and engaging in other online activities the students will enhance their skills in inquiry, information literacy and communication. In particular the autonomous development of case studies reflecting the contemporary issues in agriculture and their professional placements the students will have to consider their understandings of ethical, social and professional issues and further develop the personal and intellectual autonomy.
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
One core unit from Table E
AFNR4102 Research Project B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: No formal classes, approx 18h per week Prerequisites: AFNR4101 Assessment: Oral presentation, research paper, poster. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is a continuation of the major research project initiated in AFNR4101 and continues to build on theoretical and applied knowledge gained across most of the units of study undertaken throughout their degree program. Working with their academic supervisor in the area of specialization the student will continue to pursue the defined research project towards presenting final results and conclusions. The research results are presented in a format of a research paper as submitted to a research journal. The research paper and corrected literature review is combined and presented together as a thesis. Students will continue to build their research skills, develop strong analytical capacity, demonstrate a sound grasp of the topic, and an ability to interpret results in a broad framework. Working with an academic supervisor students will develop their ability to produce results of high quality, draw reliable conclusions and identify future areas avenues of research. Students will build on their previous research and inquiry skills through sourcing a wide range of knowledge to solve the research problem and enhance their intellectual and personal autonomy by means of the managing the research program. Students will improve their communication skills through oral presentation of their research findings, the production of a poster detailing their research findings and the writing of a research paper.
And one core or elective unit from Table D, E or F.
In semester two Year 4 students will complete one specialisation from Table E, including one, two or three core units
And up to two elective unit from Table D, E or F
* Maximum of 2 core units in Year 4 depending on specialisation (see Table E)
^ A student may apply to the degree coordinator for permission to enrol in up to one (6 cp) elective University of Sydney unit of study in year 3 and up to one (6 cp) University of Sydney unit of study in year 4 which is not listed in Tables D or E. The application must (1) be made prior to enrolment in the unit (2) be submitted with a written academic justification for enrolment by the student and (3) be submitted with written approval of the relevant unit of study coordinator.

Table E - Year 4 Core

Agricultural Chemistry
AFNR5107 Principles of Biochemical Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalind Deaker (Coordinator), Prof Les Copeland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 22 hrs of lectures and 32 hrs of laboratory during the semester Prohibitions: AGCH4007 Assessment: Assessment may include attendance and participation in lectures, quizzes, reports and problem based learning. Each module will comprise 25% of the final assessment mark and satisfactory progress in all modules is required from the successful completion of this unit. (4x25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to expose students to the principles and practice of a diverse range of analytical methods used in agricultural and environmental science. The unit of study will be presented in four modules including: materials and sampling techniques; separation techniques (chromatographic and electrophoretic); instrumentation and measurement techniques (spectral, enzymic and imaging); and microbiological and molecular biology techniques. Each module will be a combination of lectures and practical classes that will analyse common agricultural or biochemical commodities to illustrate the practical aspects of the theory. Students will also gain skills in data analysis relevant to the respective techniques.
At the completion of these modules, students will be familiar with the operation of a number of laboratory instruments, the theory that underpins their operation, be confident in the analysis of data, and be able to choose the most appropriate sampling strategy and analytical technique to perform high quality research.
AGCH3400 Agricultural Plant-Microbe Interactions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalind Deaker (unit coordinator) A/Prof Michael Kertesz Dr Tina Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lecture pw, 1 x 3 hr practical pw Prerequisites: MICR2024, PLNT2001 Assumed knowledge: General microbiology, chemistry, agricultural chemistry or biochemistry Assessment: 2 x Practical reports (2x25%) 2 x Essays (2x20%), 1 x Oral presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Can we effectively harness the potential of plant-growth promoting microorganisms to reduce dependence on chemical inputs and enhance sustainable agricultural crop production? This unit of study is designed to introduce students to important interactions between plants and microorganisms that are fundamental to nutrient cycling, nutrient-use efficiency and sustainability of resources and the environment. Disciplinary areas of study include agricultural chemistry, microbiology, plant physiology and molecular biology and will build on theoretical knowledge gained in MICR2024 and PLNT2001. There is a particular focus on beneficial plant-growth promoting microorganisms that are increasingly exploited as crop inoculants to improve soil health and reduce dependence on chemical fertilizers. This unit explores current research on beneficial plant-microbe interactions and provides a theoretical framework with which to evaluate their positive contribution to plant cultivation systems and the environment. Mechanisms of plant-growth promotion studied will include biological nitrogen fixation, nutrient (P, S, Fe) mobilization, phytohormone production and biocontrol. The unit intends to highlight the necessarily close connection between science and industry in order to realize the full potential of benefits from inoculation. In this regard, issues relating to inoculant production, quality control and application will be explored. Students will interact with inoculant industry personnel and some opportunities for work experience will be available. The unit will provide students with technical skills of value to the microbial inoculant and related industries as well as developing relevant research skills to enable participation in the rapidly evolving program of research on microbial inoculants.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of journal articles, book chapters and selected text books.
Agricultural Economics
AGEC4104 Industrial Organization of Agribusiness

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Ubilava Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: (AGEC2001 or AGEC2101) and (AGEC2003 or AGEC2103) Assessment: 1x2000 wd assignment (20%), 1x1000 wd review (10%), 1x15min presentation (5%), 1x1page evaluation of a peer (5%), and 1x2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit focuses on applications of economic theory and methods in agribusiness decision making. It provides advanced treatment of the industrial organisation of agribusiness firms. Case studies will be used to examine the economic complexities of global agribusiness systems. Extensive readings make up the central component of the unit.
Textbooks
Collections of readings.
AGEC3102 Agricultural and Resource Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture + 1x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: (AGEC2001 or AGEC2101) and (AGEC2003 or AGEC2103) Prohibitions: AGEC3002 Assessment: 1x2.5hr exam (70%) and 3x1 problem sets (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit covers the theoretical framework for economic analysis of policy interventions (welfare economics and public choice theory). Emphasis is put on building the skills needed to analyze the incidence of economic policy and on the design of policies under asymmetric information. An understanding of the institutional structure of agricultural and resource policy in Australia is promoted through the direct contact with policy makers, public agencies and lobbying groups.
N.B. Available to 3rd year students in the Faculty of Economics and Business
Textbooks
To be advised
The following unit is NOT offered in 2015, but will be in 2014
AGEC4103 International Agricultural Trade

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: (AGEC2001 or AGEC2101) and (AGEC2003 or AGEC2103) Prohibitions: AGEC4003 Assessment: 1x1hr exam (25%),1xessay (15%) and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In this unit of study the basic economic principles underlying international trade in agricultural and resource commodities and the policies involved will be presented. Issues related to trade and development will also be considered. The main topics covered will include: trends in agricultural and resources trade; economics and politics of protection, economic integration and impacts on international commodity trade; international trade policy making. An understanding of globalisation, including foreign direct investment, will also be required. Extensive reading will be required.
Textbooks
Krugman and Obstfeld. International Economics: Theory and Policy, 9th Ed. (Pearson Addison Wesley), New York.
Agricultural Genetics
GENE4015 Cytogenetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Sharp; animal component coordinator, Dr Jaime Gongora Session: Semester 2 Classes: Equivalent of 2 lecture/tutorials & 3 practicals/week Prerequisites: (BIOM2001 or ENVX2001) and GENE2001 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (25%), 1x750wd Practical report (10%) and 1x1000wd Fact Sheet (15%) 1x1200wd Laboratory report (20%), 1x2000wd Assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is a final year elective in the two degrees, BScAgr, and BAnVetBiosci. Approximately a half of the face-to-face contact hours will be given as an intensive, and this section of the unit will be held during the mid-year break before semester 2. Lecture and practical work in cytogenetics, especially of plant and animal species of applied interest in plant agriculture, animal agriculture and other applied interest in animal genetics, such as companion, native and endangered species. The lecture component covers the molecular nature of chromosomes and their transmission, variation in chromosome behaviour, both normal and disease related. In addition, the uses of chromosome engineering to produce variation in plants and animals will also be covered. The practical component covers the technologies used to study chromosomes or both plants and animals, both mitotic and meiotic chromosomes, and molecular techniques such as in situ hybridisation, gene activity and chromosomal protein localisation. On completion, students will be able to apply cytogenetic knowledge and technologies to species of eukaryotes of economic significance, and know how cytogenetic processes have affected the development of these species.
GENE4012 Plant Breeding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Richard Trethowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 20xlectures plus group presentations plus 10hrs practicals/demonstrations (26 July - 30 August) Prerequisites: GENE2001, GENE4013 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (75%) and 1xgroup project (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Lectures and practical work are devoted to the theory, philosophy and practice of plant breeding. The unit addresses screening techniques, conservation of genetic variability, breeding for disease resistance and integration of molecular technology in applied plant breeding, with examples from both field and horticultural crops. The unit is taught in the context [of] climate change, food security and the evolving global intellectual property environment.
Agronomy
AGRO4003 Crop and Pasture Agronomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x4-h lectures/weeks 1,2,9,10; 2x2h lectures 3,4,7,8, 1x full day field practical in week 11 (subject to weather); Field excursions: week 0 and 6 (subject to weather) Prerequisites: AGRO3004 Assessment: 1x2h exam (45%) and 2x reports on excursions (2x18.5%) and 2000wd field report (18%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit examines agronomy as the discipline that underpins agricultural production. As a case study, the cotton industry is examined in detail to understand the end-user and social demands on agricultural production, the technical issues that challenge the farmer and the diversity of other specialist information from relevant disciplines such as entomology, pathology and soil science that must be integrated into the farming system. Likewise the rice and/or pastoral industries provide a contrasting farming system as another case study. The unit includes a one-week excursion to cotton growing areas in northern NSW and Qld, specialist intensive instruction provided by the Cotton CRC and a series of workshops, tutorials that provides analysis and synthesis of the major farming systems in this industry. Pasture production is also considered in the context of farming systems.
AGRO4004 Sustainable Farming Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Negotiated practicals and workshops (63h) Prerequisites: AGRO3004 Assessment: Written report on the field/glasshouse experiment(s) (33%), oral debates/discussions on sustainable systems (33%), essay on sustainable agriculture (34%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is designed to provide students with training in the professional skills required to practice agronomy. The unit principally builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained in second year plant physiology (PLNT2003) and third year agronomy (AGRO3004). In this unit students will integrate their knowledge of plant physiology, soil science, experimental design, and biometry to address applied problems in agronomy, namely the issue of sustainability. Students will develop their ability to establish conclusions towards making recommendations for long term sustainability of crop and pasture systems. By implementing and managing a major field and/or glasshouse experiment(s) students will develop their research and inquiry skills. Team work is strongly encouraged in this unit and the integration and reporting of research findings will facilitate critical thinking and development of written communication skills. After completing this unit, students should be able to confidently design and manage a glasshouse/field experiment, and interpret and communicate their findings, by integrating knowledge from across disciplinary boundaries.
Entomology
ENTO4004 Insect Taxonomy and Systematics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Mansfield Session: Semester 1 Classes: (1 x 2hr lecture, 1 x 3hr practical)/week, commencing week 1. Prerequisites: ENTO2001 or ENTO2002 or BIOL2017 or BIOL2917 (Note: BIOL2017/BIOL2917 are only for the BSc students who elect to take this unit of study) Assessment: 1 x 2hr exam (40%), 1x museum project (25%), 1 x insect collection (25%), 1 x class participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Knowledge of the evolutionary relationships between insect groups contributes to our understanding of insect biology and correct taxonomic identification of insects is essential for all areas of entomological research, including pest management. This unit builds on the knowledge gained in second year entomology (BScAgr and BHortSc) and is a core unit for the entomology specialty (BScAgr). Key concepts that underpin the study of insect systematics, biogeography and phylogeny are described using examples from the evolutionary development of insects. The role of morphological, genetic and molecular studies in the classification of insects is examined. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of insect taxonomy through individual projects and assess the impact of evolutionary relationships among insect groups on modern agriculture. Research, inquiry and information literacy skills will be improved through a museum project and a self-directed insect collection. Students will practice their communication skills and develop personal and intellectual autonomy through in-class discussion of current literature.
Textbooks
Upton MS and Mantle BL, 2010. Methods for collecting, preserving and studying insects and other terrestrial arthropods, 5th edition. The Australian Entomological Society, Miscellaneous Publication No. 3.
ENTO4003 Integrated Pest Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Mansfield Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture, 1x3hr practical/week, commencing week 1. Prerequisites: ENTO2001 or ENTO2002 or BIOL2017 or BIOL2917 (Note: BIOL2017/BIOL2917 are only for BSc students who elect to take this UoS) Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1xcase study (20%), 1xgroup assignment (20%), 1xinsect collection (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The focus of this unit is the development and adoption of integrated pest management (IPM) within Australian agriculture. It builds on the knowledge gained in second year entomology (BScAgr and BHortSc) and is a core unit for the entomology specialty (BScAgr). Applied entomology deals with the control of insect pests and the use of beneficial insects. The biology of major pest (herbivores and disease vectors) and beneficial (predators, parasitoids, pollinators) insect groups is covered in depth. Students will compare the advantages and disadvantages of different pest control strategies and evaluate the importance of insect ecology, control methods and socio-economic factors to successful adoption of integrated pest management. Field trips will demonstrate the practical application of IPM concepts presented in lectures. Research, inquiry and information literacy skills will be improved through critical review of current literature and compilation of a case study. Students will practice their communication skills and develop personal and intellectual autonomy through a group project, in-class discussion and a self-directed insect collection.
Textbooks
Required: Bailey, PT (Ed.) 2007. Pests of field crops and pastures. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood, Vic. 520 pp.
Environmetrics
Two of the following four units:
BIOM4003 Matrix Algebra and Linear Models

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 6 x 1 day workshops. Prerequisites: ENVX3002 Assessment: 2 assessment tasks (2x30%), exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
In order to obtain a deeper understanding of statistics it is necessary to learn more about matrices as used to develop and explain statistical and mathematical concepts. Matrices are not just used in statistics: they find use in mathematical models in biology (e.g. age structured population growth models), engineering (e.g. structural perturbation analysis), and economic models (e.g. decision analysis). There are two aims to this unit. Firstly, we will revise matrices learnt in earlier units and then introduce new concepts such as special matrices (symmetric, orthogonal, idempotent), rank, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, as well as some matrix and vector calculus. The second aim is to apply these techniques to the formulation of linear models and linear mixed models which have been introduced in earlier units. In this unit the underlying theory will be developed along with more advanced applications. Furthermore, the students will be introduced to R, an open source statistical software package.
Textbooks
Textbooks: None. Many reference books such as:
BIOM4004 Advanced Statistical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x 1 hr lec, 1x 1 hr tutorial and 1x 1 hr computer laboratory per week Prerequisites: BIOM4003 Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x20%), exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit consists of 3 components; multivariate statistics, sample designs and generalized linear models. In the first part principal component analysis and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) will be covered. In the second part basic sample designs such as simple random, stratified random, ratio estimation and cluster sampling will be covered. Finally generalized linear models will be introduced with more theoretical detail than is taught in earlier units. Research skills will developed by project work involving the analysis of a real world dataset from a relevant discipline.
BIOM4005 Biometrical Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Bishop Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x 1 hr lect 1x 1 hr tutl and 1x 1 hr computer laboratory practical per week Prerequisites: ENVX3002 Assessment: 3 assessment tasks (3x20%), exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to essential statistical and mathematical theory that should be at the fingertips of practising statisticians. Topics include a comprehensive review of statistical distributions and their properties; including the binomial, Poisson, geometric, normal and exponential distributions. In addition techniques such as method of moments and maximum likelihood estimation will be introduced for fitting the distributions to the data will be explored. Research skills will developed by project work involving the analysis of a real world dataset.
Textbooks
Many reference books exist in various Libraries.
ENVX4001 GIS, Remote Sensing and Land Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Inakwu Odeh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week weeks 1-6, 1x1 project weeks 7-11, 1x1-½ hour presentation scheduled for weeks 12 and 13, 1x3-hr practical weeks 1-6 Assumed knowledge: Recommended units include GEOS2111/GEOS2911 (Natural Hazards: a GIS approach), ENVX3001 (Environmental GIS), SOIL3004 (The Soil Resource), GEOS3014/GEOS3914 (GIS in Coastal Management) Assessment: 1x 20 min presentation (10%), laboratory work reports (30%), Group assignment (10%), 1x 3000w project report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Consent of the unit coordinator required.
This unit of study is aimed at advanced techniques in Remote Sensing (RS), linked with Geographical Information Systems (GIS), as applied to land management problems. The unit consists of three separate but overlapping parts: 1) a short theoretical part which focuses on the concepts of RS; 2) a practical part which aims at developing hands-on skills in using RS and GIS tools, and 3) an application-focused module in which students will learn the skills of how to design a land management project and actualise it using integrated GIS and RS techniques. At the completion of this unit students will have grasp the theories and concepts of GIS and acquired research skills in the application of advanced remote sensing and GIS algorithms to provide evidence-based solutions to natural resource management and environmental problems. Communication skills and critical thinking for solving land resources problems are encouraged through class discussions, group work and tutorial presentations.
Textbooks
van Dijk, A. and Bos, M.G. 2001. GIS and remote sensing techniques in land- and water-management. Kluwer Academic Publisher, Dordrecht.
Farming Systems
AGEC4104 Industrial Organization of Agribusiness

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Ubilava Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: (AGEC2001 or AGEC2101) and (AGEC2003 or AGEC2103) Assessment: 1x2000 wd assignment (20%), 1x1000 wd review (10%), 1x15min presentation (5%), 1x1page evaluation of a peer (5%), and 1x2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit focuses on applications of economic theory and methods in agribusiness decision making. It provides advanced treatment of the industrial organisation of agribusiness firms. Case studies will be used to examine the economic complexities of global agribusiness systems. Extensive readings make up the central component of the unit.
Textbooks
Collections of readings.
AGRO4004 Sustainable Farming Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Negotiated practicals and workshops (63h) Prerequisites: AGRO3004 Assessment: Written report on the field/glasshouse experiment(s) (33%), oral debates/discussions on sustainable systems (33%), essay on sustainable agriculture (34%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is designed to provide students with training in the professional skills required to practice agronomy. The unit principally builds on theoretical and applied knowledge gained in second year plant physiology (PLNT2003) and third year agronomy (AGRO3004). In this unit students will integrate their knowledge of plant physiology, soil science, experimental design, and biometry to address applied problems in agronomy, namely the issue of sustainability. Students will develop their ability to establish conclusions towards making recommendations for long term sustainability of crop and pasture systems. By implementing and managing a major field and/or glasshouse experiment(s) students will develop their research and inquiry skills. Team work is strongly encouraged in this unit and the integration and reporting of research findings will facilitate critical thinking and development of written communication skills. After completing this unit, students should be able to confidently design and manage a glasshouse/field experiment, and interpret and communicate their findings, by integrating knowledge from across disciplinary boundaries.
Food Science
AFNR5107 Principles of Biochemical Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rosalind Deaker (Coordinator), Prof Les Copeland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 22 hrs of lectures and 32 hrs of laboratory during the semester Prohibitions: AGCH4007 Assessment: Assessment may include attendance and participation in lectures, quizzes, reports and problem based learning. Each module will comprise 25% of the final assessment mark and satisfactory progress in all modules is required from the successful completion of this unit. (4x25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is designed to expose students to the principles and practice of a diverse range of analytical methods used in agricultural and environmental science. The unit of study will be presented in four modules including: materials and sampling techniques; separation techniques (chromatographic and electrophoretic); instrumentation and measurement techniques (spectral, enzymic and imaging); and microbiological and molecular biology techniques. Each module will be a combination of lectures and practical classes that will analyse common agricultural or biochemical commodities to illustrate the practical aspects of the theory. Students will also gain skills in data analysis relevant to the respective techniques.
At the completion of these modules, students will be familiar with the operation of a number of laboratory instruments, the theory that underpins their operation, be confident in the analysis of data, and be able to choose the most appropriate sampling strategy and analytical technique to perform high quality research.
AGCH3026 Food Biotechnology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Les Copeland, Dr Thomas Roberts Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 1x4-hr practical fortnightly Prerequisites: AGCH2004 or BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or PLNT2001 or PLNT2901 or 6 credit points of Intermediate units in Chemistry Assessment: Each module has a range of tasks that may include report writing, opinion writing, quizzes or exams. All four modules are worth 25% of the final assessment mark. (4x25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The use of biotechnology in food has its basis in the establishment of agriculture and food production. The growth and selection of superior crops and the production of fermented foods and beverages such as leavened bread, cheese and beer are all traditional examples of food biotechnology. More recently, food biotechnology has come to represent the use of molecular technology, including genetically modified organisms (GMO), in the production, processing and analysis of our food. At the completion of this unit students will be able to describe the role of both traditional and modern biotechnology in food science from examples presented in class and through their own research, as well as describing the science underpinning this aspect of food production.
This unit is divided into four discrete modules that address specific examples of food biotechnology used today. These modules cover enzyme technology, postharvest technologies for fruits and vegetables, GM foods, and processing of cereal grains (milling, baking and malting). Each of these modules will be assessed individually using a range of tasks that may include an end-of-module exam (covering lectures and practicals), opinion writing, report writing and poster presentations. These tasks are designed to develop graduate attributes such as research and inquiry; information literacy; personal and intellectual autonomy; ethical, social and professional understanding and communication. Each module will consist of lectures and a laboratory class that will illustrate practical aspects of food biotechnology. This unit is particularly valuable when taken in combination with AGCH3025 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Foods.
The structure and content of the modules is such that students will be at a considerable disadvantage if they do not attend the lectures, particularly the guest lectures. Students must complete all of the laboratory classes. Each module has an equal assessment weighting of 25% of the final mark. To complete the unit successfully, students must achieve at least a Pass grade in each module.
At the completion of this unit students will be able to describe the key theories and techniques used in food biotechnology using the examples discussed in lectures and laboratory classes; demonstrate an ability to correctly use key information sources about food biotechnology; propose well-researched and creative solutions to food biotechnology problems; construct their own views and opinions on the science of food biotechnology and, communicate aspects of food biotechnology to both the scientific and broader community.
Textbooks
Laboratory notes will be available for purchase from the Copy Centre in the first week of semester and lecture notes and readings will be made available through WebCT. There is no recommended textbook.
Horticulture
HORT4004 Issues in Horticultural Science 4A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x4hr workshop/site visit per week Prerequisites: HORT3001 or HORT3004 Assessment: 1x2hr Exam (40%), weekly reports (40%), Field work (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit links a range of horticultural science topics with commercial applications. One element is designed around a "supply chain" framework, applied to multiple "real world" case studies. It will develop skills in data analysis and interpretation, problem identification and problem solving. Students will understand how multiple issues must be integrated in order to provide fresh solutions to technical or commercial challenges and opportunities. A second element exposes students to the research work at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Mt Annan. This illustrates the importance of horticultural science to conservation issues. It also covers opportunities and barriers regarding the commercial use of native flora.
HORT4005 Research and Practice in Hort Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brian Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2h tut/wk; one 1-week excursion Prerequisites: HORT3005 Assessment: Tutorial papers (30%); project proposal (10%); project report (50%); peer review (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Upon completion of this unit, students will have participated in a major excursion and a series of discussion workshops based on prescribed readings that will broaden their appreciation of current research themes in horticultural science, industry issues, stimulate critical thinking, enhance professional research skills and give an insight into the career opportunities for horticultural scientists. Attendance at seminars, written reports and presentations made during these workshops will improve student skills in critical analysis and communication.
Livestock Production
AGRO4003 Crop and Pasture Agronomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Tan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x4-h lectures/weeks 1,2,9,10; 2x2h lectures 3,4,7,8, 1x full day field practical in week 11 (subject to weather); Field excursions: week 0 and 6 (subject to weather) Prerequisites: AGRO3004 Assessment: 1x2h exam (45%) and 2x reports on excursions (2x18.5%) and 2000wd field report (18%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit examines agronomy as the discipline that underpins agricultural production. As a case study, the cotton industry is examined in detail to understand the end-user and social demands on agricultural production, the technical issues that challenge the farmer and the diversity of other specialist information from relevant disciplines such as entomology, pathology and soil science that must be integrated into the farming system. Likewise the rice and/or pastoral industries provide a contrasting farming system as another case study. The unit includes a one-week excursion to cotton growing areas in northern NSW and Qld, specialist intensive instruction provided by the Cotton CRC and a series of workshops, tutorials that provides analysis and synthesis of the major farming systems in this industry. Pasture production is also considered in the context of farming systems.
AGRO4005 Livestock Production Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lachlan Ingram Session: Semester 2 Classes: (Intensive lectures/workshop/fieldtrip commencing 2nd week of September for 1 week, plus on-line modules throughout semester) Prerequisites: AGRO3004 Assumed knowledge: ANSC3101 Assessment: One 2hr exam (50%), case study reports based on field trips (40%), participation in debate (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this unit is to highlight the inter-relationships between disease, vegetation, soil, and livestock production. Livestock production systems builds on knowledge in the AGRO3004, which deals with pasture and cropping systems and expands this into the management of systems involving animals. The unit will cover such aspects as dealing with prevention and regulatory aspects of the disease process, mechanisms to deal with disease, parasitology, managing the health of sheep, beef and dairy cows (throughout all stages of their life cycles), and reproductive disorders. Appropriate management of pasture systems can reduce the prevalence of many of these issues and will be covered in lectures that will relate livestock production to herbage quantity and quality, grazing management, limits to production and how pasture-livestock systems impact on the environment and the extent to which this can be mitigated. While this unit will be taught on-line through the University of New England, there will be a week-long intensive residential school that requires a compulsory attendance during the second week of September. Because not all aspects of the residential school is relevant to Sydney students, a one-day field trip will be held while students are attending the residential school. Lectures will also be undertaken at the University of Sydney. The assessment for this unit of study will be based around an exam (50%), three assignments (40%) and a seminar (10%). Students completing this unit will be able to evaluate how disease, pastures and livestock management interact to affect livestock production and how management of livestock systems can be a sustainable industry in terms of natural resources. Through group work and independent research on the case studies students will gain valuable research and interpersonal skills. Writing and communication skills are developed through report and exam writing and oral communication through participation in a debate
Plant Pathology
PPAT4004 Advanced Mycology and Plant Pathology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Guest Session: Semester 1 Classes: (2 tut, 3 hrs prac)/wk Prerequisites: PPAT3003 Assessment: Two hour end of semester exam (70%), 1500-word review paper (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit investigates evolution, systematics, taxonomy and biology of fungi and their role as plant pathogens; plant disease epidemiology and understanding fungal populations; infection processes and plant defence. The unit is an elective for BScAgr, BHortSc and BSc students. It builds on the material introduced in PPAT3003 and BIOL3017. Undertaking this unit will develop skills in isolating and identifying plant pathogenic fungi, diagnosing plant diseases, designing, conducting and analysing experiments. At the completion of this unit, students will be able to exercise problem-solving skills (developed through practical experiments, projects and tutorial discussions), think critically, and organise knowledge (from consideration of the lecture material and preparation of project reports), and expand from theoretical principles to practical explanations (through observing and reporting on project work). Students will consolidate their teamworking skills, develop self-directed study skills and plan effective work schedules, use statistical analysis in research, keep appropriate records of laboratory research, work safely in a research laboratory and operate a range of scientific equipment. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through individual and group research projects, information literacy and communication skills through assessment tasks and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups.
Textbooks
Agrios GN. 2005. Plant Pathology 5th ed. Academic Press
PPAT4005 Soil Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Guest Session: Semester 1 Classes: (2 tut, 3 hrs prac)/wk Prerequisites: MICR2024 or 6cp intermediate microbiology Assessment: Tutorial papers (30%), project proposal (10%), project report (50%), peer review (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit investigates the diversity of organisms living in the soil, their biology, interactions and ecology, and their roles in maintaining and improving soil function. The unit is an elective for BScAgr, BHortSc and BSc students. It builds on the material introduced in MICR2024, PPAT3003 and BIOL3017. Undertaking this unit will develop skills in monitoring soil microbes, designing, conducting and analysing experiments. At the completion of this unit, students will be able to exercise problem-solving skills (developed through practical experiments, projects and tutorial discussions), think critically, and organise knowledge (from consideration of the lecture material and preparation of project reports), and expand from theoretical principles to practical explanations (through observing and reporting on project work). Students will consolidate their teamworking skills, develop self-directed study skills and plan effective work schedules, use statistical analysis in research, keep appropriate records of laboratory research, work safely in a research laboratory and operate a range of scientific equipment. Students will gain research and inquiry skills through group research projects, information literacy and communication skills through assessment tasks and personal and intellectual autonomy through working in groups.
Textbooks
Sylvia et al. 2005. Principles and Applications of Soil Microbiology 2nd ed. Pearson.
Soil Science
SOIL3009 Contemporary Field and Lab Soil Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alex McBratney (coordinator), A/Prof Balwant Singh, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle, A/Prof Budiman Minasny Session: Semester 1 Classes: (2 lec, 2 prac)/wk, 6-day field excursion Prerequisites: SOIL2003 Assessment: 1 x viva voce exam (40%), pedology written assessments (15%), soil physics written assessments (15%), soil chemistry written assessments (15%), 1 x group presentation (5%), 1 x synthesis paper (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is a theoretical and empirical unit providing specialised training in three important areas of contemporary soil science, namely pedology, soil chemistry and soil physics. The key concepts of these sub-disciplines will be outlined and strengthened by hands-on training in essential field and laboratory techniques. All of this is synthesized by placing it in the context of soil distribution and use in North-Western New South Wales. The unit is motivated by the teaching team's research in this locale. It builds on students existing soil science knowledge gained in SOIL2003. After completion of the unit, students should be able to articulate the advantages and disadvantages of current field & laboratory techniques for gathering necessary soil information, and simultaneously recognise key concepts and principles that guide contemporary thought in soil science. Students will be able to synthesise soil information from a multiplicity of sources and have an appreciation of the cutting edge areas of soil research. By investigating the contemporary nature of key concepts, students will develop their skills in research and inquiry. Students will develop their communication skills through report writing and oral presentations and will also articulate an openness to new ways of thinking which augments intellectual autonomy. Teamwork and collaborative efforts are encouraged in this unit.
Textbooks
D. Hillel. 2004. Introduction to Environmental Soil Physics. Elsevier Science, San Diego, CA, USA
SOIL3010 The Soil at Work

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alex McBratney (coordinator) A/Prof Balwant Singh, A/Prof. Stephen Cattle (facilitators) plus research-only academics Session: Semester 2 Classes: Problem-based unit: each student completes 2 problems; 4 x 3 hr workshops per problem (each student attends 8 workshops in total) Prerequisites: SOIL2003 or SOIL2004 Assessment: For each of two scenarios: Statement of the problem report (2x12.5%) - shared info, but two team reports; How to tackle problem seminar (2x12.5%) - team seminars, before fieldwork, analyses done; Results seminar (2x12.5%) - team seminars; Final report (2x12.5%) - individual work. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is a problem-based applied soil science unit. It is designed to allow students to identify soil-related problems in the real-world and by working in a group and with an end-user to suggest short and long-term solutions to such problems. This is a core unit for students majoring or specializing in soil science and an elective unit for those wishing to gain an understanding of environmental problem-solving. It utilises and reinforces soil-science knowledge gained in SOIL2003 and/or SOIL2004 and problem-solving skills gained during the degree program. This unit will address real-world scenarios which involve soil-related problems such as carbon management, structural decline, acidification, salinisation and contamination. Students will gain some understanding of the concept of sustainability, and will be able to identify the causes of problems by reference to the literature, discussion with landusers and by the design and execution of key experiments and surveys. They will gain a focused knowledge of the key soil drivers to environmental problems and will have some understanding on the constraints surrounding potential solutions. By designing and administering strategies to tackle real-world soil issues students will develop their research and inquiry skills and enhance their intellectual autonomy. By producing reports and seminars that enables understanding by an end-user students will improve the breadth of their communication skills.
Textbooks
I.W.Heathcote 1997. Environmental Problem Solving: A Case Study Approach. McGraw-Hill, New York, NY, USA.

Table F - Year 4 electives (not including year 3 electives and year 4 core)

Agricultural Genetics
GENE4013 Molecular Genetics and Breeding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Sharp Session: Semester 1 Classes: (3 lec, 2 seminars/workshops, 1 lab)/wk Prerequisites: BIOM2001, GENE2001 Assessment: 1x2hr exam(50%), 2x 1500word assignments(35%), 1xpractical report(10%), 1xpresentation(5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Lectures and laboratory work covering the structure and function of plant genomes and genes, the technology and results of DNA transformation and the analysis of plant traits by molecular techniques including by genetic mapping using molecular and other genetic markers.
Animal Science
ANSC3107 Animal Genetics 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Claire Wade Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 3 hrs/wk, practicals 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: GENE2001 or MBLG2072 or MBLG2972 Assessment: Practicals with associated reports and on-line quizzes (25%), Mid Semester on-line examination (25%), Final Examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit of Study explores in detail genetic aspects of commercial animal populations and investigates options for the practical application of genetics to improve animal productivity. It is designed to provide the background material, fundamental concepts and data analysis methods for breeding strategies in the animal industries. The unit of study develops basic principles of population and quantitative genetics from Agricultural Genetics. It provides essential background and context to the molecular principles expanded in Animal Biotechnology. Animal Genetics provides the justification for the application for advanced reproductive technologies presented in Animal Reproduction.
At the end of this Unit of Study, students will demonstrate an understanding of: the principles of population genetics and the concepts of relationship and inbreeding, and adverse effects of this inbreeding; the principles of quantitative genetics including the concepts of genetic variance, heritability and repeatability, and methods for the identification and selection of superior livestock; the use of multi-trait selection procedures to increase the overall economic value of populations of animals; the constraints to production gains using genetic selection programmes and advantages obtained through crossbreeding; the practical application of selection and crossing in animals; the application of genomic and reproductive technologies in Animal breeding. Introductory bioinformatics, genomics, cytogenetics and conservation biology will be covered.
Textbooks
Nicholas, FW (2010) Introduction to Veterinary Genetics (3rd Ed) October 2009, 2010, Wiley-Blackwell, Iowa, USA ISBN: 978-1-4051-6832-8
AVBS4002 Dairy Production and Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Sergio (Yani) Garcia. Participating staff: Assoc. Prof. Kendra Kerrisk, Dr Pietro Celi, Dr Cameron Clark, Assoc. Prof. John House, Nicolas Lyons, Victoria Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures up to 3 hrs/wk, practicals 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: ANSC3101, (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3) Assumed knowledge: Enrolled students are expected to have some understanding of key components of the dairy production system, including basic knowledge of animal physiology and nutrition. Assessment: Whole farm professional report (30%), Pracs assessments, (30%), 1 hr exam (40%) Practical field work: Visit to commercial dairy farms and different systems of production in 3 or 4 regions of NSW (a minimum of 8 commercial farms will be visited during the semester) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will explore the various aspects of dairy farming and the dairy industry from a scientific point of view. The lectures are a mix of the principles on which sound dairy farming is based and practical examples of how this operates in practice. Focus is placed on integrating knowledge to gain understanding on the system of production as a whole.
At the end of this unit of study, students will demonstrate a solid understanding of: the characteristics of the dairy industry in Australia and in a world wide context; the key components of pasture-based dairy systems; principles and practices of pasture and feeding management; the application of new technologies to improve efficiency and productivity (particularly automatic milking).
In addition, students will demonstrate an appreciation of key aspects of reproduction and lactation physiology; the integration of knowledge of genetics and reproduction into the type of herd improvement structure set up in the dairy industry; the application of ruminant physiology knowledge to developing feeding programs for dairy cows; the extension of basic reproductive physiology onto the dairy farm using case studies as examples; the economics of the dairy farm business. Practical classes include milking cows; grazing and feeding management of dairy cows; calf rearing; and visits to commercial farms ranging from small pasture-based dairy farms to a feed-lot operation milking over 2,000 cows.
Note 1: Pracs assessments marks will be a combination of assistance (0.4) and completion of short questionaries about the prac or the farm visit (0.6)
Note 2: the professional report is basically a dairy system planning exercise reported in a professional (non academic) style. Students will be given budgeting tools and full explanations to assist with this task at the beginning of the course. The report is individual although this may depend on number of students enrolled.
AVBS4008 Intensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Downing Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 hrs/wk Prerequisites: (Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3) OR (Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3) Assessment: Written exam (50%) (Poultry and Pigs 50:50), in course evaluations and case study - Pigs (25%), Broiler growth study report and in course evaluations - Poultry (25%) Practical field work: Visits to an intensive pig/poultry farm, feed mill and poultry production and processing units when biosecurity restrictions allow Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is composed of two parts, a Poultry Production component and a Pig Production component. The course will provide students with a comprehensive overview of the production of eggs and poultry meat and pork. The individual components examine various aspects of the poultry and pig production systems important in maintaining efficiency and profitability. It investigates aspects of breeding, nutrition, housing, growth performance, heath, welfare, reproductive capability, waste management, marketing and current industry issues. This unit will expand on some aspects of previous year 3 units of study in animal structure and function, nutrition and reproduction. There is a broiler growth study which comprises a significant part of the practical work in the Poultry component. There is a strong emphasis on assessment being built into the course work as this is considered to be more relevant to learning in the final year.
Textbooks
There is no single text that adequately covers the Australian pig industry and for this reason no formal text is required. There are many sites (industry, academic institutions and government departments) on the Web which provide excellent information. Links to these will be provided. Where appropriate, relevant reference material will be identified for specific areas of the course. Often poultry specific text books are obsolete very quickly, it would be important to use trade information. The library subscribes to breeder management guides and general poultry production journals as well as specific poultry scientific journals.
AVBS4009 Aquaculture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joy Becker Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2hrs/wk, tutorials 1hr/wk, practicals 3hrs/wk Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 Assessment: written and/or oral assignments (40%), written practical report (20%), exam 2 hrs (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The Unit of Study explores in detail aspects of commercial aquaculture, including global trends in aquaculture development. Other topics include water quality, feeding, management, health and disease, genetics and reproduction, environmental impact and economic constraints to production. The unit of study emphasises methods to improve aquacultural productivity. It builds on basic principles of anatomy, physiology, nutrition, genetics and health and disease presented in other units of study in BAnVetBioSc. At the end of this Unit of Study, students will demonstrate an understanding of the principles of: the context of aquaculture in global food production; husbandry, management and welfare of aquaculture species; comparative aspects of husbandry in aquaria, domestic, commercial; health and disease relevant to aquaculture; nutrition of aquaculture species; reproduction and genetics of species in aquaculture; water quality and environmental impact of aquaculture; economics and marketing of aquaculture products.
AVBS4012 Extensive Animal Industries

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Russell Bush Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures 3hrs/wk, practicals 3hrs/wk Prerequisites: Animal and Veterinary Bioscience years 1-3 OR Bachelor of Science in Agriculture years 1-3 Assessment: case study (10%), practical report (15%), meat grading (15%), excursion report (20%) and written exam (40%) Practical field work: 5 day study tour to the Riverina Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces the concepts of sheep (wool and meat) and beef cattle production in the Australian environment within the context of world food and fibre consumption and production. The key products as well as domestic and export markets for these are presented. The course provides an historical perspective of the basis for each of these industries and describes each of the production systems designed to meet the demand for these products.
Production in both the tropical and temperate regions of Australia will be covered and include the key elements of extensive grazing and intensive feedlot systems. Major issues will include breeds and breeding systems, basic nutrition and production practices and animal welfare issues as they affect the quality and quantity of product marketed.
The concepts of first stage processing of both meat and fibre products in abattoirs and top-making plants respectively will be presented. The major factors that influence the quality of product and therefore grading and market demand will be presented.
Lecture material will be supported with appropriate practical classes and a 5 day study tour to the Riverina to evaluate different commercial production systems. Students will also have an opportunity to compete in the annual Inter Collegiate Meat Judging (ICMJ) competition as a member of the University of Sydney team. This competition involves teams from numerous universities throughout Australia as well as Japan and the USA.
Plant Pathology/Microbiology
VIRO3001 Virology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Newsome Session: Semester 1 Classes: 26 x 1-hour lectures, 7 x 4-hour practical classes, 1 x 2-hour tutorial Prerequisites: At least 6 credit points of MBLG units and at least 6 credit points in Intermediate MICR or BCHM or BIOL or IMMU or PCOL or PHSI or PLNT units. For BMedSc: 18 credit points of BMED units including (BMED2401 and BMED2404) or (BMED2801 and BMED2802 and BMED2807). Prohibitions: VIRO3901 Assumed knowledge: MICR2021/2921 or MICR2022/2922 Assessment: Pre-class assessment for practical classes: (5 x 1%), continuous assessment for practical classes: (3 x 2%), project assessment for practical classes: (7%), presentation on virology-themed research literature: (7%), theory of practical exam: (15%) (30 minutes), theory exam (60%) (120 minutes) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Students are very strongly advised to complete VIRO3001/3901 before enrolling in VIRO3002/3902 Medical and Applied Virology in Session 2.
Viruses are some of the simplest biological machinery known yet they are also the etiological agents for some of the most important human diseases. New technologies that have revolutionised the discovery of viruses are also revealing a hitherto unappreciated abundance and diversity in the ecosphere, and a wider role in human health and disease. Developing new gene technologies have enabled the use of viruses as therapeutic agents, in novel vaccine approaches, gene delivery and in the treatment of cancer. This unit of study is designed to introduce students who have a basic understanding of molecular biology to the rapidly evolving field of virology. Viral infection in plant and animal cells and bacteria is covered by an examination of virus structure, genomes, gene expression and replication. Building upon these foundations, this unit progresses to examine host-virus interactions, pathogenesis, cell injury, the immune response and the prevention and control of infection and outbreaks. The structure and replication of sub-viral agents: viroids and prions, and their role in disease are also covered. The practical component provides hands-on experience in current diagnostic and research techniques such as molecular biology, cell culture, serological techniques, immunofluorescence and immunoblot and is designed to enhance the students' practical skills and complement the lecture series. Tutorials cover a range of topical issues and provide a forum for students to develop their communication and critical thinking skills.
Textbooks
Dimmock, Easton and Leppard. Introduction to Modern Virology. 6th edition. Blackwell.