English

English

Honours

Honours in English requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 30 credit points of 4000-level Honours thesis units
(ii) 18 credit points of 4000-level Honours seminar unit

Honours seminar units of study

ENGL4113 Approaches to Critical Reading

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x 6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit introduces students to a variety of critical approaches to literature from the eighteenth century to the present. It asks a number of questions basic to the study and understanding of literature. What does it mean to read a text critically? What roles do critical and theoretical perspectives play in our understanding of literary texts? In addition to developing critical and theoretical literacy, the unit will examine how such strategies may be brought to bear on reading literary texts and whether they are effective and/or appropriate in specific cases.
ENGL4114 Approaches to Literary History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x 1500wd critical assessment (20%), 1x 2000wd archival report (30%), 1x 2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How do literary texts relate to history? When we divide time into different periods, what are the implications for interpretation? Focusing on one or two literary periods, this unit introduces students to historicist literary criticism, developing skills in relating literature to historical context. We read key texts from the designated period(s), conduct research into appropriate archives (including online databases), and identify the theoretical questions that underpin those investigations.
ENGL4115 Approaches to Global English Literatures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week. Assessment: 1x 5min, 500wd equivalent Oral presentation (10%), 1x 1500wd Take Home Exercise (35%), 1x 4000wd Research Essay (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will familiarise themselves with critical approaches to a range of literary works written throughout the world in the English language, and they will critically examine ways in which theories of globalization and place have come to inflect paradigms of local and national identity.
ENGL4116 Approaches to Genre

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x 6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit students will critically examine significant theoretical definitions of and debates about genre through time. They will apply an advanced understanding of genres (or 'kinds' or 'forms') to representative and problematic texts in order to develop a deep appreciation of the function, limitations and transformations of genre in literature. The complex relationship between formal properties, creativity and historical context will be explored.
ENGL4117 Henry James and the Art of Fiction

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x 6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In addition to writing distinctive short stories and novels, Henry James was a voluminous critic whose writings on the art of fiction have shaped modern approaches to the novel. In this unit, we take a chronological approach, reading selections from James's critical writings alongside his novels and tales to compare the author's evolving theory of fiction with his practice of it. Matters of special interest include Anglo-American literary culture; strategies of characterisation and narration; experiments in literary style; the purpose of criticism; and the ethics of representation.
ENGL4118 Modern Australian Poetry and Poetics

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x 6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the history, contexts and variety of modern and contemporary Australian poetry, with particular focus on the question of modernism. Students will study a selection of key Australian poets and statements about poetry from 1900 to the present.
ENGL4119 Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x 2500wd Essay 1 (40%), 1x 3500wd Essay 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit explores important works by Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the contexts of late-sixteenth- and early-seventeenth-century England. The unit will analyse the texts and authors in relation to one another to uncover key discourses of the period relating to politics, humanism, drama, poetry, gender and genre. Students will gain valuable insights into the literary and cultural richness of the period and come to a deeper understanding of Shakespeare's relevance and significance in his day.
ENGL4120 History Writing in English, 1500 to 1900

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 2hr seminar / week Assessment: 1x2000wd essay or seminar paper (30%), 1x4000wd essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We pose a number of interdependent questions. First, how and why have English authors from Tudor to Victorian times considered historical matters in different literary genres - verse, prose, prose-drama, and verse-drama? Second, how and why have these authors and their audiences deemed such historical writings to be literary or not? To determine the interdependence of these questions we pose a third. What are the literary and historical relations between literature and history?
ENGL4121 The Secret History of the Novel

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x 6000wd Research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The English novel emerged as a distinct genre in the eighteenth century. This unit investigates its development and circulation, analysing novels that have since been canonised as well as material usually excluded from the story of the novel's rise. We aim at a more complex understanding of the novel as a historical genre as well as the roots of its contemporary appeal.
ENGL4122 Critical Contexts for Creative Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ENGL3696 Assessment: 1x 1500wd Seminar Paper (30%), 1x 4500wd Essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will further develop your understanding of how creative writing connects with major scholarly and critical debates in literary and cultural theory. Focusing in particular on writers whose work is both creative and theoretical, the unit will examine: theories of authorship; the history of the book; the ethics and politics of writing; aesthetic hierarchy and value; close and distant reading; form, genre and style; writing, sex and embodiment.
ENGL4123 Reading Suburbia

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 8x250wd online writing tasks (20%), 1x500wd research essay proposal (5%), 1x3500wd research essay (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Suburbia is a bad object in Australian literature. Neither city nor bush, suburbs can seem culturally bland zones of consumerist domesticity from which artists and writers want to escape. Yet loathing of suburbia can be mixed with desire. This unit explores various topographies of suburbia in fiction, poetry, non-fiction and film. Why do writers return to suburbia? How do suburbs give shape to settler modernity, or stimulate literary modernism? Is the suburb a national or transnational scene in Australian writing?
ENGL4125 Sentiment and Sensation

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd conference paper written (50%), 1x3000wd equivalent 15-20 mins conference paper (50%), 1x6000wd OR Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will focus on the narrative and rhetorical strategies used to depict and engage emotion. It will examine the ways in which feeling is both conceptualised and motivated in literary texts, and relate developments in the fictional understanding of emotion to those in philosophy and the natural sciences. It will ask whether emotion can be historicised; how affective responses are engaged in the service of ethical agendas; to what extent do the feelings produced by fiction elude narrative control.
ENGL4126 Shakespeare and Modernity

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores selected works of Shakespeare in the historical context of the 20th and 21st centuries. It provides an introduction to the modern Shakespeare industry with particular focus on recent developments in theatrical performance, film, and other adaptations, and theoretical approaches. Detailed attention will be paid to both the texts of the plays and to their modern manifestations.
ENGL4127 Wooing Women in Middle English Romance

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3500wd Research essay (55%), 1x1000wd Discussion Paper (20%), 1x1500wd Annotated Bibliography (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Heroines of medieval romance were not all swooning damsels waiting to be chosen by daring knights. A strong alternative current is the figure of the wooing woman, who used a range of strategies to realise her desires. In this unit students will apply advanced critical methods to readings of wooing women in Middle English romance. Students will reflect upon these readings alongside medieval theories of feminine sexuality and contemporary reconsiderations. Texts include selections from 12th to 15th centuries.
ENGL4128 The Idea of the South

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x5000wd Essay (80%), 1x1000wd Annotated Bibliography (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The American South is frequently conceived as the Problem South, defined by its experiences of military defeat and occupation, economic backwardness and a brutal slave legacy. In this unit, we will investigate the idea of the South in a range of literary and visual texts by examining its most compelling tropes - the southern belle, poor whites, the plantation - to contemplate the region's fundamental importance to conceptions of the nation itself and the value of thinking regionally.
ENGL4129 Introduction to Old English

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 2x1hr tutorials/week Prohibitions: ENGL3621 or ENGL3622 or ENGL3631 or ENGL3632 or ENGL3633 Assessment: 1x1.5hr Exam (35%), 1x2000wd Essay (50%), 1x1000wd equivalent Translation exercise (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Old English-the ancestor of Modern English-was the language of England from the fifth century until the twelfth. Literature written in Old English includes the epic Beowulf beside a rich variety of other poetry, as well as historical texts. This unit introduces students to the language of the Anglo-Saxons through the study of Old English texts.
ENGL4130 Old Norse

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ENGL3621 or ENGL3622 or ENGL3631 or ENGL3632 or ENGL3636 or ENGL3635 Assessment: 1x1.5hr Exam (35%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x500wd Translation exercise (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Old Norse (also called Icelandic) is the language of medieval Scandinavia, spoken by the Viking invaders of Britain in the Middle Ages. Old Norse literature is rich in variety, from mythological and legendary poetry to Icelandic sagas. This unit introduces the language and literary culture of the Vikings, through texts written in Old Icelandic.
ENGL4131 Language and Subject

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course explores twentieth century attempts to understand the relation of language and linguistic meaning to the individual subject. We will consider two traditions: a 'naturalistic' approach centred around Chomsky's 'generative enterprise', and the phenomenological/hermeneutic tradition in Merleau-Ponty and Gadamer. Students will familiarise themselves with various putatively scientific attempts to understand the place of language in the world and will explore some general features of the relation between meaning and experience. No prior acquaintance with these fields is assumed.

Honours thesis units of study

ENGL4111 English Honours Thesis 1

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 7x0.5hr supervision meetings/semester Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit involves research towards and preliminary writing of an Honours thesis of 15000 words, in collaboration with a supervisor approved by the English Honours Coordinator.
ENGL4112 English Honours Thesis 2

Credit points: 18 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 7x0.5hr supervision meetings/semester Assessment: 1x 15000wd Thesis (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
In this unit you complete your substantial, independent research project in English. Regular meetings with a supervisor approved by the English Honours Coordinator will guide your progress. You will continue to submit drafts at agreed times and develop your expertise in relevant research methods and analytical skills as well as in the subject matter of your specialist topic.