Bachelor of Design Computing and Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced Studies

Table A: Bachelor of Design Computing, and Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced Studies

Bachelor of Design Computing

Students must complete 144 credit points including:
(a) 96 credit points of core units of study as set out in Table A
(b) 48 credit points of elective units of study. At least 12 credit points of these must be 2000-level or 3000-level units

Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced Studies

Students must complete 192 credit points, including:
(a) 84 credit points of core units of study as set out in Table A according to one of the following patterns:
(i) 48 credit points at 1000-level, 24 credit points at 2000-level, and 12 credit points at 3000-level; or
(ii) 48 credit points at 1000-level, 12 credit points at 2000-level, and 24 credit points at 3000-level;
(b) a major (48 credit points) or program specified in Table S (Shared Pool)
(c) for students not enrolled in the Dalyell Stream, a minimum of 12 credit points of units of study in Table O (Open Learning Environment)
(d) for students enrolled in the Dalyell Stream:
(i) a minimum of 6 credit point of units of study in Table O (Opening Learning Environment); and
(iii) a minimum of 12 credit point of Dalyell Stream units of study from Table D
(3) for students previously enrolled in the Dalyell Stream in their current degree, who are no longer enrolled in the stream and have completed at least 6 credit points of Dalyell units of study:
(i) a minimum of 6 credit point of units of study in Table O (Open Learning Environment)
(f) a minimum of 24 credit points at 4000-level from Table A or Table S, including a research, community, industry or entrepreneurship project of 12 to 36 credit points; and
(g) where appropriate, elective units from Table A, Table S, Table O or,for students enrolled in the Dalyell Stream, Table D

Core units of study

Students in the Bachelor of Design Computing are required to complete:
(i) all DECO 1000-level units
(ii) 48 credit points of 2000-level and 3000-level DECO units
Students in the Bachelor of Design Computing/Bachelor of Advanced Studies are required to complete:
(i) all DECO 1000-level units
(i) 36 credit points of 2000-level and 3000-level DECO units.

Core units of study

DECO1012 Design Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 1 Classes: seminar and tutorial 3 hrs/wk Assessment: submitted work (70%) and in-class assessments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to creative coding. It teaches an understanding of the fundamentals of computational thinking as well as skills in the design and implementation of software for creative expression and prototyping. It introduces students to tools for building interactive design applications through programming assignments, knowledge of programming concepts, and knowledge of the Javascript programming language. Key concepts covered in this unit include: object-oriented programming, control flows, and algorithmic thinking. Students learn how to design through the development of code, allowing them to incorporate programming into their own design projects as well as to collaborate effectively with software developers.
DECO1006 Design Process and Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Madeleine Borthwick Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: submitted work (70%), in-class assessments (10%) and quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of a human-centred approach to the design of interactive technologies and environments. It introduces students to design thinking and how it can be productively applied to different design situations. The unit covers theoretical concepts, methods and tools used in human-centred design, including user research, ideation, prototyping and user evaluation. It provides students with the principles, processes and tools that are used in commercial design projects. Students learn to build empathy with users, identify the problem space, develop design concepts and persuasively communicate design proposals with an emphasis on the user experience through visual storytelling.
Textbooks
Tomitsch, M., Wrigley, C., Borthwick, M., Ahmadpour, N., Frawley, J., Kocaballi, B., ... & Loke, L. (2018). Design. Think. Make. Break. Repeat. A handbook of methods. BIS Publishers
DECO1014 Digital Media Production

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Nathaniel Fay Session: Semester 1 Classes: seminar and tutorial 3 hrs/wk Assessment: submitted work (70%) and in-class assessments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the principles of digital media production for online and screen-based applications. In studying this unit, students will develop an understanding of how to document design projects, concepts or processes through digital storytelling and video production. Key concepts covered in this unit include: video capture techniques, video editing, transitions, titles, colour grading, content and flow management. Using industry standard software for video production, students will learn how to conceptualise, record and edit video content.
DECO1015 Visual Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 1 Classes: seminar and tutorial 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DECO2101 Assessment: submitted work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing only. Students from other programs should enrol in DECO2101.
This unit of study introduces students to the principles of visual design, including gestalt theory, principles of graphic design, colour theory and typography. Students will develop an understanding of how to successfully combine visual elements to effectively communicate an idea or concept, to describe a product, and to represent visual user interface elements in an interactive product. Using industry standard software such as Adobe Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC and InDesign CC, students will learn how to develop design concepts and how to turn concepts into visual communication materials in the form of digital documents.
DECO1008 3D Modelling and Fabrication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Madeleine Borthwick Session: Semester 2 Classes: seminar 3 hrs/wk Corequisites: DESA1555 Assessment: submitted work (80%) and in-class assessments (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit teaches students an understanding of the basic concepts of modelling and prototyping 3D artefacts. Students will develop skills in creating and using 3D models for real-world and virtual environments. The unit further introduces students to rapid prototyping fabrication techniques, such as 3D printing and laser cutting with the aim to understand how to prepare a digital representation of artefacts (such as digital products or packaging) for physical fabrication. Students will learn how physical artefacts are represented in 3D digital models by modelling various 3D geometric entities, and how to create photorealistic representations that accurately and efficiently describe intent, structure, and geometric and surface variations of 3D models. Key concepts covered in this unit include: boundary representations, solid and parametric modelling, texture mapping, light sources, camera locations and projections.
DECO1013 Physical Computing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Phillip Gough Session: Semester 2 Classes: seminar and tutorial 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: (DECO1006 or DECO2016) and DECO1012 Assessment: submitted work (70%) and in-class assessments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This course should be taken concurrently with, or after taking DECO1008 3D Modelling and Fabrication.
This unit introduces students to the principles of physical computing and its application in interaction design projects. This includes conceptualising computer-based implementations of product interfaces using hardware platforms such as Arduinos or littleBits, for prototyping physical computing interfaces. It introduces the core concepts of physical prototyping, basic electronic concepts, hardware programming, as well as aesthetic issues in product design. The unit covers: prototyping techniques for physical user interfaces, methods of programming and assessing interactive products, product design techniques, especially in relation to interactive contexts, and awareness of issues of aesthetics in physical computing interfaces.
DECO1016 Web Design and Technologies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 2 Classes: seminar 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: DECO1012 Prohibitions: DECO2102 Assessment: submitted work (70%) and in-class assessments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing only. Students enrolled in other programs should enrol in DECO2102.
This unit introduces students to web design and modern web technologies for the purpose of designing and prototyping web-based user interface solutions. Students will learn about design principles and patterns for the web and apply them in practical exercises that involve designing and creating interactive web applications. The unit will introduce web-based markup languages and frameworks for various media and platforms, such as desktop computers and mobile devices with a focus on interaction design. Students will develop an understanding of web technologies and their role in user experience and interaction design, including the use of web technologies for prototyping user interfaces. Prototyping techniques covered in this unit include scripting and markup languages for enabling dynamic content and interactive designs, such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript.
DECO1017 Principles of Animation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 2 Classes: seminar and tutorial 3 hrs/week Assessment: submitted work (70%) and in-class assessments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the fundamental principles of animation and its role in interaction design. Students will develop an understanding of the process involved in developing character, text and motion graphics based 2D animation, and techniques and tools for production to support animation. Assessments in this unit focus on the application of animation in user interface design. Students will acquire basic animation skills, develop the skills to create an animated sequence, and learn the critical vocabulary to describe animation. Basic knowledge will be related to foundational technical skills in industry standard software for animation.

2000-level units of study

DECO2014 User Experience Design Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Madeleine Borthwick Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/wk, studio 3 hrs/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: (DECO1006 or DECO2016) and DECO1015 Assessment: submitted work (90%) and in-class assessments (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to principles and methods relevant to the user experience design of digital products and services. Students will develop an understanding of the concept of 'user experience' and how it extends to other design practices, such as user interface design and interaction design. Students will learn about methods for designing the user experience in a range of different contexts, such as mobile devices, wearables, and interactive environments. The studio will give students an opportunity to apply the principles and methods of user experience design in the context of a design project. At the conclusion of the unit students will have a well-developed understanding of methods for gathering user requirements and translating requirements into design solutions that emphasise the user experience of the final product.
Textbooks
Tomitsch, M., Wrigley, C., Borthwick, M., Ahmadpour, N., Frawley, J., Kocaballi, B., ... & Loke, L. (2018). Design. Think. Make. Break. Repeat. A handbook of methods. BIS Publishers.
DECO2200 Interaction Design Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Hamish Henderson Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk, studio 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: (DECO1006 or DECO2016) and DECO1016 Assessment: submitted work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces principles of interface and interaction design through design projects. Students will develop technical as well as methodological skills for designing and developing interactive products and services. Elements of interaction design including menus, screen design, animation, and graphics design will be addressed for various platforms, including online applications and mobile devices. The unit builds on the design methods introduced in DECO1006/DECO2016, such as user research, storyboarding, and prototyping. It allows students to develop an advanced understanding of these methods through applying them in a specific design context. Students will learn about methods for collecting user requirements, synthesising and visualising concepts, prototyping user interfaces, e.g. in the form of mobile apps, and evaluating prototypes.
Textbooks
Tomitsch, M., Wrigley, C., Borthwick, M., Ahmadpour, N., Frawley, J., Kocaballi, B., ... & Loke, L. (2018). Design. Think. Make. Break. Repeat. A handbook of methods. BIS Publishers.

3000-level units of study

DECO3100 Information Visualisation Design Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Somwrita Sarkar Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk, studio 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: DECO1016 and DECO2014 Assessment: submitted work (80%) and in-class assessments (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The field of information visualisation focuses on how data can be effectively represented and meaningfully communicated to people, in interactive and automated ways. The unit of study introduces the principles of information visualisation design, with special attention to aesthetic communication of data, data analytics, and user engagement. Key concepts covered in this unit include: abstract data visualisation; data acquisition; and parsing and processing of data. Using a combination of vector graphics software tools and programming languages for processing data, students will develop information visualisations of real-world datasets that are both communicative and engaging. The unit will equip students with the skills to produce static as well as web-ready interactive data visualisations.
DECO3200 Interactive Product Design Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Callum Parker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk, studio 3 hrs/wk Prerequisites: DECO2014 and DECO2200 Assessment: submitted work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This studio offers a context for students to apply design, technical and creative methods to the production of high-quality group work, with a strong focus on the development of high-impact portfolios. The studio allows students to apply methods and principles of human-centred design in the context of new product development, and to engage with new technologies for interactive product design. Assignments will take the form of flexible group projects, allowing students to develop proficiency in design and prototyping skills to a wide array of design problems that they may encounter in various industries. The unit will provide students with the skills to investigate and integrate advanced technologies into the design of objects with embedded information content and interactivity.

4000-level units of study

DECO4200 Advanced Project Design Studio

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Callum Parker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week, tutorial 2 hrs/week and studio 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: DECO1012 and DECO2200 Assessment: assignment design (80%) and assignment portfolio (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This studio offers a context for students to apply design, technical and creative methods to the production of high-quality group work, with a strong focus on the development of high-impact portfolios. The studio allows students from the advanced studies stream to apply methods and principles of human-centred design in the context of new product development, and to engage with new technologies for interactive product design. Assignments will take the form of domain-specific group projects, allowing students to develop proficiency in the area of design most relevant to individual students. The unit will provide students with the skills to investigate and integrate advanced technologies into the design of objects with embedded information content and interactivity.
ARCH4108 Industry and Community Project Unit A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: tutorial 3 hrs/week; workshop 3 hrs/week Corequisites: ARCH4109 Assumed knowledge: Depth of knowledge in at least one discipline (major) Assessment: individual statement (20%), group proposal (40%), group proposal presentation (20%), group participation mark (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. The experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application.
ARCH4109 Industry and Community Project Unit B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: tutorial 3 hrs/week; workshop 3 hrs/week Corequisites: ARCH4108 Assumed knowledge: Depth of knowledge in at least one discipline (major) Assessment: individual statement (20%), group proposal (40%), group proposal presentation (20%), group participation mark (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. The experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application.

4000-level units of study for embedded Honours component

For students undertaking the embedded Honours component, the requirement is 36 credit points of Honours units as listed below and DECO4200
DECO4002 Design Computing Honours Research B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Callum Parker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: DECO4001 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students must submit an Honours application form. Entry into Honours in the Bachelor of Design Computing requires you to have completed your pass degree with a weighted average mark of at least 70.
The Honours degree requires full-time study over two semesters (DECO4001 and DECO4002 and then DECO4003 and DECO4004). In special cases the Dean may approve a part-time enrolment over four semesters. The units are not assessed separately. A single dissertation is required. The appointment of a supervisor will depend on the topic chosen for the dissertation by the student.
The dissertation should be submitted by the end of the first week of the formal examination period in the semester in which DECO4004 Design Computing Honours Research D is taken.
DECO4003 Design Computing Honours Research C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Callum Parker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: DECO4002 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students must submit an Honours application form. Entry into Honours in the Bachelor of Design Computing requires you to have completed your pass degree with a weighted average mark of at least 70.
The Honours degree requires full-time study over two semesters (DECO4001 and DECO4002 and then DECO4003 and DECO4004). In special cases the Dean may approve a part-time enrolment over four semesters. The units are not assessed separately. A single dissertation is required. The appointment of a supervisor will depend on the topic chosen for the dissertation by the student.
The dissertation should be submitted by the end of the first week of the formal examination period in the semester in which DECO4004 Design Computing Honours Research D is taken.
DECO4004 Design Computing Honours Research D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Callum Parker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: DECO4003 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students must submit an Honours application form. Entry into Honours in the Bachelor of Design Computing requires you to have completed your pass degree with a weighted average mark of at least 70.
The Honours degree requires full-time study over two semesters (DECO4001 and DECO4002 and then DECO4003 and DECO4004). In special cases the Dean may approve a part-time enrolment over four semesters. The units are not assessed separately. A single dissertation is required. The appointment of a supervisor will depend on the topic chosen for the dissertation by the student.
The dissertation should be submitted by the end of the first week of the formal examination period in the semester in which DECO4004 Design Computing Honours Research D is taken.

Electives

Students who have completed 96 credit points with a WAM of at least 70 may substitute, with the permission of the unit coordinator concerned, graduate units from within the University.

Design Computing electives

1000-level units of study

DESN1000 Principles of Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; workshop 2 hrs/week Assessment: case study reports (60%), design exercise (30%) and quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study allows students to develop an understanding of the foundation of human factors upon which much successful design is based. Students learn about the basic physical and cognitive principles (ergonomics, heuristics, human-centredness) incorporated in successful designs across a wide variety of different sectors. Students are provided with the tools to evaluate existing designs according to widely accepted design principles. They learn to apply these principles in practice in order to improve the usability, clarity and overall quality of their own designs. Through a series of academically researched case studies they reflect upon how these principles are applied in existing designs. To further develop their understanding of the design principles, they then complete a small re-design exercise. The case studies are chosen to cover a range of different domains, including products, systems, organisations, and services.
DESN1001 Design Theory and Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Leigh-Anne Hepburn Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; workshop 2 hrs/week Assessment: research report (30%), analysis report (30%), synthesis report (30%) and quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study helps students develop a theoretically grounded understanding of what design is, and the full spectrum of different disciplines that this term entails (product, graphic, urban planning, graphic, fashion, interaction, etc.). Using academic sources, they will investigate dominant historical and contemporary models of the design process, and learn about the cognitive basis of design thinking and how this differs from key skills in other disciplines. Students will research major design movements and schools of thought that have influenced the design sector over the last century (e.g. Bauhaus, eco-design, ergonomics, mass consumerism and built-in obsolescence). The unit teaches students about current foci in design (such as service design and experience design) and provides an outlook of upcoming trends and futures. Students will be able to develop these skills through studying a design movement, analysing case studies of designs, and applying design movements to specific design tasks.

2000-level units of study

DECO2010 Designing Social Media

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Madeleine Borthwick Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Social Media Project (75%); Tutorial Activities (10%); Quizzes (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an understanding of principles and technologies relevant to the design of social media, that is, media supporting social interaction. The unit covers the history and theory of social networks, techniques and methods for analysing social media networks, design principles and patterns for the creation of social media applications, and the development and delivery of social media strategy. Students will gain proficiency designing social media platforms and usage scenarios that solve a range of design challenges. Students will participate in, critically review and prototype social media platforms and content to demonstrate their understanding of the subject matter.
DECO2015 Design for Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Assessment: analysis report (35%), project work (35%) and quizzes (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended students first complete either DECO2016 or DECO1006 and/or DESN1000 before selecting this unit of study.
This unit of study introduces students to design strategies and techniques for developing alternative points of view and exploring multiple solutions iteratively. Through the analysis of real-world case studies students will develop an understanding for how to use design-thinking methods to tackle complex problems. The unit will discuss how design can be used as a method and as a way of thinking to drive innovation for products, services and processes. In the tutorial component, students will apply design strategies and techniques through small group exercises and develop a deeper understanding of them through the assessment items, which capture theory, analytical reflection and the practical application of methods.
DECO2012 Interacting with Sound

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 2 Classes: seminar 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: DECO1012 and DECO1013 and DECO1016 Assessment: submitted work (70%) and in-class assessments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to the principles of sound design and their application in interaction design projects. This includes using sound as a medium in product design, conceptualising computer-based implementations of product interfaces using sound as a medium. It introduces the core concepts of audio programming, sound in interactive systems and the creative use of sound as a medium for communication. The unit covers: prototyping techniques for sound-based user interfaces; methods of programming and assessing interactive sound-based products; knowledge of a range of product design techniques, especially in relation to interactive contexts; and awareness of issues of aesthetics in sound-based interfaces.

3000-level units of study

DECO3009 Designing for Virtual Reality

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Callum Parker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week, workshop 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: DECO1008 and DECO2200 Assessment: submitted work (80%) and in-class assessments (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives students the opportunity to design an interactive system using the emerging technology of virtual reality (VR). The unit focuses on the new kinds of interaction and compelling experiences that are made possible by VR rather than asset creation (modelling, animation, texturing, etc.) or game development. Specifically, students will be encouraged to push the boundaries on the ways people can interact in embodied interactive systems. The unit will introduce students to interaction design theory and principles for immersive environments, such as VR. Students will also learn how to create VR user experience prototypes using software tools, such as Autodesk 3ds Max and Unity.
DECO3101 Innovation Design Studio

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Assessment: reflection report (30%), design project (45%) and tutorial activities (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended students first complete either DECO2016 or DECO1006 and DECO2015 before selecting this unit of study.
This unit of study provides a format for deep engagement with design and innovation methods. Students will develop responses to a real-world design problem that requires the application of students' existing disciplinary skills combined with knowledge in an interdisciplinary context. Projects are student-led, allowing students to identify projects that are linked to their interests and discipline-specific career paths. Through interactive group work, facilitated by experienced design mentors, students will learn how to negotiate interdisciplinary requirements and boundaries. All projects developed in this unit of study are expected to address some element of innovation in an existing product, service or process. Students will be able to apply methods acquired in other units of study, and will learn about new methods through weekly project work and reviews.
DESN3000 Design Thinking for Health and Medicine

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/fortnightly; tutorial 4 hrs/fortnightly Assessment: case study (20%), design project (60%) and tutorial activities (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended students first complete either DECO2016 or DECO1006 and/or DESN1000 before selecting this unit of study.
This unit is an introduction to human-centred design methods, specifically in the context of future challenges of the type you will face in careers health and medicine. You will learn design principles and practices through evaluating current health and medical devices, processes and systems. Through the analysis of real-world case studies, you will apply design thinking methods to address the complex health and medical issues facing society. The unit will also introduce you to how design-led strategies can support healthy behaviour or be used to improve medical technologies and processes. You will develop your skills by using design exercises to demonstrate the strategic and practical applications of such methods and approaches.
DESN3001 Health and Medicine Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/fortnightly; tutorial 5 hrs/fortnightly Prerequisites: DECO1006 or DECO2016 or DESN3000 Assessment: case study report (30%), design exercise (30%) and health design project (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on the development of design solutions for the complex needs of a healthy society into the future. Through weekly teaching of design in the health and medical contexts, you will be exposed to various methods, techniques and approaches to achieve patient-centric solutions. You will apply your skills to address a health or medical challenge by creating a project based on translating a discovery into a device or process in the real world. The project will require you to work in multi-disciplinary teams to allow you to harness the relevant skill sets that are required to best navigate multifaceted challenges prevalent in health and medical sectors. All solutions designed and developed in this unit of study are expected to take the form of either a product, service, or system. You will learn how to identify problems, how to use ideation for developing patient-centric solutions and how to translate ideas into prototypes. Along this journey you will also navigate disciplinary boundaries and communicate with various stakeholders, including the health and medical professions. This will allow you to assess and test your solutions on your target audience.
DECO3665 Graduation Show

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 2 Classes: studio 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: 48 credit points Assessment: submitted work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is tailored to self-motivate students with an emphasis on more peer assessment and open critique sessions than is conventional in Design Computing electives. This is purposefully intended to encourage graduating students to experience a collaborative project similar to a small design studio. Students will be expected to articulate and defend their designs in a conversational manner and to vote on solutions internally. Students will also practice organisational and project management skills impacted by real-world deadlines for print-schedules, sponsorship and funding, concurrent website deployment, online registrations and event management.
DESN3003 Design for Social Impact

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week and workshop 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: DECO2016 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of design thinking methods and processes Assessment: design project (60%), reflective report (20%) and tutorial activities (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gets students to consider the broader application of design thinking as a way of informing and creating social outcomes. Design for social impact aims to design solutions to meet social needs in a better way than the existing solution. Students will have the opportunity to develop their design thinking competency through the application of a real-world social problem. Students will address prevailing or emerging social issues through the design of products, services and experiences. Students will be guided through the design thinking process of understanding user and stakeholder needs, defining problems, ideating solutions, prototyping and testing design solutions. This unit gives students the opportunity to tackle the challenges of 21st Century life through the exploration of new technology and current practices to design the future they want to live in.
DECO3666 Graduate Internship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Fieldwork Prerequisites: 48 credit points Assessment: submitted work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aims of the internship are to provide a direct link between the academic core of the course and disciplines and methods of practice; to enable candidates to experience aspects of practice and provide opportunity for them to work in areas of the field outside their specific expertise; to enable candidates to observe, analyse and comment on the interaction between theoretical and practical issues for their program as it is practices, and to establish connections between practice and the development of relevant research programs. The internship is intended to provide the opportunity for students to work in various situations in their program's area. A secondary intention is that students use the opportunities of placement to broaden their own experience beyond the limitations of their chosen discipline. Candidates must find a suitable professional placement. Permission to enrol is given after the proposed placement has been approved by the Program Director. The host organisation will nominate a supervisor for the student for the internship. The student must complete at least 120 hours of full or part-time experience, supervised by a practising designer. A log-book of each day's work, signed by the supervisor must be submitted on completion. A design report on the benefits of the internship must also be produced. The report will be comprised of a program of work (through a log book) and an analysis of their experiences during the internship using appropriate methods for their program.
DECO3441 Design Computing Independent Study A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: Submitted work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Computing topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Computing. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.
DECO3442 Design Computing Independent Study B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: submitted work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Computing topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Computing. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.
DECO3443 Design Computing Independent Study C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: submitted work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Computing topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Computing. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.
DECO3444 Design Computing Independent Study D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weekly meetings by arrangement Prerequisites: 48 credit points and WAM of at least 70. Assessment: submitted work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an opportunity to high achieving students to develop an interest in a specific Design Computing topic; to develop skills in independent study; and to develop advanced report writing skills.
This elective is undertaken with an agreement between the student and a supervisor on an agreed topic related to Design Computing. The student will meet with the supervisor weekly to discuss progress.
The outcome should be a reflective report on a selected topic demonstrating mastery of the topic.
DECO3551 Design Computing General Elective A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units of study Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Computing that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Education).
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.
DECO3552 Design Computing General Elective B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units of study Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment.
This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Computing that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Education).
Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.
DECO3553 Design Computing General Elective C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units of study Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment. This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Computing that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Education). Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.
DECO3554 Design Computing General Elective D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Liam Bray Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units of study Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This elective allows a group of students to pursue a topic proposed by a member of academic staff in a formal learning environment. This unit of study is available to a minimum of 10 students to engage in a topic related to Design Computing that is organised by a member of academic staff. This allows a member of staff to teach a topic of special interest or for a visiting academic to teach a subject related to their specialty. Students will participate in lectures, tutorials, or other activities as needed to pursue the elective topic. The topic for this elective is proposed by a member of academic staff and approved by the Associate Dean (Education). Students will develop an understanding of a special topic through reports, projects, and tutorial exercises.

School electives

1000-level units of study

AWSS1001 Architectural Sketching and Drawing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1 Classes: workshop 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DESA1601 or DESA1602 Assessment: portfolio of works (60%); process journal (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students may incur costs for materials in some Art Workshops units.
This unit aims to provide the student with the knowledge, skills and aptitude required to use a range of fundamental architectural sketching and drawing skills based on observation of the physical world, in particular the built world. Students will be encouraged to develop a commitment to the practice of drawing as a fundamental design skill through 13 studio classes coupled with independent study. The workshop places an emphasis on keen observation, experimental use of materials and engagement with historical frameworks used in design practice in design and architecture. Exposure in studio to the sensitivities offered by different drawing materials and techniques will give students the competency to more confidently use drawing as a communication device. Skills in perspective drawing are introduced and drawing is used to document the visible world and define structure and detail. On successful completion of this unit of study students will have demonstrated familiarity with a range of drawing media and techniques, including charcoal, graphite, pen, brush and ink, and an introduction to colour. Students will understand the importance of maintaining a sketchbook as a site to record all their visual and conceptual research, and in which to draw on a daily basis as a means to develop ideas and technical proficiency.
DESA1004 Designing with Surfaces and Light

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 2 Classes: Online. Expected total workload is approximately 35 hours online, plus independent study and preparation. Lecture materials are available on the Canvas site. They consist of PDF files and Powerpoint slides. No lecture recordings are available. Prohibitions: DESA2612 Assessment: Assignment 1 (40%), Assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Online
Objects only become visible when light reflects off of them. This unit explores the ways in which light interacts with surfaces, objects, and the human visual system. Architectural design decisions regarding the lighting, as well as exterior and interior surfaces of a building, alter the perceptual experience of users and should be done thoughtfully.
This unit introduces students to the way humans perceive and experience the built environment. It covers some of the fundamental properties of light, mechanisms of human perception, and the ways that light interacts with surfaces. The application of these topics to design decisions is also discussed. Students demonstrate their understanding of the presented material and apply their knowledge to critically analyze their own environments.
Due to the high volume of interest in this course, all questions and enquiries will be answered in online discussion forums on Canvas, instead of in face-to-face consultation.
No early results are available for this unit. No extensions will be granted because of failed internet access.

2000-level units of study

AWSS2002 Site Specific Art and Architecture

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshop 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Practical work (60%); research, written component and presentations (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This practical unit aims to give students a critical understanding of site-specific intervention, through the development of sculptural objects, material investigation and research into relevant visual art forms and architecture. Students gain experience in ways of selecting and analysing sites for the development of site-specific installation. The structured methodologies will allow students to develop material competency exploring techniques in specific combinations of materials. Students will also develop ways of analysing and evaluating site-specific works through directed group discussions engaging in an ongoing discourse regarding site-specificity, installation and the complex relationships between historical and contemporary practices and architecture.
AWSS2010 Arch and Design Material Processes (Ceramics)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: workshop 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DESA2634 Assessment: studio projects (70%); process journal and associated assignments (30%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This studio-based unit explores ceramic media and processes. Students will investigate different fabrication techniques such as slip-casting, ceramic rapid prototyping and analogue modelling. There will be an emphasis on ceramics as a modelling medium in design and architecture. Students will use the digital modelling and fabrication lab within the school to investigate possibilities for ceramic production. This exploration will be in relation to historic and contemporary architectural frameworks. Set projects will enable students to explore expression and design in an architectural form and materiality context. Students will be expected to produce a research process journal and report on how a particular practitioner/s or movement has informed or influenced their project/s.
AWSS2020 Object Design (Material and Light)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: workshop 3 hrs/week Corequisites: DESA1555 Prohibitions: DESA2643 Assessment: portfolio of works and presentation (60%); process journal and associated assignments (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
In this unit students produce light objects exploring diverse materials and fabrication techniques in the DMaF workshops. Emphasis is placed on developing and inter-relating manufacturing and artisan skills with research, analysis and design development. The course aims to develop a critical awareness of the nature of objects that surround us, exploring cultural, contextual and symbolic aspects of object design as well as functional and aesthetic qualities working with light. Sustainability and social issues relating to their manufacture, use and disposal are also discussed; the unit aims to increase appreciation of the materiality of objects focusing on timber as an example paying attention to associated environmental and ethical issues, and emerging alternative materials. Through a series of exercises, experiments and production of their major project, students develop knowledge of construction techniques and skills in using wood/plastics tools and machinery and in so doing, build an awareness of industrial and craft practices and how they impact on the design process and outcome. Students will be expected to produce a research process journal and report on how a particular designer/s or movement has informed or influenced their final project/s.
AWSS2023 Architectural Photography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: workshop 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DESA2629 Assessment: process journal and associated assignments (40%); final project and presentation (60%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This practical unit assumes students have little or no understanding of photo image making. It aims to give students an understanding of how photography functions as a contemporary visual medium, including its connection to modernism and architecture. Students will gain knowledge of the principles and practise of camera operations, the production of high quality black and white prints in small studio style classes. This module covers the use of a 35mm DSLR camera, image composition, use of lighting, image capture and correction, and printing. Practical work includes completion of set class projects, gallery visits, class discussions and the production of a portfolio. *Students should have access to a 35mm DSLR camera.
AWSS2026 2D Print Processes in Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: workshop 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DESA2638 Assessment: research journal (30%); portfolio of studio works (70%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This studio-based unit introduces a variety of traditional and experimental techniques that will enable students to design and print a series of 2D works both within and around the context of design and Architecture. It will provide students with the knowledge and skills to design and print on a variety of substrates including paper, wood, and perspex through a range of techniques and creative exercises that can be developed into an edition or a series of experimental printed works. Students will also explore the historical roots of print and print as an element in design and architecture. Techniques covered include: digital photography and vector illustration, typography, hand and laser-cut paper stencils, ink mixing, registration and print set-up for multi-coloured prints. Through studio practice, set exercises, illustrated talks, gallery visits and library research, students will develop an understanding of their creative process and ability to interpret ideas through the medium of printing and with particular focus on design and architecture applications.
AWSS2027 Arch and Design Material Processes (Casting)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: workshop 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DESA2636 Assessment: studio projects and associated tasks (70%); research process journal (30%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This studio-based unit focuses on critical engagement with materiality and form. The course introduces fundamental knowledge and technical skills for students to produce a series of 3D objects through high-definition casting and complimentary construction techniques. Students will work with a broad range of traditional and experimental materials. Emphasis is placed on developing students' material and spatial awareness of three-dimensional forms in context and investigating their conceptual meanings and applications. Students will be required to design, plan and produce a series of sculptural works, utilizing mediums and techniques explored throughout the semester. Additionally, students will critically contextualise and discuss their projects against historical precedents and contemporary practices that inform their creative inquiries.
AWSS2015 Generative Drawing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 2 Classes: workshop 3 hrs/week Assessment: portfolio (60%); process journal (40%) Practical field work: Studio practice NB: Students may incur costs for materials in some units Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit explores a variety of drawing skills with an emphasis on materials and techniques as tools for generative and process-based work related to drawing as a fundamental medium and method in design. Drawing is approached as a system for critical analysis, research and design speculation. The focus is on the formal aspects of composition and perspective while the material nature of drawing is explored as a balance between chance and control. Students use a wide variety of mark-making methods to render line, tonal value and texture. Students are provided with the opportunity to combine observational skills with experimental techniques in order to encourage a personal vision and a commitment to the practice of drawing in design. Each technique and approach will be presented against a background of Architecture and Art history and theory.

3000-level units of study

ARCH3108 Industry and Community Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Wendy Davis Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: seminars, online contact and group work Assumed knowledge: Upper-level disciplinary knowledge Assessment: Group work 2500wd plan (10%); Group Presentation (20%); Evaluative/Reflective Task (20%); Group Project 5000wd Report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for third year students to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application.
DESA3013 Expanded Colour: From Theory to Application

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Koji Ryui Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: tutorial 1 hr/week; studio 2 hrs/week Assessment: studio projects (65%); process journal and associated assignments (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This studio-based unit develops and extends research into an astonishing world of colour and the designed environment. The unit will take students across the connections made between colour, light, music, and the phenomenology of space, locating some of the main figures that have investigated and championed the use of colour historically and in contemporary contexts, including artists and theorists Josef Albers, Johannes Itten, David Batchelor, Ann Veronica Janssens, Carlos Cruz-Diez, James Turrell and Olafur Eliasson, scientist Albert Henry Munsell, architects Le Corbusier and Sauerbrauch Hutton. Using a range of materials and techniques tied to sculpture, video, photography, assemblage and installation, students will experiment and explore propositions for architecture in response to conceptual frameworks and historical and contemporary precedents. Through this unit students have the opportunity to develop observational, critical and tactical skills related to the meaning and potential uses of colour in architecture.
DESC9011 Audio Production

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Densil Cabrera Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 3 hrs/wk Assessment: Two assignments (1x40%, 1x50%); in-class quizzes and exercises (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit examines tools, techniques, processes and value systems involved in audio production. Proficiency in sound recording techniques, including field and studio recordings, is developed, including technical acoustic, audio and aesthetic considerations. Students extend their understanding and experience of production principles by which sound recordings are used for building up realistic and hyper-realistic auditory scenes. Perspectives on audio production come from aesthetics, practice, acoustics theory, audio technology and digital audio systems, but ultimately are founded in the discipline of listening. By bringing these perspectives together, this unit is designed for students with a wide range of production experience at a postgraduate level.
Students are expected to work individually and in groups to produce audio for accompanying screen media, as well as audio works that rely solely on audio to transmit a message. Students are expected to: participate in the workshops; complete class exercises/constructions; read additional materials to discuss in classes; submit a script, composition or otherwise detailed proposal for recording and postproduction with detailed rationale of production values; produce and present a completed audio project, including documentation, evidence of background research, a commentary on the production and production outcomes, track sheets, mixing notes.

Other electives

1000-level units of study

ANTH1001 Introduction to Anthropology

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ANTH1003 Assessment: 1x300wd In-class quiz (5%), 1x900wd Observation exercise (15%), 1x1500wd Take-home midterm (30%), 1x1800wd Essay (40%), x Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Anthropologists want to know what makes us human. This unit introduces you to the unique perspective on human experience in cultural anthropology. Anthropologists argue that each individual is incomplete without the input of the shared patterns acquired from one's community. In this class you will learn how anthropologists define the concept of culture, how they use cultural relativism, and how they conduct research through cultural immersion and participatory fieldwork. You will examine several cases that demonstrate the human capacity for cultural diversity, and will understand several of the core topics that anthropologists investigate to capture a society's worldview and way of life.
ARHT1001 Style and Substance: Introducing Art History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x1000wd object analysis (40%), 1x2500wd research project (50%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Taking a diverse, global view of art making from the Ancient to the Modern world, ARHT1001 will introduce students to key philosophical and methodological approaches in the field of Art History. As our experiences are increasingly mediated through a variety of visual platforms, this course will help students develop critical perspectives on visual communication. The development of professional skill sets will be a key focus. As such, the course serves as an essential introduction to Art History for those considering a career in the arts, education, or the museum and design sectors.
ARHT1002 Shock of the Now: Global Art since 1900

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr Lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Visual Test (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1500wd Exhibition/Artwork Review Blog (20%), 1x Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Art shapes our cities, streets, galleries, phones and minds. It is now made with every conceivable material, and sometimes none at all. It shocks, challenges, soothes, entertains, engrosses and overwhelms us. This unit charts the history of Modern and Contemporary Art across the world, as it is shaped by and shapes society, politics and environment. It shows current concerns in art , with materials, landscape, self-image, politics, and the body are grounded in a century of global experiment
DATA1002 Informatics: Data and Computation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alan Fekete Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: INFO1903 OR DATA1902 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers computation and data handling, integrating sophisticated use of existing productivity software, e.g. spreadsheets, with the development of custom software using the general-purpose Python language. It will focus on skills directly applicable to data-driven decision-making. Students will see examples from many domains, and be able to write code to automate the common processes of data science, such as data ingestion, format conversion, cleaning, summarization, creation and application of a predictive model.
ELEC1103 Fundamentals of Elec and Electronic Eng

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, and PHYS1003 Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop knowledge of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits. This is a foundation unit in circuit theory. Circuit theory is the electrical engineer's fundamental tool.
The concepts learnt in this unit will be made use of heavily in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of electronics, instrumentation, electrical machines, power systems, communication systems, and signal processing.
Topics: a) Basic electrical and electronic circuit concepts: Circuits, circuit elements, circuit laws, node and mesh analysis, circuit theorems, energy storage, capacitors and inductors, circuits with switches, transient response, sine waves and complex analysis, phasors, impedance, ac power. ; b) Project management, teamwork, ethics; c) Safety issues
ELEC1601 Introduction to Computer Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: David Boland Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics extension 1 or 2 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces the fundamental digital concepts upon which the design and operation of modern digital computers are based. A prime aim of the unit is to develop a professional view of, and a capacity for inquiry into, the field of computing.
Topics covered include: data representation, basic computer organisation, the CPU, elementary gates and logic, machine language, assembly language and high level programming constructs.
ENGL1011 Introduction to Film Studies

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How do form and style structure our experience of film? This unit provides a critical introduction to elements of film making and viewing, moving through an exploration of formal components of film to consider film aesthetics in relation to the history of film scholarship. We will consider films in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, from early cinema to youtube, and introduce a series of "case studies" to explore historical, cultural and material contexts of film production and consumption.
GCST1601 Introduction to Cultural Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x2000wd equivalent blogs (30%), 1x500wd equivalent group presentation (15%), 1x500wd textual analysis (20%), 1x2000wd essay (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cultural studies explores everyday life, media and popular culture. It shows us how we can make sense of contemporary culture as producers, consumers, readers and viewers, in relation to our identities and communities. How do cultural texts and practices convey different kinds of meaning and value? Students
will be introduced to some key thinkers and approaches in cultural studies and will learn how to analyse cultural forms such as advertising, television, film and popular music.
INFO1110 Introduction to Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Stavrakakis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories, seminars Prohibitions: INFO1910 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an essential starting point for software developers, IT consultants, and computer scientists to build their understanding of principle computer operation. Students will obtain knowledge and skills with procedural programming. Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, functions, recursion, the model of addressable memory. Students will be able to reinterpret a general problem into a computer problem, and use their understanding of the computer model to develop source code. This unit trains students with software development process, including skills of testing and debugging. It is a prerequisite for more advanced programming languages, systems programming, computer security and high performance computing.
INFO1113 Object-Oriented Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mohammad Polash; A/Prof Masahiro Takatsuka Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories, seminars Prerequisites: INFO1110 OR INFO1910 Prohibitions: INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Intensive January
Object-oriented (OO) programming is a technique that arranges code into classes, each encapsulating in one place related data and the operations on that data. Inheritance is used to reuse code from a more general class, in specialised situations. Most modern programming languages provide OO features. Understanding and using these are an essential skill to software developers in industry. This unit provides the student with the concepts and individual programming skills in OO programming, starting from their previous mastery of procedural programming.
INFS1000 Digital Business Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr lab workshop per week Prohibitions: ISYS1003 or INFO1000 Assessment: group work (10%), group project (25%), mid-semester test (25%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Digital Economy, with its focus on information as a key business resource, has changed the way Business Information Systems (BIS) is viewed in organisations. BIS are now seen as enablers of innovation in which people, supported by powerful technology, are considered to be the most important component. This is because problem-solving, innovation and critical thinking skills cannot be outsourced or easily acquired by competitors. This unit is designed to develop your understanding of how businesses operate. It shows how information systems support business operations and management through integration of people, business processes and systems. You will be provided with an introduction to state-of-the-art business analysis techniques, frameworks and models to assist in understanding the nature and contribution of BIS in a range of business contexts. With its emphasis on business rather than IT, this unit does not require prior IT-related experience. In this unit, you will learn about the increasingly important role of IT in business and acquire valuable business analysis and problem-solving skills.
LNGS1002 Language and Social Context

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 5x250wd short assignments (40%), 1x1hr 1000wd equivalent mid-term exam (20%), 1x2hr 2000wd equivalent Final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the study of the interrelationship between language and society. It is concerned with phenomena of language change and how that leads to varieties in a language. How are these varieties linked to social differences? What distinguishes male speech from female speech or what are the linguistic styles of different social classes or ethnic groups? What is slang, or jargon, and what distinguishes a casual conversation from an interview?
MKTG1001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: project (20%), presentation (15%), participation (7%), mid-semester exam (28%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The Intensive January and July sessions of this unit are only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in Semester 1 and Semester 2 sessions.
This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
MTRX1702 Mechatronics 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof David Rye Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC1101 or ELEC2602 or COSC1902 or COSC1002 Assumed knowledge: MTRX1701 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide a foundation for the study of systems and embedded programming for the degree in Mechatronic Engineering.
It is based around a systems engineering approach to requirements capture, software design, implementation, debugging and testing in the context of the C programming language. Problem definition and decomposition; the design process; designing for testing and defensive coding methods; modular code structure and abstract data types; best practice in programming. Programming in teams; documentation and version control.
The C language: Preprocessor, tokens, storage classes and types; arithmetic, relational and bit manipulation operators; constructs for control flow: if, switch, for, do and while; arrays; pointers and character strings; dynamic memory allocation; functions and parameter passing; derived storage classes: structures and unions; file I/O.
MUED1002 Creative Music Technology

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Benjamin Carey Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr lab/studio/wk Assessment: Creative Audio Assignment (70%), Formative Skills Assessment (20%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students will be introduced to a range of music technologies and gain a basic proficiency in sound recording, editing and mixing. Students will learn to work with audio in a digital audio workstation, how to make good quality recordings with portable recording devices, and make use of these skills in service of a creative outcome. The unit will include an overview of software for notation/sequencing, as well as basic sound synthesis concepts. In the final assessment students will explore the creative possibilities of music technology by realising a sound work using either instrumental and/or environmental sound recorded and edited by them.
MUSC1503 Fundamentals of Music 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jonathan Byrnes Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An introduction to basic music literacy skills, including learning to read and write music, and an understanding of fundamental aspects of its structure and composition. The material covered in this unit of study concentrates upon the basics of music theory and listening to ensure that participants have a solid grounding for a firm understanding of music notation and organisation.
MUSC1507 Sounds, Screens, Speakers: Music and Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Charles Fairchild Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1 tut/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1000 or MUSC1001 or MUSC1502 Assessment: Article summary, 1000 words (25%); Media analysis of 1000 words (20%); Tutorial tests (15%); Final Project, 2,000 words(30%), overall participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Music has been dramatically shaped and reshaped by every major change in communications technology in the 20th century from vinyl discs to spotify. In this unit of study we will analyse such issues as the ways in which the early recording industry transformed jazz, the blues and country music, how the presentation of music on radio and television changed the ways the music industry created new musical celebrities, and the challenges the music industry faces as digital technology transforms the creation, distribution and consumption of music.
PHIL1013 Society, Knowledge and Self

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: PHIL1010 Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline (10%), 1x1750wd essay (30%), 250wd equiv online quizzes (10%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to central issues in political philosophy, theories of knowledge and philosophical conceptions of the self. The first part will consider the state, freedom and political obligation. The second part will examine some of the major theories of knowledge in the modern philosophical tradition. The final section will look at conceptions of the self as a knowing and acting subject.
PRFM1601 Making Theatre: Process and Collaboration

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr workshop/week Assessment: 1x1000wd short essay (25%), 1x1000wd workshop description and analysis (25%),1x group work documentation (1500wd per student)(25%), 1x1000wd account of rehearsal (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A guided rehearsal of a play by Bertolt Brecht introduces you to key approaches to theatre and performance studies, including embodiment theory, ethnography, and dramaturgy. You will reflect upon and analyse performance-making processes, debating, testing and documenting decisions as you work. No theatre-making experience required.
PSYC1001 Psychology 1001

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1150 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Psychology 1001 is a general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1001 covers the following areas: science and statistics in psychology; applied psychology; themes in the history of psychology; social psychology; personality theory; human development. This unit is also offered in the January Intensive session. For more information consult the web site: https://sydney.edu.au/students/summer-winter-study.html
Textbooks
Available on-line once semester commences
PSYC1002 Psychology 1002

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1150 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Psychology 1002 is a further general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and it is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1002 covers the following areas: neuroscience; human mental abilities; learning and motivation; visual perception; cognitive processes; abnormal psychology. This unit is also offered in the Intensive January session. For more information consult the web site: https://sydney.edu.au/students/summer-winter-study.html
Textbooks
Available on-line once semester commences
SCLG1001 Introduction to Sociology 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd review exercise (10%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), 1x1500wd take home assessment (35%), 1x1000wd equiv discussion posts (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How does society shape the world we live in? What influences interactions between people in everyday life? Why is society structured the way it is, and is change possible? By delving into diverse topics such as discrimination and inequality to family life and friendship, this unit introduces the conceptual tools sociologists use to explain the world.
SCLG1002 Introduction to Sociology 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%), 1x1750wd take-home exercise (35%), 1x1750wd research essay (35%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In a rapidly changing world, how do we make sense of current social and political problems effectively? By exploring sociological concepts in creative ways, this unit gives students the tools to analyse, research and respond to real world issues such as globalisation, crime, social justice, community breakdown, and racial, sexual and indigenous inequality.
WRIT1000 Introduction to Academic Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x900wd sentence task (20%), 1x900wd research task (20%), 1x900wd paragraph task (20%), 1x900wd review task (20%), 1x900wd revision/reflection task (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
WRIT1000 teaches the fundamentals of academic writing across disciplines. Frequent, short writing assignments are designed to help students engage with the writing process at the sentence and paragraph levels and and to make appropriate style, grammar, punctuation, and syntax choices. Students will learn to research topics, document sources in keeping with academic honesty principles, and edit and revise their own and others' writing. While WRIT1000 may be suitable for non-native English speakers, it is not a language acquisition UoS and assumes basic competence in English.

2000-level units of study

ARIN2610 Internet Transformations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Media Studies or 18 credit points at 1000-level in any of Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2100 Assessment: 3x500wd analytic journal entries (25%), 1x1000wd equiv research presentation (30%), 1x2000wd critical analysis or web feature (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Internet is at the heart of major digital transformations in industry, society and culture. This unit introduces key skills in analysis and critique of the technologies involved in networked change, exploring internet imaginaries, histories and emerging phenomena.
ARIN2620 Everyday Digital Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Media Studies or 18 credit points at 1000-level in any of Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2200 Assessment: 1x1250wd take-home exercise 1 (25%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1250wd take-home exercise 2 (25%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How we eat, sleep, talk, love, shop, work, play, learn and die are all shaped by digital media. Everyday digital media focuses on the transformation of self and society through the digital mediation of everyday practices. How do we organise our social lives and engage creatively in online realms? What are the opportunities and risks of sharing and self-presentation in networked publics? How are communities reconfigured in a digital context? This unit introduces theories of digital culture and identity and applies them to our everyday experiences and interactions with social media, participatory culture, locative media, computer games, virtual reality, smart homes and connected cities.
CAEL2047 Animation

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Visual Arts or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Studio Foundation Assessment: project proposal (30%) and major self-directed project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces you to the fundamental concepts and skills associated with 2D animation production. The unit provides both a conceptual and technical framework for you to explore the possibilities of animation in relation to your existing practice or as a completely new endeavour. Working in the digital domain, you will explore a range of approaches including frame-by-frame animation and stop motion animation. The technical component of this course provides you with the necessary skills to realise a self-directed project while encouraging exploration and experimentation. Class discussions, seminars and individual tutorials support screenings of historical and contemporary animated works to allow you to situate your own projects within a contemporary context.
CATE2007 The Art of Memory

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ann Elias Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hour seminar/week Prerequisites: (THAP1201 and THAP1202) or (CATE1001 and CATE1002) or (12 senior credit points of Art History and Theory) Assessment: short visual analysis (20%) and small group presentation (10%) and major essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the discourse of memory through the practice of contemporary art and theory. From this perspective, it considers the relationship between memory, the politics of identity, and history through a critical exploration of different forms of remembrance, such as: storytelling and autobiography; collective memory; forgetting and the erasure of time; and trauma and embodiment.
Textbooks
James McConkey, The Anatomy of Memory: An Anthology, New York: Oxford University Press, 1996.
COMP2017 Systems Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Stavrakakis Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1103 Corequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP2129 OR COMP9017 OR COMP9129 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, elementary methods for developing robust, efficient, and re-usable software will be covered. The unit is taught in C, in a Unix environment. Specific coding topics include memory management, the pragmatic aspects of implementing data structures such as lists and hash tables and managing concurrent threads. Debugging tools and techniques are discussed and common programming errors are considered along with defensive programming techniques to avoid such errors. Emphasis is placed on using common Unix tools to manage aspects of the software construction process, such as version control and regression testing. The subject is taught from a practical viewpoint and it includes a considerable amount of programming practice.
COMP2022 Models of Computation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kalina Yacef Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113 Prohibitions: COMP2922 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 OR MATH2069 OR MATH2969) AND (INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 OR COMP2823) Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the foundations of computational models, and their connection to programming languages/tools. The unit covers various abstract models for computation including Lambda Calculus, and Logic calculi (e. g. concept of formal proofs in propositional, predicate, and temporal logic). For each abstract model, we introduce programming languages/tools that are built on the introduced abstract computational models. We will discuss functional languages including Scheme/Haskell, and Prolog/Datalog.
COMP2123 Data Structures and Algorithms

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Andreas Van Renssen Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1113 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 Prohibitions: INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2823 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will teach some powerful ideas that are central to solving algorithmic problems in ways that are more efficient than naive approaches. In particular, students will learn how data collections can support efficient access, for example, how a dictionary or map can allow key-based lookup that does not slow down linearly as the collection grows in size. The data structures covered in this unit include lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, search trees, hash tables, and graphs. Students will also learn efficient techniques for classic tasks such as sorting a collection. The concept of asymptotic notation will be introduced, and used to describe the costs of various data access operations and algorithms.
COMP2823 Data Structures and Algorithms (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julian Mestre Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1113 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 Prohibitions: INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will teach some powerful ideas that are central to solving algorithmic problems in ways that are more efficient than naive approaches. In particular, students will learn how data collections can support efficient access, for example, how a dictionary or map can allow key-based lookup that does not slow down linearly as the collection grows in size. The data structures covered in this unit include lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, search trees, hash tables, and graphs. Students will also learn efficient techniques for classic tasks such as sorting a collection. The concept of asymptotic notation will be introduced, and used to describe the costs of various data access operations and algorithms.
COMP2922 Models of Computation (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kalina Yacef Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: Distinction level result in INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113 Prohibitions: COMP2022 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 OR MATH2069 OR MATH2969) AND (INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 OR COMP2823) Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the foundations of computational models, and their connection to programming languages/tools. The unit covers various abstract models for computation including Lambda Calculus, and Logic calculi (e.g. concept of formal proofs in propositional, predicate, and temporal logic). For each abstract model, we introduce programming languages/tools that are built on the introduced abstract computational models. We will discuss functional languages including Scheme/Haskell, and Prolog/Datalog.
DATA2001 Data Science: Big Data and Data Diversity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Uwe Roehm Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: DATA1002 OR DATA1902 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1103 Prohibitions: DATA2901 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course focuses on methods and techniques to efficiently explore and analyse large data collections. Where are hot spots of pedestrian accidents across a city? What are the most popular travel locations according to user postings on a travel website? The ability to combine and analyse data from various sources and from databases is essential for informed decision making in both research and industry.
Students will learn how to ingest, combine and summarise data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects, such as relational, semi-structured, time series, geospatial, image, text. As well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with relevant Python libraries, this course will also introduce students to the concept of declarative data processing with SQL, and to analyse data in relational databases. Students will be given data sets from, eg. , social media, transport, health and social sciences, and be taught basic explorative data analysis and mining techniques in the context of small use cases. The course will further give students an understanding of the challenges involved with analysing large data volumes, such as the idea to partition and distribute data and computation among multiple computers for processing of 'Big Data'.
ELEC2104 Electronic Devices and Circuits

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Craig Jin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: ELEC1103. Ohm's Law and Kirchoff's Laws; action of Current and Voltage sources; network analysis and the superposition theorem; Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits; inductors and capacitors, transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits; the ability to use power supplies, oscilloscopes, function generators, meters, etc. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern Electronics has come to be known as microelectronics which refers to the Integrated Circuits (ICs) containing millions of discrete devices. This course introduces some of the basic electronic devices like diodes and different types of transistors. It also aims to introduce students the analysis and design techniques of circuits involving these discrete devices as well as the integrated circuits.
Completion of this course is essential to specialise in Electrical, Telecommunication or Computer Engineering stream.
INFS2010 People, Information and Knowledge

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: group project report (30%); group project presentation (10%); individual assignment (10%); final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To compete effectively in today's knowledge economy businesses are required to systematically manage their information and knowledge resources. In this unit, you will develop an understanding of the main issues businesses face when they develop and implement knowledge management initiatives. You will be introduced to the tools and systems that enable businesses to acquire, store, distribute, analyse, and leverage information and knowledge resources. By focusing on the theoretical and practical principles that link people, information, and organisations, this unit will help you understand the processes of generating, communicating, and using knowledge in businesses, and the way these can be integrated with business strategy and information technology. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS2020 Business Process Modelling and Improvement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3 hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: individual assignment (25%), group project (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides you with an in-depth understanding of the role of business process management (BPM) and process architectures in a business environment. You will gain essential skills of the entire BPM lifecycle, from process identification to process monitoring, including process modelling, analysis, redesign and automation required to achieve high performing business processes in a service-oriented business environment. In this unit, you will attain considerable hands-on skills with BPM tools, by documenting, analysing, and simulating current and improved processes. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS2030 Digital Business Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: Group Project Report (25%); Group Project Presentation (5%); Mid-Term Exam (20%); Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide you with a detailed overview of the concepts and models used in doing business digitally via the Internet. These concepts and models will enable you to evaluate, synthesise and implement Internet-enabled business models. The unit will provide the critical link between the firm's performance and modern Internet technologies, such as e-Commerce platforms, Social Media and Social Networking. Emphasis will be put on the utilisation of Internet technologies to enable new forms of digital business, rather than on the technologies themselves. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
ISYS2110 Analysis and Design of Web Info Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Muhammad Hasan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: INFO2110 Assessment: through semester assessment (40%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organisations use to determine how they should conduct their business, with a particular focus on how web-based technologies can most effectively contribute to the way business is organized. The course covers a systematic methodology for analysing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, web-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solution, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities needed to address the business requirements, and specifying the requirements for the information systems solution in particular, in-house development, development from third-party providers, or purchased commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages.
ISYS2120 Data and Information Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Matloob Khushi Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1003 OR INFO1903 OR DECO1012 Prohibitions: INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR COMP5138 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The ubiquitous use of information technology leaves us facing a tsunami of data produced by users, IT systems and mobile devices. The proper management of data is hence essential for all applications and for effective decision making within organizations.
This unit of study will introduce the basic concepts of database designs at the conceptual, logical and physical levels. We will place particular emphasis on introducing integrity constraints and the concept of data normalization which prevents data from being corrupted or duplicated in different parts of the database. This in turn helps in the data remaining consistent during its lifetime. Once a database design is in place, the emphasis shifts towards querying the data in order to extract useful information. The unit will introduce the SQL database query languages, which is industry standard. Other topics covered will include the important concept of transaction management, application development with a backend database, and an overview of data warehousing and OLAP.
ISYS2160 Information Systems in the Internet Age

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simon Poon Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: ISYS2140 Assumed knowledge: INFO1003 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide a comprehensive conceptual and practical introduction to information systems (IS) in the Internet era. Key topics covered include: system thinking and system theory, basic concepts of information systems, internet and e-commerce, e-payment and m-commerce, online marketing and social media, information systems for competitive advantage, functional and enterprise systems, business intelligence, information systems development and acquisition, information security, ethics, and privacy
MUSC2653 Introduction to Digital Music Techniques

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damian Barbeler Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hr lecture/demonstration/wk Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Prohibitions: MUSC2053 Assessment: Sound recording and editing assignment (30%); creative assignments (60%); online assessments, attendance and participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: An ability to read music at a basic level and an understanding of fundamental musical terminology is an advantage in this unit of study.
This unit is an introduction to the use of digital sound and music in creative and multimedia contexts. It is a practical course in which students are introduced to tools of sound creation and manipulation. Students will undertake creative projects as a means to learning. In addition, participants will be exposed to a number of approaches to electroacoustic music across the 20th and 21st centuries.
PHIL2642 Critical Thinking

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1xin-class test (20%) and 1x2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An introduction to critical thinking and analysis of argument. By examining arguments drawn from diverse sources, including journalism, advertising, science, medicine, history, economics and politics, we will learn how to distinguish good from bad arguments, and how to construct rationally persuasive arguments of our own. Along the way we will grapple with scepticism, conspiracy theories and pseudoscience. The reasoning skills imparted by this unit make it invaluable not only for philosophy students but for every student at the University.
PSYC2013 Cognitive and Social Psychology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: PSYC1001 and PSYC1002 Prohibitions: PSYC2015 or PSYC2915 or PSYC2016 or PSYC2017 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, major assignment (1500-2000 word essay/report), minor assignment (short written practical exercise and/or tutorial quiz) (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit expands the depth and range of topics introduced in the first year lectures on Cognitive Processes, Social Psychology and Developmental Psychology. The section on Cognitive Processes focuses on current theories of memory, attention, and reasoning and discusses the methods and issues involved in investigating these processes in both healthy individuals and people with cognitive dysfunctions. The second section on Social Psychology examines salient social constructs such as impression management, and prejudice, and explores how mental processes affect social judgment and behaviour. The final section on Developmental Psychology presents and evaluates evidence about the early influences on children's social and cognitive development.
PRFM2601 Being There: Theories of Performance

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive November,Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lectures/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Prohibitions: PRFM2001 Assessment: Short responses to set readings (1200wd total)(30%), 1x800wd research proposal (20%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What if all the world really is a stage? In this unit, you will learn key theories and conceptual tools for analysing the broad spectrum of performance events that lie beyond what is conventionally associated with the term 'theatre'. You will conduct original research, focusing on how performance (re)constitutes identity and (re)forms a culture.
PRFM2602 Performance: Production and Interpretation

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Theatre and Performance Studies Prohibitions: PRFM2002 Assessment: 1x600wd short response to performance (10%), 1x1200wd tutorial paper (30%), 1x500wd raw notes (10%), 1x2200wd performance analysis essay (50%) Practical field work: Students will undertake some workshop exercises in their tutorials and will attend professional theatre productions outside class times Mode of delivery: Block mode
How do we make meaning from our experience of text, movement, spatial design, costuming, lighting, sound and other elements of theatrical performance? Through practical workshops and theatre excursions, you will learn some basic production techniques and develop a critical language for analysing live performance.
SOFT2201 Software Construction and Design 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Xi Wu Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: INFO3220 OR COMP9201 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the foundations of software design and construction. It covers the topics of modelling software (UML, CRC, use cases), software design principles, object-oriented programming theory (inheritance, polymorphism, dynamic subtyping and generics), and simple design patterns. The unit aims to foster a strong technical understanding of the underlying software design and construction theory (delivered in the lecture) but also has a strong emphasis of the practice, where students apply the theory on practical examples.
SOFT2412 Agile Software Development Practices

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Basem Suleiman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP9412 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds students skills to follow defined processes in software development, in particular, working in small teams in an agile approach. Content covers the underlying concepts and principles of software processes, their analysis, measurement and improvement. Students will practice with a variety of professional-strength tool support for the practices that ensure quality outcomes. The unit requires students to enter already skilled in individual programming; instead this unit focuses on the complexities in a team setting.

3000-level units of study

ARIN3620 Researching Digital Cultures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2000 Assessment: 1x2000wd Research blog (45%), 1x2500wd Research proposal (45%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How do people make and use new media technologies? To answer this question you need to know how to conduct research: a systematic investigation using carefully chosen and ethically sound methods. In this unit students prepare a research proposal to improve knowledge about the social implications of the latest developments in information technologies. They build their methodology by choosing a combination of methods: big data analysis; ethnography, interviews, surveys, online methods, discourse analysis, content analysis and/or case studies.
ARIN3630 Digital Arts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Art History or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Film Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Design Computing Prohibitions: ARIN2630 Assessment: 1x Participation (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Review (30%), 1x1000wd Tutorial activity (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Explore digital technologies in the visual and performing arts, film and popular culture to analyse how new media transform the ways art is made and experienced. Discuss and evaluate their technologies, aesthetics, and how audiences interact with, and even produce them.
ARIN3640 Games and Play

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2640 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial activity (20%), 1x2000wd game analysis (40%), 1x1500wd game design project (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Games are distinctive cultural forms, with histories, aesthetics, design cultures, player communities and academic theory. This unit explores how games work and how they are situated in culture. Drawing on games studies, media studies, HCI and design, students analyse games and develop a game concept.
ARIN3610 Technology and Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2600 Assessment: 1x1000wd Provocations and report (20%), 1x1500wd Influence analysis (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Technology and Culture analyses the relationships between technological developments and cultural change, with a particular focus on digital media. This unit of study interrogates the changing conceptions of technology in society by tracing the influence of key works in the critical Humanities and social sciences. Through close readings and provocative discussion of advanced texts, students explore the significance of technology in social power, identity, gender, social shaping, class, space, assemblages, actor-networks, experience, thought, time, and the future.
COMP3221 Distributed Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dinesh Thilakarathna Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: (INFO1105 OR INFO1905) OR ((INFO1103 OR INFO1113) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823)) Prohibitions: COMP2121 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide broad introduction to the principles of distributed computing and distributed systems and their design; provide students the fundamental knowledge required to analyse, design distributed algorithms and implement various types of applications, like blockchains; explain the common algorithmic design principles and approaches used in the design of message passing at different scales (e.g., logical time, peer-to-peer overlay, gossip-based communication).
COMP3027 Algorithm Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Seeun Umboh Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP2007 OR COMP2907 OR COMP3927 Assumed knowledge: MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 Assessment: through semester assessment (40%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the design techniques that are used to find efficient algorithmic solutions for given problems. The techniques covered include greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and adjusting flows in networks. Students will extend their skills in algorithm analysis. The unit also provides an introduction to the concepts of computational complexity and reductions between problems.
COMP3308 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Irena Koprinska Session: Semester 1 Classes: Tutorials, Lectures Prohibitions: COMP3608 Assumed knowledge: Algorithms. Programming skills (e.g. Java, Python, C, C++, Matlab) Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Artificial Intelligence (AI) is all about programming computers to perform tasks normally associated with intelligent behaviour. Classical AI programs have played games, proved theorems, discovered patterns in data, planned complex assembly sequences and so on. This unit of study will introduce representations, techniques and architectures used to build intelligent systems. It will explore selected topics such as heuristic search, game playing, machine learning, neural networks and probabilistic reasoning. Students who complete it will have an understanding of some of the fundamental methods and algorithms of AI, and an appreciation of how they can be applied to interesting problems. The unit will involve a practical component in which some simple problems are solved using AI techniques.
COMP3419 Graphics and Multimedia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tom Cai Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a broad introduction to the field of graphics and multimedia computing to meet the diverse requirements of application areas such as entertainment, industrial design, virtual reality, intelligent media management, social media and remote sensing. It covers both the underpinning theories and the practices of computing and manipulating digital media including graphics / image, audio, animation, and video. Emphasis is placed on principles and cutting-edge techniques for multimedia data processing, content analysis, media retouching, media coding and compression.
COMP3520 Operating Systems Internals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bing Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (COMP2017 OR COMP2129) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905) Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide a comprehensive discussion of relevant OS issues and principles and describe how those principles are put into practice in real operating systems. The contents include internal structure of OS; several ways each major aspect (process scheduling, inter-process communication, memory management, device management, file systems) can be implemented; the performance impact of design choices; case studies of common OS (Linux, MS Windows NT, etc.).
COMP3927 Algorithm Design (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Seeun Umboh Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP2007 OR COMP2907 OR COMP3027 Assumed knowledge: MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 Assessment: through semester assessment (40%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the design techniques that are used to find efficient algorithmic solutions for given problems. The techniques covered include greedy, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, and adjusting flows in networks. Students will extend their skills in algorithm analysis. The unit also provides an introduction to the concepts of computational complexity and reductions between problems.
CMPN3635 Writing Music for the Moving Image

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Blinkhorn Session: Semester 1 Classes: 6 x 1 hour lectures for the first six weeks; 6 x 2 hour tutorials thereafter Prerequisites: MUED1002 or CMPN1013 or MUSC2653 or MUED4002 Assessment: Written paper (20%), Presentation (30%), Final Music (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides a practical introduction into the creation of, and aesthetics for music and
moving image. Topics for discussion will include, but are not be limited to: relationships
between image and sound, diegetic and non-diegetic sound, thematic development,
partnerships between composers, directors and other such collaborations within the creative
sector, sound design, music for games and animation, and non-commercial applications of
music for image (audiovisual art, cymatics etc). The unit seeks to enable
students the ability to develop a skillset within their own studio spaces for the creation and
dissemination of their projects; both at a sector ready, as well as a technically proficient level.
Importantly, students will be presented with a variety of possible projects and collaborations
with industry partners across differing creative sectors.
DATA3404 Data Science Platforms

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Uwe Roehm Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: DATA2001 OR DATA2901 OR ISYS2120 OR INFO2120 OR INFO2820 Prohibitions: INFO3504 OR INFO3404 Assumed knowledge: This unit of study assumes that students have previous knowledge of database structures and of SQL. The prerequisite material is covered in DATA2001 or ISYS2120. Familiarity with a programming language (e.g. Java or C) is also expected. Assessment: through semester assessment (40%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive overview of the internal mechanisms data science platforms and of the systems that manage large data collections. These skills are needed for successful performance tuning and to understand the scalability challenges faced by when processing Big Data. This unit builds upon the second' year DATA2001 - 'Data Science - Big Data and Data Diversity' and correspondingly assumes a sound understanding of SQL and data analysis tasks.
The first part of this subject focuses on mechanisms for large-scale data management. It provides a deep understanding of the internal components of a data management platform. Topics include: physical data organization and disk-based index structures, query processing and optimisation, and database tuning.
The second part focuses on the large-scale management of big data in a distributed architecture. Topics include: distributed and replicated databases, information retrieval, data stream processing, and web-scale data processing.
The unit will be of interest to students seeking an introduction to data management tuning, disk-based data structures and algorithms, and information retrieval. It will be valuable to those pursuing such careers as Software Engineers, Data Engineers, Database Administrators, and Big Data Platform specialists.
ELEC3506 Data Communications and the Internet

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Yonghui Li Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students undertaking this unit should be familiar with fundamental digital technologies and representations such as bit complement and internal word representation. Students should also have a basic understanding of the physical properties of communication channels, techniques and limitations. Furthermore, students should be able to apply fundamental mathematical skills.
The unit will cover the following specific material: Communication reference models (TCP/IP and OSI). Circuit switched and packet switched communication. Network node functions and building blocks. LAN, MAN, WAN, WLAN technologies. Protocols fundamental mechanisms. The TCP/IP core protocols (IP, ICMP, DHCP, ARP, TCP, UDP etc. ). Applications and protocols (ftP, Telnet, SMTP, HTTP etc. ), Network Management and Security.
ELEC3607 Embedded Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Philip Leong Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Prerequisites: ELEC1601 AND ELEC2602 Assumed knowledge: ELEC1601 AND ELEC2602. Logic operations, theorems and Boolean algebra, data representation, number operations (binary, hex, integers and floating point), combinational logic analysis and synthesis, sequential logic, registers, counters, bus systems, state machines, simple CAD tools for logic design, basic computer organisation, the CPU, peripheral devices, software organisation, machine language, assembly language, operating systems, data communications and computer networks. Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Embedded systems have become pervasive in modern society. The aim of this unit of study is to teach students about embedded systems architecture, design methodology, interfacing and programming. Topics covered include peripheral devices, interrupts, direct memory access (DMA), assembly language, communications and data acquisition. A major design project is part of this course.
ELEC3610 E-Business Analysis and Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Phee Yeoh Session: Semester 1 Classes: Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Presentation, Tutorials Prohibitions: EBUS3003 Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the essential pre-production stages of designing successful internet websites and services. It focuses on the aspects of analysis, project specification, design, and prototype that lead up to the actual build of a website or application. Topics include, B2C, B2B and B2E systems, business models, methodologies, modeling with use cases / UML and WebML, the Project Proposal and Project Specification Document, Information Architecture and User-Centred Design, legal issues, and standards-based web development. Students build a simple use-case based e-business website prototype with web standards. A final presentation of the analysis, design and prototype are presented in a role play environment where students try to win funding from a venture capitalist. An understanding of these pre-production fundamentals is critical for future IT and Software Engineering Consultants, Project Managers, Analysts and CTOs.
INFO3315 Human-Computer Interaction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Anusha Withanghe Don Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a first subject in HCI, Human Computer Interaction. It is designed for students who want to be involved in one of the many roles required to create future technology. There are three main parts: the human foundations from psyschology and physiology; HCI methods for design and evaluation of interfaces; leading edge directions for technologies.
This subject is highly multi-disciplinary. At the core, it is a mix of Computer Science Software Engineering combined with the design discipline, UX - User Experience. It draws on psychology, both for relevant theories and user study methods. The practical work is human-centred with project work that motivates the formal curriculum. This year the projects will be in area of health and wellness.
INFO3616 Principles of Security and Security Eng

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Samarakkody Seneviratne Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials, research Prohibitions: ELEC5616 OR INFO2315 Assumed knowledge: (INFO1110 OR INFO1910) AND INFO1112 AND INFO1113 AND MATH1064. Knowledge equivalent to the above units is assumed. This means good programming skills in Python or a C-related language, basic networking knowledge, and skills from discrete mathematics. A technical orientation is absolutely required, especially capacity to become familiar with new technology without explicit supervision. Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the many facets of security in the digital and networked world, the challenges that IT systems face, and the design principles that have been developed to build secure systems and counter attacks. The unit puts the focus squarely on providing a thorough understanding of security principles and engineering for security. At the same time, we stress a hands-on approach to teach the state-of-the-art incarnations of security principles and technology, and we practice programming for security. We pay particular attention to the fact that security is much more than just technology as we discuss the fields of usability in security, operational security, and cyber-physical systems. At the end of this unit, graduates are prepared for practical demands in their later careers and know how to tackle new, yet unforeseen challenges.
This unit also serves as the initial step for a specialisation in computer and communications security.
ISYS3402 Decision Analytics and Support Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Soyeon Han Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: (ISYS2110 OR INFO2110) AND (ISYS2120 OR INFO2120) Assumed knowledge: Database Management AND Systems Analysis and Modelling Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
With the rapid increases in the volume and variety of data available, the problem of providing effective support to facilitate good decision making has become more challenging. This unit of study will provide a comprehensive understanding the diverse types of decision and the decision making processes. It will introduce decision modelling and the design and implementation of application systems to support decision making in organisational contexts. It will include a range of business intelligence and analytics solutions based on online analytical processing (OLAP) models and technologies. The unit will also cover a number of modelling approaches (optimization, predictive, descriptive) and their integration in the context of enabling improved, data-driven decision making.
SOFT3202 Software Construction and Design 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bernhard Scholz Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: SOFT2201 Prohibitions: INFO3220 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a sequel of Software Construction and Design I (SOFT2301). It introduces advanced concepts which build on the topics of SOFT2301. SOFT3302 covers topics including software validation and verification, the theory of testing, and advanced design patterns. The unit has a strong focus on the theoretical underpinning of software design. I the labs the theory is applied with contemporary tools with concrete examples.
SOFT3410 Concurrency for Software Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Xi Wu Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: (INFO1105 OR INFO1905) OR ((INFO1103 OR INFO1113) AND (COMP2123 OR COMP2823)) Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The manufacturing industry has experienced a radical shift in the way they design computers, with the integration of multiple processors on the same chip. This hardware shift now requires software developers to acquire the skills that will allow them to write efficient concurrent software. Software developers used to wait for manufacturers to increase the clock frequency of their processors to see increases in the performance of their programs, the challenge is now to exploit, in the same program, more and more processing resources rather than faster processing resources. In this unit, you will learn how to tackle the problems underlying this challenge, including developing and testing concurrent programs, synchronizing resources between concurrent threads, overcoming fairness issues and guaranteeing progress, and ensuring scalability in the level of concurrency.
MKTG3110 Digital Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture and 1x50min tutorial per week - plus daily engagement is expected through technology. A number of the tutorials will be scheduled in the laboratories for hands-on sessions. Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), report (20%), presentation (10%), project (25%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores how marketing campaigns are designed, conceptualised and executed digitally. Particular attention is given to techniques unique to digital technologies and the networked nature of social media platforms. Their applications to marketing strategy specifically to do with brand building, target audiences, public relations and communications are covered with an aim to equip students to understand the digital consumer journey.
MKTG3114 New Products Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), mid-semester test (20%), presentation (10%), project (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. The goal is to help students learn how to develop and market new products and services in both the private and public sectors. A product development assignment is carried out to reinforce the material covered and to provide realistic examples of how new products are designed, tested and launched.
MKTG3121 Advertising: Creative Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: MKTG1001 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), fortnightly work-in-progress reports (15%), midterm exam (28%), group project (30%), group presentation (15%), research component (2%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Most companies use advertising to introduce themselves, their products and services to existing and potential customers. Advertising is their public face and together with integrated marketing communications and public relations is one of the three pillars of commercial communication. This subject explores the creative material that is developed and produced to contact, inform, educate and influence consumer decisions. Advertising is the point where communication theory is put into practice. Understanding the creative principles and practices used by advertising personnel enables the marketer to commission, evaluate and produce creative material to professional industry standards. This subject addresses topics such as the importance of creativity; messaging issues, determining consumer insights; the creative potential and purpose of different media; developing creative concepts; determining the advertising idea; critiquing advertising; identifying key issues; producing the final creative material and taking it to the marketplace.