History

History

ANHS2602 Law, Disorder and Ideology in Rome

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Cowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Greek (Ancient), Latin or History) OR (6 junior credit points of Ancient History AND 6 junior credit points of History, Latin, Greek (Ancient), Philosophy or Archaeology) Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We live in an era in which the interests of national security are constantly balanced against the rule of law. In Rome too, crisis and emergency, whether genuine or the product of partisan rhetoric, could threaten the rule of law. This unit explores the idea that the collapse of the rule of law engendered the collapse of the Republic, whilst also seeking to promote stimulating and topical discussion about the rule of law in democratic societies like our own.
ANHS2603 Ancient Greek Democracies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History or History OR (6 Junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 Junior credit points of either Classical Studies, Latin, Greek (Ancient), or Archaeology) Prohibitions: ANHS2003 Assessment: 1x2 hour exam (40%), 1x2500 word class paper (50%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit studies the rise and working of democracy in ancient Greece, examining Athens from the time of Solon through the fifth century and into the fourth century B.C. We shall look at the history of Athens and her relation to other cities, and evaluate the evidence of historians and of inscriptions. Athenian political institutions and social history, including the role of the theatre, looking at both tragedy and comedy, the role of other festivals and the law and the lives of the elite and the "forgotten people", such as women and slaves, will be considered.
ANHS2605 Ancient Greek Religion

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julia Kindt Session: Semester 2,Summer Early Classes: 2x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Classical Studies, Ancient Greek or History OR 6 junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), Classical Studies, History, Philosophy, Archaeology (Classical) or Archaeology (Near Eastern) Assessment: 1x2000wd class paper (40%), 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x500wd reading journal (15%) and participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores Greek religion as a defining feature of what it meant to be Greek. We will investigate similarities and differences between religious beliefs and practices throughout the ancient Greek world and trace how religion changed over time. Topics addressed include sacrifice, religious festivals and games, the use (and abuse) of divination, and shared notions of purity and pollution.
ANHS2606 The City of Rome: History and Landscape

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathryn Welch Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 6 junior credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of Ancient History, History, Archaeology, Philosophy, Greek (Ancient) or Latin Assessment: 1x500wd site analysis (15%), 1x2000wd essay (35%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (15%), 1x1500wd reading journal (25%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'The city, stick to the city, and live in its light.' (Cicero) This unit will explore the rich history of Rome's urban landscape from the middle Republic (c.200BCE) to the early fourth century CE. We will examine the ways in which the physical city interacted with and even affected the political, religious and cultural life of the Romans and how the great monuments of Empire were eventually destroyed, recovered and reinvented by later ages.
ANHS2609 Alexander and the Hellenistic World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Miles Session: Semester 1,Summer Early Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of ANHS or HSTY OR 6 credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of ARCA, GRKA, HSTY, LATN or PHIL Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The legacy of Alexander the Great is often defined as one of military conquest. However it was also an age when scholars revolutionized the way poetry was written, artists found new ways of representing the body in extraordinarily life-like terms and radical new philosophies competed for hearts and minds. From Greece to Afghanistan we will explore a wonderfully diverse and vibrant world that was as much united by culture and learning as it was statecraft and steel.
ANHS2610 SPQR: The Senate and the People of Rome

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Early Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History, History or Classical Studies OR (6 Junior credit points of Ancient History or Classical Studies and 6 Junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), History or Archaeology) Assessment: 1x2000 word class paper (40%), 1x500 word assessment task (10%), 1x2 hour exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What kind of society produced the Roman Republic? How did its political institutions develop and to what extent were they unique? How did they stand up to the pressures of external threat, social change, internal dissention and the impact of empire? We will study the partnership of senate and people from 287 to 88BC and ask the Romans whether a society always gets the politicians it deserves.
ANHS2614 The Emperor in the Roman World 14-117 AD

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Classical Studies, Ancient Greek or History) or (6 junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), Classical Studies, History, Philosophy, Archaeology (Classical) or Archaeology (Near Eastern)) Assessment: 1x2500 word essay (50%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The first century AD is a fascinating and important period of tension and negotiation between the emperor, senate, and people of Rome. The empire expanded to its physical apogee, and new avenues of power and arenas of competition emerged to transform politics. This unit examines the period 14-117 AD, comprising the reigns of the Julio-Claudians (Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, Nero), Flavians (Vespasian, Titus, Domitian), Nerva, and Trajan. It will treat politics, court culture, the imperial family, foreign policy, conspiracy and propaganda.
ANHS2616 Tragedy and Society in Greece and Rome

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Cowan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points of ANHS, GRKA, HSTY or LATN OR 6 credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of ARCA, ENGL, GRKA, HSTY, LATN or PHIL. Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x1500wd essay (30%), tutorial presentation (10%), 1x500wd review of performance (10%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Oedipus, Agamemnon, Medea - tragedy as a genre and as a worldview was invented in Classical Athens and has dominated Western culture ever since. This unit will explore all aspects of tragedy in Athens and Rome from the poetry of its language to the theatricality of its staging, but with particular emphasis on how it reflected and shaped the societies in which it was performed, and engaged with those societies' central concerns: gender, religion and politics, war, justice and ethnicity.
ANHS2618 The Later Roman Empire (AD 286-474)

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History, Greek (Ancient), Latin or History OR (6 Junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 Junior credit points of either History, Latin, Greek (Ancient), Philosophy or Archaeology) Assessment: 1x2500 word Essay (50%), 1x2 hour exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will focus on the transformation of the Classical Mediterranean into the radically different world of Late Antiquity. Through the exploration of topics such as the growth of imperial bureaucracy, the development of court ceremonial, the displacement of polytheism by Christianity, the emergence of new styles of art and literature and the growing prominence of barbarians - the unit will reveal the vibrancy of a society often erroneously dismissed as a period of decline and fall.
ANHS2619 The World of Ancient Epic

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Roche, Dr Anne Rogerson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1 hour lectures and 1x1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: (12 credit points of ANHS, GRKA, HSTY or LATN) or (6 credit points of ANHS and 6 credit points of ARCA, ENGL, GRKA, HSTY, LATN or PHIL) Assessment: 1x1000 word tutorial paper (20%), 1x1500 word essay (30%), 1x2 hour exam (40%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Ancient epic helped shape the European cultural imagination. These masterpieces treat issues of universal concern: life, death, love, war, fate, the supernatural, and journeys of experience. Homer's Iliad and Odyssey are both entertainment and serious explorations of social values. Vergil's Aeneid recounts the foundations of Rome, and considers the individual's plight amid unstoppable historical and supernatural forces. Lucan's Civil War presents a disturbing vision of a world descending into chaos. This unit explores in detail these brilliant and influential poems.
ANHS2622 Herodotus and His World

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History or History OR (6 Junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 Junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), History, or Archaeology) Prohibitions: ANHS3609 Assessment: 1x2000wd Research essay (40%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (30%), 1x1000wd reading journal (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Have you ever heard of the riches of the Lydian king Croesus? Or of the gold-digging ants of India? In this unit of study you will encounter these and other famous aspects of Herodotus' Histories, a text that blends history, literature, ethnography, geography and religion. You will explore the different intellectual worlds Herodotus inhabited and relate them to the world he created in his Histories - a key source for the study of the transition between the archaic and the classical periods in the history of ancient Greece.
ANHS2634 Julius Caesar and the Roman Republic

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Greek (Ancient), Latin or History) or (6 junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 junior credit points of History, Latin, Greek (Ancient), Philosophy or Archaeology) Assessment: 1x500wd textual commentary (15%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x2000wd formal exam (35%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Julius Caesar, politician, general, author. Loved and hated, the story of Caesar still inspires strong debate. This unit interrogates the narrative of first-century BCE Rome and Caesar's place within it. Why did Caesar and the 'Fall of the Republic' have such an impact on Western culture?
ANHS2635 Augustus and the Roman Revolution

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: "2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Greek (Ancient), Latin or History) or (6 junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 junior credit points of History, Latin, Greek (Ancient), Philosophy or Archaeology) Assessment: 1x1000wd textual commentary (20%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%), participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Roman 'revolution' of the First Century BCE involved civil wars, political chaos, lawlessness and violence against civilians. From it emerged a regime which celebrated peace, political harmony, law, justice and the happiness of the citizens. Augustus was at the heart of this change. This unit explores the transformation of the Republic in his lifetime.
ANHS3608 The Peloponnesian War and Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alastair Blanshard Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 6 senior credit points of ANHS and 6 senior credit points of ANHS, HSTY, ARCA, PHIL, GRKA or LATN Assessment: 1x4000wd class paper (50%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), classwork (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Peloponnesian War dominates the Greek world in the second half of the fifth century BC. At the same time, throughout this period, we see art and culture flourish as never before. This unit of study aims to trace these two features and examine the relationship between them. It looks at the stimulus war provides to culture, and the way culture responds to war's anxieties. It also examines the position that the Peloponnesian War has occupied in western European thought.
ANHS3632 Livy: Republics Past and Present

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Senior credit points from Ancient History) or (12 Senior credit points from History) Assessment: 1x3000wd Research essay (60%), 1x500wd reading commentary (15%) and 1x1hr exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This senior unit encourages students to examine the ways in which historians writing during the transition from Republic to autocracy thought about the Republican past. Students will be encouraged to think about the possible ways in which Livy's contemporary experience is echoed in his account of Rome's foundation and growth. Questions of censorship and self-censorship will be examined alongside an investigation into the historian's hopes and aspirations. What are the historian's responsibilities and what is her/his role in a time of political, cultural and ideological change?
ANHS3635 Historiography Ancient and Modern

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Senior credit points from Ancient History) or (12 Senior credit points from History) Prohibitions: ANHS2691 or ANHS2692 or ANHS2612 Assessment: 1x3000wd Research essay (40%), 1x1000wd student-led exercise (30%), 1x500wd writing journal/online discussion board (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From Herodotus to Robert Darnton; from Thucydides to John Mearsheimer; from Plutarch's Life of Julius Caesar to Barack Obama's autobiography. In this unit of study you will compare ancient and modern ways of writing history. You will study relevant key texts, theories, and methods - both ancient and modern - and use them in your own historiographic practice. Brace yourself for an unusual, insightful, and challenging journey from ancient Egypt, via Greece and Rome, to modern France and Australia. Looking at history will never be the same again.
ANHS3636 Hannibal, Carthage and Rome

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 senior credit points from Ancient History) or (12 senior credit points from History) Assessment: 1x3000wd research essay (60%) and 1x1.5hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will specifically investigate the back-story to one of the greatest confrontations in the history of the Ancient World: the rivalry between Carthage and Rome. It will explore the extent to which it is possible to reclaim the history of Carthage from the grip of hostile Greek and Roman historians. What will emerge is a vibrant and dynamic civilisation that dominated much of the southern and western Mediterranean for over three centuries.
ARIS2674 Islam and Politics: Modernity Challenges

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARIS1001 or ARIS1671) or (12 Junior credit points from History or Ancient History) or (RLST1002 and RLST1005) Prohibitions: ARIS2004 or JCTC3601 Assessment: 1x2250wd Essay (40%), 1x2250wd Take-home exercise (40%), Class presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit focuses on Islam as a political and cultural force in the modern world, particularly in the Middle East, North Africa and Asia. Issues include: Islamic political thought; the Sunna-Shi'a divergence and the significance of Shi'a Islam; Islamic traditionalism; reform; radicalism; Jihad and 'fundamentalism'; Islamic political movements in Arab countries; Turkey, Iran and Asia; Islam and legitimacy of political regimes; Muslim minorities in the world; current debates on the 'Islamic threat'; 'terrorism'; 'clash of civilisations' and Islamic-Western mutual perceptions.
ARIS2675 Gendering History in the Arab World - Departmental permission is required for this unit

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from one of (Arabic and Islamic Studies, European Studies, European, Classical or Middle Eastern Languages or Studies, English, Government and International Relations, History, Sociology, Media and Communications or Gender and Cultural Studies)) or (12 Junior credit points History or 12 Junior credit points from Ancient History) or (RLST1002 and RLST1005) Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x500wd mid semester test (20%), 1x1000wd research project plan (10%), 1x500wd Tutorial presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit situates contemporary debates about gender in the context of the history of the Middle East and North Africa. The unit focuses on a selection of literary and audiovisual productions from Egypt, Iraq, Palestine, Lebanon and the Maghreb countries. Representations of masculinity (and male and female homosexuality) will form an integral part of the analysis. The interactions of gender, culture and history are analysed through feminist, literary, cultural and historiographical criticism.
ASNS2623 India: Tradition and Modernity

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from (Asian Studies or Japanese Studies or Korean Studies or Chinese Studies or Indonesian Studies or Sanskrit or History or Ancient History or International and Global Studies or Buddhist Studies) Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (50%) and 1x1500wd tutorial paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit explores assumptions underpinning Indian thought and culture with specific reference to Indian religious traditions. In particular traditional notions of the individual, authenticity, and the concept of dharma will be addressed through an exploration of social and political structures, gender and the family, and forms of artistic, literary and religious expression. A key focus will be on the continuity of tradition and its interaction with modernity and the implications this has for understanding today's India.
ASNS2627 India, China, Tibet: Cultural Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Assessment: 1x2500wd major Essay (35%), 1xtutorial paper and presentation (equivalent to 1000wds) (30%), media file (equivalent to 1000wds) (30%), class participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
While India and China emerge as present-day superpowers, their historical inter-relations are not well known. This unit provides an overview of cultural interactions between Indian and Chinese civilisations, especially as these have shaped Tibetan cultural identity. A key focus is upon how pre-modern cultural interactions with India and China provide ideological contexts within which Tibetan religious and cultural traditions and political institutions developed. This is undertaken in order to understand interactions between all three cultures on the current global stage.
ASNS2631 Origins of Japanese Tradition

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from (Asian Studies or Japanese Studies or Korean Studies or Chinese Studies or Indonesian Studies or Sanskrit or History or Ancient History or International and Global Studies) Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x1500wd Tutorial presentation (20%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit explores the historical validity of key motifs of Japanese traditions. Through the liberal exploration of primary historical sources including texts, pictorial sources and material artifacts, students will learn of such diverse topics as early religion, imperial authority, the lives of the court and military elites (samurai), Zen monastic practice, medieval aesthetics, geisha, and the tea ceremony. By separating stereotype and cliche from history, we will attempt to construct a more sober yet ultimately more viable narrative of early Japanese history and culture.
ASNS2632 Modern Japanese Social History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Prohibitions: ASNS2308 Assessment: 1x500wd Tutorial presentation (5%), 1x750wd outline and bibliography (10%), 1x1500wd position or short research paper (20%), 1x750wd mid-term test (20%), 1x1hr Exam (35%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit of study will begin with examination of social aspects of the Meiji reforms, evaluating interpretations of their aims and effects. The focus will then turn to the emergence of new social forces in the twentieth century, including industrial workers, an urban middle class and a women's movement. We will also explore changes in daily life and attitudes to work and leisure as urbanisation and industrialisation progressed and assess the effects of the Second World War and the Occupation.
ASNS2636 The Enigma of Japanese Power

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Prohibitions: ASNS2306 or JPNS2316 Assessment: 1x, 2500wd equivalent tutorial writing tasks (45%), 1x2hr Final exam (40%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The usual but contradictory descriptions of Japanese society (hierarchical but egalitarian, adaptable but conservative and traditional, consensual but authoritarian, etc.) show that "power" - manifest or hidden in decision making, consensus building, conflict resolution or avoidance - is the enigma of Japan. We will focus on power relationships in politics, administration, enterprises, families, schools, etc, survey the various explanations proposed to solve the enigma and, more generally, learn about the origins, forms and treatments of power and conflict relations.
ASNS2641 Traditional Korea

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Prohibitions: ASNS2501 Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Examination (40%), 4x Weekly posts equivalent to 600wd in total (10%), 1xOral Presentation equivalent to 400wd (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce Korea's historical experience from antiquity to the early phase of the Choson dynasty (1392-1910). Topics include sources and historiography of early Korea; foundation myths and legends of the Three Korean Kingdoms; process of state formation and subsequent political developments; religious ideology, focusing on Buddhism; and cultural and social traditions of Korea from the 4th to the 15th century. These topics will enable students to understand and appreciate the uniqueness of Korean identity.
ASNS2642 Modern Korea

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from (Asian Studies or History or Ancient History or Korean Studies or International and Global Studies or Japanese Studies) Prohibitions: ASNS2502 Assessment: Tutorial presentation (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr Final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce some of the major issues in the history of Korea in the late 19th century and the last century. Topics include contradictions of the late Choson dynasty society; opening of Korea to the West and Japan and the attendant wave of reforms and rebellions; Japan's colonial rule; Korea's fight for freedom; liberation and division of Korea in 1945 and the subsequent process of nation-building in the two Koreas.
ASNS2664 Southeast Asia Transformed

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr mixed tutorial/online learning/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Assessment: 1xresearch report (consisting of in-class presentation equivalent to 1000wds, (15%) and 2000wd write-up, (30%)(45% total) , 1x2000wd essay (45), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Social change in Southeast Asia involves shifts in relations of production and consumption. This unit examines these shifts first through tracing the colonial origins of present-day relations of production, and then through assessing the changes in social life since the 1950s. Important features of these changes include the decline of agriculture, the growth of new kinds of industry such as clothing production and tourism, and new patterns of consumption generated by the rise of middle-class lifestyles in the region.
ASNS2672 Japan in East Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Assessment: 2x250wd quiz (10%), 1x2000wd essay (20%), 1x1500wd exam (40%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (20%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit places the modern and contemporary history of Japan within its East Asian context. We will examine a number of key events and subjects pertaining to the relations between Japan, China and Korea. Doing so, we will touch sensitive and controversial topics, become aware of differing views of history prevalent in these countries, and understand why the historical question constitutes a major political issue in East Asia.
HSTY1025 The Middle Ages

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x750wd source analysis (15%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Middle Ages were actually a beginning, the birth and early growth of Europe's influential civilisation, shaping social relations and institutions in ways that still resonate today. From key moments in the lives of medieval men and women, we explore the Christianisation of England; rise of Islam and its impact on the Mediterranean; Vikings, Normans and Crusade; evolution of feudal relations; growth of towns and universities; creation of epic, romance and chivalry; and the deadly threat of inquisition and plague.
HSTY1031 Renaissance and Reformation (1498-1648)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Starting with the brilliant culture of Renaissance Italy, with its courts, despots, republics, courtiers, diplomats, with its humanists, artists and their patrons, the unit of study will then move to the religious, political, social and cultural revolution known as the Reformation, with its great theologians, preachers and writers like Luther, Calvin, More and Montaigne. Throughout the semester, attention will be paid to both 'high' and popular culture. The unit of study will conclude with an examination of how these forces were played out in the English Revolution. Attention will also be given to Europe's 'discovery' and conquest of the New World.
HSTY1044 Twentieth-Century Europe

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSTY1043 Assessment: 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit surveys Europe's twentieth century, examining the First World War, the Russian Revolution, fascism, the cultural ferment of the interwar years, the Second World War and the Holocaust, European empires and decolonization, Cold War culture and politics, and European unification. The transformations of the twentieth century took place in many different spheres of human existence, and this unit introduces students to some of the varieties of history and the diverse ways historians approach the past.
HSTY1045 Modern European History 1750-1914

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd primary source analysis (10%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2250wd (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the dramatic changes in European life that marked the transition from pre-modern to modern societies. We will see that these changes emancipated many Europeans from legal and physical burdens while creating many new ones of their own. The catastrophes of the twentieth century have their roots in the period we examine, a period that culminated in the First World War and the spectacular explosion of the ideals of material and moral progress that had animated bourgeois elites. In particular, we discuss the transformations that took place in the key areas of human activity: politics and ideology; family life; work and technology; religious belief; colonialism; social class.
HSTY1076 American History from Lincoln to Obama

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSTY2035 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (15%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x250wd group Tutorial presentation (5%), 1x2hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the United States in the years in which Americans felt their society, culture, politics, and individual and national identities, were taking new, 'modern' forms. It offers insights into a nation that is one of the principal forces shaping the world in which we live. We will explore topics such as the rise and fall of racial segregation, immigration, social reform movements, mass consumer culture, sexual revolution, and the changing stance of the United States in the world.
HSTY1089 Australia: Conflict and Transformation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australia has been called the 'quiet continent', but conflict has been part of its history since 1788. This unit examines the violence of convict society, frontier conflict and early battles for self-government. It maps the political struggles, contested stories and shifts in Indigenous-settler relations that accompanied the creation of a nation state after 1880, and explores the effects of war on different social groups. Finally, it charts Australia's cultural and political transformation after 1945 into the postindustrial postcolonial society of today.
HSTY1090 The Chinese World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ASNS1101 Assessment: 1x500wd Tutorial Paper (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (35%), 1x1.5hr Exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces you to the Chinese world over a 4,000-year period, both looking at big issues and making time for ordinary people's lives. Through the study of primary sources we will seek to understand the meanings of religion, ritual, empire and war, among others, within Chinese society.
HSTY2304 Imperialism, 1815-2000

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Empire is one of the key topics in human history, and we continue to live with the consequences of Europe's imperial age. This unit will examine imperialism, resistance to foreign rule, and decolonisation from 1815 to the present. It will look at particular cases of expansion (especially the French and British examples), and examine the theories used to understand imperialism. Among specific themes that will be covered are the ideologies of empire and culture, gender, race, the environment, and imperialism and nationalism.
HSTY2602 Tablet to iPad: A History of Information

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (12 Senior credit points of Digital Cultures) Assessment: 1x1500wd journal (30%), 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How has information technology shaped our past? This unit investigates the history of the Western world's technologies of literacy and organisation of knowledge. We start with ancient materials - clay, wax, skin, paper - and the organisation and circulation of information from antiquity to the Renaissance. How did pre-modern networks function? Who was the public? The author? We compare Western systems with those of China, the Islamic World, and the Americas, and conclude with the new challenges of the digital age.
HSTY2605 Contemporary Europe

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (6 senior credit points of European Studies) Prohibitions: HSTY2005 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial exercise (15%) and 1x2500wd research essay (40%) and 1x1500wd exam (30%), and tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century Europe is economically, politically, and culturally, the most dynamic continent on earth. But it also remains a continent replete with paradox. This unit surveys Europe's contemporary history since WWII, from its status as the pariah continent, to the forefront of thinking and planning on issues as diverse as democracy, diversity, social justice, climate change, and international cooperation. The unit draws on film as well as current news, and themes such as war, peace, memory, multiculturalism.
HSTY2606 China in the Nineteenth-Century World

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History) or (12 Junior credit points of Asian Studies) Prohibitions: HSTY2006 Assessment: 1x250wd bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The nineteenth century was a time of critical transition in China's history. The Qing dynasty was declining, like every dynasty before it, but this decline was different. The most famous rebel claimed to be Christ's younger brother; the most successful article of foreign trade was opium (imported); China's most dangerous foreign foes were island nations - first Britain, later Japan. We explore how the dynasty responded to the crises and how foreign intrusions affected China's cities, intellectual life and ordinary people.
HSTY2607 Approaches to the Arab Israeli Conflict

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Dirk Moses Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in History, Arabic and Islamic Studies, or Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies Prohibitions: : JCTC2008 or GOVT2772 Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (50%) and 1x1hr exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will provide students with a grounding in the historical context of and reasons for conflict in Israel/Palestine. It will enable them to identify the causes of conflict and attempted avenues for peace, as well as making them aware of the politicised nature of much of the scholarship on the region. The unit commences in the Ottoman period and traces the rival of aspirations of Zionism and Palestinian nationalism, as well as the geopoitical dimensions of the conflict. The unit will enable students to gain detachment from the dominant narratives about the issues so they are equipped to form their own judgements.
HSTY2608 European Film and History

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr film screening/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (6 Senior credit points of European Studies) or (18 Junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: HSTY2008 Assessment: 1x2500wd Research essay (50%) and 1x2hr formal examination (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Using a number of significant films from across the continent of Europe, the unit examines the way in which films can both create the past and transform existing ideas about the past. The unit examines a range of different kinds of films: "historical" films which set out self-consciously to construct a version of the past as well as those in which film-makers have confronted the contemporary problems of their own society.
HSTY2609 African-American History and Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Essay Proposal and Bibliography (10%), 1x2500wd Research essay (45%), 1x1.5hr Exam (35%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From fashion, food, and music, to speech patterns and protest methods, African-American culture has had a profound effect both on America and the wider world. In this unit, we survey race relations after the end of slavery, focusing on the emergence of black communities across the North and South; the spread of black music, literature, and film; the history of the civil rights and black power movements, and the role of race in the contemporary America.
HSTY2611 America in World Affairs: A History

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Curran Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd historiography assignment (30%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the ideas and ideological assumptions that have shaped America's approach to the world from the Revolution until the presidency of Barack Obama. It explores how the leading politicians and policymakers in Washington have projected power overseas, and how their decisions have played out in the public sphere. Key topics include: isolationism and internationalism; Communism and the Cold War; the challenge of unipolarity; terrorism; and the underlying historical forces shaping US policy, especially American national mythology.
HSTY2612 High Renaissance

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Eckstein Session: Semester 2,Summer Late Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1000wd document exercise (20%), 2500wd essay (50%), 1000wd reading journal (20%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Europe after 1500 saw conflict, companionship, refinement and squalor. Beginning in opulent Rome, we discover a cast of Renaissance men and women, from Machiavellian political theorists and crafty swindlers to prophets and scientists, artists and poets. This was a world of bustling towns, sumptuous artefacts, bitter religious disputes, and electric debates over politics and learning. Europeans travelled to Italy, which in turn nourished culture and ideas around Europe: this unit follows these many pathways.
HSTY2613 Russia's Revolutions: 1905 to Present

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Essay Proposal (5%), 1x250wd Bibliography (5%), 1x2500wd Research essay (45%), 1x1500wd Take-home Exercise (35%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course surveys the history of the revolutionary project in Russia from the first clash with tsarism in 1905, through the twin revolutions of 1917, Stalin's dictatorship and World War II, and the break-up of the Soviet Union in the 1990s. Out of the Russian empire the Bolsheviks claimed to be building a new socialist utopia, a scene of radical social and cultural experimentation. How successful were they, and what legacy have they left for the post-Soviet world?
HSTY2614 Living in Modern Australia

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2014 Assessment: 1x500wd research bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the lives of ordinary Australians from the temperate south to the tropical north as they came to terms with the social transformations of the twentieth century. Social and geographic position, age, gender, sexuality and ethnicity shaped their experience of the traumatic disturbances of the Great War, the Depression and World War II, and their response to profound changes to Australian society wrought by mass immigration, the post-war economic boom, the Cold War and the demise of White Australia.
HSTY2616 The Human Rights Revolution

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd Bibliography & Proposal (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What accounts for the spectacular rise of human rights movements and norms from 1945 to the present? This unit investigates the causes and consequences of this radical global transformation in transnational activism, foreign policy and international law. The first portion of the unit explores the early history of natural rights, minority rights, women's rights and humanitarianism. The second portion examines the impact of domestic politics, gender politics and geopolitics on the postwar 'human rights revolution'.
HSTY2618 Mediterranean World in High Middle Ages

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2018 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x250wd research bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines aspects of the history of the Mediterranean world from the eleventh through the fourteenth century. Topics may include 'culture clashes' between Christianity and Islam, the Crusades and European expansion, the decline of Byzantium and the rise of the Latin West, and selected other cultural, social and political developments in Europe and neighbouring regions.
HSTY2619 Living in Colonial Australia

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2019 Assessment: 1x500wd Proposal (5%), 1x2500wd Essay (55%), 1x1.5hrs Formal Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
If "the past is a foreign country", how did people live in colonial Australia? Taking a fresh perspective on Australia's history by focusing on everyday life, we question our assumptions that Australia was settled by people not that different from ourselves. Considering the economic, social and cultural impact of colonization and exploring the contested aims of diverse groups within this emerging society, we will discover why colonial Australia was stranger and more fascinating than you ever imagined.
HSTY2624 The Origins of Human Rights

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial exercise (10%), 1x250wd research bibliography (5%), 1x250wds Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd final Essay (50%) and 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We tend to think of rights as things that all people have held at all times, but they are not. Rights have a history. The idea of individual rights did not exist prior to medieval times and it has been understood in many different ways since. This unit traces the creation and development of the idea of rights, and its historical uses, from medieval times through to the rise of the modern state and into the Enlightenment.
HSTY2626 Fascism and Antifascism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Judith Keene Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2026 Assessment: 1x2500wd research essay (50%) and 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%) and 1x1hr formal exam (20%) and tutorial participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the origins and development of the movements of the New Right that emerged in Europe after World War One paying particular attention to their political, social and cultural manifestations as well as the movements on the left that attempted to confront what was seen as a new political phenomenon. The unit will use primary material of literature, diaries, cinema and photography as well as the more conventional sources of political and historical analysis.
HSTY2628 BOOM! The History of War

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay proposal (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%) and 1.5hr exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Enlightenment promised to make war a thing of the past, replacing brute force with diplomacy and law. So why has the resort to arms been so depressingly persistent? How have societies rationalised war over time and how have ways of making or experiencing war changed? And to what extent has war been a driving force in history, propelling technological, medical, or social transformations? Examining one of humankind's most intractable problems, this unit presents war's surprising, troubling, and complicated history.
HSTY2629 Sex and Scandal

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2029 Assessment: 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd proposal (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%) and 1hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What makes a scandal? This unit examines a number of sensational case studies from England, America and Australia, beginning with the outrage surrounding Marie-Antoinette and then weaving through the increasingly strait-laced nineteenth century, in which scandals abounded, destroying reputations, rulers and families. It was not behaviour itself, but the ever-changing interpretations of behaviour that gave rise to condemnation and scandalised indignation. Examining occasions when social rules have been flouted allows us to consider the ways in which such rules are themselves constituted, maintained and challenged.
HSTY2631 Sin City? A History of Sydney

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History or 12 Junior credit points of Socio-Legal Studies Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x250wd Research essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Research essay outline (5%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From its beginnings as a convict colony, Sydney had to deal with an unsavoury reputation. This course explores the history of the city we live in, its people and its places. Distinct communities and neighbourhoods emerged as battles were fought over who belonged in Sydney, and how they should behave. Topics include Aboriginal resistance, convict scandals, poverty and plague, the 'Razor Gang Wars', Mardi Gras protests, the 'Emerald City' excesses of the 1980s, and the Cronulla riots.
HSTY2632 Love and Death in the Middle Ages

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd research bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the Middle Ages, love and death were constants in life. Medieval people loved as we do now. Married love, sensual love, spiritual love all co-existed in a world where death was likewise ever-present. Medieval people prepared for death, and they longed to make a good death. Dying was understood both spiritually and socially, as reward or punishment. The unit covers such cultural practices as courtly love, spiritual charity, familial love, rituals of love and death, death as spectacle.
HSTY2638 Modern China's Wars, 1895-1953

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Research Exercise and Commentary (10%), 1x2500wd Research Paper (40%), 1x1.5hr Exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Much of modern China's early twentieth century history was inevitably tied to war. Ranging from humiliating wars against foreign imperialism to the protracted domestic struggle between Mao Zedong and Chiang Kai-shek, war became inextricably linked to ideas of nationhood and survival among the Chinese population at large. Through discussion of case studies between 1895 and 1953, this unit will consider the ways in which war shaped China's political, social and cultural history.
HSTY2640 Twentieth-Century China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History) or (12 Junior credit points of Asian Studies) Prohibitions: HSTY3071 or HSTY3072 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x250wd research bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 1920s, China was likened to a sleeping lion - one whose roar would shake the world when it awoke. This prediction has already proved true more than once. Why was China ever said to be "asleep"? How did a whole nation awaken, to what, and with what results? This unit of study traces the forces of nationalism and revolution through China's tumultuous twentieth century. We focus upon making sense, in Chinese terms, of events that outsiders have found baffling.
HSTY2642 Beyond The Great Wall: China's Frontiers

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History) or (12 Junior credit points of Asian Studies) Assessment: 1x250wd quiz (5%), 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2250wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The relationship between China and neighbouring peoples such as the Mongols and Tibetans is one of the great themes in Chinese history. This unit explores Chinese ideas about the "barbarian", the relationship between nomadic and sedentary societies, and the influence of trade and migration on culture and religion in China. The unit will look at non-Chinese dynasties such as the Mongol Yuan and the Manchu Qing, and examine the place of the "ethnic minorities" in China's modern transformations.
HSTY2645 Venice Floating City: Myth and History

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Eckstein Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2045 Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline (10%), 1x500wd essay bibliography (10%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x1hr exam (20%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Venice is famous for grandiose spectacle and cultural achievement; and notorious for vice, the sexual licence of Casanova, for cinematic imaginings of horror and death. This unit traces Venice from medieval origins in a muddy Adriatic lagoon, through the rise and decline of its mighty early-modern empire, to emergence as a 21st-century global tourist Mecca. It investigates Venice's extraordinary impact on everything from republican thought to understanding of how human beings inhabit the city environment.
HSTY2647 Renaissance Italy

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2047 Assessment: 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit uses a special study of Florence to investigate the extraordinary cultural flowering that occurred in Italy between the 14th and 16th centuries. Major themes embrace parallel developments in Venice, Rome, Siena and other city-states; the social context of art; neighbourhood; community; gender; sexuality; the family; poverty; rebellion; religion; and intellectual life. Students use a wide variety of textual and visual sources to critique the concept of the Renaissance, its modern image and its impact on our own age.
HSTY2651 Spanish Civil War

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Judith Keene Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History, Asian Studies or Spanish Language Prohibitions: HSTY2051 Assessment: 1x2500wd research essay (50%) and 1x2hr formal examination (40%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Spanish civil war (1936-1939) was a critical event in modern Spanish history and in international relations. The conflict in Spain elicited an enormous response from intellectuals and activists of the Left and Right around the world. As well, some hundred thousand foreigners enlisted in Spain, most with the Republican International Brigades in what, politically and militarily, was the curtain-raiser to World War Two. This unit enables students to study this important and fascinating twentieth-century event in depth.
HSTY2652 Genocide in Historical Perspective

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2052 Assessment: 1x1000wd Bibliography & Proposal (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit we aim to come to an historical understanding of genocide in the modern era, that is, in approximately the last 250 years. We do so in a chronological, i.e. historical manner, and thereby seek not only to compare genocides, but determine how they may be related to one another. This unit begins by exploring the concept of genocide and concludes with post-1945 attempts to prevent it, as well as to prosecute its perpetrators under international law.
HSTY2656 A House Divided: The American Civil War

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Frances Clarke Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2056 Assessment: 1x500wd essay proposal (10%) and 1x2000wd research essay (40%) and 1x2000wd take-home exam (35%) and tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Civil War had momentous consequences for America - realigning the nation's political culture, ending slavery and forever transforming millions of lives. This unit analyses the social, cultural and political history of the Civil War and Reconstruction. We begin by looking at combat experience, civilian mobilization and state formation, the war's effects on gender and race relations and the causes for Reconstruction's failure, and we end by focusing on how and why this war continues to resonate in American culture.
HSTY2660 Violence in Italy

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2060 Assessment: 1x500wd Bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay Outline (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x1hr Exam (20%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Violence is a feature of all human societies in every era. This unit examines the cultural significance of violence in Italy, from the Ancient Roman amphitheatre to the language of twentieth-century Fascist violence and post-war Italy's confrontation with left and right-wing terrorism, the 'years of lead', and Italy's continuing struggle with the Mafia. Themes include urban violence in Medieval, Renaissance and Early-Modern Italy, religious, gender and sexual violence, crime and punishment, and nationalist representations of violence in the nineteenth century.
HSTY2662 Atlantic World in the Age of Empire

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History or 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Prohibitions: HSTY2062 Assessment: 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Between 1450 and 1825, the nations of Europe began building a series of overseas colonies and empires that fundamentally shaped the world in which we now live. This unit will survey the creation and development of the new Atlantic World that resulted. Starting with the voyages of Columbus, and focusing on the experiences of natives, settlers and slaves, we'll explore early encounters, immigration, the slave trade and finally independence movements and revolutions that created the new nations of the Americas.
HSTY2664 Medieval Cultures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Ann Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2064 Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd exam (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit about people and cultures. Women and men, merchants and monks, Christians and Jews all formed the cultures, classes and statuses which constituted late medieval European society. The study themes of this unit focus on the means by which ideas, cultures and expectations were constructed and transmitted, and include topics such as healthcare, civic life, the body, gender and sexuality, religious beliefs and practices, otherness, death, political theory, art and architecture, travel.
HSTY2665 Festivals and Faith

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2065 Assessment: 1x500wd Annotated Bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay Outline (10%), 1x2000wd Research essay (40%), 1x1500wd Examination (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A lively and accessible survey of late medieval popular beliefs and religious practices. Topics include devotional practices, mysticism, festivals, saints' cults, pilgrimage, and heretical movements. The unit locates religious practice in contexts such as medieval doctrine and liturgy, the development of affective piety, gender and the parish. Expressions of lay piety are to be found in a variety of primary sources including written texts, art works, and architecture, and students will have the opportunity of working with these remarkable resources.
HSTY2667 Politics and Cultures of US Imperialism

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2067 Assessment: 1x250wd bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Since the 2003 invasion of Iraq, public debate about American power has been dominated by the question: is the United States an empire? Taking this debate as a starting point, students examine: the expansion of American power across the continent and then overseas; political, economic and cultural forms of domination and the subsequent transformation of societies overseas and the US itself; and the value and limits of applying the concept of imperialism to US power.
HSTY2671 Law and Order in Modern America

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores crime in the United States from Civil War to the present. It begins by examining historical approaches to crime, using murder as a case study. We look at the development of the criminal justice system, focusing on the police, the FBI, and extra-legal justice and lynching, and explore specific crimes: morals offenses; sex crimes; white-collar crime; and organized crime. Our focus is on the changing incidence, definitions and representation of crime in modern American culture and society.
HSTY2676 Australia's World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x1000wd historiographical debate (20%), 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines Australia's relations with the world in the post-war era. It explores the historical themes which shaped Australia's response to the world: loyalties to race and empire; communities of interest and culture; the 'Free' versus the 'Communist' worlds; the rise of Asian nationalism, ANZUS and Australian military engagements from Korea to Vietnam. It also investigates the making of Australia's foreign and defence policy from the 1980s to the present, including debates over engagement with Asia and the American alliance.
HSTY2677 Australia: Politics and Nation

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Late Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd Short Paper on Research Skills (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the intersection between political culture and nationalism in Australia, with particular attention to the question of when (and if?) Australia became an 'independent' nation. It examines the content and character of British race patriotism in Australia before 1945 and the gradual unravelling of this British myth in the post-war period. Among other issues, the unit explores the end of 'White Australia', the rise of multiculturalism, engagement with Asia, Aboriginal reconciliation and republicanism.
HSTY2687 Alliance Anxiety: Australia-USA-Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of History or 12 junior credit points of Ancient History) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Assessment: 1x1000wd historiographical debate (20%), 1x250wd essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the history of Australian-American relations in the Asia-Pacific from the early twentieth century to today. Topics covered include the respective US and Australian approaches to the region and the world, the creation of ANZUS, the West New Guinea crisis, Vietnam, and the recognition of China. Among other questions, the unit asks whether the alliance relationship has been one of simple subservience, or whether politicians and policymakers have tried to use the alliance to further Australia's own national interests.
HSTY2689 Civility and Squalor: 18 C. British Isles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cindy McCreery Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of junior History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY3699 Assessment: 1x1000wd draft essay (20%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) and 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Eighteenth-century British and Irish society displayed stark contracts: conspicuous consumption jostled with abject poverty, humanitarian campaigns co-existed with capital punishment, and major treatises on political liberty were published alongside drinking manuals. This unit uses contemporary sources like newspapers, magazines, cartoons and pamphlets to trace major cultural, political, economic and social themes in Britain and Ireland, eg aristocratic leadership and decadence, political liberty and repression, religious faith and doubt, women's private and public lives, urbanization and unemployment, fashion and leisure.
HSTY2691 Writing History

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2901 or ANHS2691 Assessment: 1x1000wd journal review (30%), 1x2000wd reflective Essay (30%), 1x3000wd diary (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the practices and problems of historical inquiry. It surveys the most recent historiographical debates, and the social (and historical) contexts shaping contemporary discussions, and arguments, about history. Students will learn about the history of History, the place of theory in the discipline, and the practical aspects of writing history. Students also become familiar with the research and writing of members of the Department. This unit is recommended for students who are majoring in History, and is a requirement for entry into Honours in History.
HSTY2692 International and Global History

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x1000wd document assignment (20%), 1x250wd research bibliography (10%), 1x250wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x1000wd exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The new history is investigated on a global scale, but international history has been around for more than a century. This unit explores the international and global dimensions of the past. It focuses on the history of internationalist thinking since the seventeenth century, varieties of internationalism in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the intersecting modern histories of internationalism and nationalism, and the historical development of international institutions. It also offers students an understanding of the latest scholarship on international and global history, and the chance to investigate the international past for themselves through the use of primary sources.
HSTY2693 Frontier Violence in Modern Memory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: "2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd proposal and bibliography (10%), 1x1500wd exam (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), in-class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The myth of the frontier is a foundation stone of national identity in the United States, where it gave birth to a global film genre, the Western. In Australia, where 'history wars' are waged over the level of violence and the legality of colonial expansion, the very existence of a frontier is disputed rather than romanticised. This unit compares the significance of the frontier in each country's history and popular memory from the perspective of both settlers and indigenous peoples.
HSTY2694 New Orleans: From Mardi Gras to Katrina

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (AMST1001 and HSTY1023) Assessment: 1x500wd Proposal and Bibliography (10%), 1x2500wd Research Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Exam (40%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Explores the history and representation of New Orleans from its founding in 1718 through Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Sitting at the intersection of French, Spanish, Caribbean, and American history, New Orleans presents a unique window on the history of the US as well as American and world cities. Specific attention will be paid to environmental history, French colonialism, slavery, Latin American trade relations, neo-liberal urbanism, and race relations, as well as the city's famed musical and parade culture.
HSTY2695 Reconquest? A History of Medieval Spain

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay Outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr Exam (30%), Tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Spain's history in the Middle Ages was shaped by continual warfare between Christianity and Islam, but also by more peaceable relations. From this complex story historians have created opposing myths of 'Reconquest' and 'convivencia', concepts that still resonate in Spanish society today. This unit reassesses both notions and explores more deeply the fascinating dynamics of the Iberian Medieval world.
HSTY2696 The Empire Strikes Back

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Film/Book Review (10%), 1x1000wd Reflective Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Research Essay (40%), 1x1hr Final Exam (20%), Tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 20th century, millions of people fought to overthrow oppressive colonial regimes. In this unit we will study the global history of decolonisation, mainly from the perspective of formerly colonised and indigenous peoples. We will examine case studies from Asia, Africa and the Pacific, and end by asking: what would decolonisation in Australia look like?
HSTY2698 Free Speech: An International History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x1000wd dossier analysis (20%), 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x1.5hr exam (25%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines political, legal, and cultural struggles over freedom of expression since the late eighteenth century. We will examine how concepts of freedom of speech and freedom of the press have changed over time. In the process we will explore changing ideas about citizenship and about the effects of words and ideas. The unit ranges over Australia, South Africa, India, France, and Russia, with special attention to Britain and the United States.
HSTY2699 Global Epidemics: From Black Death to Ebola

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline with bibliography (10%), 1x2500wd research essay (45%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Through the ages, human societies have understood epidemic diseases as results of Providence, pollution, or proliferation of germs. Today, chronic conditions and 'diseases of civilisation' like obesity and drug addiction are seen as epidemics. What are the social, political, cultural, economic, and health implications of such `plagues¿? Tracing histories of epidemics from pre-modern outbreaks of Black Death and smallpox to recent pandemics such as AIDS and Ebola, this unit investigates the moral panics and public health measures they have inspired.
HSTY3901 History in the Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Project Proposal (5%), 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x750wd Project Draft (10%), 1x4500wd Research Project (60%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you will independently frame, research and write an original work of historical analysis, based on primary sources and drawing on your knowledge of any period, place or culture examined in history units previously completed. The weekly lectures will guide you through the stages of framing a historical problem, conducting research, choosing a methodology or approach, shaping an argument or narrative, and editing your final work. In tutorials we will workshop every stage of your project.
HSTY3902 History Beyond the Classroom

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points of history or ancient history Assessment: 1x250wd Project Proposal (5%), 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x1250wd Project Diary (15%), 1x4000wd Research Project (55%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you will frame, research and produce an original project based on an engagement with communities and organisations outside the University. You will explore history in action in a variety of contexts and think about different ways of creating and disseminating history that will interest and inform a public audience. Lectures and field trips will help you to frame relevant community-based questions, adopt appropriate methodologies, and explore new ways of presenting your arguments or narratives.
HSTY3903 History and Historians

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points from History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Project Proposal (5%), 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x750wd Project Draft (10%), 1x4500wd Research Project (60%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you will independently frame, research and write an original Essay analyzing how historians have written about the past. In choosing your topic you may draw upon historical issues, approaches and debates encountered throughout your previous studies in history. The lectures and tutorials introduce you to new methodologies and approaches to the past, and guide you through the stages of identifying an issue or debate, researching and understanding its different aspects, and shaping your own argument in response.
HSTY4011 History Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week in Semester 1 Assessment: A thesis of 15000-20000 words and 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Honours is an intensive year-long program of advanced study based around research. Honours is undertaken after successful completion of a Bachelor degree and where the overall mark is a minimum credit average (70%). Entry into Honours is selective and work at this level is challenging. Honours is available in most subjects areas taught in the Faculty, and which are listed under Tables A and B in the Handbook. Students will complete a thesis and coursework seminars throughout the year. For further information contact the Honours Coordinator in the department or consult the Handbook entry for the relevant subject area.
HSTY4012 History Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: HSTY4011 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to HSTY4011
HSTY4013 History Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: HSTY4012 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to HSTY4011
HSTY4014 History Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: HSTY4013 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to HSTY4011
JCTC2603 Jews Under the Crescent and the Cross

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in one of of (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture, or Studies in Religion, or History, or Ancient History) Prohibitions: JCTC2003 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The story of Jews living under the Crescent (Muslim rule) and the Cross (Christian rule) comprises a vibrant period of Jewish history. The unit explores Jews under Muslim rule in Spain and the experiences of Jews under Christian rule in Germany, France and England in the Medieval period, including the problems of Christian antisemitism and the Crusades. These are seminal periods in the development of Jewish thought, with the contribution of great commentators and philosophers including Moses Maimonides.
JCTC2604 From Expulsion to Regeneration

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Suzanne Rutland Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in one of of (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture, or Studies in Religion, or History, or Ancient History) Prohibitions: JCTC2004 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
One of the most traumatic events in Jewish history was the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492. Explore the reasons behind the expulsion and the ways in which new centres of Jewish life emerged, especially in Eastern Europe. Light will also be shed on the establishment of Jewish communities in the Netherlands and England on the eve of emancipation when the new ideas of the Enlightenment paved the way for the rise of the modern Jew.
JCTC2605 From Emancipation to the Holocaust

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of one of the following (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture; or Ancient History; or History; or European Studies; or Government and International Relations; or Sociology) Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to introduce students to the turbulent history of European Jewry, 1750 to 1933. Against the background of far-reaching transformation in almost every aspect of society and culture, the Jew's entry into the modern world will be examined. At the centre stands the process of acculturation, integration, assimilation and Zionism, as well as the responses by non-Jewish society, especially the rise of modern antisemitism.
JCTC2606 The Holocaust: History and Aftermath

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of one of the following (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture; or Ancient History; or History; or European Studies; or Government and International Relations; or Sociology) Prohibitions: JCTC2006 Assessment: 1x2000wd Research essay (30%), 1xTutorial presentation / summary equivalent to 500wds (20%), Tutorial participation (10%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an in-depth study of the Holocaust. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of Nazi ideology, in particular racial antisemitism, and the gradual implementation of this policy towards the Jews and other victim groups from 1933 to 1945. Other themes focus on the responses of the victims and the role of the by-standers, as well as post-war politics of memory and other issues, including Holocaust denial and war crimes prosecution.
JCTC2607 Israel in the Modern Middle East

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in one of of (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture, or Studies in Religion, or History, or Ancient History) Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of tutorial paper (20%), 1x2hr exam (40%), and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Israel's position in the modern Middle East and the wider world from state formation to the present has been shaped by social, political and economic processes. Study these processes in the context of the nature of Israeli society and the major foreign policy decisions taken by Israeli leaders. Topics to be studied include: the genesis and development of Zionism, democracy and religion in Modern Israel, post-Zionism, the role of the Holocaust in Israel, Jerusalem and the settlements.
JCTC3601 Unravelling the Arab - Israeli Conflict

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points of one of the following (Jewish Civilisation,Thought and Culture; or History; or Ancient History; or Government and International Relations) Prohibitions: JCTC2008 or GOVT2702 or HSTY2607 or ARIS2674 or JCTC2608 Assessment: 1x500wd proposal/annotated bibliography (10%), 1x3000wd Research essay (60%), 1x1000wd test (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course examines the Arab-Israeli conflict from its early twentieth century origins to the present day. We analyse the conflict's origins, the British Mandate, the Arab-Israeli wars; peace process from Camp David to Oslo, the reasons for its failure, and present prospects for peace. You will be encouraged to understand the complexity of this conflict on three levels: the local, between Israel and the Palestinians, the regional, between Israel and the Arab World; and the international, involving the global players.
PHIL2663 Justice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in Philosophy Prohibitions: PHIL3663 Assessment: 600wd editing assessments (5%), 600wd argument analysis assessment (15%), 600wd multiple-choice tests (20%), 1x1200wd Research essay (30%) and 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines ethical questions concerning social justice. It surveys influential theories of which institutions and social relationships are necessary for a just society. The unit provides students with an overview of views of freedom and equality. Finally, it critically reviews attempts to reconcile these apparently conflicting goals, e.g. as they pertain to questions like: Is taxation theft? Is private education inegalitarian? Are there moral limits to markets? Should we be free to engage in speech that undermines others' statuses?
USSC2604 Sex, Race and Rock in the USA

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Rebecca Sheehan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from one of the following subject area; American Studies, Anthropology, Music, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, English, European Studies, Government and International Relations, History, International and Global Studies, Media and Communications, Performance Studies, Philosophy, Political Economy or Sociology Prohibitions: HSTY2057 Assessment: Tutorial readings exercise(500wds)(10%) 500wd essay proposal and annotated bibliography(10%) 2000wd research essay (40%) Take home exam (1500wds)(30%) Class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the cultural history of and intersections between sexuality, race and rock music in the United States from Elvis to Lady Gaga. Influenced by black and working-class cultures, and with sexuality embedded in its form and practice, rock music challenged and transformed existing norms of family, sex and gender. Through subjects including black women, glam rock, and disco, students will learn that rock music, far from frivolous, provided a realm for rebellion, freedom, community and profit.