Archaeology

Archaeology

ARCA1000 Early Humans: Hunters and Farmers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Alison Betts Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ARCA1002 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (40%) and 2x1500wd class tests (2x30%)
This unit introduces the discipline of Archaeology and the study of the human past through material remains. It traces the evolution of humans and human behaviours, the archaeology of gatherer-hunters, and investigates the emergence of farming through a review of a range of key themes and regional studies while also presenting many of the basic concepts used in archaeological research and interpretation. The unit acts as a foundation for the continuing study of archaeology.
ARCA1001 Ancient Civilisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ted Robinson, Dr Lesley Beaumont Session: Semester 2,Summer Early Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 2x1hr class tests each equivalent to 1000wds (2x25%) and 1x500wd-equivalent tutorial presentation (10%)
This unit is an introduction to the great civilisations of the old world in North Africa, Asia, and the Mediterranean from ca. 3000 BC-AD 300. We will explore the major achievements and characteristics of these rich cultures, as well as the fascinating interplay between them. To understand ways in which archaeologists read the past, students will study and examine ancient material evidence from some of these civilisations.
ARCA2602 Field Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ted Robinson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH3921 Assessment: 1x3000wd report/lab book (60%) and 1x1000wd class test (40%)
This unit is an essential introduction to the basic principles and skills involved in archaeological fieldwork. A special focus is on the practical aspects of archaeological research design, including sampling and survey strategies. The unit includes lectures and on-campus training in core survey techniques, including site descriptions and field-plans, tape and compass site recording and surveys using dumpy-level. The ethical and legal aspects of archaeological field investigations will also be considered.
ARCA2607 Digital Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH3690 Assessment: 1x1hr class test (15%), 1x1hr class test (25%), 1x2000wd project report (25%), 1x2000wd project report (35%) Practical field work: online discussion and wiki contributions
Every part of life today is touched by digital methods, not least Archaeology and other historical disciplines. This unit reviews the ways in which digital methods and global connectivity are changing the practice of historical disciplines. Practical sessions will give students the opportunity to develop skills in basic data management (recording systems, bibliographies, databases), creating and manipulating images (digital photographs, maps and diagrams) and dissemination on the web (web sites, blogs, wikis and social systems).
ARCA2609 Foreign Relations of Ancient Egypt

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Nicola Harrington Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1hr in-class test (30%), 1x500wd-equivalent tutorial assignment (10%), 1x3000wd research paper (60%)
Ancient Egypt had complex links with her neighbours. Warfare, diplomacy and trade formed the building blocks on which the Pharaohs founded their historical legacy. A rich heritage of archaeological evidence enables us to reconstruct this world of prestige, glory and intrigue. This unit explores the cycle of trade and conquest between Egypt and her North African neighbours, relations with the Levant, and the delicate balance of power between Egypt and her powerful northern rivals, Mesopotamia and Anatolia.
ARCA2611 Ancient Mediterranean Lives

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Meg Miller Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%), 2x0.5 hour test (20%) and tutorial participation (10%)
The archaeology of Greek urban settlement encompasses the range from early Iron Age villages through the complex planned cities of the Hellenistic and Roman eras. Such themes as house design and interior, evidence for the religious life of the polis, streets, evolution of public architecture, and the extent to which social structure can be deduced from archaeological remains, are addressed.
ARCA2621 Advanced Archaeology Practicum

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Martin Gibbs Session: Int July Classes: 26-hrs lectures, 26-hrs workshops. Monday 7 July - Friday 18 July 2014 Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x1000wd class presentation (20%) and 1x3000wd final report (60%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Field collection and analysis of archaeological data forms the core of archaeological practice. This unit will allow advanced students to undertake intensive training in field and/or laboratory investigations. This will foster an understanding of the links between research design, field and laboratory practice, as well archaeological interpretation and the ethical responsibilities of professional archaeology. In 2014 it will be run on-site in Tasmania, focusing on the analysis of artefacts from the Port Arthur convict site.
ARCA2623 The Art of the Ancient Near East

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Javier Alvarez-Mon Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x3000wd research paper (60%), 1x1000wd course journal and literature review (30%) and 1x500wd-equivalent tutorial presentation (10%)
This unit of study provides an introduction to ancient Near Eastern art pertaining to the ancient civilizations of the Middle East (Iran, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine and Jordan). Emphasis is placed on understanding the notion of art as applied to the archaeological and cultural context of ancient non-western cultures and in gathering basic skills necessary for artistic analysis (iconography and style) and interpretations. Material studied will include monumental and domestic architecture, ceramics, metal-work, glyptic, and literary arts.
ARCA2627 Vesuvian Cities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ted Robinson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 2x1hr class tests (2x20%) and 9xtutorial quizzes (20%)
The eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD79 and the sudden burial of Pompeii and Herculaneum created a unique opportunity for archaeologists and historians to study an ancient city and its inhabitants. This unit will explore how the material record of these cities can be used to reconstruct the lives of ancient Romans, collectively and individually. A broader context will be provided by other sites in the important region of Campania, especially the smaller, rural settlements buried by the volcano.
ARCA2634 Mobility and the Sedentary Transition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roland Fletcher Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH2603 Assessment: 1x3500wd essay with illustrations (60%), 1x1000wd-equivalent tutorial presentation with visuals (30%) and tutorial participation (10%)
The unit provides an introduction to mobile communities including hunter-gatherers and pastoralists and the transition to sedentary community life over the past 10,000 years. An integrated global approach is applied to understanding the way mobile communities function and the material basis of the development of sedentary societies. The unit of study concludes with an analysis of the biological and social implications of sedentism.
ARCA2635 Explanation and Theory in Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lesley Beaumont Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%), 1x1000wd in-class test (20%) and 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (20%)
The unit provides an introduction to theory and explanation in archaeology. By exploring changes in archaeological thought over time, in a historical context, students will come to better understand the diversity of contemporary archaeological practice and the various ways in which archaeologists seek to explain past societies. This unit is compulsory for all students majoring in Archaeology and creates the foundation for their senior studies.
ARCA2636 Global Dispersions of Humans

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Hiscock Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (60%) and 2x1000wd seminar papers (2x20%)
During pre-history humans colonized every landmass other than Antarctica. Archaeological and genetic evidence shows multiple expansions of hominids out of Africa over the last two million years, with humans spreading across the globe in the final migration lasting more than 100,000 years. This dispersion is the foundation of modern physical and cultural variation and is a significant process in studies of human evolution. In this unit the evidences for and consequences of out-of-Africa dispersals are examined.
ARCA2637 Archaeology in Film

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Hiscock Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr film screening/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) or (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (70%) and 2x750wd-equivalent oral presentations (2x15%)
Archaeology and archaeologists are disproportionately well represented in big budget films. From Karl Freund to Steven Spielberg movie-makers have explored archaeology on screen. In this unit we examine ideas of archaeology and the ancient past presented in popular film culture. Through lectures that include film screenings, commentary and close-analysis we explicate the nature of filmic representations of archaeology/archaeologists and by implication the nature of film narratives of and concepts about archaeology within popular culture.
ARCA2639 Archaeological Principles and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARCA2601 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%) and 2x2000wd class tests (2x25%)
This subject gives an introduction to some of the major principles and practices in archaeological research and interpretation. Topics will include archaeological research design, site formation processes, dating techniques and the basic principles behind archaeological laboratory processes and the classification and analysis of artefacts. It will also examine the quantification and interpretation of archaeological data and some of the ethical, legal and practical aspects of archaeological research.
ARCA3601 Research in Australasian Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roland Fletcher Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points of Archaeology, including ARCA2635   Assessment: 1x4000wd research report (60%), 1x1500wd seminar paper (30%), 1x500wd seminar presentation (10%)
An advanced seminar for students who wish to develop their research, analytical, writing and presentation skills by investigating a key area of contemporary archaeological research. Specific topics will vary from year to year with primary emphasis on Australasian archaeology (Asia, Australia, and the Pacific) placed in global perspective and/or current issues in archaeological theory, method and practice relevant to staff research projects (e.g. history and philosophy of archaeology, spatial analysis, digital methods, public archaeology and heritage studies, historical archaeology, archaeozoology, archaeologies of colonialism).
ARCA3605 Dialogue of Civilizations: East and West

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Javier Alvarez-Mon Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points of Archaeology, including ARCA2635   Prohibitions: ARNE2005 Assessment: 1x4500wd research paper (65%), 1x1000wd course journal and literature review (25%) and class presentations equivalent to 500wds (10%)
This unit of study introduces the student to the cultural dialogue between the ancient civilizations of the Western Mediterranean world and Near Eastern and Asian civilizations, by examining the material and literary records of ancient western Asia and neighbouring regions. Western cultural stereotypes and prejudices are investigated, as well as notions of cultural identity, assimilation, rejection, and superiority. Problems to be addressed may concern, amongst many, cultural borrowing, funerary traditions, gift-giving, tribute, plundering, arts and coinage, trade, and dress.
ARNE2602 Ancient Mesopotamia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Javier Alvarez-Mon Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or 6 junior credit points of Archaeology plus 6 junior credit points of Ancient History or Classical Studies Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
This unit will examine the archaeology and early history of Mesopotamia, focussing on: climate and the evolution of landforms; evidence for early settlement; subsistence and natural resources; production; kinship; religion; mortuary practices; writing; and contact with adjacent peoples, particularly concentrating on Iran, the Gulf, and the Indus Valley.
ARCA4011 Archaeology Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roland Fletcher Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester (or equivalent) Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 senior credit points of Archaeology (up to 18 credit points of cross-listed units admissable), inclusive of ARCA3601 or ARCA3602. Assessment: a thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Please contact relevant Departmental staff for advice and assistance. All students with credit or above results are encouraged to apply for Honours.
The Honours program in Archaeology consists of: 
1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff; 
2. two seminars that meet weekly for two hours (or equivalent) each in Semester 1. 
The thesis should be of 18,000-20,000 words in length. Each seminar requires 6,000 words of written work or its equivalent. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars is worth 20%. 
The following seminars are on offer in 2014: 
History and Philosophy of Archaeology (Prof Alison Betts)
Approaches to Archaeological Research (Prof Alison Betts, Dr Ted Robinson and others). 
For more information, contact Professor Roland Fletcher (Chair of Department). 
ARCA4012 Archaeology Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARCA4011
Refer to ARCA4011
ARCA4013 Archaeology Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARCA4012
Refer to ARCA4011
ARCA4014 Archaeology Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARCA4013
Refer to ARCA4011