History

Errata
Item Errata Date
1. HSTY2659 Nationalism is on offer in Semester 1. 19/2/2018
2. HSTY2656 A House Divided is not on offer in 2018. 19/3/2018

History

Major

A major in History requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level units
(iii) 18 credit points of 3000-level units
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level Interdisciplinary Project units

Minor

A minor in History requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level units
(ii) 12 credit points of 2000-level units
(iii) 12 credit points of 3000-level units

1000 level units of study

HSTY1001 History Workshop

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x 2000 wds Research paper (40%), 5x 500 wds (2500wds total) Short response paper (50%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces you to key aspects of historical thinking that have broad applications: evidence, change, context. Working in a small group with a specialist in the field, you will develop these skills by examining social, cultural, political, or economic transformation in one particular time and place over the course of a semester. Examples include Rome 1215, Venice 1516, the Straits of Singapore 1603, New York 1827, Shanghai 1927, La Perouse 1931, Leflore County, Mississippi, 1955, Melbourne 1956, Paris 1968, Moscow 1991.
HSTY1002 Age of Empires

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 6x 500 wds (3000wds total) Short paper (50%), 1x 1500 wds Exam (40%), x Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you will develop the analytical skills to understand historical change. We will examine political, economic, social and cultural trends in a range of regions across a large span of time, c. 1000-1750 AD. Topics covered include Christianity and Islam, varieties of states and empires, and political transformations. We will examine the significance of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Enlightenment, and consider what these episodes look like in a global context.
HSTY1003 Forging of the Modern World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 6x 500 wds (3000wds total) Short paper (50%), 1x 1500 wds Exam (40%), x Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically examines the emergence of the modern world, from the eighteenth century to the present. We explore the making of the modern world in diverse locations, including Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Australia, relating social, cultural, political and economic factors. Is there one definition of modernity, across these different places?

2000 level units of study

HSTY2304 Imperialism, 1815-2000

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Empire is one of the key topics in human history, and we continue to live with the consequences of Europe's imperial age. This unit will examine imperialism, resistance to foreign rule, and decolonisation from 1815 to the present. It will look at particular cases of expansion (especially the French and British examples), and examine the theories used to understand imperialism. Among specific themes that will be covered are the ideologies of empire and culture, gender, race, the environment, and imperialism and nationalism.
HSTY2605 Contemporary Europe

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (6 senior credit points of European Studies) Prohibitions: HSTY2005 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial exercise (15%) and 1x2500wd research essay (40%) and 1x1500wd exam (30%), and tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century Europe is economically, politically, and culturally, the most dynamic continent on earth. But it also remains a continent replete with paradox. This unit surveys Europe's contemporary history since WWII, from its status as the pariah continent, to the forefront of thinking and planning on issues as diverse as democracy, diversity, social justice, climate change, and international cooperation. The unit draws on film as well as current news, and themes such as war, peace, memory, multiculturalism.
HSTY2607 Palestine, Israel and the Middle East

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Dirk Moses Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in History, Arabic and Islamic Studies, Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Arabic Language and Culture or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture Prohibitions: JCTC2008 or GOVT2772 Assessment: 5x200wd lecture posts (15%), 2x750wd film review (30%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (45%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a historical grounding in the region of the Middle East and its conflicts. It identifies the causes of conflict and attempted avenues for peace, as well the politicised scholarship on the subject. The unit commences in the Ottoman period, and includes the emergence of Zionism and Palestinian nationalism, colonial interests, the role of diasporas, and subsequent geopolitical developments until the present day. It covers political, social, and cultural history, and takes account not only of the official narratives but also of the voices from below. Visual arts, film, and literary texts will be considered as part of the historical narratives about Israel and Palestine.
HSTY2608 European Film and History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr film screening/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points in History or Ancient History) or (6 Senior credit points in European Studies) or (18 Junior credit points including ENGL1011) or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture Prohibitions: HSTY2008 Assessment: 1x2500wd Research essay (50%) and 1x2hr formal examination (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Using a number of significant films from across the continent of Europe, the unit examines the way in which films can both create the past and transform existing ideas about the past. The unit examines a range of different kinds of films: "historical" films which set out self-consciously to construct a version of the past as well as those in which film-makers have confronted the contemporary problems of their own society.
HSTY2609 African-American History and Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Essay Proposal and Bibliography (10%), 1x2500wd Research essay (45%), 1x1.5hr Exam (35%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From fashion, food, and music, to speech patterns and protest methods, African-American culture has had a profound effect both on America and the wider world. In this unit, we survey race relations after the end of slavery, focusing on the emergence of black communities across the North and South; the spread of black music, literature, and film; the history of the civil rights and black power movements, and the role of race in the contemporary America.
HSTY2611 America in World Affairs: A History

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd historiography assignment (30%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the ideas and ideological assumptions that have shaped America's approach to the world from the Revolution until the presidency of Barack Obama. It explores how the leading politicians and policymakers in Washington have projected power overseas, and how their decisions have played out in the public sphere. Key topics include: isolationism and internationalism; Communism and the Cold War; the challenge of unipolarity; terrorism; and the underlying historical forces shaping US policy, especially American national mythology.
HSTY2613 Russia's Revolutions: 1905 to Present

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Essay Proposal (5%), 1x250wd Bibliography (5%), 1x2500wd Research essay (45%), 1x1500wd Take-home Exercise (35%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course surveys the history of the revolutionary project in Russia from the first clash with tsarism in 1905, through the twin revolutions of 1917, Stalin's dictatorship and World War II, and the break-up of the Soviet Union in the 1990s. Out of the Russian empire the Bolsheviks claimed to be building a new socialist utopia, a scene of radical social and cultural experimentation. How successful were they, and what legacy have they left for the post-Soviet world?
HSTY2615 Australia: Environment, Place and History

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x 500wd proposal research essay (10%), 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit offers students the opportunity to understand the environmental history of Australia in a way that will deepen their understanding of contemporary debates around environmental issues. What is environmental history? How did Indigenous ideas of country differ from settler concepts of the environment? What is the historical importance of place and environment to ideas of belonging and national identity? What of the history of fire and drought? How, when and why did an environmental consciousness emerge in Australia?
HSTY2616 The Human Rights Revolution

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd Bibliography and Proposal (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What accounts for the spectacular rise of human rights movements and norms from 1945 to the present? This unit investigates the causes and consequences of this radical global transformation in transnational activism, foreign policy and international law. The first portion of the unit explores the early history of natural rights, minority rights, women's rights and humanitarianism. The second portion examines the impact of domestic politics, gender politics and geopolitics on the postwar 'human rights revolution'.
HSTY2618 The Age of the Crusades

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2018 Assessment: 1x500wd research bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the history of the high medieval Mediterranean world during the Crusades era (c1050-c1300). Topics include the struggle for influence between the Latin West, Byzantium and Islam, and the multi-faceted social, economic and cultural contacts connecting the regions of the Great Sea.
HSTY2626 Fascism and Antifascism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Judith Keene Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in History, Ancient History or Asian Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture Prohibitions: HSTY2026 Assessment: 1x2500wd research essay (50%) and 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%) and 1x1hr formal exam (20%) and tutorial participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the origins and development of the movements of the New Right that emerged in Europe after World War One paying particular attention to their political, social and cultural manifestations as well as the movements on the left that attempted to confront what was seen as a new political phenomenon. The unit will use primary material of literature, diaries, cinema and photography as well as the more conventional sources of political and historical analysis.
HSTY2628 BOOM! The History of War

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay proposal (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%) and 1.5hr exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Enlightenment promised to make war a thing of the past, replacing brute force with diplomacy and law. So why has the resort to arms been so depressingly persistent? How have societies rationalised war over time and how have ways of making or experiencing war changed? And to what extent has war been a driving force in history, propelling technological, medical, or social transformations? Examining one of humankind's most intractable problems, this unit presents war's surprising, troubling, and complicated history.
HSTY2629 Sex and Scandal

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Winter Main Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2029 Assessment: 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd proposal (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%) and 1hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What makes a scandal? This unit examines a number of sensational case studies from England, America and Australia, beginning with the outrage surrounding Marie-Antoinette and then weaving through the increasingly strait-laced nineteenth century, in which scandals abounded, destroying reputations, rulers and families. It was not behaviour itself, but the ever-changing interpretations of behaviour that gave rise to condemnation and scandalised indignation. Examining occasions when social rules have been flouted allows us to consider the ways in which such rules are themselves constituted, maintained and challenged.
HSTY2631 Sin City? A History of Sydney

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points each in any of History or Ancient History or Socio-Legal Studies Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x250wd Research essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Research essay outline (5%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From its beginnings as a convict colony, Sydney had to deal with an unsavoury reputation. This course explores the history of the city we live in, its people and its places. Distinct communities and neighbourhoods emerged as battles were fought over who belonged in Sydney, and how they should behave. Topics include Aboriginal resistance, convict scandals, poverty and plague, the 'Razor Gang Wars', Mardi Gras protests, the 'Emerald City' excesses of the 1980s, and the Cronulla riots.
HSTY2632 Love and Death in the Middle Ages

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd research bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the Middle Ages, love and death were constants in life. Medieval people loved as we do now. Married love, sensual love, spiritual love all co-existed in a world where death was likewise ever-present. Medieval people prepared for death, and they longed to make a good death. Dying was understood both spiritually and socially, as reward or punishment. The unit covers such cultural practices as courtly love, spiritual charity, familial love, rituals of love and death, death as spectacle.
HSTY2638 Modern China's Wars, 1895-1953

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Research Exercise and Commentary (10%), 1x2500wd Research Paper (40%), 1x1.5hr Exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Much of modern China's early twentieth century history was inevitably tied to war. Ranging from humiliating wars against foreign imperialism to the protracted domestic struggle between Mao Zedong and Chiang Kai-shek, war became inextricably linked to ideas of nationhood and survival among the Chinese population at large. Through discussion of case studies between 1895 and 1953, this unit will consider the ways in which war shaped China's political, social and cultural history.
HSTY2640 Twentieth-Century China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points each in either History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY3071 or HSTY3072 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x250wd research bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 1920s, China was likened to a sleeping lion - one whose roar would shake the world when it awoke. This prediction has already proved true more than once. Why was China ever said to be "asleep"? How did a whole nation awaken, to what, and with what results? This unit of study traces the forces of nationalism and revolution through China's tumultuous twentieth century. We focus upon making sense, in Chinese terms, of events that outsiders have found baffling.
HSTY2645 Venice Floating City: Myth and History

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Eckstein Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2045 Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline (10%), 1x500wd essay bibliography (10%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x1hr exam (20%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Venice is famous for grandiose spectacle and cultural achievement; and notorious for vice, the sexual licence of Casanova, for cinematic imaginings of horror and death. This unit traces Venice from medieval origins in a muddy Adriatic lagoon, through the rise and decline of its mighty early-modern empire, to emergence as a 21st-century global tourist Mecca. It investigates Venice's extraordinary impact on everything from republican thought to understanding of how human beings inhabit the city environment.
HSTY2647 Renaissance Italy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points each in either History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2047 Assessment: 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit uses a special study of Florence to investigate the extraordinary cultural flowering that occurred in Italy between the 14th and 16th centuries. Major themes embrace parallel developments in Venice, Rome, Siena and other city-states; the social context of art; neighbourhood; community; gender; sexuality; the family; poverty; rebellion; religion; and intellectual life. Students use a wide variety of textual and visual sources to critique the concept of the Renaissance, its modern image and its impact on our own age.
HSTY2652 Genocide in Historical Perspective

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2052 Assessment: 1x1000wd Bibliography & Proposal (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit we aim to come to an historical understanding of genocide in the modern era, that is, in approximately the last 250 years. We do so in a chronological, i.e. historical manner, and thereby seek not only to compare genocides, but determine how they may be related to one another. This unit begins by exploring the concept of genocide and concludes with post-1945 attempts to prevent it, as well as to prosecute its perpetrators under international law.
HSTY2656 A House Divided: The American Civil War

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Frances Clarke Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in Ancient History or Asian Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in American Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2056 Assessment: 1x500wd essay proposal (10%) and 1x2000wd research essay (40%) and 1x2000wd take-home exam (35%) and tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Civil War had momentous consequences for America - realigning the nation's political culture, ending slavery and forever transforming millions of lives. This unit analyses the social, cultural and political history of the Civil War and Reconstruction. We begin by looking at combat experience, civilian mobilization and state formation, the war's effects on gender and race relations and the causes for Reconstruction's failure, and we end by focusing on how and why this war continues to resonate in American culture.
HSTY2664 Medieval Cultures

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Ann Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2064 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit about people and cultures. Women and men, merchants and monks, Christians and Jews all formed the cultures, classes and statuses which constituted late medieval European society. The study themes of this unit focus on the means by which ideas, cultures and expectations were constructed and transmitted, and include topics such as healthcare, civic life, the body, gender and sexuality, religious beliefs and practices, otherness, death, political theory, art and architecture, travel.
HSTY2666 American Revolutions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael McDonnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1 hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points in History or 12 junior credit points in Ancient History) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Prohibitions: HSTY2066 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (15%) and 1x3000wd research paper (45%) and 1x1000wd take-home exercise (30%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the series of rebellions, wars, independence movements and revolutions that rocked the Atlantic World between 1750 and 1825. Though we will focus on the American Revolution in particular, we will put that event in a larger Atlantic context, from the Native American resistance movements of the 1750s and 1760s, through to the Spanish American independence movements of the early nineteenth century. We will also explore connections with the Haitian and French Revolutions and slave rebellions more generally.
HSTY2670 Black Manhattan

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in Ancient History or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) or 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in American Studies Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline (10%), 1x500wd essay biblography (10%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd take-home exercise (20%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the twentieth century Harlem was the black metropolis, the black capital of the world. This unit will explore the history of African Americans in New York City, from its beginnings as a Dutch settlement down to today. We will look at the people, images and events that defined Black Manhattan, paying particular attention to everyday life in Harlem in the twentieth century.
HSTY2671 Law and Order in Modern America

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores crime in the United States from Civil War to the present. It begins by examining historical approaches to crime, using murder as a case study. We look at the development of the criminal justice system, focusing on the police, the FBI, and extra-legal justice and lynching, and explore specific crimes: morals offenses; sex crimes; white-collar crime; and organized crime. Our focus is on the changing incidence, definitions and representation of crime in modern American culture and society.
HSTY2672 Britain and the World: C.1837-1914

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd draft essay (20%), 1x2000wd final essay (40%), 1x1500wd take home exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the political, social and cultural significance of Britain's foreign engagements c.1837-1914, including war (e.g. Crimean War, Afghan Wars, Maori Wars, Boer War), 'gunboat diplomacy' (e.g. the Royal Navy in the Pacific) and colonial rule (especially India, Ireland and Australia). Special emphasis will be given to the role these engagements played in fostering or challenging a sense of British identity among a wide range of men and women, both in Britain and the wider world.
HSTY2676 Australia's World

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x1000wd historiographical debate (20%), 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines Australia's relations with the world in the post-war era. It explores the historical themes which shaped Australia's response to the world: loyalties to race and empire; communities of interest and culture; the 'Free' versus the 'Communist' worlds; the rise of Asian nationalism, ANZUS and Australian military engagements from Korea to Vietnam. It also investigates the making of Australia's foreign and defence policy from the 1980s to the present, including debates over engagement with Asia and the American alliance.
HSTY2677 Australia: Politics and Nation

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd Short Paper on Research Skills (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the intersection between political culture and nationalism in Australia, with particular attention to the question of when (and if?) Australia became an 'independent' nation. It examines the content and character of British race patriotism in Australia before 1945 and the gradual unravelling of this British myth in the post-war period. Among other issues, the unit explores the end of 'White Australia', the rise of multiculturalism, engagement with Asia, Aboriginal reconciliation and republicanism.
HSTY2682 Portraits of Medieval Women

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY3696 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Prostitutes, nuns, saints, mothers, mystics, alewives, pilgrims - the lives of medieval women in the 12th-15th centuries were rich and varied. Their experience and contributions to their medieval worlds come alive through insights into such broad categories such as family and marriage, intellectual and spiritual life, as well as through focused case studies. Students in this unit engage with the lives of medieval women through an array of textual and iconographic portraits as well as through a splendid scholarly literature.
HSTY2687 Alliance Anxiety: Australia-USA-Asia

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of History or 12 junior credit points of Ancient History) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Assessment: 1x1000wd historiographical debate (20%), 1x250wd essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the history of Australian-American relations in the Asia-Pacific from the early twentieth century to today. Topics covered include the respective US and Australian approaches to the region and the world, the creation of ANZUS, the West New Guinea crisis, Vietnam, and the recognition of China. Among other questions, the unit asks whether the alliance relationship has been one of simple subservience, or whether politicians and policymakers have tried to use the alliance to further Australia's own national interests.
HSTY2689 Civility and Squalor: 18 C. British Isles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cindy McCreery Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in junior History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY3699 Assessment: 1x1000wd draft essay (20%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) and 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Eighteenth-century British and Irish society displayed stark contracts: conspicuous consumption jostled with abject poverty, humanitarian campaigns co-existed with capital punishment, and major treatises on political liberty were published alongside drinking manuals. This unit uses contemporary sources like newspapers, magazines, cartoons and pamphlets to trace major cultural, political, economic and social themes in Britain and Ireland, eg aristocratic leadership and decadence, political liberty and repression, religious faith and doubt, women's private and public lives, urbanization and unemployment, fashion and leisure.
HSTY2693 Frontier Violence in Modern Memory

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: "2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd proposal and bibliography (10%), 1x1500wd exam (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), in-class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The myth of the frontier is a foundation stone of national identity in the United States, where it gave birth to a global film genre, the Western. In Australia, where 'history wars' are waged over the level of violence and the legality of colonial expansion, the very existence of a frontier is disputed rather than romanticised. This unit compares the significance of the frontier in each country's history and popular memory from the perspective of both settlers and indigenous peoples.
HSTY2695 Reconquest? A History of Medieval Spain

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay Outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr Exam (30%), Tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Spain's history in the Middle Ages was shaped by continual warfare between Christianity and Islam, but also by more peaceable relations. From this complex story historians have created opposing myths of 'Reconquest' and 'convivencia', concepts that still resonate in Spanish society today. This unit reassesses both notions and explores more deeply the fascinating dynamics of the Iberian Medieval world.
HSTY2696 The Empire Strikes Back

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Film/Book Review (10%), 1x1000wd Reflective Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Research Essay (40%), 1x1hr Final Exam (20%), Tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 20th century, millions of people fought to overthrow oppressive colonial regimes. In this unit we will study the global history of decolonisation, mainly from the perspective of formerly colonised and indigenous peoples. We will examine case studies from Asia, Africa and the Pacific, and end by asking: what would decolonisation in Australia look like?
HSTY2698 Free Speech: An International History

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x1000wd dossier analysis (20%), 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x1.5hr exam (25%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines political, legal, and cultural struggles over freedom of expression since the late eighteenth century. We will examine how concepts of freedom of speech and freedom of the press have changed over time. In the process we will explore changing ideas about citizenship and about the effects of words and ideas. The unit ranges over Australia, South Africa, India, France, and Russia, with special attention to Britain and the United States.
HSTY2699 Global Epidemics: From Black Death to Ebola

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline with bibliography (10%), 1x2500wd research essay (45%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Through the ages, human societies have understood epidemic diseases as results of Providence, pollution, or proliferation of germs. Today, chronic conditions and 'diseases of civilisation' like obesity and drug addiction are seen as epidemics. What are the social, political, cultural, economic, and health implications of such `plagues¿? Tracing histories of epidemics from pre-modern outbreaks of Black Death and smallpox to recent pandemics such as AIDS and Ebola, this unit investigates the moral panics and public health measures they have inspired.
HSTY2700 What Do We Want? Protest in Australia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial /week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in HSTY or ANHS Assessment: 1x750wd essay outline (10%), 1x2250wd research essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit follows Australian protest movements across the last century. We will examine struggles over labour rights and working conditions in the 1900s, women's suffrage, Aboriginal land rights, race relations and the White Australia Policy, homelessness during the Great Depression, freedom of speech during the Cold War, the Vietnam Moratorium and sexual liberation in the 1970s, the environmental movement, refugees and asylum seekers, and LGBT rights today. In the process we will explore changing ideas about government, community and identity while conducting individual research projects through local archives.
HSTY2701 Spies in the Archive

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (15%), 1x2500wd research essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Historians love spies, whose clandestine collection of information in the service of states and as a weapon of war has created irresistible archival records. This course traces the history, culture and changing technologies of espionage and surveillance, from the Spanish Inquisition to Cold War Australia, from Russian empire to neighbourhood spy networks in interwar Britain and current debates over terrorism and social media. Can we use such material without becoming complicit in the voyeurism and implied violence of its collection?
HSTY2702 Gender and Medicine in Modern America

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in American Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2619, HSTY2697 Assessment: 1x 1.5 hours final exam (35%), 1x 500 wds essay proposal (10%), x tutorial participation (10%), 1x 2500 wds research essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the evolution of scientific and popular ideas of female and male bodies and minds in modern America. It addresses questions such as: How did the sex binary develop? In what ways do social norms about gender inform medical understandings of health and disease? How has the female body in particular been medicalised and regulated?
HSTY2703 Convicts and Capitalists

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Ancient History Assessment: Tutorial Participation (10%), 1x 1000 wds Short paper (20%), 1x 2000 wds Essay (40%), 1x 1500 wds Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Dregs of a vicious society, wretched victims of industrial capitalism, or boastful capitalists themselves: convicts have always held a special place in the drama of Australia's past. This unit explores lively debates, then and now, about their place in the making of colonial society.
HSTY2704 Vikings of the Sunrise

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x 500 wds Blog entry (10%), 1x 500 wds Proposal and bibliography (10%), 1x 2000 wds Research essay (40%), 1x 1.5hrs Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The largest ocean in the world is a sea of interconnected islands, peopled for over 40,000 years by some of the most intrepid navigators the world has known. In this unit, we will examine histories of the Pacific from diverse perspectives, focusing on the making and re-making of people, environment, and knowledge in this storied space.
HSTY2705 History of Capitalism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History Assessment: 1x 3000 Research essay (50%), x 0 Participation/discussion (15%), 1x 500 Research Proposal (15%), 1x 1000 Tutorial Paper (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit studies capitalism as a contingent mode of organising a variety of social, cultural, and political developments across diverse historical societies. Our purpose is to explore the histories that have come together to produce the economic world we live in and often take for granted as natural.
HSTY2706 France in Modern Europe and Beyond

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History Prohibitions: HSTY2658 Assessment: Ongoingx Participation (10%), 1x 500 Proposal and bibliography (10%), 1x 2500 wds Research essay (50%), 1x 1500 wds Final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The history of France since the 19th century is marked by tumultuous social and political social transformations; by clashes of ideologies, classes and cultures, disastrous wars, colonialism and decolonisation. In this unit you will study these phenomena, their immediate legacies and their larger impact on France's search for identity in the context of migration and globalisation.
ANHS2603 Ancient Greek Democracies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History or History OR 6 Junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 Junior credit points of either Classical Studies, Latin, Greek (Ancient) or Archaeology Prohibitions: ANHS2003 Assessment: 1x2 hour exam (40%), 1x2500 word class paper (50%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit studies the rise and working of democracy in ancient Greece, examining Athens from the time of Solon through the fifth century and into the fourth century B.C. We shall look at the history of Athens and her relation to other cities, and evaluate the evidence of historians and of inscriptions. Athenian political institutions and social history, including the role of the theatre, looking at both tragedy and comedy, the role of other festivals and the law and the lives of the elite and the "forgotten people", such as women and slaves, will be considered.
ANHS2606 The City of Rome: History and Landscape

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathryn Welch Session: Intensive January,Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 6 Junior credit points in ANHS and 6 credit points in any of Ancient History, History, Archaeology, Philosophy, Greek (Ancient) or Latin or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Archaeology Assessment: 1x500wd annotated bibliography (15%), 1x2000wd research essay (35%), 1x500wd oral tutorial presentation (15%), 1x1500wd final exercise (25%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'The city, stick to the city, and live in its light.' (Cicero) This unit will explore the rich history of Rome's urban landscape from the middle Republic (c.200BCE) to the early fourth century CE. We will examine the ways in which the physical city interacted with and even affected the political, religious and cultural life of the Romans and how the great monuments of Empire were eventually destroyed, recovered and reinvented by later ages.
ANHS2609 Alexander and the Hellenistic World

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Miles Session: Semester 1,Summer Early Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of ANHS or HSTY OR 6 credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of ARCA, GRKA, HSTY, LATN or PHIL Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The legacy of Alexander the Great is often defined as one of military conquest. However it was also an age when scholars revolutionized the way poetry was written, artists found new ways of representing the body in extraordinarily life-like terms and radical new philosophies competed for hearts and minds. From Greece to Afghanistan we will explore a wonderfully diverse and vibrant world that was as much united by culture and learning as it was statecraft and steel.
ANHS2610 SPQR: The Senate and the People of Rome

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History, History or Classical Studies OR (6 Junior credit points of Ancient History or Classical Studies and 6 Junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), History or Archaeology) Assessment: 1x2000 word class paper (40%), 1x500 word assessment task (10%), 1x2 hour exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What kind of society produced the Roman Republic? How did its political institutions develop and to what extent were they unique? How did they stand up to the pressures of external threat, social change, internal dissention and the impact of empire? We will study the partnership of senate and people from 287 to 88BC and ask the Romans whether a society always gets the politicians it deserves.
ANHS2618 The Later Roman Empire (AD 286-474)

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History, Greek (Ancient), Latin or History OR (6 Junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 Junior credit points of either History, Latin, Greek (Ancient), Philosophy or Archaeology) Assessment: 1x2500 word Essay (50%), 1x2 hour exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will focus on the transformation of the Classical Mediterranean into the radically different world of Late Antiquity. Through the exploration of topics such as the growth of imperial bureaucracy, the development of court ceremonial, the displacement of polytheism by Christianity, the emergence of new styles of art and literature and the growing prominence of barbarians - the unit will reveal the vibrancy of a society often erroneously dismissed as a period of decline and fall.
ANHS2622 Herodotus and His World

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History or History OR (6 Junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 Junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), History, or Archaeology) Prohibitions: ANHS3609 Assessment: 1x2000wd Research essay (40%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (30%), 1x1000wd reading journal (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Have you ever heard of the riches of the Lydian king Croesus? Or of the gold-digging ants of India? In this unit of study you will encounter these and other famous aspects of Herodotus' Histories, a text that blends history, literature, ethnography, geography and religion. You will explore the different intellectual worlds Herodotus inhabited and relate them to the world he created in his Histories - a key source for the study of the transition between the archaic and the classical periods in the history of ancient Greece.
ANHS2635 Augustus and the Roman Revolution

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: "2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Ancient History, Greek (Ancient), Latin or History or 6 Junior credit points in Ancient History and 6 Junior credit points in History, Latin, Greek (Ancient), Philosophy or Archaeology Assessment: 1x1000wd textual commentary (20%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%), participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Roman 'revolution' of the First Century BCE involved civil wars, political chaos, lawlessness and violence against civilians. From it emerged a regime which celebrated peace, political harmony, law, justice and the happiness of the citizens. Augustus was at the heart of this change. This unit explores the transformation of the Republic in his lifetime.
ASNS2618 Remaking Chinese Society, 1949-Present

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in units of study listed in Table A Prohibitions: ASNS2118 Assumed knowledge: Students with no prior knowledge of modern Chinese history are encouraged to read an introductory textbook (e.g., Edwin E. Moise. Modern China: A History. Second edition. Longman, 1994) before the start of the semester. Assessment: 1x1000wd presentation (20%), 1x1000wd short Essay (20%), 3x Quiz equivalent to 500wd in total (20%), 1x2000wd final Essay (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The history of the People's Republic of China comprises two periods. In the Maoist era (1949-1978), the Communist-led government attempted to build a centrally planned, socialist society in which politics dominated people's daily lives. In the post-Mao era (since 1978), by contrast, the socialist institutions have largely been dismantled in pursuit of a market-based alternative. This unit of study explores key social, political, cultural and economic features of both periods and analyses the problems and paradoxes of transition.
Textbooks
Maurice Meisner. Mao's China and After: A History of the People's Republic. Third edition. New York: Free Press, 1999.
ASNS2627 India, China, Tibet: Cultural Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in units of study listed in Table A Assessment: 1x2500wd major Essay (35%), 1xtutorial paper and presentation (equivalent to 1000wds) (30%), media file (equivalent to 1000wds) (30%), class participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
While India and China emerge as present-day superpowers, their historical inter-relations are not well known. This unit provides an overview of cultural interactions between Indian and Chinese civilisations, especially as these have shaped Tibetan cultural identity. A key focus is upon how pre-modern cultural interactions with India and China provide ideological contexts within which Tibetan religious and cultural traditions and political institutions developed. This is undertaken in order to understand interactions between all three cultures on the current global stage.
ASNS2631 Origins of Japanese Tradition

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Asian Studies, Japanese Studies, Korean Studies, Chinese Studies, Indonesian Studies, Sanskrit, History, Ancient History or International and Global Studies Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x1500wd Tutorial presentation (20%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit explores the historical validity of key motifs of Japanese traditions. Through the liberal exploration of primary historical sources including texts, pictorial sources and material artifacts, students will learn of such diverse topics as early religion, imperial authority, the lives of the court and military elites (samurai), Zen monastic practice, medieval aesthetics, geisha, and the tea ceremony. By separating stereotype and cliche from history, we will attempt to construct a more sober yet ultimately more viable narrative of early Japanese history and culture.
ASNS2634 Samurai and Merchants: Tokugawa Japan

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level each in either Asian Studies or History Prohibitions: ASNS2304 Assessment: attendance and participation in tutorials (15%), tutorial writing tasks and essays (equivalent to 2500 words) (45%), 2 hour final exam (equivalent to 2000 words) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Tokugawa Japan (1603-1868) had a complex feudal structure articulated around the shogun, the feudal lords and their samurai retainers. It also had huge cities, birthplaces of some of the first modern ways of life. The tensions between the feudal framework and the embryonic modernity of Tokugawa society make a fascinating case study in the non-Western world of what is to be modern. To do so, we shall follow a cross disciplinary approach: history, politics, sociology, economy, religion, arts and literature.
ASNS2636 The Enigma of Japanese Power

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Prohibitions: ASNS2306 or JPNS2316 Assessment: 1x, 2500wd equivalent tutorial writing tasks (45%), 1x2hr Final exam (40%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The usual but contradictory descriptions of Japanese society (hierarchical but egalitarian, adaptable but conservative and traditional, consensual but authoritarian, etc.) show that "power" - manifest or hidden in decision making, consensus building, conflict resolution or avoidance - is the enigma of Japan. We will focus on power relationships in politics, administration, enterprises, families, schools, etc, survey the various explanations proposed to solve the enigma and, more generally, learn about the origins, forms and treatments of power and conflict relations.
ASNS2641 Traditional Korea

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in units of study listed in Table A Prohibitions: ASNS2501 Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Examination (40%), 4x Weekly posts equivalent to 600wd in total (10%), 1xOral Presentation equivalent to 400wd (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce Korea's historical experience from antiquity to the early phase of the Choson dynasty (1392-1910). Topics include sources and historiography of early Korea; foundation myths and legends of the Three Korean Kingdoms; process of state formation and subsequent political developments; religious ideology, focusing on Buddhism; and cultural and social traditions of Korea from the 4th to the 15th century. These topics will enable students to understand and appreciate the uniqueness of Korean identity.
ASNS2642 Modern Korea

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in units of study listed in Table A Prohibitions: ASNS2502 Assessment: Tutorial presentation (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr Final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce some of the major issues in the history of Korea in the late 19th century and the last century. Topics include contradictions of the late Choson dynasty society; opening of Korea to the West and Japan and the attendant wave of reforms and rebellions; Japan's colonial rule; Korea's fight for freedom; liberation and division of Korea in 1945 and the subsequent process of nation-building in the two Koreas.
ASNS2660 Islam, Trade and Society-Arabia to SE Asia

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Asian Studies) or (12 Junior credit points from History or 12 Junior credit points from Ancient History) or (12 Junior credit points of Indonesian Studies) Prohibitions: ASNS2402 Assessment: tutorial participation (15%), tutorial writing tasks and essays (equivalent to 2500wds), (45%), 1x2 hr final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will examine the commercial, religious and cultural relations between the Islamic world of West Asia and Southeast Asia between the ninth century and the present day. Some attention will be paid to the role of India in these relationships. The unit of study will explore the development of Islamic commercial, political, religious and social ideas and practices, and examine the economic, political, religious and social conditions associated with the localisation of these ideas and practices in Southeast Asia.
ASNS2661 History of Modern Indonesia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in units of study listed in Table A Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (45%), 1x2hr Exam (45%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the history of Indonesia, the world's fourth most populous country, emphasizing the interaction between Islam, nationalism and democracy. The unit traces these forces impact on the formation of modern Indonesia from the late nineteenth century, highlighting the experience and legacy of colonialism, the independence struggle, and the rise and fall of military rule. Particular attention is given to changing notions of national identity, debates about the place of Islam in the polity and authoritarianism and democratisation.
ASNS2672 Japan in East Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Assessment: 2x250wd quiz (10%), 1x2000wd essay (20%), 1x1500wd exam (40%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (20%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit places the modern and contemporary history of Japan within its East Asian context. We will examine a number of key events and subjects pertaining to the relations between Japan, China and Korea. Doing so, we will touch sensitive and controversial topics, become aware of differing views of history prevalent in these countries, and understand why the historical question constitutes a major political issue in East Asia.
USSC2604 Sex, Race and Rock in the USA

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from one of the following subject area; American Studies, Anthropology, Music, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, English, European Studies, Government and International Relations, History, International and Global Studies, Media and Communications, Performance Studies, Philosophy, Political Economy or Sociology Prohibitions: HSTY2057 Assessment: Annotated bibliography (500wds) (15%) research paper proposal (1000wds) (25%) research paper (2500wds) (40%) group presentation (500wds) (10%) Class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the cultural history of and intersections between sexuality, race and rock music in the United States from Elvis to Beyonce. Influenced by black and working-class cultures, and with sexuality embedded in its form and practice, rock music challenged and transformed existing norms of family, sex and gender. Through subjects including bwomen of colour, glam rock, disco and hip hop, students will learn that rock music provided a realm for rebellion, freedom, community and profit and has transformed the United States..

3000 level units of study

HSTY3901 History in the Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points in History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Project Proposal (5%), 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x750wd Project Draft (10%), 1x4500wd Research Project (60%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you will independently frame, research and write an original work of historical analysis, based on primary sources and drawing on your knowledge of any period, place or culture examined in history units previously completed. The weekly lectures will guide you through the stages of framing a historical problem, conducting research, choosing a methodology or approach, shaping an argument or narrative, and editing your final work. In tutorials we will workshop every stage of your project.
HSTY3902 History Beyond the Classroom

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points in History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Project Proposal (5%), 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x1250wd Project Diary (15%), 1x4000wd Research Project (55%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you will frame, research and produce an original project based on an engagement with communities and organisations outside the University. You will explore history in action in a variety of contexts and think about different ways of creating and disseminating history that will interest and inform a public audience. Lectures and field trips will help you to frame relevant community-based questions, adopt appropriate methodologies, and explore new ways of presenting your arguments or narratives.
HSTY3903 History and Historians

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points in History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Project Proposal (5%), 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x750wd Project Draft (10%), 1x4500wd Research Project (60%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you will independently frame, research and write an original Essay analyzing how historians have written about the past. In choosing your topic you may draw upon historical issues, approaches and debates encountered throughout your previous studies in history. The lectures and tutorials introduce you to new methodologies and approaches to the past, and guide you through the stages of identifying an issue or debate, researching and understanding its different aspects, and shaping your own argument in response.
ANHS3635 Historiography Ancient and Modern

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points each in either Ancient History or History Prohibitions: ANHS2691 or ANHS2692 or ANHS2612 Assessment: 1x3000wd Research essay (40%), 1x1000wd student-led exercise (30%), 1x500wd writing journal/online discussion board (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From Herodotus to Robert Darnton; from Thucydides to John Mearsheimer; from Plutarch's Life of Julius Caesar to Barack Obama's autobiography. In this unit of study you will compare ancient and modern ways of writing history. You will study relevant key texts, theories, and methods - both ancient and modern - and use them in your own historiographic practice. Brace yourself for an unusual, insightful, and challenging journey from ancient Egypt, via Greece and Rome, to modern France and Australia. Looking at history will never be the same again.
ASNS3002 Modern Japanese Social History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Asian Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in History Assessment: 1x 1500wd essay (30%), 1x 2500wd exam (40%), 1x 500wd tutorial presentation (20%), x tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
You will learn the story of the changing life of the Japanese people since the mid-19th century until today: from the momentous Meiji reforms to the emergence of new social forces in the twentieth century; from the devastation of the Second World War to the trauma of the Fukushima nuclear disaster.
JCTC3002 The Holocaust: History and Aftermath

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture or 12 credit Points at 2000 level in European Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in History Assessment: 1x 500wd research proposal/annotated bib (10%), 1x 3000wd research essay (50%), 1x 1hr exam (30%), x class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an in-depth study of the Holocaust. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of Nazi ideology, in particular racial antisemitism, and the gradual implementation of this policy towards the Jews and other victim groups from 1933 to 1945. Other themes focus on the responses of the victims and the role of the by-standers, as well as post-war politics of memory and other issues, including Holocaust denial and war crimes prosecution.
JCTC3003 The Modern Jewish Experience

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture or 12 credit points at 2000 level in European Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in History or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Modern Hebrew Assessment: 1x 500wd research proposal/annotated bib (10%), 1x 3000wd research essay (50%), 1x 1hr exam (30%), x class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the history of European Jewry from the late eighteenth century until the eve of WW2. During this period ancient traditions met the modern forces of enlightenment and emancipation, industrialisation, democratisation and nation building. External pressures provoked profound internal responses as the challenges and opportunities of modernity radically reshaped Jewish thought and life. Students will develop an understanding of the intricacy of relations between Jews and non-Jews and an appreciation of the mosaic of European Jewish life destroyed during the Holocaust.
ITLN3662 Machiavelli and Renaissance Italy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 6 Senior credit points in any of European Studies, European or Middle Eastern or Classical Languages or Studies or Asian Studies or Government or History or Ancient History or Philosophy or Studies in Religion or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Italian Studies or History Assessment: 1x1000wd research bibliography (10%), 1x3500wd research essay (35%), 2x500wd total short answer tests (30%), 1x1000wd class presentation (15%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit studies Machiavelli as a political strategist, writer, philosopher and observer of his time. Discussion of his and other Renaissance authors' works will demonstrate the social and cultural conditions of literary production, the ideas and debates surrounding philosophy and politics, and topics including sexuality, ethics, the self, and the classical tradition during the Italian Renaissance.

Interdisciplinary Project units of study

FASS3999 Interdisciplinary Impact

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture/performance event week for 5 weeks 2hr workshop per week for 10 weeks 2hr online learning modules for 5 weeks Prerequisites: 18 credit points at 2000 level Assessment: 1x 2000 wds equivalent Mapping knowledge exercise (30%), 1x 10 minutes Collaborative Presentation (30%), 1x 2000 wds equivalent Critical reflection essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Interdisciplinarity is a key skill in fostering agility in life and work. This unit provides learning experiences that build students' skills, knowledge and understanding of the application of their disciplinary background to interdisciplinary contexts. In this unit, students will work in teams and develop interdisciplinarity skills through problem-based learning projects responding to 'real world problems'.

Honours

Honours in History requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 4000-level seminar core units
(ii) 36 credit points of 4000-level thesis units

Seminar

HSTY4101 Approach Seminar

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x 5000 wds Essay (70%), 1x 1000 wds Response paper (20%), x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students undertaking the Honours program in History enrol in one Field Seminar and one Approach Seminar, which run concurrently from Week 1 to Week 13 of Semester 1. In the Approach Seminar, students examine one particular conceptual or theoretical approach to historical writing and research (examples include: 'Historical Approaches to Food and Eating'; 'Violence in History'; 'The Problem of the Text'). Students explore different applications of this approach in a diverse array of contexts (geographical and temporal) in order to understand the ways this approach has developed and its implications for the field and the students' own practice as historians. Students will choose their topic from a range of three or four options.
HSTY4102 Field Seminar

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x 5000 wds Research paper (70%), 1x 1000 wds Proposal/Literature Review (20%), x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Students undertaking the Honours program in History enrol in one Field Seminar and one Approach Seminar, which run concurrently from Week 1 to Week 13 of Semester 1. In the Field Seminar, students examine current or emerging debates and research foci in a specific field of history. Each field is defined by place, time and geography, but is construed broadly so as to expose students to complex questions of change and continuity. Students choose their preferred field from a range of offerings (examples include: modern European history, American history; Australian history; Medieval Europe).

Thesis

HSTY4201 History Honours Thesis 1

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 7 x half-hour supervision meetings/semester, on average. Assessment: Research (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
In this unit you will begin to design, research and plan a substantial original research history project. You will meet regularly with a supervisor approved by the History Honours Coordinator, who will oversee and guide your progress. If necessary you will submit an ethics clearance form. You will determine the scope and thrust of your argument; familiarise yourself with disciplinary standards and conventions; develop expertise in relevant historical theories and methodologies; advance your research; and begin drafting your thesis.
HSTY4202 History Honours Thesis 2

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One-on-one supervision for at least half an hour per meeting at least every two weeks. Assessment: 1x 18000-20000 wds Thesis (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
In this unit you will complete and submit your substantial, independent research project in history. Your progress will be guided in regular meetings with a supervisor approved by the History Department. You will continue to submit drafts at agreed times; you will continue to develop your expertise in relevant research methods and analytical skills, both in relation to the discipline of history as a whole and in relation to your specialist topic.

Advanced coursework

The requirements for advanced coursework in History are described in the degree resolutions for the Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Advanced Studies.
24-36 credit points of advanced study will be included in the table for 2019.