Table G – Interaction Design and Electronic Arts

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Interaction Design and Electronic Arts

ARIN6901
Network Society
6      Semester 2
ARIN6902
Internet Governance
6      Semester 1
Winter Main
COMP5047
Pervasive Computing
6    A Background in programming and operating systems that is sufficient for the student to independently learn new programming tools from standard online technical materials. Ability to conduct a literature search. Ability to write reports of work done.

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
COMP5216
Mobile Computing
6    A COMP5214 OR INFO9103 - Software Development in JAVA, or similar introductory software development units
Semester 2
COMP5347
Web Application Development
6    A INFO9220 or COMP5028. The course assumes basic knowledge on OO design and UML diagrams.
Semester 1
COMP5415
Multimedia Design and Authoring
6    A COMP5114 or COMP9419.
Semester 2
COMP5427
Usability Engineering
6      Semester 2
COMP9007
Algorithms
6    A This unit of study assumes that students have general knowledge of mathematics (especially Discrete Math) and problem solving. Having moderate knowledge about Data structure can also help students to better understand the concepts of Algorithms will be taught in this course.
N COMP5211
Semester 1
Semester 2
COMP9103
Software Development in Java
6    N COMP5214
Semester 1
Semester 2
COMP9110
System Analysis and Modelling
6    A Experience with a data model as in COMP9129 or COMP9103 or INFO9220 or INFO9120 or COMP5212 or COMP5214 or COMP5028 or COMP5138
N ELEC3610 OR ELEC5743 OR INFO2110 OR INFO5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
COMP9120
Database Management Systems
6    A Some exposure to programming and some familiarity with data model concepts
N INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR INFO2005 OR INFO2905 OR COMP5138. Students who have previously studied an introductory database subject as part of their undergraduate degree should not enrol in this foundational unit, as it covers the same foundational content.
Semester 1
Semester 2
COMP9121
Design of Networks and Distributed Systems
6    N COMP5116
Semester 2
COMP9601
Computer and Network Organisation
6    N COMP5213
Semester 1
COMP9220
Object-Oriented Design
6    A Students enrolled in COMP5028/INFO9220 are assumed to have elementary Java programming experience or equivalent experience in another object oriented programming language. This unit does not have assessment with heavy coding task. But some knowledge in object-oriented programming would have big impact on learning experience.
N COMP5028 OR INFO3220

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
CMPN5006
Recording Portfolio
6      Semester 1
DESC9011
Audio Production
6   
Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
DESC9090
Audio Systems and Measurement
6    A DESC9138
Semester 2
DESC9115
Digital Audio Systems
6      Semester 1
DESC9117
Sound Design for New Media
6      Semester 2
DESC9153
Graduate Internship
6   
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Masters students only. Graduate Diploma students with permission of the Program Coordinator. Advanced Standing will not be granted for this unit of study.
Intensive December
Intensive July
Intensive November
Semester 1
Semester 2
DESC9154
Lighting Design Software
6      Semester 2
DESC9164
Lighting Technologies
6    N DESC9063
Semester 2
DESC9166
Photometry and Colorimetry
6    N DESC9072
Semester 1
DESC9167
Light and Vision
6    N DESC9085
Semester 1
DESC9198
Subjective Analysis in Lighting Design
6      Semester 2
DESA9008
Object Design
6    A DESA1555
N AWSS2020

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
Semester 2
DESA9009
Public Art

This unit of study is not available in 2017

6    N AWSS2001

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
Semester 2
IDEA9101
IDEA Laboratory 1
6    P IDEA9103
C IDEA9102


Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
Semester 1a
IDEA9102
IDEA Studio 1
12    P IDEA9106
C IDEA9101


Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
Semester 1b
IDEA9103
Design Programming
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
IDEA9105
Interface Design
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
IDEA9106
Design Thinking
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
IDEA9201
IDEA Laboratory 2
6    P IDEA9103
C IDEA9202


Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
Semester 2a
IDEA9202
IDEA Studio 2
12    P IDEA9106
C IDEA9201


Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
Semester 2b
IDEA9302
IDEA Research Project
12    P 48 Credit Points including (18 credit points from IDEA9103 and IDEA9105 and IDEA9106) and (18 credit points from IDEA9101 and IDEA9102 and IDEA9201 and IDEA9202)

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is available to MIDEA students only. Students must seek permission to enrol from the Program Director before the start of the teaching semester.
Semester 1
Semester 2
IDEA9303
IDEA Dissertation
12    P 48 credit points including (18 credit points from IDEA9103 and IDEA9105 and IDEA9106) and (18 credit points from IDEA9101 and IDEA9102 and IDEA9201 and IDEA9202)
C IDEA9302

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is available to MIDEA students only. Students must seek permission to enrol from the Program Director before the start of the teaching semester.
Semester 1
Semester 2
IDEA9311
IDEA Research Internship
12    P 48 Credit Points including (18 credit points from IDEA9103 and IDEA9105 and IDEA9106) and (18 credit points from IDEA9101 and IDEA9102 and IDEA9201 and IDEA9202)

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students must seek permission to enrol from the Program Director before the start of the teaching semester. Internship must end before end of semester. Advanced standing will not be granted for this unit of study.
Semester 1
Semester 2
IDEA9301
Graduation Studio
12    P 48 Credit Points including (18 credit points from IDEA9103 and IDEA9105 and IDEA9106) and (18 credit points from IDEA9101 and IDEA9102 and IDEA9201 and IDEA9202)
Semester 1
Semester 2
MARC6102
3D Computer Design Modelling
6   

Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Student Administration Centre (SAC).
Semester 1
Semester 2
MFDI9313
Digital Editing for Film and Video
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
MMDE6001
History and Theory of New Media 1

This unit of study is not available in 2017

6   
Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
Semester 2
MMDE6101
Animation for Media and Video
6   

Special permission is required for cross-faculty enrolments. Please contact unit of study co-oridinator.
Semester 1

Interaction Design and Electronic Arts

ARIN6901 Network Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Online activities (20%), 1x1500wd Report and network analysis (25%), 1x1000wd equivalent Responses to readings (20%), 1x500wd Abstract (5%), 1x2000wd Major Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Is the network the distinctive mode of organisation for the 21st century? The Internet is the paradigmatic mode of decentralised many-to-many communication that interconnects with the century-old telecommunications and broadcasting networks. Geopolitical networks have displaced left/right Cold War oppositions. Social and professional networks extend influence beyond traditional institutional and family allegiances. Network models have challenged rationalist rule-governed models of thought and practice. The interdisciplinary critical analysis of current research, theory and debates will allow students to understand and evaluate the significance of networks in the contemporary world.
ARIN6902 Internet Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd journalism piece (40%), 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The internet plays an increasingly important role in all aspects of social, cultural and economic life. This unit of study explores cultures and governance of the online world and investigates how politics manifest not only in public debates and policy, but also in the struggle to develop new information architectures and digital ecosystems.
COMP5047 Pervasive Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Studio class Assumed knowledge: Background in programming and operating systems that is sufficient for the student to independently learn new programming tools from standard online technical materials. Ability to conduct a literature search. Ability to write reports of work done. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is an advanced course on Pervasive Computing, with a focus on the "Internet of Things" (IoT). It introduces the key aspects of the IoT and explores these in terms of the new research towards creating user interfaces that disappear into the environment and are available pervasively, for example in homes, workplaces, cars and carried.
COMP5216 Mobile Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: COMP5214 OR INFO9103 - Software Development in JAVA, or similar introductory software development units Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Mobile computing is becoming a main stream for many IT applications, due to the availability of more and more powerful and affordable mobile devices with rich sensors such as cameras and GPS, which have already significantly changed many aspects in business, education, social network, health care, and entertainment in our daily life. Therefore it has been critical for students to be equipped with sufficient knowledge of such new computing platform and necessary skills. The unit aims to provide an in-depth overview of existing and emerging mobile computing techniques and applications, the eco-system of the mobile computing platforms, and its key building components. The unit will also train students with hand-on experiences in developing mobile applications in a broad range of areas.
COMP5347 Web Application Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratory, Project Work Assumed knowledge: INFO9220 or COMP5028. The course assumes basic knowledge on OO design and UML diagrams. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nowadays most client facing enterprise applications are running on web or at least with a web interface. The design and implementation of a web application require totally different set of skills to those are required for traditional desktop applications. All web applications are of client/ server architecture. Requests sent to a web application are expected to go through the public Internet, which slows the responsiveness and increases the possible security threat. A typical web application is also expected to handle large number of requests coming from every corner of the Internet and sent by all sorts of client systems. This further complicates the design of such system.
This course aims at providing both conceptual understanding and hand-on experiences for the technologies used in building web applications. We will examine how data/messages are communicated between client and server; how to improve the responsiveness using rich client technology; as well as how to build a secure web application.
At the end of this course, students are expected to have a clear understanding of the structure and technologies of web applications. Students are also expected to have practical knowledge of some major web application environments and to be able to develop and deploy simple web applications. Cloud based platform are increasingly popular as the development and deployment platform. This course will incorporate the cloud aspect of web application development as well.
COMP5415 Multimedia Design and Authoring

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: COMP5114 or COMP9419. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides principles and practicalities of creating interactive and effective multimedia products. It gives an overview of the complete spectrum of different media platforms and current authoring techniques used in multimedia production. Coverage includes the following key topics: enabling multimedia technologies; multimedia design issues; interactive 2D and 3D computer animation; multimedia object modelling and rendering; multimedia scripting programming; post-production and delivery of multimedia applications.
COMP5427 Usability Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratory Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Usability engineering is the systematic process of designing and evaluating user interfaces so that they are usable. This means that people can readily learn to use them efficiently, can later remember how to use them and find it pleasant to use them. The wide use of computers in many aspects of people's lives means that usability engineering is of the utmost importance.
There is a substantial body of knowledge about how to elicit usability requirements, identify the tasks that a system needs to support, design interfaces and then evaluate them. This makes for systematic ways to go about the creation and evaluation of interfaces to be usable for the target users, where this may include people with special needs. The field is extremely dynamic with the fast emergence of new ways to interact, ranging from conventional WIMP interfaces, to touch and gesture interaction, and involving mobile, portable, embedded and desktop computers.
This unit will enable students to learn the fundamental concepts, methods and techniques of usability engineering. Students will practice these in small classroom activities. They will then draw them together to complete a major usability evaluation assignment in which they will design the usability testing process, recruit participants, conduct the evaluation study, analyse these and report the results.
COMP9007 Algorithms

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: COMP5211 Assumed knowledge: This unit of study assumes that students have general knowledge of mathematics (especially Discrete Math) and problem solving. Having moderate knowledge about Data structure can also help students to better understand the concepts of Algorithms will be taught in this course. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The study of algorithms is a fundamental aspect of computing. This unit of study covers data structures, algorithms, and gives an overview of the main ways of computational thinking from simple list manipulation and data format conversion, up to shortest paths and cycle detection in graphs. Students will gain essential knowledge in computer science, including basic concepts in data structures, algorithms, and intractability, using paradigms such as dynamic programming, divide and conquer, greed, local search, and randomisation, as well NP-hardness.
COMP9103 Software Development in Java

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture, Laboratory Prohibitions: COMP5214 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Programming in a legible, maintainable, reusable way is essential to solve complex problems in the pervasive computing environments. This unit will equip students with foundation of programming concepts that are common to widely used programming languages. Students will be progressively guided in this introductory unit from necessary and important building blocks of programming to the object-oriented approach. Java, one of the most popular programming languages, is used in this unit. It provides interdisciplinary approaches, applications and examples to support students from broad backgrounds such as science, engineering, and mathematics.
COMP9110 System Analysis and Modelling

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC3610 OR ELEC5743 OR INFO2110 OR INFO5001 Assumed knowledge: Experience with a data model as in COMP9129 or COMP9103 or INFO9220 or INFO9120 or COMP5212 or COMP5214 or COMP5028 or COMP5138 Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to the analysis of complex systems. Key topics are the determination and expression of system requirements (both functional and non-functional), and the representation of structural and behavioural models of the system in UML notations. Students will be expected to evaluate requirements documents and models as well as producing them. This unit covers essential topics from the ACM/IEEE SE2004 curriculum, especially from MAA Software Modelling and Analysis. Note: The lectures of this unit are co-taught with INFO2110.
COMP9120 Database Management Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project work Prohibitions: INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR INFO2005 OR INFO2905 OR COMP5138. Students who have previously studied an introductory database subject as part of their undergraduate degree should not enrol in this foundational unit, as it covers the same foundational content. Assumed knowledge: Some exposure to programming and some familiarity with data model concepts Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a conceptual and practical introduction to the use of common platforms that manage large relational databases. Students will understand the foundations of database management and enhance their theoretical and practical knowledge of the widespread relational database systems, as these are used for both operational (OLTP) and decision-support (OLAP) purposes. The unit covers the main aspects of SQL, the industry-standard database query language. Students will further develop the ability to create robust relational database designs by studying conceptual modelling, relational design and normalization theory. This unit also covers aspects of relational database management systems which are important for database administration. Topics covered include storage structures, indexing and its impact on query plans, transaction management and data warehousing.
In this unit students will develop the ability to: Understand the foundations of database management; Strengthen their theoretical knowledge of database systems in general and relational data model and systems in particular; Create robust relational database designs; Understand the theory and applications of relational query processing and optimisation; Study the critical issues in data and database administration; Explore the key emerging topics in database management.
Note that the first two thirds of the lectures of this foundational unit will be co-taught with the corresponding undergraduate class in semester 1 (INFO2120); tutorials and assignments will be organised separately.
COMP9121 Design of Networks and Distributed Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: COMP5116 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit covers general foundations of communication systems and a detailed walk through of the implementation of the TCP/IP protocol stack, which forms the basis of the Internet. The unit also covers the basic knowledge of how to analyse, design and implement simple communication protocols.
On completion of this unit students will have developed an understanding of the principles and practice of the layered model of communications architecture, the TCP/IP protocol stack and its component protocols, and various common techniques and tools for protocol analysis and design.
COMP9601 Computer and Network Organisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: COMP5213 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to computer organisation and network protocols. It covers a broad range of topics including computer hardware, software architecture (operating systems, compilers, etc), and principles of communication network protocols. It is designed to give students an understanding of how software programs operate and run inside the computer hardware, and therefore the knowledge how to use computers most effectively.
COMP9220 Object-Oriented Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project work Prohibitions: COMP5028 OR INFO3220 Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in COMP5028/INFO9220 are assumed to have elementary Java programming experience or equivalent experience in another object oriented programming language. This unit does not have assessment with heavy coding task. But some knowledge in object-oriented programming would have big impact on learning experience. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces essential object-oriented design methods and language mechanisms, especially the principles of modelling through Rational Unified Process and agile processes using Unified Modeling Language (UML) and Java or C++, both of which are industry standard. Students work in small groups to experience the process of object-oriented analysis, object-oriented design, implementation and testing by building a real-world application. Java or C++ is used as the implementation language and a special emphasis is placed on those features of Java or C++ that are important for solving real-world problems. Advanced software engineering features, including exceptions and name spaces are thoroughly covered.
CMPN5006 Recording Portfolio

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 to 5 hours per week of recording projects, consultations with Supervisor and participation in seminar workshops. Assessment: Recording projects and class presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a practical introduction to recording projects. Aspects of creative production are examined alongside project planning, management and the professional delivery of master recordings to appropriate standards. The student, in consultation with their supervisor, will devise a program of practical recording projects. This program will integrate into the existing musical activities that occur at the Conservatorium and as such the hours will be flexible and may include, evening and weekend projects. In addition students will be required to attend and participate in a number of seminars/workshops.
DESC9011 Audio Production

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Michael Bates, Assoc Prof William Martens Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Technical documentation (20%); project development (30%); final project (30%); presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit examines tools, techniques, processes and value systems involved in audio production. Proficiency in sound recording techniques, including field and studio recordings, is developed, including technical acoustic, audio and aesthetic considerations. Students extend their understanding and experience of production principles by which sound recordings are used for building up realistic and hyper-realistic auditory scenes. Perspectives on audio production come from aesthetics, practice, acoustics theory, audio technology and digital audio systems, but ultimately are founded in the discipline of listening. By bringing these perspectives together, this unit is designed for students with a wide range of production experience at a postgraduate level.
Students are expected to work in groups to produce an audio project in one or more of the following areas: drama, feature, documentary, sound composition, or music recording. Students are expected to: participate in the workshops; complete class exercises/constructions; read additional materials to discuss in classes; submit a script, composition or otherwise detailed proposal for recording and postproduction with detailed rationale of production values; produce and present a completed audio project, including documentation, evidence of background research, a commentary on the production and production outcomes, track sheets, mixing notes. It may be an adaptation or original work.
DESC9090 Audio Systems and Measurement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Densil Cabrera Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 10x3 hrs, Labs 3x3 hrs (and continued lab projects) Assumed knowledge: DESC9138 Assessment: Two assignments (1x40%, 1x60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will learn to make and understand a wide range of acoustical and electroacoustical measurements, assessed through laboratory or field work, and learn major aspects of sound system design, assessed through project work. Students will work in small groups in laboratory or field project work. Audio Systems and Measurement will develop knowledge and practical skills in electroacoustics; and the laboratory and project work will extend thinking and personal skills, so that students can apply the unit content to new situations.
Upon completing Audio Systems and Measurement, students will be expected to understand the signal-processing basis, implementation and limitations of a wide range of audio and acoustical measurement techniques, such as sound pressure, linear time-invariant system response, source directivity, non-linear distortion, time variance, uncertainty in measurement, intelligibility, and audio quality. Students will also be expected to be able to design sound reinforcement systems, and to model audio system performance using various theoretical techniques.
DESC9115 Digital Audio Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof William Martens Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 13 x 1.5 hrs, Labs 13 x 1.5 hrs Assessment: Two written review assignments (40%); one laboratory report (20%); weekly lab assignments (20%), 4 x in-class quiz (20%) Practical field work: Practical exercises include programming for digital signal processing of audio signals using high-level software packages to generate, manipulate and analyse sounds. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objective of this unit is to provide both a strong theoretical understanding of digital audio and practical experience in applying these principles to digital audio systems. This unit offers a systematic approach to understanding digital audio systems. Beginning with basic principles the unit provides a knowledge base for understanding advanced digital audio components, systems and techniques. Examples of everyday audio signals are used and characterised in terms of their temporal and spectral properties. Practical application is emphasised and is supported through laboratory exercises that include programming as well as the use of current hardware and software packages. Topics include: digital principles, digital systems, sampling and quantisation, 1-bit and multi-bit conversion, digital signal processing, filtering, spectral analysis, sampling-rate conversion, data compression (MPEG, etc.), effects processing (echo, reverb, etc.), virtual reality audio, mixing, editing, digital audio storage and transmission formats.
Having successfully completed this unit the student will have the tools to understand what happens to a digital audio signal when a given process is applied to it; how to best apply this process and how to successfully combine digital audio components.
DESC9117 Sound Design for New Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Michael Bates, Assoc Prof William Martens Session: Semester 2 Classes: Seminars 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Class attendance and participation (10%); Journal (20%); Major project: initial proposal presentation and 1000wd documentation (20%); Final project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce essential concepts in sound design for screen-based media, including for cinema, television, digital video, web-based and interactive content including head-mounted display. A grounding will be provided in the theory and criticism of sound design in order to develop an understanding of the potentialities of utilizing audio in synergy with visual media. The sound designer's role in the process of creation of meaning will be examined in cultural as well as technical contexts, with the aim of developing and extending production practices towards an individual aesthetic. The unit will also look at current computer-based tools and techniques available to the sound designer, as well as examine the various underlying strategies, processes, and sound design philosophies.
Upon completion of this unit students will be expected to: understand the audiovisual medium and its essential concepts and terminology, and to be acquainted with the history, theory and criticism of sound design for audiovision. Students will develop technical and conceptual skills in preproduction, general miking techniques, post-synchronisation dialogue recording and editing, producing sound effects, multi-track laying, creating atmospheres and various psychoacoustic effects, and mixing sound for screen-based content.
DESC9153 Graduate Internship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Dean (Education) Session: Intensive December,Intensive July,Intensive November,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Fieldwork Assessment: Log book signed by practice supervisor and 2000wd report on the benefits of the internship (100%); pass/fail only Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Masters students only. Graduate Diploma students with permission of the Program Coordinator. Advanced Standing will not be granted for this unit of study.
The aims of the internship are to provide a direct link between the academic core of the course and the disciplines and methods of practice; to enable candidates to experience aspects of practice and provide the opportunity for them to work in areas of the field outside their specific expertise; to enable candidates to observe, analyse and comment on the interaction between theoretical and practical issues of their Program as it is practiced, and to establish connections between practice and the development of relevant research programs. The internship is intended to provide the opportunity for students to work in various situations in their Program's area. A secondary intention is that students use the opportunities of placement to broaden their own experience beyond the limitations of their chosen discipline. Candidates must find a suitable professional placement. Permission to enrol is given after the proposed placement has been approved by the Program Director. The host organisation will nominate a supervisor for the student for the internship. The student must complete at least 120 hours of full or part-time experience, supervised by a practicing designer (or other professional depending upon the field). A log-book of each day's work, signed by the supervisor must be submitted on completion. A 2000-word report on the benefits of the internship must also be produced. At the end of the internship the student will: demonstrate that they have completed a program of work (through a log-book); present a report; analyse their experiences and compare these to the theoretical content of the units they have completed, and suggest appropriate research directions so as to improve the complementarity of theory to practice.
DESC9154 Lighting Design Software

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Wenye Hu Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5-day intensive (9am-5pm) Assessment: Two assignments (2x50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Modern lighting design practice requires the use of computer software to create design plans that can be easily modified, shared, and presented to clients. In this unit, students learn the basic operation of popular lighting design software packages, with particular emphasis on AGi32. This unit discusses the advantages and limitations of different calculation models used within lighting software. The fundamentals of rendering, importing and exporting data, selecting calculation modes, interpreting outputs, and complying with lighting design standards are included. Students gain hands-on experience modelling the effects of different lighting technologies within various architectural spaces. The use of lighting design software as a tool in the design process, rather than a replacement for it, is emphasised.
DESC9164 Lighting Technologies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Wenye Hu Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5-day intensive Prohibitions: DESC9063 Assessment: Two assignments (2x50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit covers the technologies employed in generating, distributing, and controlling light in illuminated environments. Students learn the advantages and disadvantages of different hardware options for various lighting applications. A brief history of lighting technologies and the physical processes involved with electrically generating light are included in this unit. Practical characteristics of currently popular lamp types, as well as emerging lighting technologies, are presented. The effects of integral luminaires and other light fittings on the resulting illumination are covered, as are the electrical requirements of different lighting technologies. This unit also includes calculation techniques for predicting the illumination in spaces from lighting products. The selection, operation, and implications of lighting control options are discussed. The underlying principles and practical consequences of the different characteristics of various lighting technologies are emphasised to enable students to independently evaluate future innovations in lighting technologies.
DESC9166 Photometry and Colorimetry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Wendy Davis Session: Semester 1 Classes: 5-day intensive. Prohibitions: DESC9072 Assessment: Two assignments (2x50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Measurements of light based only on physical properties are of limited use to the lighting designer. Instead, the tools to measure and communicate the characteristics of light sources and illumination consider the impact of the physical attributes of light on the human visual system. This unit covers the photometric measures related to the quantity of light and illumination and the colorimetric systems used to characterise the colour of lights and objects. The calculation methods underlying these measures are included, with an emphasis on useful simulation techniques. The derivations, meanings, proper applications, and limitations of these measurements systems are discussed. An overview of physical instruments for photometric and colorimetric measurements is included. Students learn to apply knowledge of photometry and colorimetry to evaluate lighting products.
DESC9167 Light and Vision

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Wendy Davis Session: Semester 1 Classes: 5-day intensive (9am-5pm) Prohibitions: DESC9085 Assessment: Two assignments (2x50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
In lighting design, the primary function of light is to facilitate visual perception of the illuminated scene. User-centred lighting design requires a thorough understanding of the biological link between light and vision. In this unit, students learn the fundamentals of the human visual system and the physical properties of light that impact perception. Specific topics includes an overview of visual anatomy, the behaviour of the photoreceptors, and post-receptoral processing that leads to colour perception. The spectral, spatial, and temporal characteristics of visual processing are also covered. Important visual phenomena, such as chromatic adaptation and contrast sensitivity, are discussed. The link between fundamental knowledge of the human visual system and the practical application of lighting design is emphasised.
DESC9198 Subjective Analysis in Lighting Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Wenye Hu Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures and Studio - 35 hours/semester Assessment: Group Design Project Report and Presentation (50%); Individual Design Report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Lighting to a high aesthetic standard under pre-determined constraints requires an understanding of visual perception, quality of light, form and modelling, human sensitivity to a wide range of lighting environments, and a balanced approach involving critical reasoning and subjective analysis. This unit will be valuable for those interested in the lighting of architectural forms, objects and environments that demand a high level of aesthetic sensitivity. It will not only draw on learning outcomes from other illumination design units, but also be open to related disciplines with the aim of extending acquired skills beyond the confines of traditional lighting practices. Students will gain a broadened ability to interpret and respond to a wide range of illumination applications.
DESA9008 Object Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Prohibitions: AWSS2020 Assumed knowledge: DESA1555 Assessment: Studio Projects and associated tasks (70%); Research Process Journal (30%) Practical field work: Studio practice. NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
In this unit students develop and inter-relate manufacturing and artisan skills with research, analysis and design development. It aims to develop a critical awareness of the nature of objects that surround us, exploring cultural, contextual and symbolic aspects of object design as well as functional and aesthetic qualities. Sustainability and social issues relating to their manufacture, use and disposal are also discussed. The unit aims to increase appreciation of the materiality of objects focusing on timber as an example and introduces students to the wonderful diversity of timber species, environmental and ethical issues associated with their selection, and also emerging alternative materials. Through a series of exercises, experiments and production of their major project, students develop knowledge of construction techniques and skills in using wood/plastics tools and machinery and in so doing, build an awareness of industrial and craft practices and how they impact on the design process and outcome. Students will be expected to produce a research process journal and report on how a particular designer/s or movement has informed or influenced their final project/s.
DESA9009 Public Art

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk and 2 x 3 hr field trips Prohibitions: AWSS2001 Assessment: Studio Projects and associated tasks (70%); Research Process Journal (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This practical unit will provide students with the opportunity to explore changing notions and legislative framework for public art. The course addresses the shift of focus from the making of objects in space to more self-reflexive modes of art making that use public space itself as a medium. Students will be introduced to early experimental works from the 1960s to more recent movements of DIY urbanism, public interventions and relational aesthetics. During the course students will study public artworks, through field trips and/or guest lectures and workshops with local and international artists, and work in public spaces to create their own works.
IDEA9101 IDEA Laboratory 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luke Hespanhol Session: Semester 1a Classes: Friday and/or Saturday blocks 6 hrs/day Prerequisites: IDEA9103 Corequisites: IDEA9102 Assessment: Class exercises (30%), Assignment (30%), Assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
The aim of this unit of study is the learning of key technical skills for prototyping and building interactive digital media within a creative design framework. The unit provides an introduction to the fundamentals of various software and hardware construction tools, and the technological platforms available for building sensor-based interfaces. The lab sessions will be conducted as a series of intensive workshops during the first half of the semester. Students will gain practical experience through a series of exercises and assignments. For those students enrolled in IDEA9102 IDEA Studio 1, it will provide the foundation for the technical implementation of the studio project.
IDEA9102 IDEA Studio 1

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luke Hespanhol Session: Semester 1b Classes: Friday/Saturday blocks 6 hrs/day Prerequisites: IDEA9106 Corequisites: IDEA9101 Assessment: Project (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
The aim of the studio is to explore new interaction possibilities offered by emerging digital technologies through a design-led approach. Each studio is based around one or more design projects, which address a specialised area of study, supported by lectures and workshops to introduce the relevant theory, knowledge and design precedents. The specialized areas of study will vary from semester to semester, ranging for example from small-scale wearable devices to large-scale environments, and will reflect contemporary issues in interaction, art, design, culture and technology. The studio aims to develop the student's conceptual design abilities together with their technical skills, within the framework of a highly creative, research-based and human-centred design process. Students will be expected to apply interaction design methodologies to their project work and follow a design-oriented approach to the development of hardware and software, through experimentation and iterative prototyping.
IDEA9103 Design Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Nathaniel Fay Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, Tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Quizzes (20%), Assignments (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to introduce students to computer programming, both as a tool for design computing and as a medium of expression in digital media. It will focus on the practical application of computer programming as a way to expand the students' abilities to use computers in creative design and research tasks. Topics covered include object-oriented programming concepts such as classes, methods, object creation, instance and local variables, primitive and object types, simple I/O, and control flow; and implementation techniques such as editing, using libraries, and compilation and runtime environments. Students will develop their programming skills through lab exercises and individual assignments, to explore creative applications of software. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.
IDEA9105 Interface Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, Tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Participation (10%); Design Assignments (90%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the fundamentals of user interface design. Interface design is an important element of a human-centred design approach to the development of interactive computational systems. Students will learn about industry standard user interface design and usability principles and guidelines, based in visual design theory and visual perception. They will acquire practical knowledge through the application of tools and techniques for designing and evaluating user interfaces for web and mobile products. The unit increases awareness of good and bad design through observation and evaluation of existing technology, and develops appreciation of visual design principles and their impact on the user experience of interactive products. The knowledge and skills developed in this unit will equip students with the essential capabilities for working in the interaction design and user experience profession. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.
IDEA9106 Design Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, Tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Design assignments (90%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of a human-centred approach to the design of products and systems. It introduces students to design thinking and how it can be productively applied to different design situations. The theoretical concepts, methods and tools for the key stages of interaction design are covered including user research, ideation, prototyping and user evaluation. It provides students with the principles, processes and tools for working collaboratively on design projects in studio. Students learn to build empathy with users, identify and reframe the problem space, develop value-driven design concepts and persuasively communicate design proposals with an emphasis on the user experience through visual storytelling.
IDEA9201 IDEA Laboratory 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 2a Classes: Friday and/or Saturday blocks 6 hrs/day Prerequisites: IDEA9103 Corequisites: IDEA9202 Assessment: Class exercises (30%), Assignment (30%), Assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
The aim of this unit of study is the learning of key technical skills for prototyping and building interactive digital media within a creative design framework. The unit provides an introduction to the fundamentals of various software and hardware construction tools, and the technological platforms available for building sensor-based interfaces. The lab sessions will be conducted as a series of intensive workshops during the first half of the semester. Students will gain practical experience through a series of exercises and assignments. For those students enrolled in IDEA9202 IDEA Studio 2, it will provide the foundation for the technical implementation of the studio project.
IDEA9202 IDEA Studio 2

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 2b Classes: Friday/Saturday blocks 6 hrs/day Prerequisites: IDEA9106 Corequisites: IDEA9201 Assessment: Project (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
The aim of the studio is to explore new interaction possibilities offered by emerging digital technologies through a design-led approach. Each studio is based around one or more design projects, which address a specialised area of study, supported by lectures and workshops to introduce the relevant theory, knowledge and design precedents. The specialized areas of study will vary from semester to semester, ranging for example from small-scale wearable devices to large-scale environments, and will reflect contemporary issues in interaction, art, design, culture and technology. The studio aims to develop the student's conceptual design abilities together with their technical skills, within the framework of a highly creative, research-based and human-centred design process. Students will be expected to apply interaction design methodologies to their project work and follow a design-oriented approach to the development of hardware and software, through experimentation and iterative prototyping.
IDEA9302 IDEA Research Project

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Group Supervision 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: 48 Credit Points including (18 credit points from IDEA9103 and IDEA9105 and IDEA9106) and (18 credit points from IDEA9101 and IDEA9102 and IDEA9201 and IDEA9202) Assessment: 2000wd Proposal and Presentation (10%); 5000wd Research Report and Built work (80%); Final presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit of study is available to MIDEA students only. Students must seek permission to enrol from the Program Director before the start of the teaching semester.
The research project offers students the opportunity to work on an individual research project exploring current problems and issues in a wide range of application areas that would benefit from an inter-disciplinary design research approach to design, technology and human-computer interaction. Students can choose to follow one of the primary types of design research: design (a fundamental component of the research is the design and implementation of an artefact/system); empirical (empirical data gathering is required to understand a phenomenon); model (a computational model is generated to understand a phenomenon); and studio-based (creative/experimental design or artform is produced for exhibition). Students must prepare a research proposal outlining the research objectives and questions, a brief literature review, the research methodology and a timeline. The project is written up into a research report, and may include evidence and documentation of Built Work.
This unit of study can be taken alone for students wishing to focus on the practice of design research, or in conjunction with IDEA9303 Research Dissertation for students wishing to develop their academic research capacity and with an interest in further postgraduate research study.
IDEA9303 IDEA Dissertation

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Group Supervision 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: 48 credit points including (18 credit points from IDEA9103 and IDEA9105 and IDEA9106) and (18 credit points from IDEA9101 and IDEA9102 and IDEA9201 and IDEA9202) Corequisites: IDEA9302 Assessment: 2000wd Proposal and presentation (10%); 10,000wd Research Dissertation and Built work (80%); Final presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit of study is available to MIDEA students only. Students must seek permission to enrol from the Program Director before the start of the teaching semester.
The combined research project and dissertation offers students the opportunity to work on an individual research project exploring current problems and issues in a wide range of application areas that would benefit from an inter-disciplinary design research approach to design, technology and human-computer interaction. Students can choose to follow one of the primary types of design research: design (a fundamental component of the research is the design and implementation of an artefact/system); empirical (empirical data gathering is required to understand a phenomenon); model (a computational model is generated to understand a phenomenon); and studio-based (creative/experimental design or artform is produced for exhibition). Students must prepare a research proposal outlining the research objectives and questions, a brief literature review, the research methodology and a timeline. The project is written up into a research dissertation, and may include evidence and documentation of Built Work. A single result is given for the combined project and dissertation.
IDEA9311 IDEA Research Internship

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Min. 8 hrs/semester group supervision; 2 hrs/wk supervision by private partner Prerequisites: 48 Credit Points including (18 credit points from IDEA9103 and IDEA9105 and IDEA9106) and (18 credit points from IDEA9101 and IDEA9102 and IDEA9201 and IDEA9202) Assessment: 2000wd Proposal and presentation (10%); 5000wd Written report and Built work (70%); Critical reflection on design process and Logbook (10%); Final presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must seek permission to enrol from the Program Director before the start of the teaching semester. Internship must end before end of semester. Advanced standing will not be granted for this unit of study.
This unit allows students to collaborate with a private partner on a project with a strong design research character. Such project would typically not be connected to the direct commercial goals, require a certain degree of risk, and necessitate a level of technical and design expertise that is not available by the private partner. The unit coordinator can choose to offer pre-approved client briefs from known external partners to interested students. Students need to submit a written project proposal, detailing the project objectives, the approach, the intended outcomes and timeline of the internship, and the agreement from the private partner. The proposal must describe how the outcomes of the internship will include design research work that has a clear relationship to the skills and knowledge taught in the MIDEA program. The project is written up into a final report, and may include evidence and documentation of Built Work.
IDEA9301 Graduation Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: 48 Credit Points including (18 credit points from IDEA9103 and IDEA9105 and IDEA9106) and (18 credit points from IDEA9101 and IDEA9102 and IDEA9201 and IDEA9202) Assessment: Project (90%); Portfolio (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the culminating studio of the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts that provides students with a capstone experience. The aim of this studio is to draw together and synthesise the learning that has taken place during the whole degree. The student will develop a graduation design project based on an industry- or community-focused brief. Students will work in small teams or individually to produce a design proposal and solution that addresses contemporary issues and challenges and incorporates innovate interactions and applications of emergent technologies. The submitted design work should be of high quality suitable for professional presentation and portfolio.
MARC6102 3D Computer Design Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Ivana Kuzmanovska Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Computer laboratory contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Assessment: Assignments Weeks 1-13 (80%); Final Portfolio Week 15 (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful, please seek permission from the Student Administration Centre (SAC).
This unit of study consolidates students' knowledge of advanced concepts in digital modelling, visualization media and digital fabrication techniques available for architectural design. The unit develops conceptual understanding of generative geometric logic through a case study analysis followed by a small design project. Students will explore the practical applications of the digital geometry they create using commercial modelling and rendering packages in conjunction with the digital fabrication equipment available in DMaF. It will help students: generate sophisticated digital geometry through pre-packaged techniques and scripting processes, assign colour and texture information, generate sophisticated images for visualization purposes and fabricate prototypes. At the conclusion of this unit students should be conversant with 3D modelling, photo-rendering and digital fabrication terminology and be able to generate complex 3D models. Class preparation: 3 hours/week, assessment preparation 8 hours/semester.
MFDI9313 Digital Editing for Film and Video

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project proposal (25%) and class presentation (15%) and project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to equip you with a conceptual understanding and technical expertise in the use of digital editing for film and video projects. You will be introduced to the use of software programs such as Final Cut Pro HD to explain how edit moving images in to a project and how moving images can be transformed over time in combination with text, masks, filters, effects and sound. You will learn how to edit and master in Final Cut Pro HD through an intensive series of tutorials film/video screenings and practical studio workshops. This will culminate in the production of a studio project. The project is to be developed in consultation with an academic adviser.
MMDE6001 History and Theory of New Media 1

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hour lecture and 1x2 hour tutorial/week Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (50%) and 1 x tutorial seminar (30%) and participation in class exercises (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this unit of study is to provide you with a theoretical understanding of New Media forms. The concept of New Media is explored in relation to interactivity, narrative, networked space and, more specifically, the Internet. The unit provides both an historical overview and critical perspective to a range of approaches and forms that have emerged in direct relationship to the possibilities of digital technology and networked space. A range of digital, interactive and internet-based art and design projects will be examined and discussed in relation to key concepts surrounding new media. This unit will allow you to conceptualise and situate your practice both in terms of media-specific debates and the broader context of contemporary art and media discourses.
MMDE6101 Animation for Media and Video

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hour lecture and 1x2-hour tutorial/week Assessment: 1x15min oral examination of presentation of major studio project (60%) and pre-production documentation (20%) and participation in class exercises (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Special permission is required for cross-faculty enrolments. Please contact unit of study co-oridinator.
The aim of this unit of study is to give you a comprehensive understanding of techniques and approaches to enable you to create animated sequences for use in interactive media and video. Through a combination of film/video screenings, tutorials, practical studio seminars and class critiques you will be provided with an understanding of the creative potential of animation. A range of digital techniques will be explored, including the use of software programs such as Adobe Flash. You will learn techniques such as rotoscoping, and frame-by-frame animation while being introduced to fundamental approaches for producing 2D animated sequences in the digital environment. In addition, a range of other techniques such as stop-motion animation will be examined in the context of contemporary production. During the semester you will complete a short animation project that will be developed, along with supporting paper-based designs, in consultation with an academic advisor.