Bachelor of Design in Architecture and Bachelor of Laws

The Bachelor of Design in Architecture and Bachelor of Laws is offered jointly with the Faculty of Law. The Faculty of Law is the point of contact for all enquiries regarding admission, candidature and graduation.

Table C: Bachelor of Design in Architecture/Bachelor of Laws units of study

Candidates are required to complete all of the following Architecture core units:

Junior units of study

BDES1010 Architecture Studio 101

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1011, BDES1024 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and HSC English Standard or equivalent Assessment: Minor Project (30%) Major Project (50%), Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 101 introduces students to the skills and knowledge required to produce creative, innovative and appropriate solutions to architectural problems. It seeks to develop the architectural imagination as a dialogue between poetic thought and pragmatic material circumstance, nurturing the capacity to move back and forth between conceptual, intuitive levels of reference and the precise skills required for credible technical resolution. It expands students' vocabulary of architecture through study of relevant precedents and examination of techniques for spatial organization. Students develop a preliminary understanding of contemporary architectural theory and deploy a range of architectural representation techniques.
BDES1011 Architectural History/Theory 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ross Anderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1010, BDES1024 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and HSC English Standard or equivalent Assessment: Participation and Written Reviews (50%), Research Reports (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural History/Theory 1 introduces students to the discourse of architectural history and theory. It commences with a concise chronological survey of key periods of architectural history from antiquity to the mid-nineteenth century, providing an overview of the scope of the field and establishing initial points of reference. It then changes focus to investigate more closely the ways in which particular architectural themes and ideas traverse across history, coming to the fore in certain periods and receding in others. Students will interrogate these themes in small groups through intense study of a single significant building, which they will research, document and illustrate in a written report, and re-construct in a suite of finely crafted scale models. They will be introduced to fundamental principles and skills of scholarly research, including locating and evaluating sources, and constructing arguments.
BDES1012 Architectural Communications 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simon Weir Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture, computer laboratory and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1020, BDES1023 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and HSC English Standard or equivalent Assessment: Assignments (70%), Portfolio (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Communications 1 introduces students to fundamental modes of communication that are used to comprehend, conceive, explore, articulate and document architecture. It covers the domains of sketching, technical drawing, model making, verbal and written communication, diagramming and photography. It both familiarises students with necessary technical skills and encourages their creative deployment through practical experimentation.
BDES1020 Architecture Studio 102

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Tawa Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1010 or DESA1001 Corequisites: BDES1012, BDES1023 Prohibitions: DESA1002 Assessment: Project (30%); Major Project (50%); Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 102 further develops and applies the skills and knowledge gained in Architecture Studio 101 in response to increasingly concrete and complex programmatic and contextual issues. The design of a single building in a complex urban context is advanced through a series of iterations with an emphasis on practical experimentation at a range of scales and in a range of media. The work is drawn together into a final presentation comprising a finely crafted model and panels of drawings.
BDES1023 Architectural Technologies 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Daniel Ryan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1012, BDES1020 Prohibitions: DESA1102 Assessment: Assignments (60%), Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Technologies 1 introduces students to the roles that environmental considerations, structures and construction play in architecture. The fundamental concepts underpinning each of these key areas are presented and students demonstrate their developing knowledge of them via project-based assignments. These progressively complex tasks initiate students to the knowledge required to successfully analyse and synthesise construction and technical systems in basic buildings.
BDES1024 Art Workshop 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Chris Fox Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Corequisites: BDES1010, BDES1011 Assessment: Studio Work (50%); Research Journal and Gallery Review (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
In Art Workshop 1, first year architecture students begin to shape and communicate their ideas and experiences through various art practices. A range of studio-based modules within one semester seeks to foster technical, creative and conceptual skills with a particular emphasis on interdisciplinary process, tactility, interactions and critical thinking. A combination of specific disciplines in both contemporary art and the reworking of traditional art media, extend students' understanding of their own creative process and how art may contribute to their architectural study. A framework of lectures, gallery visits and readings asks students to consider the dynamic interchange between historical, cultural and environmental concerns and the field of contemporary art.

Senior units of study

BDES2010 Architecture Studio 201

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Perren Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1020 or DESA1002 Corequisites: BDES2012, BDES2013 Prohibitions: DESA2001 Assessment: Project 1 (25%), Project 2 (25%), Project 3 (40%), Portfolio (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 201 introduces principles of urban landscape, including an understanding of urban ecological and socio-cultural processes as they impact and influence understandings of place and the siting and design of buildings in built topographies. Learning objectives in the first part of the semester include development of knowledge and skills in analysis and the conceptual configuration of contexts that may involve contested ideas and competing interests. In the second part of the semester approaches to the siting, spatial composition and design through urban landscape and architectural strategies that support social sustainability, and an awareness of the inter-connectedness between context and architecture, are explored.
BDES2012 Architectural Communications 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dagmar Reinhardt Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture, computer laboratory and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1012 Corequisites: BDES2010, BDES2013 Prohibitions: DESA2001 Assessment: Assignments (70%), Portfolio (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Communications 2 particularly explores the roles that digital technology can play in contemporary architectural communication. It revisits graphic representation, modelling and verbal and written communication through the lens of computer-aided operations. This unit of study equips students with skills in digital drafting and modelling, texture mapping, lighting, rendering and digital fabrication, and encourages their creative deployment in an iterative design project for a simple specific building typology Students are asked to develop a clear understanding of their chosen typology and represent it through a range of media in order to create an archive of their own analysis of its concepts and expressions. Communications 2 is divided into both guided lab and studio sessions. The lab sessions deploy a variety of analogue techniques and move towards digital design in order to better understand the typology's experimental qualities including scale, proportion, texture and materiality.
BDES2013 Architectural Technologies 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Michael Muir Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1023 Prohibitions: DESA2111 Assessment: Assignments (60%), Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Technologies 2 explores the roles that environmental considerations, structures and construction play in moderately complex medium-scale buildings. Emphasis is placed on developing in students an active awareness of the impact that technical and constructional decisions have on architectural Architectural Technologies 2 explores the role that environmental, structural and constructional considerations play in moderately complex small-scale buildings. Attention is paid to the impact that choices of materials, detailing, structural systems and energy systems, whether passive or active, have on architectural design. Through project-based learning, students develop an active awareness of the important role that appropriate technical and constructional decisions, including architectural details, play in terms of fulfilling conceptual ambitions in tangible works of architecture. Students develop and demonstrate their developing appreciation of these issues via case study analysis, a group project, individual technical drawings and a final examination. Students develop and demonstrate their awareness of these issues via the analysis of case studies, a large project-based assignment, and a final exam.
BDES2020 Architecture Studio 202

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Ferng Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2010 or DESA2001 Corequisites: BDES2021 Prohibitions: DESA2002 Assessment: Minor Project (30%), Major Project (50%), Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 202 requires the design of a moderately complex building in an urban context. Students develop an increased awareness of the broader social, cultural and environmental consequences of architectural decisions. The design process that is fostered explores the creative tension between intuition and prescription, using accumulative techniques that are intended to elicit unexpected solutions. Participatory and collaborative work processes are promoted and students are required to sensitively and imaginatively negotiate between the internal logic of the design approach and urban strategies. They become increasingly attentive to the complexities of architectural design, from the interpretation of programmatic requirements in respect to the opportunities and limitations of particular site conditions to the spatial and tectonic implications of design decisions.
BDES2021 Architectural History/Theory 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Anderson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1011 Corequisites: BDES2020 Prohibitions: DESA2111 Assessment: Attendance, discussions and weekly proformas (25%), group research presentation and building analysis (25%), final research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural History/Theory 2 offers a critical examination of the developments of modern architecture in design, theory, spatial programming and construction technology, as well as its social and environmental effects across the world from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. It provides a broad overview of diverse approaches to modern architecture and rethinks critically how they have advanced different architectural propositions about modern ways of dwelling and building under a constellation of social and cultural conditions. By exposing students to a variety of theoretical issues, this unit of study aims to enhance students' capability to reflect on the values embedded in design, and to develop their understanding of the intertwined relationship between space, society and power.
BDES3010 Architecture Studio 301

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ross Anderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2020, or equivalents from DESA2002, DESA2111 Corequisites: BDES3023 Prohibitions: DESA3001 Assessment: Minor Project (30%), Major Project (50%), Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architecture Studio 301 engages in students the observational, analytical, interpretative and speculative capacities required to produce a conceptually and tectonically grounded solution to a medium-scale urban architectural problem. It seeks initially to refine skills in the development of a thematic framework for design, the analysis of broad urban contexts and specific site conditions, together with a strong awareness of historical and theoretical conditions for design. Students deploy these analyses in creative and experimental ways via the design of a medium-scale building with a complex functional program. Students are required to integrate multiple criteria - including thematic, conceptual, programmatic, contextual, tectonic and technical concerns - into a persuasive architectural design proposition.
BDES3011 Architectural History/Theory 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lee Stickells Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2021 or DESA2111 Corequisites: BDES3010, BDES3023 Prohibitions: DAAP3001 Assessment: Opinion Editorial (10%), Lexicon Entry (10%), Quotation for an Installation (15%), Abstract and Bibliography (10%), Research Paper (50%), Tutorial Participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural History/Theory 3 surveys contemporary architectural debates through historical precedents, central texts, and present-day criticism on aesthetic design, cultural influences, mass media, and political events. Architectural discourse can be understood as a wide array of interlocking 'regimes of thought', each of which has its own multiple histories, transformations and unique effects. Students will become generally conversant in the principles of these central theories, and will understand some of their terms and references. Contemporary issues will not be taken at face value but interrogated through theoretical principles raised by the assigned readings. Paying close attention to the exchange between thought and action, students will explore the relevance of the discussed theories to the formation of current circumstances, and to the place of architecture within contemporary culture as a whole. Students take responsibility for their own learning, engaging in continuous reflection and developing skills in oral, written, and visual forms of communication to critique, create and articulate knowledge. They will be introduced to fundamental principles and skills of scholarly research, including locating and evaluating sources, and constructing arguments.
BDES3012 Architectural Communications 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dagmar Reinhardt Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture, computer laboratory and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2012 or DESA2002 Corequisites: BDES3020 Prohibitions: DESA3001 Assessment: Assignments (70%), Portfolio (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Communications 3 both consolidates students' abilities to effectively communicate architecture using graphic and verbal means and further advances their digital knowledge through concepts of movement and simulation. Students are introduced to interoperable animation and database software used for simulation and documentation of architecture, and they further develop familiarity with advanced digital fabrication. They work in a 3D modelling environment using Rhino, Grasshopper and 3DStudio Max. This unit of study aims to instil in students sensitivity to working creatively with hybrid techniques, and introduces them to dynamic communication procedures deployed in professional architectural practice to move between the digital and the real.
BDES3020 Architecture Studio 302

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francois Blanciak Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES3010 or DESA3001 Corequisites: BDES3012 Prohibitions: DESA3002 Assessment: Minor Project (30%), Major Project (50%), Portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
As the culminating design studio for the degree, Architecture Studio 302 presents students with the opportunity to express their own theoretical positioning through the design of an important civic building, and to demonstrate the technical and representational capacities that they have developed across the course of their degree. They work with a great deal of autonomy in a collaborative working environment alongside their peers and under the guidance of their tutor to produce conceptually challenging, integrated and compelling pre-professional architectural projects.
BDES3023 Architectural Technologies 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Francesco Fiorito Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2013 or DESA2111 Corequisites: BDES3010 and BDES3011 Prohibitions: DAAP3002 Assessment: Assignments (60%), Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Architectural Technologies 3 develops in students an advanced understanding of moderately complex building systems. It addresses the technical design of buildings in their entirety and in their details, through the three interrelated perspectives of environment, structures and construction. As in Architectural Technologies 1 and 2, primary emphasis is placed on developing an understanding that appropriate formal architectural solutions can be the outcome of technological considerations and that, reciprocally, technical solutions can not only support but inform conceptual ambitions. A major project-based assignment, a case study analysis, individual technical drawings and a final examination are used as the vehicles for students to demonstrate the knowledge that they have gained in analyzing and synthesizing the various considerations that are to be addressed in the design of a building system that appropriately responds to, and integrates, the three key technical considerations of environment, structures and construction.
Candidates are additionally required to complete 144 credit points of Law units of study, of which 48 credit points are Combined Law compulsory units of study for Years 1, 2 and 3 and are credited towards the requirements for both the Bachelor of Design in Architecture and the Bachelor of Laws degrees. The required Laws units of study are listed in the Faculty of Law Undergraduate Table of Units of Study.