Government International Relations

Government and International Relations

GOVT1001 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT1002 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT1101 Australian Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1800wd Essay (40%), 1x450wd Critical Research Excercise (10%), 1x2hr Examination (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to debates about the nature and limits of Australian democracy, to the major institutions of Australian politics, and to the distribution of power in Australian society. Major institutions and forces such as parliament, executive government, the federal system, political parties and the media are examined as arenas of power, conflict and consensus. Who rules? How? Which groups are excluded?
GOVT1104 Introduction to Political Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Reading assignment (20%), 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x1.5hr Examination (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the study of politics through a focus on the key organising principle of power. Different ways in which power is theorised and structured are considered. This includes power between individuals, groups, classes and genders as well as different power-sharing arrangements within and across political institutions. In critically assessing these different approaches, students will be exposed to a range of political science theories and methods, which will equip them for future study in Government and International Relations. The empirical focus of this unit is on Australia, with reference to other developed countries.
GOVT1105 Geopolitics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1hr mid-term exam (20%), 2hr Final exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine how the contemporary international political order has emerged by focusing upon the interplay of diplomatic and strategic issues in the post-war world. It will begin with an analysis of the Cold War and its origins, tracing the development of Soviet-American rivalry, its manifestations in Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America, and the different ways in which that rivalry was played out. The collapse of the Soviet Union as both a superpower and a state and the disappearance of the communist bloc will be analysed, before surveying the post-Cold War international scene. Among the issues reviewed in the post-Cold War era will be the question of US hegemony and unilateralism vs. multilateralism, nuclear proliferation, the continuing tension between the first and the third worlds, questions of civilisational conflict, non-state actors and terrorism, democratisation, and regional conflict.
GOVT1202 World Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x450wd Case Essay (10%), 1x1600wd Essay (35%), 1x2hr Examination (40%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: In Summer School this unit is available to current HSC students only.
This unit introduces the core content of the field of international relations. The first part of the unit presents the realist, liberal, Marxist and constructivist paradigms of international relations. The second part of the unit discusses the key actors and processes political scientists define in the field, including the state, decision makers, bureaucratic organisations, and classes. The final part of the unit focuses on international security, international political economy, and global problems.
GOVT1881 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT1882 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT2111 Human Rights and Australian Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations or 12 Junior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies Prohibitions: GOVT2101 Assessment: 1x2500wd briefing paper (30%), 1x2hr exam (50%), Tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit introduces students to the notion of human rights, outlines international human rights enforcement mechanisms and the application of human rights standards in Australia. Throughout the unit we consider the evolution of human rights in Australia and raise questions about the adequacy of Australia's existing human rights machinery, and examine the reasons for Australia's reluctance to adopt a Bill of Rights. We examine government policies toward the indigenous Australians, women and refugees. We also consider current legislative changes to combat terrorism and consider the implications of these changes on Australian's civil rights.
GOVT2112 Modern Political Thought

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x1500wd Mid-semester Take-home exercise (30%), 1x2500wd final Essay (60%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit considers key themes in modern and contemporary political thought. It uses primary texts to address topics such as sovereignty, democracy, fascism, liberalism, human rights, politics and religion, violence, and political identity. Authors may include Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Kant, Nietzsche, Marx, J.S. Mill, Tocqueville, Rawls, Arendt, Schmitt, and Foucault.
GOVT2114 The Australian Political Party System

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2104 Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1000wd Website review (20%), 1x1.5hr Examination (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit examines the Australian party system, including colonial-era pre-party politics, the development of major parties (Labor, Liberal and National) and minor parties (Democrats, Greens, One Nation etc), parties and ideology, parties and social movements, internal party politics, parties and the law, parties and elections, parties and parliamentary politics, and parties and public policy. Emphasis is placed on how theoretical and comparative models of political parties help to explain Australian party politics.
GOVT2116 Australian Foreign and Defence Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2106 Assessment: 500wd policy brief (10%) and 2000wd Essay (40%) and 2hr exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines Australia's foreign and defence policies since Federation with a focus on contemporary issues, such as: defence planning and operations; engagement with the global economy; and, Canberra's stance on terrorism, nuclear affairs, asylum seekers, and global environmental management.
GOVT2119 Southeast Asia: Dilemmas of Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations) or (12 Junior credit points from Asian Studies) Prohibitions: GOVT2109 Assessment: 1x1400wd Essay (30%), 2x 1hr Exam (40%), 1xTutorial presentation equivalent to 900wd (20%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Until the 1997 East Asian economic/financial crisis, Southeast Asia was acclaimed as one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing regional economies in the Asia-Pacific sphere. Not surprisingly, the region has attracted enormous interest from social scientists and the wider business community in Australia. However, there is limited consensus about the causes for the region's economic performance and socio-political trajectory during the 'boom' and 'post-boom' years. This unit aims to place the region's economic experiences and socio-political changes within a broader historical and comparative context. Such an approach allows us to better appreciate the economic continuities, understand the major socio-political dilemmas and changing patterns of development.
GOVT2221 Politics of International Economic Rels

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2201 Assessment: 1x500wd Tutorial presentation (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an overview of four major theoretical approaches to international political economy and how these apply to understanding the practice of international economic relations. These theories are: economic nationalism, liberalism, neo-Marxism and poststructuralism. The unit analyses the theory and practice of economic relations by and between states, by focussing in particular on relations between the developed and developing world. It applies each of the four main theories to developing country regions. In this way students also become acquainted with the theory and practice of economic development.
GOVT2225 International Security in 21st Century

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2205 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%), Tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the theoretical foundations, essential concepts and central issues in the field of international security. It provides students with analytical tools to understand and participate in current debates concerning security and threats. The first part of the unit provides an introduction to the theoretical interpretations of international security. The second part discusses security phenomena, problems and strategies, including the coercive use of force, deterrence, guerrilla and counterinsurgency, nuclear stability, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, crisis management, arms races and disarmament, security cooperation and security regimes. The discussion in this part includes a critical review of the dilemmas, strategies, and solutions in each of the issue areas.
GOVT2226 International Organisations

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2206 Assessment: 1x700wd Short paper (15%), 1x1800wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
International Organisations is a survey of both the range of institutions created in response to various economic, security and environmental challenges faced by states and other actors in the global system, and some of the most prominent theories aimed at explaining them. The unit will be arranged around a series of case studies of particular issue areas, from international peacekeeping, to the regulation of multinational corporations, and the struggle to slow global warming. More broadly, the unit will question whether international organisations are instruments of or rivals to sovereign states, and whether they reflect the hegemony of the West, solutions to international collective problems, or agents of new transnational communities.
GOVT2228 Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2208 Assessment: 1x1000wd Short Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Major Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr Examination (30%), 1xTutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Environmental issues pose increasingly difficult challenges to our societies. What is the nature of these challenges? Where have they come from? How have political institutions adapted to them, at the national and international levels? What further changes might be necessary to better meet them? How might these changes come about? What effects might they have on the future of politics? This unit of study will engage these kinds of questions as an introduction to some theoretical and practical dimensions of environmental politics.
GOVT2331 Social Change and Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2301 Assessment: 1x1500wd campaign case analysis (30%), 1x1500wd team campaign design project (30%), 1.5hr exam (30%), Tutorial and online participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines how processes of social change are shaped by a variety of non-institutionalised political actors, including individuals, interest groups and social movements. It will answer questions such as: What is political participation? How and why do people act politically in Australia? How does participation both shape policy agendas and lead to societal change? The main conceptual topics include: political participation, political socialisation, civil society, interest groups and social movements. This conceptual framework will be used to examine the strategic repertoires adopted by movements and groups in society, including: young people, environmental movements, identity movements, the labour movement, anti-corporate globalisation action and community-based politics.
GOVT2424 Politics of China

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations) or (12 Junior credit points from Asian Studies) Prohibitions: GOVT2402 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), Tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Introduction to government and politics of modern China. Brief examination of traditional background and modern revolution from 19th century to 1949. Primary focus on ideology, leadership, institutions and political processes of the People's Republic. Covers politics of social groups, major issue areas, the Cultural Revolution and the politics of reform.
GOVT2445 American Politics and Foreign Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points in Government and International Relations) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Prohibitions: GOVT2405 Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 10x30wd tutorial quizzes (10%), 1x2hr exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will be an overview of the American political system and the formulation of foreign policy. It will cover the major Federal political institutions: the Presidency, the Congress, and the Supreme Court. The unit will consider how foreign policy is made through the interaction of these institutions and with other elements of civil society. Finally, it will examine the outcome of this process - US foreign policy itself - with special emphasis on the post-Cold War period. We will seek to answer two key questions: (a) what is the influence of domestic politics on US foreign policy; and (b) how does the US system cope with the apparent contradictions between its ideals and the imperatives of global power?
GOVT2552 Policy Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2502 Assessment: 1x2500wd Eval case study (40%), 1x2hr exam (50%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The unit outlines the nature of public policy - dealing with such matters as definitions of policy and approaches to analysing public policy; Examines the main building blocks of the policy process: actors, institutions, and policy instruments; Explores key stages of the public policy process: notably problem definition, agenda setting, policy formation, decision making, implementation and evaluation. Examples are drawn from Australia and a range of countries throughout the world; Addresses policy-making in extreme, 'crisis' situations.
GOVT2603 Media Politics & Political Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Chen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations) or (12 Junior credit points from GCST, SCLG, ANTH, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Assessment: 2000wd essays (2x45%) and in-class quiz (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is primarily about news, its production, contents and impacts. It will examine the special demands of different news organisations and of reporting different news areas; the news media as an arena in political conflicts and the consequent interests and strategies of various groups in affecting news content; and the impacts of news on political processes and relationships. Our primary focus is on Australia, but there is some comparison with other affluent liberal democracies. The substantive areas the unit will focus on include election reporting, scandals and the reporting of war and terrorism.
GOVT2611 Capitalism and Democracy in East Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations) or (12 Junior credit points from Asian Studies) Prohibitions: GOVT2411 Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 3x 500wd equivalent In-class quizzes (20%), 1x1hr Examination (20%), 1x500wd equivalent Tutorial debates (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will shed light on the springs of change in politics and economics and their intersections in East Asia, which includes South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. The unit examines the political and economic transformation in the region. Among the major issues considered are: Are East Asia's political institutions distinctive? How does economic change affect political power and the state? Will democratisation and globalisation undermine the distinctive traditions of the region?
GOVT2616 Key Concepts in Political Thought

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures, 1x1hr tutorial Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x2000wd Mid-semester Take-home exercise (40%), 2000wd Essay (40%), 500wd equivalent Oral Presentation (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What enables us as political animals to live together in political communities? This unit examines key concepts undergirding our contemporary political life handed down to us through centuries of political thought; from the Athenian city-state to contemporary reflections on identity. Some of the concepts and problématiques explored may include: the state; sovereignty; the political; liberty; property; the citizen vs. the subject, reasons vs. the passions.
GOVT2617 Introduction to Non-Traditional Security

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Assessment: 500wd equivalent group role playing exercise (10%) and 1hr Mid-semester exam (30%) and 2500wd analytical Essay (50%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces a variety of non-traditional security (NTS) challenges, along with different perspectives and policies regarding threats other than war. How does NTS relate to war and peace, and what dangers are most threatening? When does conflict over scarce resources - food, water, energy - affect survival? And what can be done about emerging threats like climate change and cyber attack? Considering these and other questions, students will tackle some of the greatest security challenges in the world.
GOVT2881 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT2882 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT2883 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT2884 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT2885 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT2991 Political Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations at the level of Credit or better, or with the consent of the Honours Coordinator. Prohibitions: GOVT2091 Assessment: 1x1600wd Essay (35%), 1x1400wd Group project (30%), 1x1hr In-class examination (25%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit assists students enrolled in the honours program to develop the conceptual and practical skills they need to excel in any area of substantial political inquiry. An overview of political inquiry is presented through an examination of the diversity in theoretical and methodological approaches used by those who carry out political research. This includes looking at, for example, institutional, behavioural, discourse and feminist approaches in political inquiry, and the usage of quantitative and qualitative methods. The assessment is based around constructing research projects that can be utilised to answer current political questions.
GOVT3986 Gender, Security and Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2336 Assessment: 800wd Essay proposal (15%) and 2000wd Essay (35%) and 1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) and 4x175wd tutorial quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit offers a gender perspective on human rights, with a focus on gender and insecure international contexts. The unit covers themes related to the challenges of pursuing human rights, violations of human rights, and the role of civil society groups in advocating human rights. Attention will be given to the gendered nature of human rights and to specific issues that impact men and women differently when it comes to human rights protection and promotion.
GOVT3987 Comparative Public Sector Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2557 Assessment: 1x2250wd Research essay (50%), 1.5hr exam (35%), 750wd equivalent group presentation and peer review (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores how the public sector sets policy and delivers public services. It begins by using the main concepts and theories of public management and governance to assess the various trade offs that are involved in designing and implementing different types of public sector reform. These theories are then applied to evaluate specific reform initiatives and compare reform patterns between different countries and across different policy sectors. Topics include: public administration, privatisation, performance management, partnership working and community engagement.
GOVT3988 Globalisation, Governance and the State

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points in Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2440 Assessment: 1x1hr 1000wd equivalent Mid-semester test (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), Tutorial participation (10%), 1x1.5hr Final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Globalisation is posited as a process of deep change to the international order, one that restructures the role of the state (internally and externally), and has implications for a wide range of actors (international institutions, corporations, interest groups and individuals). One argument is that this erodes the capacity of national, and sub-national governments to manage economic and social change. In response to these concerns, this unit will appraise the debates about the impact of globalisation and state power erosion.
GOVT3989 Divided Societies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2442, GOVT2412 Assessment: 1x2500wd Research essay (50%), 1x2hr exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically examines the role that ethnic conflict plays in national and international politics. Students will have advanced knowledge of nationalism, and close familiarity with current thinking around the role of the ethnic nationalism in particular. This unit will analyse the most influential theories, historical and contemporary, about the role of ethnic nationalism (as opposed to civic nationalism), regionally and internationally. We will consider a range of competing theoretical approaches, concentrating on the theory of a "divided society".
GOVT3990 Islam and Democracy in the Muslim World

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points in Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2774 Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (30%), 1x1000wd equivalent group Oral Presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines why there is no clear consensus on the status of Islam and sharia (Islamic law) within the state, constitution and political system. It will also consider whether the secular democratic state is consistent with Islamic principles such as adil (justice) and maslaha (common good). The unit highlights the linkages between historical, political and cultural Islam and the emergence of discourses which provide a contextual understanding of the faith.
GOVT3993 Power

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture-seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and International Relations and GOVT2991, each at the level of Credit or better, or with the consent of the Honours Coordinator. Prohibitions: GOVT3991 Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (2x15%), 2500wd Essay (50%), Seminar and online participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Power is the essential concept of political science, which is the systematic study of politics. Bertrand Russell, perhaps the greatest mind of the 20th Century, said power is the central concept of all the social sciences. Students explore this concept in different parts of political science and survey some debates on power, assessing the advantages and disadvantages of concepts of power. There are three themes in this unit. The first is the distribution of power in society. The second is power in comparative politics and the third is power in international relations. The emphasis is on the nature, sources and use of power.
GOVT3994 Research Preparation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and International Relations and GOVT2991, each at the level of Credit or better, or with the consent of the Honours Coordinator. Prohibitions: GOVT3992 Assessment: 1x1500wd Thesis review (20%), 1x1500wd Thesis comparison (20%), 1x3000wd Thesis prospectus (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit assists students to build towards a better fourth year honours dissertation. It considers the construction of a dissertation topic, planning the research, bibliographic searches, and writing the dissertation. The unit devotes a considerable amount of time to exercises designed to help students envisage their honours dissertation and plan fruitful lines of inquiry.
GOVT3995 Politics and Environment: Current Issues

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and International Relations, including GOVT2228 Prohibitions: GOVT2615 Assessment: 2x750wd Essay (2x25%) and 2500wd Research essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The focus of environmental politics often shifts, and this unit will examine key contemporary issues in the field - from the more longstanding to emergent issues just gaining political urgency. The unit will focus on key issues in depth; this may include climate change, environmental justice, food politics, sustainable cities, and/or other timely issues in the Australian or global context. Students will be required to do intensive research in a relevant and salient area of interest in environmental politics and policy.
GOVT3996 Science, Tech and International Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and International Relations, including GOVT2225 Prohibitions: GOVT2618 Assessment: 1x1.5hr Exam (25%), 1x4000wd analytical Essay (50%), 1x500wd equivalent group presentation (10%), Seminar participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Science and technology have been intimately involved with security ever since mankind discovered fire and started using tools. This interdisciplinary unit considers how scientific facts and technical artifacts influence security and, conversely, how security influences science and technology. Through advanced reading, independent research, seminar discussions, and other exercises, students will analyze and apply a wide variety of perspectives - strategic, organizational, cultural, and ethical, among others - to evaluate the complex relationship between modern science, advanced technology, and international security.
GOVT3997 Parliament and Democracy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and GOVT1101 Assessment: 1x1250wd Short Paper (25%), 1x1250wd Draft Inquiry Submission (25%), 1x2000wd Critical Analysis Paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Just how important are parliaments to democracy? This unit takes a critical look at how well Australian parliaments carry out their representative, law-making and accountability functions. Analytical material will be complemented by practical insights from members and staff of the NSW Parliament.
GOVT3999 Terrorism and Organised Crime

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 senior credit points from Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x1hr Mid-semester Exam (20%), 2x1750wd Network Assessment (70%), Tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit serves as a rigorous investigation of the politics of violent and criminal non-state actors. It will start with a conceptual discussion of such groups, focusing on analysis of their structure and behaviour and the roles that globalisation and technology play in non-state threats, before moving on to specific types of dark networks. The dark networks that may be covered include terrorist organisations, non-state nuclear proliferation networks, and various forms of organised crime, including maritime piracy, drug trafficking, mafias, mundane smuggling, and money laundering.
GOVT4101 Government Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week in Semester 1 Assessment: 3000wd bibliographic Essay (10%) and 18000-20000wd thesis (50%) and 6000wd equivalent written work at each seminar (2x20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Honours is an intensive year-long program of advanced study based around research. Honours is undertaken after successful completion of a Bachelor degree and where the overall mark is a minimum credit average (70%). Entry into Honours is selective and work at this level is challenging. Honours is available in most subjects areas taught in the Faculty, and which are listed under Tables A and B in the Handbook. Students will complete a thesis and coursework seminars throughout the year. For further information contact the Honours Coordinator in the department or consult the Handbook entry for the relevant subject area.
GOVT4102 Government Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GOVT4101 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
refer to GOVT4101
GOVT4103 Government Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GOVT4102 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
refer to GOVT4101
GOVT4104 Government Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GOVT4103 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
refer to GOVT4101