Table G – Urban Design

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Urban Design

ARCH9001
Urban Design Studio A
12    A ARCH9100
Semester 1
Semester 2
ARCH9002
Urban Design Studio B
12    P ARCH9001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ARCH9060
Urban Design Report
12    P 48 credit points including ARCH9001
N ARCH9031, ARCH9045, ARCH9046, PLAN9010, PLAN9011, PLAN9018

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Administration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol. This unit is for Masters students in an Urban Design stream only.
Semester 1
Semester 2
ARCH9063
Urban Morphology
6    A Some prior study of architectural, urban or planning history.
N ARCH9021
Semester 2
ARCH9080
Urban Ecology, Design and Planning
6    N PLAN9048
Semester 2a
ARCH9100
Introduction to Urban Design
6   

Students may be granted advanced standing based on portfolio.
Int February
Int July
MARC4001
Urban Architecture Research Studio
12   

This studio cannot be taken in the same semester as MARC4002 or MARC4003. Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
Semester 1
Semester 2
MARC4002
Sustainable Architecture Research Studio
12   

This studio cannot be taken in the same semester with MARC4001 or MARC4003. Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
Semester 1
Semester 2
MARC4003
Digital Architecture Research Studio
12   

This studio cannot be taken in the same semester with MARC4001 or MARC4002. Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
Semester 1
Semester 2
MARC4102
Modern Architectural Theory
6    N ARCH6104, ARCH9048, ARCH9049
Semester 2
MARC4201
Modern Architectural History
6    N ARCH4102
Semester 1
PLAN9045
Economics for Planners
6      Semester 2
PLAN9061
Planning Principles, Systems & Practice
6    N PLAN9020, PLAN9044


Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful please contact the Student Administration Centre (SAC). Permission required in Semester 1 unless enrolled in Urban and Regional Planning.
Semester 1
Semester 2a
PLAN9062
Planning Law
6    C PLAN9061
N PLAN9021
Semester 2
PLAN9063
Strategic Planning and Design
6    N PLAN9027
Semester 1
PLAN9064
Land Use and Infrastructure Planning
6    A Some prior knowledge of urban design/place making principles as learned in the core unit ARCH 9100
N PLAN9028
Semester 2
PLAN9068
History & Theory of Planning & Design
6    N PLAN9031, ARCH9060
Semester 1

Urban Design

ARCH9001 Urban Design Studio A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rod Simpson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 3 hrs/wk Assumed knowledge: ARCH9100 Assessment: Group assignments x 3 (10%, 20%, 40%); individual assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
These studios are the heart of the urban design program. Values, knowledge and skills acquired in other units and from previous experience are supplemented and enhanced, and applied creatively to both the investigation and development phases of design projects at an urban scale. These may be concerned with the generation of strategies, frameworks, concepts, master plans, public space improvements, or other urban design purposes. They are chosen carefully to expose students to a range of contexts (central city, suburban, institutional campuses, etc) and contemporary issues concerning urban form, activity, transport and the implementation of projects.
Students are expected to extend their presentation methods by developing illustrative, writing and verbal skills appropriate to urban design. It is usual for the backgrounds of those enrolled in the studios to span at least architecture, planning and landscape architecture, with inter-disciplinary group work an essential part. Visionary and innovative approaches are encouraged.
Students will be expected to demonstrate appropriate (professional-level) problem recognition, investigative, analytical, interpretative, design and presentation skills and abilities on projects of an urban scale. Assessment may also embrace abilities to prepare and interpret project briefs, program proposals and work in groups.
The central aim of this unit is to develop abilities and skills (investigation, analysis and interpretation, design development and presentation) which will enable students to carry out urban design projects such as the preparation of strategies, frameworks, concepts and master plans in a professional and visionary manner.
ARCH9002 Urban Design Studio B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rod Simpson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: ARCH9001 Assessment: Groups assignments x 3 (10%), (20%), (40%); individual assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Students will be expected to demonstrate appropriate (professional-level) problem recognition, investigative, analytical, interpretative, design and presentation skills and abilities on projects of an urban scale. Assessment may also embrace abilities to prepare and interpret project briefs, program proposals and work in groups. These studios are the heart of the urban design program. Values, knowledge and skills acquired in other units and from previous experience are supplemented and enhanced, and applied creatively to both the investigation and development phases of design projects at an urban scale. These may be concerned with the generation of strategies, frameworks, concepts, master plans, public space improvements, or other urban design purposes. They are chosen carefully to expose students to a range of contexts (central city, suburban, institutional campuses, etc) and contemporary issues concerning urban form, activity, transport and the implementation of projects. Students are expected to extend their presentation methods by developing illustrative, writing and verbal skills appropriate to urban design. It is usual for the backgrounds of those enrolled in the studios to span at least architecture, planning and landscape architecture, with inter-disciplinary group work and essential part. Visionary and innovative approaches are encouraged. The central aim of this unit is to develop abilities and skills (investigation, analysis and interpretation, design development and presentation) which will enable students to carry out urban design projects such as the preparation of strategies, frameworks, concepts and master plans in a professional and visionary manner.
ARCH9060 Urban Design Report

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rod Simpson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Individual supervision (approx. 1 hr/wk) Prerequisites: 48 credit points including ARCH9001 Prohibitions: ARCH9031, ARCH9045, ARCH9046, PLAN9010, PLAN9011, PLAN9018 Assessment: Urban design report (approx. 10,000 to 15,000 words) (90%); presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Submit an Independent Study Approval Form to the Student Administration Centre (SAC), signed by your proposed supervisor, with your request to enrol. This unit is for Masters students in an Urban Design stream only.
The Urban Design Report is a substantial project involving research conducted over one semester. It will usually take the form of an illustrated report (between 10000 and 15000 words) on an approved urban design subject of the student's choice. The subject may be of a practical bent (e.g. review or preparation of an urban design project) or more theoretical (e.g. review of a conceptual viewpoint), or it may occupy the middle ground (e.g. exploration of a contemporary issue or review/testing of a method). If of a more practical nature, its theoretical underpinning should be explicit. If more theoretical, it should refer to its practical implications. The report is an opportunity to advance knowledge and skills in a particular area of urban design and so develop a "professional edge". The aim of the Report is to enhance abilities and knowledge essential to the practice of urban design. These include the abilities to: define and address a practical or theoretical urban design problem; conduct such a project in an acceptable investigatory manner; think critically about the subject; identify, access and use appropriate and up-to-date information sources, including relevant theory and methods; and present the report, including appropriate illustrations, in a manner that shows both academic and professional competence. The report must demonstrate these features. Permission to continue the Urban Design Report is subject to the approval of a satisfactory research proposal by week 3 of the semester in which the student is enrolled. The Urban Design report is to be submitted by the end of the first week of the formal examination period for the semester in which the student is enrolled.
ARCH9063 Urban Morphology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rod Simpson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 1 hr/wk (weeks 1-9); tutorial 2 hrs/wk (weeks 10-13) Prohibitions: ARCH9021 Assumed knowledge: Some prior study of architectural, urban or planning history. Assessment: Scoping Report (20%), Class Presentation (20%) and Final Report (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The unit outlines the nature of urban morphology, and its rise as an area of study, and explores the evolution of city forms with an emphasis upon urban structure and typology. Most designed components of our cities conform in their general characteristics to identifiable types; they reflect the functions of cities, cultural values and the technological, economic and social circumstances of their times. These have been laid down over particular landforms and previous built forms and landscapes to result in usually complex, and often distinct, local characteristics.
The ability to recognize, investigate and respond to these forms and relationships lies at the heart of good urban design. The development of an historical knowledge, and of sensibilities and skills in the recording and interpretation of urban pattern and form for design purposes is the unit's primary aim. It will develop abilities to make more informed 'readings' of the urban landscape, and judgments about structure and form in contemporary urban design: retention, modification, replacement, etc. On completion, a student will be better able to: recognize structures and patterns, and key building and spatial typologies that contribute to overall city morphology; record and describe these, investigate and explain their origins, and discuss informatively their place in urban change and contemporary design.
It complements the Urban Design - Ideas and Methods unit (ARCH9062) which emphasises the theories and models underpinning the forms that are covered in this unit. It is a core unit that supports the Urban Design Studios in the Urban Design programs and an informative elective for students enrolled in or intending to enrol in the Urban Architecture Research Studio.
ARCH9080 Urban Ecology, Design and Planning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rod Simpson/Assoc Prof Paul Jones Session: Semester 2a Classes: Intensive block mode: Lectures 3 hrs/wk for 7 weeks, plus self-directed preparation and assingments, for a minimum total student commitment of approximately 35 hours Prohibitions: PLAN9048 Assessment: Assignment (25%), Presentation (25%), Design-related report (50%) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit will introduce the conceptual bases for sustainable development and explore how principles of sustainability can be introduced into land use planning and urban design, including environmental management and multi-criteria evaluation methodologies in three modules:
Module 1 will examine the evolution of urban areas in relation to their biophysical setting using the Sydney metropolitan area as a case study. This will lead to an understanding and appreciation of the urban ecology of the city in terms of the flows of materials, resources and energy, and the challenges presented by climate change and peak oil.
Module 2 will introduce principles of sustainability and the history and development of concepts of urban sustainability.
Module 3 will introduce methods and frameworks for evaluating and measuring sustainability.
ARCH9100 Introduction to Urban Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Rod Simpson Session: Int February,Int July Classes: Intensive delivery for total of 38 hours Assessment: Site and place analysis (25%), graphic and visual representation (15%), numerical analysis (15%), 3 dimensional computer modelling (15%), ideas for placemaking comprising an illustrated report (30%) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: Students may be granted advanced standing based on portfolio.
This introductory unit of study will provide students with the necessary skills to participate effectively in the urban design studios and will include site, spatial and public domain analysis, map and plan reading, visual, verbal and written communication techniques, and basic computer-based 3 dimensional modelling and numerical analysis. This unit will introduce students to the objectives and principles of urban design by analysing a number of public spaces, the spaces between buildings and the public domain and urban conditions in Sydney.
MARC4001 Urban Architecture Research Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lee Stickells and Dr Peter Armstrong Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact (technical consultants and demonstrations as required), plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum student commitment averaging 18 hours per week. Assessment: Portfolio (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This studio cannot be taken in the same semester as MARC4002 or MARC4003. Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
The studio examines the role and agency of architecture in the urban context - interrogating the internal and external parameters that act on the design process at incremental urban scales and intensities and engaging with the societal, financial, legislative and managerial frameworks that shape urban development, The studio will prompt students to develop critical positions in regard to urban issues and to extend and explore those positions through the architectural design process.
MARC4001 Urban Architecture Research Studio, MARC4002 Sustainable Architecture Research Studio and MARC4003 Digital Architecture Research Studio are all available in both semesters 1 and 2. Students may enrol or pre-enrol freely, but some will be asked to swap to create equal groups. After three semesters each student will have done each of the studios. The studios examine the relationships between architecture and urbanism; architecture and sustainability; and architecture and digital design. Each is based around one or more design projects which address a specialised area of study, supported by lectures and seminars which introduce the relevant theory, knowledge and design precedents. Studios require the investigation of key technical issues and systems, and their innovative integration in the design, with the preparation of appropriate contract documents. On the successful completion of these units, students will have demonstrated: an ability to formulate, interpret and communicate appropriate concepts derived from the study of brief and site; an ability to extend those starting points into a working design proposal; an ability to develop the design proposal in response to critique, and produce a building design which demonstrably embodies understanding of the principles associated with the specialised study area; an ability to communicate the design ideas effectively through appropriate graphic and three-dimensional means using architectural conventions; and an ability to cohesively design and execute a comprehensive presentation of the project. These units are core to the Master of Architecture.
MARC4002 Sustainable Architecture Research Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glen Hill/Daniel Ryan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact (technical consultants and demonstrations as required), plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 18 hours per week. Assessment: Portfolio (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This studio cannot be taken in the same semester with MARC4001 or MARC4003. Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
MARC4002 Studio B Sustainable Architecture will focus on the theories, technologies and techniques that promote the creation of a sustainable built environment. The studio projects will directly explore the interdependent issues of environmental, social and economic sustainability. The studio will prompt students to develop critical positions in regard to sustainability and to extend and explore those positions through the architectural design process. MARC4001 Urban Architecture Research Studio, MARC4002 Sustainable Architecture Research Studio and MARC4003 Digital Architecture Research Studio are all available in both semesters 1 and 2. Students may enrol or pre-enrol freely, but some will be asked to swap to create equal groups. After three semesters each student will have done each of the studios. The studios examine the relationships between architecture and urbanism; architecture and sustainability; and architecture and digital design. Each is based around one or more design projects which address a specialised area of study, supported by lectures and seminars which introduce the relevant theory, knowledge and design precedents. Studios require the investigation of key technical issues and systems, and their innovative integration in the design, with the preparation of appropriate contract documents.On the successful completion of these units, students will have demonstrated: an ability to formulate, interpret and communicate appropriate concepts derived from the study of brief and site; an ability to extend those starting points into a working design proposal; an ability to develop the design proposal in response to critique, and produce a building design which demonstrably embodies understanding of the principles associated with the specialised study area; an ability to communicate the design ideas effectively through appropriate graphic and three-dimensional means using architectural conventions; and an ability to cohesively design and execute a comprehensive presentation of the project. These units are core to the Master of Architecture.
MARC4003 Digital Architecture Research Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dagmar Reinhardt Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact (technical consultants and demonstrations as required), plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 18 hours per week. Assessment: Portfolio (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This studio cannot be taken in the same semester with MARC4001 or MARC4002. Students may incur materials costs in this unit.
MARC4003 Studio C Digital Architecture explores theories, media and techniques that involve digital mediation to create engaging architectural designs that stimulate all human senses in their relationship with the built environment. The studio addresses various issues of digital media, digital design techniques, design theories, computational concepts and other factors influencing the development of architectural production using digital tools. The studio prompts critical reflections on design conventions and creates novel design positions. MARC4001 Urban Architecture Research Studio, MARC4002 Sustainable Architecture Research Studio and MARC4003 Digital Architecture Research Studio are all available in both semesters 1 and 2. Students may enrol or pre-enrol freely, but some will be asked to swap to create equal groups. After three semesters each student will have done each of the studios. The studios examine the relationships between architecture and urbanism; architecture and sustainability; and architecture and digital design. Each is based around one or more design projects which address a specialised area of study, supported by lectures and seminars which introduce the relevant theory, knowledge and design precedents. Studios require the investigation of key technical issues and systems, and their innovative integration in the design, with the preparation of appropriate contract documents. On the successful completion of these units, students will have demonstrated: an ability to formulate, interpret and communicate appropriate concepts derived from the study of brief and site; an ability to extend those starting points into a working design proposal; an ability to develop the design proposal in response to critique, and produce a building design which demonstrably embodies understanding of the principles associated with the specialised study area; an ability to communicate the design ideas effectively through appropriate graphic and three-dimensional means using architectural conventions; and an ability to cohesively design and execute a comprehensive presentation of the project. These units are core to the Master of Architecture.
MARC4102 Modern Architectural Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prohibitions: ARCH6104, ARCH9048, ARCH9049 Assessment: Assignment 1 (30%); Assignment 2 (10%); Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The objective of the Modern Architectural Theory unit is to equip students with a critical understanding of key Western architectural theories from the Enlightenment to the present. Emphasis is placed on the specific historical situations and cultural and philosophical contexts in which those theories arose, and ultimately how they were represented within the domain of architectural embodiment. It is organized predominantly as a chronological survey which clearly identifies particular trains of thought in their continuity and transformation throughout history. Students will become generally conversant in the principles of central theories, and will understand their terms and references. Through readings, lectures, and tutorial sessions, students will acquire the literacy required to perceive and articulate contemporary theoretical standpoints, and will refine their research and writing skills through independent research into a particular aspect of recent architectural theory and history related to their concurrent studio design project. Close attention will be paid to the exchange between practice and theory and the relevance of the discussed theories to the formation of current circumstances, and to the place of architecture within contemporary culture as a whole.
MARC4201 Modern Architectural History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prohibitions: ARCH4102 Assessment: Illustrated Research Essay (50%), Critical Summaries (20%), and Seminar Presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit presents foundational knowledge concerning modern movements in global architecture and urbanism, from the early-20th century to the present. It explores the relationships between developments in architectural practice and broader dynamics of 20th century history. Organised as a chronological survey focused on case studies of individual buildings, the course uses architectural exemplars to explore the social, political, technological, economic, and aesthetic guises of modernity. In addition to developing student analytical skills, the unit seeks to introduce students to formal and conceptual approaches to architectural modernity, provide a critical overview of the architectural profession and its historical context over the last century, and impart knowledge of the major periods and developments of modern movements in architecture and their relationship to the multiple guises of modernity in which they were embedded.
Through readings and lectures, students will acquire the architectural literacy required to perceive the contemporary built environment as an artefact of modernity's varied legacies. In addition, students will be expected to refine their research and writing skills through their individual investigations of a particular aspect of modern architecture.
PLAN9045 Economics for Planners

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Phibbs Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk Assessment: 2 x individual written reports of 2,000 words (70%); 1 x group presentation and report (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of PLAN9045 Economics for Planners is to introduce the key economic theories, processes and techniques used by contemporary urban planners. The Unit of Study has two parts. In the first part of the unit, students are introduced to the economic drivers shaping city and regional development outcomes, and the location and form of different land uses and how they evolve. The second part of the unit equips students with core technical skills, including project evaluation, economic impact analysis, development feasibility, and introductory aspects of public finance.
PLAN9061 Planning Principles, Systems & Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Nicole Gurran Session: Semester 1,Semester 2a Classes: 4 day intensive (9am-5pm) Prohibitions: PLAN9020, PLAN9044 Assessment: Assignment 1 (40%); assignment 2/presentation (10%); assignment 3 (50%) Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: Enrolment numbers limited by teaching resources. If your attempt to enrol online is unsuccessful please contact the Student Administration Centre (SAC). Permission required in Semester 1 unless enrolled in Urban and Regional Planning.
This unit aims to prepare you for professional practice as a strategic or development assessment planner. It focuses on social, economic and environmental principles for contemporary planning practice; the systems for land use planning and environmental management in Australia, and the practice of statutory planning and development assessment in NSW.
By the end of this unit of study you will: understand the social, economic, and environmental principles underpinning contemporary planning practice; appreciate key legal and institutional processes for environmental planning in Australia and internationally; be familiar with the various planning state, regional, and local planning instruments in NSW, and understand when and how they apply to planning proposals. You will also be able to assess the social, economic, and environmental impacts of basic planning proposals, and justify these recommendations in professional planning reports. In preparing for professional practice you will gain an understanding of the principles, techniques and requirements for public participation in environmental planning and assessment; and the ethical responsibilities of land use planners, including respect for diversity and the importance of social equity, in guiding decision making processes and assessing planning proposals.
PLAN9062 Planning Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mary-Lynne Taylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk Corequisites: PLAN9061 Prohibitions: PLAN9021 Assessment: Local Government Decision-making Report, Court Decision-making Report, and Heritage Decision-making Report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to develop an understanding of planning law that enables competent professional practice in addressing a range of complex planning issues. Students will be able to prepare reports on practical planning issues that demonstrate: knowledge of how planning intentions are implemented through policies, instruments and controls; knowledge of how planning law shapes practice; knowledge of instrumental arrangements and environmental planning procedures; knowledge of the main characteristics of well-reasoned and well-structured documents; awareness of the importance of evidence and argument in preparing planning proposals, for example, about planning instruments and development applications; and a general understanding of techniques for community consultation.
PLAN9063 Strategic Planning and Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Phibbs Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk, seminar 2 hrs/wk. An additional hour of tuition time may be assigned. Prohibitions: PLAN9027 Assessment: Three reports and graphics, based on group work on a project, with individual submissions, each equivalent to 2,000-2,500 words in length. Assessment (2 x 30%, 1 x 40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of PLAN9063 Strategic Planning and Design is to provide students with grounding in the core knowledge and skills needed to practice as a contemporary planner. A key emphasis in the unit is understanding the skills needed to undertake strategic planning at a range of levels (both process and content). Strategic planning in one form or other is a generic process that underpins much of the work that planners and urban designers are involved in at varying spatial levels. This course will provide students with the basic skills required to function as a planner and it will also act as an introduction to a number of other units in the program by highlighting the connection between the work of a planner and the need to understand a range of different knowledge and skill areas. The basic skills which will be covered include basic demographic analysis, graphic presentation, governance audits, consultation strategies and survey tools, economic analysis, and GIS. In addition, this Unit of Study will enable students to develop generic skills such as group discussion, productive group work and organisation, negotiation skills and information literacy skills. This is an introductory core unit for the Urban Planning degree and an elective for the Urban Design degree.
PLAN9064 Land Use and Infrastructure Planning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Paul Jones Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk. Additonal tuition time may be assigned for introduction to graphic plan making. Prohibitions: PLAN9028 Assumed knowledge: Some prior knowledge of urban design/place making principles as learned in the core unit ARCH 9100 Assessment: Two illustrated reports, each equivalent to 2,000 to 2,500 words, consisting of 1 x group work on a project (50%) and 1 x individual report (40%); class attendance and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is primarily concerned with planning, land use and infrastructure within the built environments. It emphasises conceptual knowledge, with examples and case studies to demonstrate the application of concepts in practice. Students are encouraged to think independently, creatively and critically in developing understanding and practical knowledge about environmental planning at the metropolitan and local level. This unit is in two modules, each of which is assessed.
1. Land use, infrastructure planning and urban development: different forms of infrastructure; the role of infrastructure in creating good environments and urban development; transport and the space economy; accessibility, the emergence of transport technologies and their influence on urban form; the impacts of car travel on densities, dispersion, congestion etc; orthodox transport planning; transport systems management; demand management and travel pricing; traffic restraint and local area traffic management; mobility and accessibility; networks, centres, and development corridors; transit oriented development and urban form. The Sydney Metropolitan Strategy and concepts contained therein are used as a main focus for this module.
2. Land use planning, development control and plan making: within the context of more effective land use planning, this module examines the process of assessing a local area (such as structure, form and understanding character), developing local vision and neighbourhood strategies and structure plan, translating the strategy and structure plan into basic land use and planning controls (such as building height, floor space ratio, heritage, and other local area provisions) and producing a basic plan for development control purposes. A case study is used for group work (with practitioners involved) so as to understand how the plan making process evolves and is constructed. Questioning the assumptions and values that underpin planning controls and guidelines is a key skill emphasised in the unit via the group work. This is an introductory core unit for the Urban Planning degree and an elective for the Urban Design degree.
PLAN9068 History & Theory of Planning & Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Paul Jones and Assoc Prof Rod Simpson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk Prohibitions: PLAN9031, ARCH9060 Assessment: Assignment 1 short questions (35%); group work local area analysis (30%); analytical essay (25%); attendance and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is in two overlapping modules, each of which is assessed.

Module one enables students to understand how the main concepts and practices of urban planning and development have evolved; appreciate different perspectives about the roles and purposes of planning; undertake basic historical research about Australian urban planning and development issues, and prepare basic stories and arguments about practical planning issues and current theories. There is a strong emphasis on enriching the ability of students to better appreciate urban form, structure and planning practice generally by analysing such form, structure and process through the lens of history (as 'snapshots' in time), and the understanding planning drivers that shape and express such urban change. Interpreting planning practice and what this means and reflects (such as underlying values, norms attitudes, public interest, etc) is a key element of this module.

Concurrent with module one, module two familiarises students with the main ideas and methods that have influenced urban design practice from the late nineteenth century to the present. It covers the dominant urban design theories, principles, conceptual and physical models, analytical methods and drawings from key contributing authors over the period, and explores critically how and why these arose, their interrelationships, spheres of influence, and continuing validity. In this module, key urban design 'classics' are discussed critically as history, design sources and tools.
Students will be able to: critically review and interpret key planning and urban design texts, construct and present basic arguments, orally and in documents; access and engage with key literature and other sources of knowledge; and use basic conceptual frameworks about planning arguments and stories for both the overlapping fields of urban planning and urban design.
This is an introductory core unit for both the Urban Planning and Urban Design degrees.