Archaeology

Archaeology

ARCA1000 Early Humans: Hunters and Farmers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ARCA1002 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (40%) and 2x1500wd class tests (2x30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the discipline of Archaeology and the study of the human past through material remains. It traces the evolution of humans and human behaviours, the archaeology of gatherer-hunters, and investigates the emergence of farming through a review of a range of key themes and regional studies while also presenting many of the basic concepts used in archaeological research and interpretation. The unit acts as a foundation for the continuing study of archaeology.
ARCA1001 Ancient Civilisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Early Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 2x 2000wds equivalent Class Test (50%), 5x 500wds equivalent Tutorial Exercises (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to the great civilisations of the old world in North Africa, Asia, and the Mediterranean from ca. 3000 BC-AD 300. We will explore the major achievements and characteristics of these rich cultures, as well as the fascinating interplay between them. To understand ways in which archaeologists read the past, students will study and examine ancient material evidence from some of these civilisations.
ARCA2601 Laboratory Methods

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Annie Clarke and Dr Melanie Fillios Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH2614 Assessment: 1x3000wd laboratory report (60%), 1x1500wd class test (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An introduction to post-fieldwork archaeological laboratory principles and practices. The unit introduces students to key principles for the effective management and processing of archaeological finds and other materials excavated from archaeological sites, recording and interpretation of data recorded from this material and the application of various methods of analysis which can be used to produce different types of archaeological knowledge and interpretation.
ARCA2602 Field Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH3921 Assessment: 1x3000wd report/lab book (60%) and 1x1000wd class test (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an essential introduction to the basic principles and skills involved in archaeological fieldwork. A special focus is on the practical aspects of archaeological research design, including sampling and survey strategies. The unit includes lectures and on-campus training in core survey techniques, including site descriptions and field-plans, tape and compass site recording and surveys using dumpy-level. The ethical and legal aspects of archaeological field investigations will also be considered.
ARCA2604 Ancient Levant: Land of Wine & Merchants

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Alison Betts Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARNE2604, ARNE2605 Assessment: 750wd tutorial assignment (15%), 750wd equivalent in-class quiz (15%) and 3000wd research paper (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Levant formed a physical and cultural bridge between the ancient centres of civilisation in Egypt and Mesopotamia. It was also a land of farmers, traders and craftsmen who flourished on supplying their resource-poor neighbours. The unit of study examines the rich archaeological record of these fascinating lands from the first farming villages to the kingdoms of the Iron Age.
ARCA2605 Ancient Australia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH2607 Assessment: 1x3500wd major Essay (70%), 2x 500wd Seminar Paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australia has been occupied by people for at least 50,000 years. During that period geographically varied cultural systems changed frequently, adjusting to the altered economic and social circumstances. By using archaeological, historical, climate and biological evidence we can understand aspects of these ancient societies, such as how their economies operated, and how people perceived their society and environment. This course traces the long history of humans in this continent, a surprising, remarkable story of culture change!
ARCA2606 Maps, Time and Visualisation

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Johnson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH3690 Assessment: 2x1hr in-class tests and 2x2000wd project reports Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines ways in which maps, timelines and other forms of data visualisation are constructed and used to present archaeological data and historical argument, and how digital methods and web delivery have facilitated the use of visualisation and enabled greater user engagement through interaction with online databases, encyclopaedias, collaborative systems, maps, timelines, animations and 3D models. Practical sessions offer students the opportunity to become familiar with simple techniques and software tools for creating and publishing visualisations on the Web.
ARCA2607 Digital Methods

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr workshop/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH3690 Assessment: 1x1hr class test (15%), 1x1hr class test (25%), 1x2000wd project report (25%), 1x2000wd project report (35%) Practical field work: online discussion and wiki contributions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Every part of life today is touched by digital methods, not least Archaeology and other historical disciplines. This unit reviews the ways in which digital methods and global connectivity are changing the practice of historical disciplines. Practical sessions will give students the opportunity to develop skills in basic data management (recording systems, bibliographies, databases), creating and manipulating images (digital photographs, maps and diagrams) and dissemination on the web (web sites, blogs, wikis and social systems).
ARCA2608 Near Eastern Ancient Civilisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Javier Alvarez-Mon Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week Assessment: one 1 hour mid-term exam (equivalent to 1000 words) (30%), one 1 hour final exam (equivalent to 1000 words) (30%), course journal (equivalent to 3000 words) (30%) and quizzes on reading assignments and maps (equivalent to 1000 words) (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to the wide sweep of cultures that have shaped western and central Asia. Using archaeological evidence, students will learn about the development of agriculture, the first cities, the earliest forms of writing, and how civilisations developed in rich and varied ways across the ancient world. Material is based within a broad chronological framework, beginning with the growth of the first farming villages and going on to explore the rise of kingdoms and empires.
ARCA2609 Foreign Relations of Ancient Egypt

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x1hr In-class test (30%), 1x500wd-equivalent Tutorial assignment (10%), 1x3000wd Research paper (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Ancient Egypt had complex links with her neighbours. Warfare, diplomacy and trade formed the building blocks on which the Pharaohs founded their historical legacy. A rich heritage of archaeological evidence enables us to reconstruct this world of prestige, glory and intrigue. This unit explores the cycle of trade and conquest between Egypt and her North African neighbours, relations with the Levant, and the delicate balance of power between Egypt and her powerful northern rivals, Mesopotamia and Anatolia.
ARCA2610 Minoans and Mycenaens

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Margaret Miller Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture and 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), tutorial presentation (15%), tutorial work (5%), 2x1hr exams (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Archaeological research since the 19th century discovery and excavation of Knossos and Mycenae continues to expand our understanding about the rich prehistoric cultures of Greece but dimly remembered in later times. Recent shift of attention from palace centres to the economic, social and religious life of the ordinary person is aided by such discoveries as the Cycladic town at Akrotiri. The three main cultures of Bronze Age Greece (ca. 3000-1100 BC) are explored with focus on their characteristic features.
ARCA2611 Ancient Mediterranean Lives

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%), 2x0.5 hour test (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The archaeology of Greek urban settlement encompasses the range from early Iron Age villages through the complex planned cities of the Hellenistic and Roman eras. Such themes as house design and interior, evidence for the religious life of the polis, streets, evolution of public architecture, and the extent to which social structure can be deduced from archaeological remains, are addressed.
ARCA2612 A Greek Odyssey: The First Millennium BC

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lesley Beaumont Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%), tutorial/workshop based exercises (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Between 1050 and 146 BC the Aegean world underwent radical transformation. The changes which took place not only affected all aspects of ancient Greek society, but also established the foundations on which modern western civilization would later build. This unit traces the history and development of the Greek world as evidenced by the surviving material culture of the first millennium BC. The unit also examines the resonances of the ancient Aegean still evident in contemporary Australia.
ARCA2613 Athenian Art, Architecture and Society

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARCL2601 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay, 1xslide test and 1x2hr exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Athenian art and architecture are examined within their topographical and socio-political context. The chronological focus of study is the Archaic and Classical periods, a time of great and dynamic cultural and socio-political change. Lectures are complemented by regular "hands-on" tutorials in the Nicholson Museum.
ARCA2614 Contact and Exchange in South Italy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ted Robinson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%) and 2x1hr class tests (equivalent to 1,000 words each) (40%) and tutorial exercises (equivalent to 500 words) (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Ancient South Italy existed at a vital crossroads between the Eastern and Western Mediterranean. From the arrival of the earliest settled farmers in the 7th millennium BC to its conquest by the Romans, the region experienced repeated waves of migrants, visitors, colonists and conquerors, and developed a distinctive and vibrant culture as a result. The Unit will begin its survey in the Neolithic period, but concentrate especially on the Greek/Italian colonial interactions of the first millennium BC.
ARCA2621 Advanced Archaeology Practicum

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 26hrs lectures, 26hrs workshops. Monday 7 July - Friday 18 July 2014 Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (20%), 1x1000wd Class presentation (20%) and 1x3000wd final report (60%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Field collection and analysis of archaeological data forms the core of archaeological practice. This unit will allow advanced students to undertake intensive training in field and/or laboratory investigations. This will foster an understanding of the links between research design, field and laboratory practice, as well archaeological interpretation and the ethical responsibilities of professional archaeology. In 2014 it will be run on-site in Tasmania, focusing on the analysis of artefacts from the Port Arthur convict site.
ARCA2623 The Art of the Ancient Near East

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x3000wd research paper (60%), 1x1000wd course journal and literature review (30%) and 1x500wd-equivalent Tutorial presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to ancient Near Eastern art pertaining to the ancient civilizations of the Middle East (Iran, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine and Jordan). Emphasis is placed on understanding the notion of art as applied to the archaeological and cultural context of ancient non-western cultures and in gathering basic skills necessary for artistic analysis (iconography and style) and interpretations. Material studied will include monumental and domestic architecture, ceramics, metal-work, glyptic, and literary arts.
ARCA2625 Urbanism and Industrial Transition

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roland Fletcher Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/wk, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 3500wd essay (60%), 1000wd tutorial presentation (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an introduction to the development of agrarian-based urbanism worldwide from the 1st millennium BCE and the transition to industrial-based urbanism from the mid 19th century in the European world . An integrated global approach is applied to understanding the operation of cities and the differing constraints on the growth of compact and dispersed urban settlements.The unit of study concludes with an analysis of the implications for contemporary urban life.
ARCA2627 Vesuvian Cities

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 2x1hr class tests (2x20%) and 9xtutorial quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD79 and the sudden burial of Pompeii and Herculaneum created a unique opportunity for archaeologists and historians to study an ancient city and its inhabitants. This unit will explore how the material record of these cities can be used to reconstruct the lives of ancient Romans, collectively and individually. A broader context will be provided by other sites in the important region of Campania, especially the smaller, rural settlements buried by the volcano.
ARCA2630 Historical and Contemporary Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH2612 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%) and 2x1000wd class tests (2x25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Historical Archaeology is the archaeological study of the emergence of the modern world. Contemporary Archaeology focuses more specifically on the archaeology of the very recent past from WWII to the present-day. Students will explore the theoretical, thematic and methodological approaches to these archaeologies of the recent past, as well as the ethical issues these studies raise, through examples as diverse as the material culture of 19th century class, gender and ethnicity, the Cold War, graffiti, modern ruins and industrial complexes.
ARCA2633 Silk Road Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARNE2606 Assessment: 1x3000wd research paper (60%), 1x1000wd in-class test (30%), and 1x500wd-equivalent tutorial presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The trade networks of the ancient Silk Roads stretched from the western borders of China to the shores of the Mediterranean, passing through the deserts of Central Asia. This unit explores the archaeology of these remote and little-known regions from the first rich Bronze Age cultures of the steppes and oases through the Greek invasion under Alexander to the rise of great empires and the full flourishing of trade from China to Rome.
ARCA2634 Mobility and the Sedentary Transition

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH2603 Assessment: 1x3500wd Essay with illustrations (60%), 1x1000wd-equivalent Tutorial presentation with visuals (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an introduction to mobile communities including hunter-gatherers and pastoralists and the transition to sedentary community life over the past 10,000 years. An integrated global approach is applied to understanding the way mobile communities function and the material basis of the development of sedentary societies. The unit of study concludes with an analysis of the biological and social implications of sedentism.
ARCA2635 Explanation and Theory in Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (60%), 1x1000wd in-class test (20%) and 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an introduction to theory and explanation in archaeology. By exploring changes in archaeological thought over time, in a historical context, students will come to better understand the diversity of contemporary archaeological practice and the various ways in which archaeologists seek to explain past societies. This unit is compulsory for all students majoring in Archaeology and creates the foundation for their senior studies.
ARCA2636 Global Dispersions of Humans

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology or (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (60%) and 2x1000wd seminar papers (2x20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
During pre-history humans colonized every landmass other than Antarctica. Archaeological and genetic evidence shows multiple expansions of hominids out of Africa over the last two million years, with humans spreading across the globe in the final migration lasting more than 100,000 years. This dispersion is the foundation of modern physical and cultural variation and is a significant process in studies of human evolution. In this unit the evidences for and consequences of out-of-Africa dispersals are examined.
ARCA2637 Archaeology in Film

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr film screening/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) or (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (70%) and 2x750wd-equivalent Oral Presentations (2x15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Archaeology and archaeologists are disproportionately well represented in big budget films. From Karl Freund to Steven Spielberg movie-makers have explored archaeology on screen. In this unit we examine ideas of archaeology and the ancient past presented in popular film culture. Through lectures that include film screenings, commentary and close-analysis we explicate the nature of filmic representations of archaeology/archaeologists and by implication the nature of film narratives of and concepts about archaeology within popular culture.
ARCA2638 Analysis of Lithic Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr laboratory session/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARPH2517, ARPH2617 Assessment: 1x2000wd report (40%), 1x1000wd in-class practical exam (25%) and 1x1500wd laboratory notebook (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The production of stone artefacts, lithic technology, is the oldest cultural residue and a key evidence for Palaeolithic cultural evolution. The unit introduces the technology, and describes methods and theories behind its archaeological analysis and interpretation. Students will develop skills in the identification, classification and explanation of archaeological artefacts; expertise which is valuable in consultancy and research archaeology worldwide. These understandings are developed through conventional lectures, instructional film, laboratory study of archaeological specimens, and a program of student experiments.
ARCA2639 Archaeological Principles and Practice

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology OR (6 Junior credit points of Archaeology and ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANTH1001 or ARHT1001 or HSTY1089) Prohibitions: ARCA2601 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (50%) and 2x2000wd class tests (2x25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This subject gives an introduction to some of the major principles and practices in archaeological research and interpretation. Topics will include archaeological research design, site formation processes, dating techniques and the basic principles behind archaeological laboratory processes and the classification and analysis of artefacts. It will also examine the quantification and interpretation of archaeological data and some of the ethical, legal and practical aspects of archaeological research.
ARCA2640 Hunter-Gatherer Palaeoeconomies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Archaeology Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x1000wd Exam (20%), 1x1000wd Presentation/paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
No longer the dominant form of society, for most of human history people were hunter-gatherers. This unit examines archaeological evidence for long-term hunter-gatherer economic activity from early hominins in Africa several million years ago to recent populations across a number of regions. As hunter-gatherers encompassed diverse economic systems, this unit will address several major themes, such as human-environment interactions, settlement, subsistence and technology. Theoretical and frameworks will be considered, incorporating key Australian and international case studies.
ARCA2801 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ARCA2802 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ARCA2803 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ARCA2804 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ARCA2805 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ARCA2806 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ARCA2807 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ARCA2808 Archaeology Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ARCA3601 Research in Australasian Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points of Archaeology, including ARCA2635 Assessment: 1x4000wd research report (60%), 1x1500wd seminar paper (30%), 1x500wd Seminar presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An advanced seminar for students who wish to develop their research, analytical, writing and presentation skills by investigating a key area of contemporary archaeological research. Specific topics will vary from year to year with primary emphasis on Australasian archaeology (Asia, Australia, and the Pacific) placed in global perspective and/or current issues in archaeological theory, method and practice relevant to staff research projects (e.g. history and philosophy of archaeology, spatial analysis, digital methods, public archaeology and heritage studies, historical archaeology, archaeozoology, archaeologies of colonialism).
ARCA3605 Dialogue of Civilizations: East and West

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points of Archaeology, including ARCA2635 Prohibitions: ARNE2005 Assessment: 1x4500wd Research Paper (60%), 1x500wd equivalent Class presentation (5%), 1x1000wd equivalent Class presentation (25%), Continuous Discussion of reading (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The interaction between cultures within the ancient Mediterranean and West Asia is explored against the background of reception theory and utilizing a range of approaches. Through focused study of specific artefact classes and regions, students engage in the practical application of archaeological evidence to address issues of interculturation.
ARCA3620 Archaeology and Iconography

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points of Archaeology including ARCA2635 Assessment: 1x4000wd research essay (60%), 1x1000wd-equivalent oral presentation (20%) and 1x1000wd in-class test (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Images have the capacity to both reflect and shape human society. This unit examines the value and use of images in the archaeological context, focusing particularly on the challenges of viewing and interpreting imagery created by cultures removed from our own in time and space. Students will learn the skills necessary to employ iconographical analysis as a tool that can enrich and enlighten our understanding of the experience and cognition of bygone societies.
ARCA4011 Archaeology Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week, each seminar meets weekly for 2 hours for one semester (or equivalent) Assessment: A thesis of 18000-20000 words and 6000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Please contact relevant Departmental staff for advice and assistance. All students with credit or above results are encouraged to apply for Honours.
Honours is an intensive year-long program of advanced study based around research. Honours is undertaken after successful completion of a Bachelor degree and where the overall mark is a minimum credit average (70%). Entry into Honours is selective and work at this level is challenging. Honours is available in most subjects areas taught in the Faculty, and which are listed under Tables A and B in the Handbook. Students will complete a thesis and coursework seminars throughout the year. For further information contact the Honours Coordinator in the department or consult the Handbook entry for the relevant subject area.
ARCA4012 Archaeology Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARCA4011 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to ARCA4011
ARCA4013 Archaeology Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARCA4012 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to ARCA4011
ARCA4014 Archaeology Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARCA4013 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to ARCA4011
ARNE2601 Egyptian Archaeology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Reade Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours of lectures per week Assessment: one 1 hour test, one 3000 word essay and one 2 hour exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit offers the student an introduction to the rich cultures of ancient Egypt, examining the rise of complex society in Egypt and the development, floruit and regional impact of the Egyptian state. It will explore Egyptian art, architecture, material culture, religion, kinship and attitudes to death and burial through examination of archaeological, textual and iconographic evidence.