Master of Urban Design

Unit of study descriptions

Certificate, Diploma and Master of Urban Design

Core units

ARCH9100 Introduction to Urban Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Non Arkaraprasertkul Session: Semester 1a,Semester 2a Classes: Intensive delivery (lectures and tutorials) for total of 38 hours over 7 weeks Assessment: (60%) Formative assessment, (40%) summative assessment. Assessments comprise both group and individual components. Peer review of group work will be required. Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students may be granted advanced standing based on portfolio.
This introductory unit of study will provide students with the necessary skills to participate effectively in the urban design studios and integrated urbanism studio. The unit will include site, spatial and public domain analysis, map and plan reading, visual, verbal and written communication techniques, and basic computer-based 3 dimensional modelling and numerical analysis. It will introduce students to the objectives and principles of urban design by analysing a number of public spaces, the spaces between buildings and the public domain and urban conditions in Sydney.
Textbooks
Glaeser, Edward. Triumph of the city: How our greatest invention makes us richer, smarter, greener, healthier, and happier. Penguin, 2011.
ARCH9063 Urban Form and Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Senior Lecturer Deena Ridenour Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly lectures and tutorials Prerequisites: ARCH9100 Prohibitions: ARCH9021 Assumed knowledge: Some prior study of architectural, urban or planning history. Assessment: Formative Assessment (40%) and Summative Assessment (60%). Assessments comprise both group and individual components. Peer review of group work will be required. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit explores the complexity and evolution of city form and the influences of planning and design processes and practice.
Using Australian and international case studies, the unit will investigate how urban functions, cultural values; technological, socio-economic and political circumstances; and design theory and practice shape the form of specific cities over time. The morphological elements of the city including: ecological systems; settlement and landownership patterns; transport, open space and street networks; urban infrastucture; open space, street and building typologies ¿ are investigated to reveal often distinct local characteristics and the forces that shaped them.
The ability to recognize, investigate and respond to the forces that shape the city lies at the heart of good urban design. On completion, a student will be better able to: recognize structures and patterns, and key building and spatial typologies that contribute to overall city morphology; record and describe these, investigate and explain their origins, and discuss informatively their place in the evolving city and contemporary design.
It complements the History and Theory Planning and Design (PLAN9068) which emphasises the theories and models underpinning the forms that are covered in this unit. It is a core unit that supports the Urban Design Studios in the Urban Design program and the Integrated Urbanism Studio in the Urbanism program and an informative elective for students enrolled in or intending to enrol in the Urban Architecture Research Studio.
PLAN9068 History and Theory of Planning and Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Paul Jones Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2hrs/wk (and may include some tutorials and group discussions) Prohibitions: PLAN9031 or ARCH9062 or ARCH9031 or MARC4201 Assessment: Assignment 1: short questions including local field work/observation (40%); Assignment 2 is an analytical portfolio of inqury into 3-4 papers with a strong emphasis on understanding key concepts in the modern planning era via clarity of text and strong visual/image support (50%).Group work (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is in two overlapping modules, each of which is assessed.
Module one enables students to understand how the main concepts and practices of urban planning and development have evolved; appreciate different perspectives about the roles and purposes of planning; undertake basic historical research about Australian urban planning and development issues, and prepare basic stories and arguments about practical planning issues and current theories. There is a strong emphasis on enriching the ability of students to better appreciate urban form, structure and planning practice generally by analysing such form, structure and process through the lens of history (as 'snapshots' in time), and the understanding of planning theory as drivers that shape and express such urban change such as Garden City values. Interpreting planning practice, places and spaces at different scales and what this reflects (such as underlying theory, values, norms attitudes, public interest, etc.) is a key element of this module.
Concurrent with module one, module two familiarises students with the main ideas and methods that have influenced urban design practice from the late nineteenth century to the present. It covers the dominant urban design theories, principles, conceptual and physical models, analytical methods and drawings from key contributing authors over the period, and explores critically how and why these arose, their interrelationships, spheres of influence, and continuing validity. In this module, the work of key urban planning and design idealists and visionaries are discussed such as Ebenezer Howard and Le Corbusier.
Students will be able to: critically review and interpret key planning and urban design texts/papers; construct and present basic arguments orally and in conjunction with graphics/images in illustrated documents; access and engage with key literature and other sources of knowledge; and use basic conceptual frameworks about planning arguments and stories for both the overlapping fields of urban planning and urban design. Interpreting the built form around you from an historical lens is an important learning outcome.
Textbooks
"City Reader" (Fifth Edition) by Richard Le Gates and Frederic Stout (Routledge)
ARCH9001 Urban Design Studio: Urban Precinct

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Senior Lecturer Deena Ridenour Session: Semester 2 Classes: Half-day weekly lectures and studio based tutorials Prerequisites: ARCH9100 Assessment: Mid-term Presentation and Submission (50%); Final Presenation and Submission (50%); Assessments will include both group and individaul work. Group work is peer reviewed. An individual Design Journal is a requirement. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Design studios are the heart of the urban design program. Values, knowledge and skills acquired in other units and from previous experience are supplemented and enhanced, and applied creatively to both the investigation and development phases of design projects at an urban scale.
Urban Design Studio: Urban Precinct is concerned with developing design propositions that respond to the changing environmental, economic and social context of the city and that challenge `business as usual¿ practice. Projects are carefully chosen to explore large complex urban areas, such as urban centres, waterfront precincts, renewal precincts, institutional campuses or major infrastructure interventions. The studio will generate proposals for major urban structures, spaces and forms which are rigourously informed by design methodologies.
Inter-disciplinary group work is an essential part of the studio and integrates the broad range of backgrounds and skills of the students while mimicing the reality of practice.
The central aim of this unit is to develop illustrative, writing and verbal skills which will enable students to carry out urban design projects such as the preparation of strategies, frameworks, master plans and public domain concepts in a professional and visionary manner. Students will be expected to demonstrate appropriate problem recognition, investigative, analytical, interpretative, design and presentation skills and abilities on projects of major urban scale. Assessment may also embrace abilities to prepare and interpret project briefs, program proposals and work in groups.
ARCH9002 Urban Design Studio: Urban Project

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Senior Lecturer Deena Ridenour Session: Semester 1 Classes: Half-day weekly lectures and studio based tutorials Prerequisites: ARCH9100 Assessment: Mid-term Presentation and Submission (50%); Final Presenation and Submission (50%); Assessments will include both group and individaul work. Group work is peer reviewed. An individual Design Journal is a requirement. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Design studios are the heart of the urban design program. Values, knowledge and skills acquired in other units and from previous experience are supplemented and enhanced, and applied creatively to both the investigation and development phases of design projects at an urban scale.
Urban Design Studio: Urban Project is concerned with the design development for a local urban project that explores how a specific design intervention can be a catalyst to broader urban change. Projects are carefully chosen to explore complex local urban sites or groups of sites and to generate proposals for public and private building types, streets, spaces and transport infrastructure that are rigourously informed by design methodologies. Implementation through staging, development controls and guidelines will also be addressed.
Inter-disciplinary group work is an essential part of the studio and integrates the broad range of backgrounds and skills of the students while mimicing the reality of practice.
The central aim of this unit is to develop illustrative, writing and verbal skills which will enable students to carry out urban design projects such as the preparation of frameworks, master plans and public domain concepts in a professional manner. Students will be expected to demonstrate appropriate problem recognition, investigative, analytical, interpretative, design and presentation skills and abilities on projects of local urban scale. Assessment may also embrace abilities to prepare and interpret project briefs, program proposals and work in groups.
ARCH9092 Urban Report

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Introductory Seminar - 2 hours; Presentation of Draft Outline - 3-hour Seminar; Presentation of Final Content - 3-hour Seminar; 10 weekly 1-hour meetings with Supervisor Prerequisites: 48 credit points including- ARCH9100, ARCH9063, ARCH9074, ARCH9080, ARCH9075, PLAN9068, PLAN9061 Prohibitions: ARCH9060 or PLAN9018 or PLAN9010 or PLAN9011 Assessment: Preliminary Report (5%); First Draft Report (20%); Final Presentation (5%); Report (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Urbanism Report is a substantial project involving research conducted over one semester. It will usually take the form of an illustrated report (between 5,000 and 10,000 words) on an approved subject of the student's choice. The aim of the unit is to allow students to deepen their understanding, and methodological approach in relation to an aspect of urbanism of the student's choice and with the approval of the program director. The subject may be of a practical bent (e.g. review or preparation of an urban design, or urban development project) or more theoretical (e.g. review of a conceptual viewpoint), or it may occupy the middle ground (e.g. exploration of a contemporary issue or review/testing of a method). If of a more practical nature, its theoretical underpinning should be explicit. If more theoretical, it should refer to its practical implications. The report is an opportunity to advance knowledge and skills in a particular area of urbanism and so develop a 'professional edge'. The aim of the report is to enhance abilities and knowledge essential to the practice of urbanism.
Textbooks
N/A: the supervisor will provide advice in regards to appropriate text to assist in the preparation of the Report.

Electives

Electives may be selected from any postgraduate units in the School of Architecture, Design and Planning, or, with the permission of the Program Director, from any other postgraduate course in the University.
ARCH9080 Urban Ecology, Design and Planning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hrs lectures/tutorials/wk Prohibitions: PLAN9048 Assessment: Two assessments, each 50%; both assessments may comprise group and individual work. Peer assessment of group tasks may be required. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce the conceptual bases for sustainable development and explore how principles of sustainability can be introduced into land use planning and urban design, including environmental management and multi-criteria evaluation methodologies in three modules. The unit will examine the evolution of urban areas in relation to their biophysical setting. This will lead to an understanding and appreciation of the urban ecology of a city in terms of the flows of materials, resources and energy, and the challenges presented by climate change and peak oil. The principles of sustainability and the history and development of concepts of urban sustainability will be demonstrated through case studies. Assessments will explore a student's learning of the methods and frameworks for evaluating and measuring sustainability that are introduced in this unit.
PLAN9063 Strategic Planning and Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk; site visits and workshops may be organised outside of timetabled hours Prohibitions: PLAN9027 Assessment: There are two assessments, each worth 50%. The assessments may include group work. Group work will be peer assessed. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of PLAN9063 Strategic Planning and Design is to provide students with grounding in the core knowledge and skills needed to practice as a contemporary planner. A key emphasis in the unit is understanding the skills needed to undertake strategic planning at a range of levels (both process and content). Strategic planning in one form or other is a generic process that underpins much of the work that planners and urban designers are involved in at varying spatial levels. This course will provide students with the basic skills required to function as a planner and it will also act as an introduction to a number of other units in the program by highlighting the connection between the work of a planner and the need to understand a range of different knowledge and skill areas. Basic skills may include basic demographic analysis, graphic presentation, governance audits, consultation strategies and survey tools, economic analysis, and GIS. In addition, this Unit of Study will enable students to develop generic skills such as group discussion, productive group work and organisation, negotiation skills and information literacy skills. This is an introductory core unit for the Urban Planning degree, a specialisation unit for the Master of Urbanism and an elective for the Urban Design degree.
PLAN9045 Economics for the Built Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Phibbs Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4-day intensive (9am-5pm) Assessment: 2 x individual written reports of 2,000 words (70%); 1 x group presentation and report (30%). Peer assessment may occur for group work. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of PLAN9045 Economics for the Built Environment is to introduce the key economic theories, processes and techniques used by contemporary urban planners. This unit of study has two parts. In the first part of the unit, students are introduced to the economic drivers shaping city and regional development outcomes, and the location and form of different land uses and how they evolve. The second part of the unit equips students with core technical skills, including project evaluation, economic impact analysis, development feasibility, and introductory aspects of public finance. A key focus of the course is to equip students with a very good working knowledge of property feasibility analysis.
PLAN9064 Land Use and Infrastructure Planning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dallas Rogers Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk. Additional tuition time may be assigned for introduction to graphic plan making. Assumed knowledge: ARCH9100 Assessment: Two illustrated reports, each equivalent to 2,000 to 2,500 words, consisting of: 1 x individual report of short questions on key metropolitan concepts such as density and land use relationships (50%); 1 x group work on a local government Masterplan project where land use change is being leveraged from a major infrastructure project (50%). Peer assessment may apply to group work presentations.Practical field work:Second part of the semester involves group work in the field and in class. Practical field work: Second part of the semester involves group work in the field and in class. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is concerned with planning, land use and infrastructure within the built environments. It emphasises conceptual knowledge with examples and case studies to demonstrate the application of concepts in practice. Students are encouraged to think independently, creatively and critically in developing understanding and practical knowledge about environmental planning at the metropolitan and local level. This unit is in two modules, each of which is assessed.
1. Land use, infrastructure planning and urban development: different forms of infrastructure and the role of infrastructure in creating good environments and urban development; transport and the space economy; accessibility, the emergence of transport technologies and their influence on urban form; the impacts of car travel on densities, dispersion, congestion, etc.; orthodox transport planning; transport systems management; mobility and accessibility; networks, centres, and development corridors; transit-oriented development and implications on urban form and structure. The Sydney Metropolitan Strategy and concepts and ideas associated with the current work of the Greater Sydney Commission are used as a main focus for this module.
2. Land use planning, development control and plan making: within the context of more effective land use planning, this module examines the process of assessing a local area (such as structure, form and understanding character), developing local vision and neighbourhood strategies and structure plan, translating the strategy and structure plan into basic land use and planning controls (such as building height, floor space ratio, heritage, and other local area provisions) and producing a basic plan for development control purposes. A case study is used for group work so as to understand how the plan making process evolves and is constructed for both the private and public realms. In 2015 and 2016, this involved working with an inner city local government on priority urban renewal issues. Questioning the assumptions and values that underpin planning controls and guidelines is a key skill emphasised in the unit via the group work.
PLAN9049 International Urban Development Planning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Paul Jones Session: Semester 1a Classes: Overseas Intensive Mode ¿ lectures, seminars and group work discussions, International Field Trip. Assessment: Three major assignments: (1) group presentations overseas (20%); (2) group portfoilios and posters (45%); (3) individual reflection piece on the nature of informal urbanism as learned and experienced in the field (35%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In 2018, this unit will be run as an overseas 8-10 day intensive and combined with the ITB Plancosmo Conference to be held in Bandung, April 2018. There is a cap of 20 students maximum in this unit.
This unit is designed to fill a significant gap in the evolution of the urban and regional planning syllabus by focusing on urban issues in a developing country context. This unit is designed for planners and urban designers who may work in the field of international development and/or who have an interest in better understanding urbanisation, especially in the Asia and Pacific Region. The unit is run as an international field trip with the highly esteemed Insititute of Technology Bandung (ITB), Indonesia, and is based around the theme of `informal urbanism'. By the end of this unit of study you should have an understanding of (i) the key policy themes of poverty, spatial justice, and environmental sustainability, (ii) tools to explore the nature of informal urbanism, including understanding patterns and types of urban form and structure at the local level, and (iii) cross cultural considerations in planning and urban design. The unit reflects the increasing internationalisation of Australian planning practice in better managing urbanisation, especially within the Asia and Pacific Region. It caters to the needs of local and international students intending to work on urban and regional planning projects internationally and wishing to better understand how the city is made and shaped incuding understanding dimensions of urban complexity.
Textbooks
Jones, P. (2016). Unpacking Informal Urbanism - Planning and Urban Design Education in Practice. Institute of Technology Bandung (ITB) University Press (Penerbit); Indonesia
ARCH9074 Principles of Heritage Conservation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cameron Logan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 1.5 hrs/wk; tutorials 1 hr/wk Prohibitions: ARCH9003 Assessment: Weekly Discussion Forum/In-class Test (50%), Research Paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will introduce students to key controversies, theoretical propositions and practical innovations that have driven the historical development of heritage conservation. The unit covers ideas and examples from the ancient world until the present, with the main focus being on the period from 1850 until today.
The aim of the unit is to help students to arrive at a clear understanding of the concepts and practices that define heritage conservation and to promote a strong historical perspective on the field. Students will consider, for example, the meaning of, and differences between, conservation, restoration and reconstruction; the different forms of historical value that inform our place protection efforts; the function of conservation protocols such as the Venice Charter, Burra Charter and Hoi An Protocols; the importance of advocacy and activism; the growth of world heritage and its relationship to human rights and cultural rights; and the ideas of cultural landscape and historic urban landscape. The unit also challenges students to think about areas of practice and theory that challenge traditional approaches and knowledge such as indigenous heritage and the conservation of modernism.
ARCH9075 New Design in Old Settings

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cameron Logan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hrs/week combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, site visits. Assessment: Group work (30%); individual assignments (70%). Total of 4000-5000 words. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
New Design in Old Settings explores the architectural approaches, conservation methodologies and planning issues relevant to situations when new meets old in the built environment. The unit highlights architecturally innovative reuse projects, exemplary additions and alterations to historic places, and architecturally distinguished new buildings in historic precincts and landscapes. We also examine historic theming, façadism and some of the design ideas and planning compromises that have blighted historic places.
The aims of the unit are to develop an understanding of the history of designing and building new buildings in old settings; to develop an understanding of the major theoretical and practical issues of designing new buildings in old settings; and to develop an ability to assess critically the appropriateness of new development in culturally significant places. Students will develop analytical skills in assessing design strategies and develop confidence in making critical judgements about design propositions in historically significant settings.
ARCH9093 Integrated Urbanism Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tooran Alizadeh Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures; Seminars; Studio - 4 hrs/wk Prerequisites: Students should have completed 48 credit points in their degrees including ARCH9100, PLAN9061 and PLAN9068 Assumed knowledge: ARCH9080 and PLAN9063 and PLAN9073 Assessment: Mid-term presentation and submission (50%). Final presentation and submission (50%). Assessments will include both group and individual work. Group work is peer reviewed. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Integrated Urbanism Studio is a capstone unit for the Master of Urbanism. The studio will be focussed on "real world" strategic urban issues and the need for urbanists to formulate a compelling 'urban proposition' to convince the public, stakeholders, politicians and investors of the benefits of a particular approach or scheme. The studio will emulate practice by working with or being exposed to community groups, developers, politicians and practitioners to develop an appreciation of the strategic, economic, social and environmental context in which urban design and planning occurs. The specific intention will be to recognise and overcome the limitations imposed by professional 'silos' and give regard to, and reconcile the multitude of perspectives that are characteristic of the urban condition. Students will be working to develop abilities and skills (investigation, analysis and interpretation, design development and presentation) that enables them to prepare strategies, frameworks, concepts and master plans in a professional and visionary manner. Familiarity with economic, social and environmental factors, analytic and communication techniques will be assumed from previous units.
Textbooks
Exemplary planning documents, development strategies prepared by local government and state government agencies from NSW, other states and overseas will be used as reference material. A range of papers, articles and chapters of books related to planning theory will be used to provide a basis for a critique of the process. Readings will be distributed prior to and during the workshop.
ARCH9101 Future Cities

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Intensive July Classes: 1 x 3 hr seminar, 20 hrs workshop (2.5 days) 1 x 6hr tutorial, 1 x 6 hr studio Assumed knowledge: Students to have completed a minimum of 12 credit points in the Urban and Regional Planning or Urban Design programs. Assessment: Assignments (1 x 10%, 1 x 20%), written report (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit of study will provide students with the opportunity to work with practicing planners and urban designers in local government to formulate 'urban projects' for their respective areas that will then be the subject of interdisciplinary and inter-council critique in a workshop format over three days. Planning has been usually seen as a linear process where high level strategic objectives 'cascade' down through the various levels; from state, to regional, to subregional, to local to neighbourhood, to detailed public domain plans and individual controls for individual development proposals. Urban design and consideration of built form and quality of place only occur at the end of the process. But these end results of the process are arguably what matters to the public most. So the challenge is to find a way to engage with the detail and represent it early in the planning process. 'Strategic urban design' is about bringing these different aspects of planning and design together at the same time: long term and next steps, strategic and design-focused, visualised and quantified to enable the results to inform corporate plans and provide an evidence base for decision making while at the same time being able to answer the question 'what will it look like?'
PLAN9073 GIS Based Planning Policy and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Intensive June,Intensive November Classes: 4-day intensive (9am-5pm) Assessment: Two smaller analytical assessments (2 x 25%) and a larger report (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is concerned with using GIS to analyse planning problems and undertake policy analyses. The unit will include a comprehensive introduction to mapping and the use of GIS: data structures, topology, projections, spatial and non-spatial queries. Australian census products will be described and students will be expected to analyse census statistics using GIS maps. The role of GIS in coordinating various forms of information for policy analyses, preparing master plans, in presenting information for development control, impact analyses and wider management purposes will also be covered. The use of GIS to support visualisation will be covered, using examples about designing development projects and planning instruments. Finally, the various forms of distributing maps to the public and policy-makers will be discussed. The unit integrates the hands-on learning of GIS software with a `research-based` approach. Teaching will involve short lectures, studios and workshops. Assessment will be on a series of smaller assignments and a larger report prepared by each student that integrates GIS-based (and other) graphics into a coherent policy analysis. In addition, each student will make oral presentations on their work in studio sessions.
PLAN9075 Urban Data and Science of Cities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Somwrita Sarkar Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate-level mathematics and statistics, some experience with programming preferred Assessment: assessment 1 (individual) (25%), major project (group) (20%), major project (individual) (50%), tutorial exercises and class participation (individual) (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The discipline of Science of Cities examines relationships between the physical form of cities and the social, cultural, economic, technological and spatial processes that give rise to this form. As technology evolves and changes, so do the ways in which we make and think about our cities. In this era of unprecedented and fast-accelerating changes, digital technologies are reshaping the ways in which we measure, sense, conceive of, design and plan for our cities. As a result, we collect and store large amounts of data on every aspect of the urban environment, but it is as yet unclear how this data can be used to inform evidence based planning and urban management. This unit of study will introduce the principles of science of cities and the tools, methods, algorithms and techniques on big urban data that enable transformative ways of thinking about, designing and planning for a fast urbanizing world. Emphasis will be placed on developing understanding of urban structure and fast and slow dynamics shaping this structure. This transdisciplinary unit of study will be relevant for designers, planners, geographers, economists, physicists and data scientists interested in modelling urban systems.
Textbooks
Batty, M. (2015). The New Science of Cities. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press Townsend, A.M. (2013). Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia. New York: W.W. Norton Krugman, P. (1996). Confronting the mystery of urban hierarchy. Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, 10, pp. 399-418 Gabaix, X. (1999). Zipf's Law for Cities: An Explanation. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 114(3), pp.739-767 Bettencourt, L., Lobo, J., Helbing, D., Kuhnert, C., and West, G.B. (2007). Growth, innovation, scaling and the pace of life in cities. PNAS, 104 (17), pp.7301-7306 Research and data reports, The Australian Bureau of Statistics (specific references provided through the unit)
ITLS5100 Transport and Infrastructure Foundations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 12 x 3hr lectures, 1 x 2hr field trip Prohibitions: TPTM6241 Assessment: report 1 (20%), report 2 (20%), presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This is the foundation unit for all transport and infrastructure management programs and should be completed in the first period of study.
Transport and infrastructure plays an important role both in terms of personal mobility as well as accessibility of businesses and their transportation needs. This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to the role of transportation and infrastructure within the economy. The key concepts and theories needed for management of transport and infrastructure are introduced along with the analysis and problem solving skills needed for confident decision making. In providing the foundational knowledge for students in transport and infrastructure, the unit also introduces students to the professional communication skills needed. Examples and case studies are drawn from all modes of transport and infrastructure.