Digital Cultures

Digital Cultures

ARHT3601 Cinematic Transformations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT2656 and 12 senior credit points from ARHT) or (ARHT2656 and 12 senior credit points from (ARHT2652 or ARHT2653 or ARHT2655 or ARHT2657 or ENGL2627 or ENGL2638 or ENGL3604 or FILM2601 or HSTY2608 or ICLS2637 or ASNS3616 or MUSC2663)) Assessment: 1x1000wd montage analysis (20%), 1x750wd online group assessment task (15%), 1x2000wd research essay (35%), 1x750wd blog (20%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What is the cinematic object of the twenty-first century? Where do we locate the essence of a medium that has undergone such a radical transformation? This course examines the intersection of film, digital cinema, and new media experiences such as YouTube, machinima and mobile cinema. Where many have spoken of the death of cinema in a digital era, we will conceptualise the complexity of cinema's evolution from its earliest celluloid incarnation to the technologies of digital simulation.
ARIN2610 Web Transformations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points from (Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender and Culture Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Media and Communication, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology) Prohibitions: ARIN2100 Assessment: 1x1500wd equivalent Workshops and tutorial exercises (20%), 1x1500wd Report to government/industry (40%), 1x1500wd Digital Media Strategy (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Internet is a medium undergoing constant change, while also becoming progressively integrated into everyday life. Web Transformations critically examines recent changes in the technology, language, design and social networking on the internet. It introduces key skills in evaluation, strategy, interaction design and writing for the web within a historical context. Beyond the web, it evaluates the implications of emerging applications such as mobile technologies, internet of things and social media.
ARIN2620 Cyberworlds

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points from (Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender and Culture Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Media and Communication, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology) Prohibitions: ARIN2200 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x1000wd test (20%), 1x1500wd take-home exercise (40%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Are online encounters different from face-to-face encounters? What is the difference between the real and the virtual? How do online identities relate to offline identities? This unit of study introduces students to key perspectives, themes and debates in the expanding world of online interaction and cultural production including social media, art, games, virtual worlds, augmented reality and participatory culture. Is the term 'cyberworld' redundant in a world where online and offline experiences, cultural forms and identities have become increasingly enmeshed?
ARIN2630 Digital Arts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points from (Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender and Culture Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Media and Communication, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology) Prohibitions: ARIN2300 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd review (20%), 1x1500wd blog (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Digital Arts explores the ways digital and new media technologies are being used to transform cultural production, distribution and reception in the visual and performing arts, film and popular culture. Students will learn about the changing aesthetic, cultural and technical dimensions of new digital technologies and will develop the critical and analytical tools with which to discuss and evaluate digital art works and the ways that audiences interact with them.
ARIN2640 Games and Play

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 junior credit points from (Anthropology or Art History or Computer Science or Design Computing or English or Gender and Cultural Studies or History or Information Systems or Information Technology or Linguistics or Media and Communication or Philosophy or Psychology or Sociology) Prohibitions: ARIN3640 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial activity (20%), 1x2000wd game analysis (40%), 1x1500wd game design project (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Computer games have emerged as distinctive cultural forms, with their own aesthetics, design cultures, user communities and academic study. This unit of study uses historical and critical theories on games and play to explore how computer games work and to examine their complex interrelationships with culture. Drawing on readings from games studies, new media and design, students will analyse a range of different games and use hands-on exercises to develop their own game design concept.
ARIN3610 Technology and Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 senior credit points from (Digital Cultures, Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender and Culture Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Media and Communication, Psychology or Sociology) Prohibitions: ARIN2600 Assessment: 1x1000wd Provocations and report (20%), 1x1500wd Influence analysis (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Technology and Culture analyses the relationships between technological developments and cultural change, with a particular focus on digital media. This unit of study interrogates the changing conceptions of technology in society by tracing the influence of key works in the critical Humanities and social sciences. Through close readings and provocative discussion of advanced texts, students explore the significance of technology in social power, identity, gender, social shaping, class, space, assemblages, actor-networks, experience, thought, time, and the future.
ARIN3620 Researching Digital Cultures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Digital Cultures Prohibitions: ARIN2000 Assessment: 1x2000wd Research blog (45%), 1x2500wd Research proposal (45%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How do people make and use new media technologies? To answer this question you need to know how to conduct research: a systematic investigation using carefully chosen and ethically sound methods. In this unit students prepare a research proposal to improve knowledge about the social implications of the latest developments in information technologies. They build their methodology by choosing a combination of methods: big data analysis; ethnography, interviews, surveys, online methods, discourse analysis, content analysis and/or case studies.
ARIN4011 Digital Cultures Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis on approved topic (60%), 1x12000-13000wd written works (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Mid year enrolment is not available. Part time enrolment is not available. Students from other institutions may be accepted into the program, and are requested to provide samples of previous academic work as well as a proposal. Please contact the Honours coordinator, ideally by early November in the year prior to intended enrolment.
Honours is an intensive year-long program of advanced study based around research. Honours is undertaken after successful completion of a Bachelor degree and where the overall mark is a minimum credit average (70%). Entry into Honours is selective and work at this level is challenging. Honours is available in most subjects areas taught in the Faculty, and which are listed under Tables A and B in the Handbook. Students will complete a thesis and coursework seminars throughout the year. For further information contact the Honours Coordinator in the department or consult the Handbook entry for the relevant subject area.
ARIN4012 Digital Cultures Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIN4011 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to ARIN4011
ARIN4013 Digital Cultures Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIN4012 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to ARIN4011
ARIN4014 Digital Cultures Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: ARIN4013 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to ARIN4011
DECO2010 Designing Social Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Madeleine Borthwick Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk; tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Social Media Project (80%); Tutorial activities (10%); Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an understanding of principles and technologies relevant to the design of social media, that is, media supporting social interaction. The unit covers the history and theory of social networks, techniques and methods for analysing social media networks, design principles and patterns for the creation of social media applications, and the development and delivery of social media strategy. Students will gain proficiency designing social media platforms and usage scenarios that solve a range of design challenges. Students will participate in, critically review and prototype new forms of sociable media to demonstrate their understanding of the subject matter.
DECO2101 Visual Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Nathaniel Fay Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk (Week 1 only); tutorial 2 hrs/wk; online modules 1 hr/wk Prohibitions: DECO1015 or DECO1100 or DAAE2009 Assessment: Visual Design Assignments (80%); Quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study introduces students to the principles of visual design, including graphic design, colour theory and typography. Students will develop an understanding of how to successfully combine visual elements to effectively communicate an idea or concept, to describe a product, and to represent visual user interface elements in an interactive product. Using digital image manipulation tools, such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator, students will learn how to develop design concepts and how to turn concepts into visual communication materials in the form of digital images.
DECO2102 Web Design and Technologies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Martin Tomitsch Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk (Week 1 only); tutorial 2 hrs/wk; online modules 1 hr/wk Prohibitions: DECO1016 Assessment: Web Design Assignments (80%); Quizzes (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to web design and modern web technologies for the purpose of designing and prototyping web-based user interface solutions. Students will learn about design principles and patterns for the web and apply them in practical exercises that involve designing and creating interactive web applications. The unit will introduce web-based markup languages and frameworks for various media and platforms, such as desktop computers and mobile devices, with a focus on interaction design. Students will develop an understanding of web technologies and their role in user experience and interaction design, such as the use of web technologies for prototyping user interfaces. Prototyping techniques covered in this unit include: scripting and markup languages for enabling dynamic content and interactive designs, such as HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.
FILM2601 Cinema Today: Traffic in Moving Images

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) or (12 senior credit points from Digital Cultures) Assessment: 1x500wd descriptive exercise (10%), 1x1500wd critical analysis (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The twentieth century was known as the cinematic century. How best should we understand film today? Once confined to the physical space of the movie theatre, the cinematic image is now mobile, part of our everyday mediascapes. This unit considers the broad history of film from the perspective of the contemporary moment, while also providing the conceptual tools for analyzing the future of film in a media-convergent world.
GCST2612 Youth and Youth Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from (Gender and Cultural Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Prohibitions: WMST2012 Assessment: 1xTutorial presentation equivalent to 500wds (10%), 1x1500 Short Essay (30%), 1x2000 Take-home Exercise (50%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines academic, public and popular ideas about youth and practices of youth culture. It will introduce students to some of the current parameters for studying youth cultural forms and practices and the significance of various conceptions of youth. Points of focus will include popular images of youth and youth culture, discourses on (im)maturity, development, and training, and critical perspectives on youth as an identity and an experience.
GCST2630 Consumer Cultures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Early Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from (Gender and Cultural Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Prohibitions: GCST3603 Assessment: 2x500wd journal exercise (25%), 1x1500wd critical analysis (30%), 1x500wd final project outline (10%), 1x2000wd final project (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Consumerism is a contradictory cultural formation. It is a source of meaning, pleasure and identity, but also a cause of environmental degradation, social injustice and, for some, individual alienation. This unit sets out some of the ethical, environmental and social problems associated with consumerism, and examines in detail some of the creative, ingenious and determined responses to these problems.
GCST3604 Using Cultural Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Senior credit points from Gender and Cultural Studies) or (12 Senior credit points of Digital Cultures) Assessment: 2x 750 Critical Exercise (50%), 1x3000 Essay or Take-home Exercise (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cultural Studies was widely discussed as one of the "New Humanities" in the 1990s, but a long history of debates about and theories of culture precede the discipline, and the processes of deciding what are the key texts and concepts of Cultural Studies is ongoing. This unit overviews foundational and emerging critical concepts and writers in the field. Students will also undertake reading and analysis exercises designed to help them come to grips with using "theory" in their own work.
HSTY2602 Tablet to iPad: A History of Information

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (12 Senior credit points of Digital Cultures) Assessment: 1x1500wd journal (30%), 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How has information technology shaped our past? This unit investigates the history of the Western world's technologies of literacy and organisation of knowledge. We start with ancient materials - clay, wax, skin, paper - and the organisation and circulation of information from antiquity to the Renaissance. How did pre-modern networks function? Who was the public? The author? We compare Western systems with those of China, the Islamic World, and the Americas, and conclude with the new challenges of the digital age.
LNGS2613 Computer Applications in Linguistics

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001, or 12 Senior credit points from Digital Cultures Prohibitions: LNGS2007 or LNGS2027 Assessment: 6x1000wd Written assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the many uses of computers in the humanities with specific reference to linguistics: computer lexicography; building and searching text corpora, examining speech signals, collocations, style, authorship, discourse structure and syntactic constructions. Accessing information on languages and linguistics through library catalogues, electronic mailing lists, FTP sites and the World Wide Web. Other linguistics units (like phonetics, field methods, historical linguistics and semantics) will benefit from some basic knowledge of the use of computers.
LNGS3608 Computers, Discourse, Language

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: LNGS2624 Assessment: 1x1000wd corpus design and building (20%), 1x1000wd corpus analysis (20%), 1x2500wd research report (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'Language looks different when you look at a lot of it at once.' This unit of study introduces you to the use of computer software to look at a lot of language at once: Do we refer to 'men' and 'women' equally often? What are the five most frequent words in the English language? What is the difference between 'pure' and 'sheer'? How does television dialogue differ from real-world dialogue? And how does a computer help us to answer these and similar questions?
SCLG2610 Science, Technology and Social Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (6 Senior credit points from Digital Cultures) or (12 Junior credit points from GCST, SCLG, ANTH, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Prohibitions: SCLG2504 Assessment: 1xOral Presentation (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-home exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines a range of sociological theories and debates concerning science and technology. Students will investigate the two-way relationship between science/technology and society (ie. the social shaping of science and technology, and the impact of science and technology on society). Issues to be examined include the social production of science and technology, the science-technology relationship, the politics and economics of science and technology, science and technology in medicine, in reproduction, in the workplace, and the role of science and technology in environmentalism and the environmental movement.
SCLG2628 Surveillance and Society

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Late Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent in intensive session Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (6 Senior credit points from Digital Cultures) or (12 Junior credit points from Gender and Cultural Studies) Assessment: 1x1000wd book review Essay (25%), 1x3500wd Research essay (65%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The actions of both citizens and institutions are being scrutinised as never before. Personal information is a key commodity and resource, being routinely extracted from individuals as they partake in everyday activities. Surveillance has a complex form as both material force and discursive construction. Thus, the unit's objective is to equip students with the theoretical tools required to analytically comprehend the diverse ways in which surveillance is produced, represented and experienced.
WRIT2000 Contemporary Rhetoric

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior Credit Points Assessment: 1x1125wd Analysis (25%), 1x1125wd Comparison (25%), 1x1125wd Essay (25%), 1x1125wd Reflection (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce students to contemporary theories and practices of rhetoric, examining the work of Kenneth Burke and Chaïm Perelman, among others. It will trace the development of contemporary rhetoric from the classical era, comparing these approaches through examples of social, political, and popular rhetoric across a range of genres. Students will develop a better understanding of the relationship between rhetoric and writing and how to apply rhetorical principles to the analysis, interpretation and production of a range of texts.