Jewish Civilisation Thought Culture

Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture

BBCL2603 Messianism in Biblical Prophetic Texts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points including at least 6 from (BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or HBRW1111 or HBRW1112 or HBRW2631 or HBRW2632 or RLST1002) and 6 from (Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, Ancient History, History, English, Studies in Religion or Arabic Studies) Assessment: 1x1500wd tutorial report (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presents an overview of prophetic works of the Hebrew Bible, examining literary, socio-political, and religio-historical aspects of the texts, with special emphasis on the theme of Messianism in the biblical prophets.
BBCL2607 Biblical Poetic Books

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points including at least 6 from (BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or HBRW1111 or HBRW1112 or HBRW2631 or HBRW2632) and 6 from (Hebrew, or Biblical and Jewish Studies, or Ancient History, or History, or English, or Studies in Religion, or Arabic Studies) Prohibitions: BBCL2003 Assessment: 1x1500wd Tutorial report (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the Biblical Poetic Books such as Psalms, the Song of Songs and Lamentations. The main focus of the course is on how the literary conventions of the genre of Hebrew poetry are used by the poets to set out the theological and philosophical concepts the texts are designed to express. These literary conventions will be studied in the light of other Ancient Near Eastern literature of a similar genre.
BBCL2609 Historical Jesus to Written Gospels

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points including at least 6 from (BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or HBRW1111 or HBRW1112 or HBRW2631 or HBRW2632 or RLST1002) and 6 from Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, Ancient History, History, English, Studies in Religion or Arabic Studies Prohibitions: BBCL2003 Assessment: 1x2000wd research essay 1 (40%), 1x2000wd research essay 2 (40%), 1xequivalent to 500wds short tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the relationship between the historical person of Jesus of Nazareth and the literary-theological achievement of the early Christian Gospels (including non-canonical Gospels). Students are encouraged to apply rigorous historical method and careful literary analysis in order to gain a nuanced understanding of how the leader of a Jewish renewal movement became the object of devotion in earliest Christianity. The unit will read Biblical texts in English translation.
BBCL2610 The New Testament as Literature

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points including at least 6 from (BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or HBRW1111 or HBRW1112 or HBRW2631 or HBRW2632 or RLST1002) and 6 from Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, Ancient History, History, English, Studies in Religion or Arabic Studies Assessment: 1x2700wd research essay (50%), 1xequivalent to 1500wds tutorial presentation and paper (30%), 1x300wd research proposal (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of the New Testament as a literary and theological work, seeking to understand both the early Christian 'story' and the various modes in which it was retold and applied in the first century CE. Students explore the various genres of NT literature, including 'gospel', epistolary forms, parable and apocalyptic. Particular attention is paid to reader-response criticism of the Gospels and intertextuality in the NT epistles. Documents will be read in English translation.
EUST2002 Language and Society in Europe

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from (European Studies, International and Global Studies, Sociology, Arabic Language and Cultures, French Studies, Germanic Studies, Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, Italian Studies, Modern Greek Studies, Spanish, Latin American Studies, GOVT1104, GOVT1105, GOVT1202, ENGL1009, ENGL1026, ENGL1011, HSTY1045, HSTY1032 or HSTY1044) Assessment: 1x750wd tutorial written test (15%), 1xTutorial presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (20%), 1x750wd annotated bibliography (15%), 1x3000wd Essay (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Europe is characterised by a multiplicity of languages and the consciousness of linguistic diversity permeates its societies. We will examine the complexities of language in Europe by examining issues such as multilingualism and diglossia, official vs minority languages, EU language policy, and questions of language and identity. Drawing upon case studies from European contexts, we explore key issues of language usage, such as different interactional styles, aspects of linguistic interaction, and the broader workings of power and politics in language.
EUST2605 Europe: Literature and Dictatorship

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Morgan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd assignment (15%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x1-hr exam (20%), class participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Europe: Literature and Dictatorship focuses on aspects of literature, culture, and the public sphere in the twentieth-century socialist states of Central and Eastern Europe. Literature played an important role - both clandestinely and as a public institution - under socialism. However literary texts cannot be separated from wider issues of politics, culture, and society. Hence attention will be paid to the role of the intelligentsias, to censorship, and to problems of dissidence and free expression in authoritarian, closed, and totalitarian societies.
GOVT2112 Modern Political Thought

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations Assessment: 1x1500wd Mid-semester Take-home exercise (30%), 1x2500wd final Essay (60%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit considers key themes in modern and contemporary political thought. It uses primary texts to address topics such as sovereignty, democracy, fascism, liberalism, human rights, politics and religion, violence, and political identity. Authors may include Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Kant, Nietzsche, Marx, J.S. Mill, Tocqueville, Rawls, Arendt, Schmitt, and Foucault.
HBRW2603 Hebrew Modern 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1102 Prohibitions: HBRW2103 Assessment: 3x10 minute vocabulary quizzes (10%), 10x100wd writing tasks (25%), 1x1.5hr class test (30%), 1x5 minute oral test (5%), 1x2-hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW1102. It consists of an intensive study of spoken Modern Hebrew with emphasis on communicative skills that enable students to communicate in simple Hebrew for everyday situations. Simple literary texts and language components, which are orientated around relevant themes, are dealt with. A variety of different methods are used to explain grammatical structures, morphology and syntax and to provide examples in their use.
HBRW2604 Hebrew Modern 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2603 Prohibitions: HBRW2104 Assessment: 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%), 10x150wd writing tasks (25%), 1x1.5hr class test (30%), 1x2hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW2603. It uses a communicative approach to language learning. Students' active participation through teamwork, role-playing and other interactive techniques is an essential aspect of all classes. It is expected that by the end of this unit students will be able to take part in simple everyday Hebrew conversation.
HBRW2606 Hebrew Modern 6

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2605 Prohibitions: HBRW2106 Assessment: 3x10 minute oral assignments (15%), 10x100wd writing tasks (25%), 1x1.5hr class test (30%), 1x2hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW2605. By the end of the unit, students will be able to converse confidently in everyday Hebrew. As well, this unit is designed to enable students who wish to continue learning Modern Hebrew to make the transition into HBRW2607 and HBRW2608.
HBRW2623 Hebrew Classical 3

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ian Young Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1112 or HBRW2402 or HBRW2632 or HSC Hebrew Assessment: 2x1-hr exams (60%), assigned preparation of text for class [equivalent to 500wds] (10%), 1x2000wd essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The books of the Hebrew Bible are studied in the light of their setting and their literary and linguistic features. The course consists of: set classical texts; and special background area study: Mishnaic Hebrew.
Textbooks
Contact the department.
HBRW2625 Hebrew Classical 5

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1112 or HBRW2632 or HBRW2402 or HSC Hebrew Assessment: 2x1hr exams (60%), assigned preparation of text for class [equivalent to 500wds] (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The books of the Hebrew Bible are studied in the light of their setting and composition history. The course consists of: set classical texts, and special background area study: Ancient Inscriptions.
HBRW2631 Hebrew Accelerated C1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from any of (Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, Ancient History, Anthropology, Archaeology, History, English, Linguistics, Philosophy, Studies in Religion or Arabic Studies) Prohibitions: HBRW2401 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%), continuous assessment (quizzes, grammar assignments, equivalent to 2500wds) (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides senior-level students with the essential linguistic foundation to the study of Hebrew language and literature. It is taught concurrently with the existing Hebrew B-stream.
HBRW2632 Hebrew Accelerated C2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2401 or HBRW2631 Prohibitions: HBRW1112, HBRW2402 Assessment: 1x2-hr exam (50%), continuous assessment (quizzes, grammar assignments, equivalent to 2500wds) (40%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit brings students to a level necessary for the study of Hebrew at an advanced level. It forms a bridge between Hebrew Accelerated C1 and other senior Hebrew units.
HBRW2651 Syriac 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1112 or HBRW2402 or HBRW2632 or HSC Hebrew Prohibitions: HBRW2911 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (60%), weekly assignments, exercises and Tutorial participation (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
For those beginning the study of Syriac this is a preparation for more advanced study of Syriac language and literature. It concentrates on the study of elementary Syriac grammar, prose composition and an introductory study of selections of texts from the Old and New Testament Peshitta.
HBRW2652 Syriac 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2911 or HBRW2651 Prohibitions: HBRW2912 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (60%), weekly assignments, exercises and Tutorial participation (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on the foundation of Syriac 1. It concentrates on the study of advanced Syriac prose composition and selections of texts from the Old and New Testament Peshitta.
HBRW3601 Hebrew Classical Advanced 4

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2632 or HBRW2623 or HBRW2625 Prohibitions: HBRW2116, HBRW2624 Assessment: 1x1000wd Psalms written test (25%), 1x1000wd Qumran written test (25%), 1x2500wd research essay (40%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit students will apply advanced linguistic skills to complex biblical and extra-biblical texts. Students will analyse the poetic and linguistic features of the book of Psalms, and will evaluate the historical, social and linguistic background of the Dead Sea (Qumran) Scrolls.
HBRW3602 Hebrew Classical Advanced 6

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2632 or HBRW2623 or HBRW2625 Prohibitions: HBRW2626 Assessment: 1x1000wd Poetry written test (25%), 1x1000wd Medieval Hebrew written test (25%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit students will apply advanced linguistic skills to complex biblical and extra-biblical texts. Students will analyse the poetic and linguistic features of biblical poetry outside the Psalms, as well as the linguistic features of Medieval Hebrew used by Jewish Biblical commentators, especially those features that differentiate Medieval from Biblical Hebrew.
HSTY2607 Approaches to the Arab Israeli Conflict

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Dirk Moses Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in History, Arabic and Islamic Studies, or Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies Prohibitions: : JCTC2008 or GOVT2772 Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (50%) and 1x1hr exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will provide students with a grounding in the historical context of and reasons for conflict in Israel/Palestine. It will enable them to identify the causes of conflict and attempted avenues for peace, as well as making them aware of the politicised nature of much of the scholarship on the region. The unit commences in the Ottoman period and traces the rival of aspirations of Zionism and Palestinian nationalism, as well as the geopoitical dimensions of the conflict. The unit will enable students to gain detachment from the dominant narratives about the issues so they are equipped to form their own judgements.
HSTY2608 European Film and History

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr film screening/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (6 Senior credit points of European Studies) or (18 Junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: HSTY2008 Assessment: 1x2500wd Research essay (50%) and 1x2hr formal examination (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Using a number of significant films from across the continent of Europe, the unit examines the way in which films can both create the past and transform existing ideas about the past. The unit examines a range of different kinds of films: "historical" films which set out self-consciously to construct a version of the past as well as those in which film-makers have confronted the contemporary problems of their own society.
HSTY2616 The Human Rights Revolution

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd Bibliography & Proposal (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What accounts for the spectacular rise of human rights movements and norms from 1945 to the present? This unit investigates the causes and consequences of this radical global transformation in transnational activism, foreign policy and international law. The first portion of the unit explores the early history of natural rights, minority rights, women's rights and humanitarianism. The second portion examines the impact of domestic politics, gender politics and geopolitics on the postwar 'human rights revolution'.
HSTY2624 The Origins of Human Rights

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial exercise (10%), 1x250wd research bibliography (5%), 1x250wds Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd final Essay (50%) and 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We tend to think of rights as things that all people have held at all times, but they are not. Rights have a history. The idea of individual rights did not exist prior to medieval times and it has been understood in many different ways since. This unit traces the creation and development of the idea of rights, and its historical uses, from medieval times through to the rise of the modern state and into the Enlightenment.
HSTY2626 Fascism and Antifascism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Judith Keene Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2026 Assessment: 1x2500wd research essay (50%) and 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%) and 1x1hr formal exam (20%) and tutorial participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the origins and development of the movements of the New Right that emerged in Europe after World War One paying particular attention to their political, social and cultural manifestations as well as the movements on the left that attempted to confront what was seen as a new political phenomenon. The unit will use primary material of literature, diaries, cinema and photography as well as the more conventional sources of political and historical analysis.
HSTY2652 Genocide in Historical Perspective

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2052 Assessment: 1x1000wd Bibliography & Proposal (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit we aim to come to an historical understanding of genocide in the modern era, that is, in approximately the last 250 years. We do so in a chronological, i.e. historical manner, and thereby seek not only to compare genocides, but determine how they may be related to one another. This unit begins by exploring the concept of genocide and concludes with post-1945 attempts to prevent it, as well as to prosecute its perpetrators under international law.
JCTC1001 Palestine: Roman Rule to Islam

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How did the religion and history of the Jewish people change from the Second Temple to the rabbinic period? Explore the history and religion of the Jews during the watershed period in Palestine under Roman rule. Study the Hellenist influence on Judaism, the development of different sects, including the Dead Sea sect, and the emergence of Christianity. Lectures (2 hours a week) focus on the history of the period. Tutorials deal with broad questions such as who is a Jew and universalism and chosenness in Judaism together with a knowledge and understanding of basic Jewish belief and practice. Students will gain insights into the evolution of Judaism from pagan times to the present. At the upper level, students can study Medieval Judaism, Holocaust and Israel.
JCTC1002 Jewish Settlement Outside Palestine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: JCTC1001 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Do you wish to understand the gradual dispersion of Jews from Palestine? Study this unit to understand the spread of Judaism from Palestine into Africa and Asia. Students will study the story of Muhammed and the rise of Islam; the place of the Jew under Islamic law and the rapid Islamic conquest of much of the known world. They will learn about the dispersed diaspora communities in Babylon and Egypt and the development of Jewish communities in India and China from their early origins to the present day. Lectures focus on the history of the period. The tutorials deal with moral, ethical and philosophical questions relating to Judaism. Discussions will explore the existence and nature of God, prophecy, the Messiah, Torah and the commandments, conversion to Judaism and Jewish attitudes to other faiths.
JCTC2603 Jews Under the Crescent and the Cross

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in one of of (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture, or Studies in Religion, or History, or Ancient History) Prohibitions: JCTC2003 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The story of Jews living under the Crescent (Muslim rule) and the Cross (Christian rule) comprises a vibrant period of Jewish history. The unit explores Jews under Muslim rule in Spain and the experiences of Jews under Christian rule in Germany, France and England in the Medieval period, including the problems of Christian antisemitism and the Crusades. These are seminal periods in the development of Jewish thought, with the contribution of great commentators and philosophers including Moses Maimonides.
JCTC2604 From Expulsion to Regeneration

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Suzanne Rutland Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in one of of (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture, or Studies in Religion, or History, or Ancient History) Prohibitions: JCTC2004 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
One of the most traumatic events in Jewish history was the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492. Explore the reasons behind the expulsion and the ways in which new centres of Jewish life emerged, especially in Eastern Europe. Light will also be shed on the establishment of Jewish communities in the Netherlands and England on the eve of emancipation when the new ideas of the Enlightenment paved the way for the rise of the modern Jew.
JCTC2605 From Emancipation to the Holocaust

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of one of the following (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture; or Ancient History; or History; or European Studies; or Government and International Relations; or Sociology) Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to introduce students to the turbulent history of European Jewry, 1750 to 1933. Against the background of far-reaching transformation in almost every aspect of society and culture, the Jew's entry into the modern world will be examined. At the centre stands the process of acculturation, integration, assimilation and Zionism, as well as the responses by non-Jewish society, especially the rise of modern antisemitism.
JCTC2606 The Holocaust: History and Aftermath

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of one of the following (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture; or Ancient History; or History; or European Studies; or Government and International Relations; or Sociology) Prohibitions: JCTC2006 Assessment: 1x2000wd Research essay (30%), 1xTutorial presentation / summary equivalent to 500wds (20%), Tutorial participation (10%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an in-depth study of the Holocaust. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of Nazi ideology, in particular racial antisemitism, and the gradual implementation of this policy towards the Jews and other victim groups from 1933 to 1945. Other themes focus on the responses of the victims and the role of the by-standers, as well as post-war politics of memory and other issues, including Holocaust denial and war crimes prosecution.
JCTC2607 Israel in the Modern Middle East

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in one of of (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture, or Studies in Religion, or History, or Ancient History) Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of tutorial paper (20%), 1x2hr exam (40%), and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Israel's position in the modern Middle East and the wider world from state formation to the present has been shaped by social, political and economic processes. Study these processes in the context of the nature of Israeli society and the major foreign policy decisions taken by Israeli leaders. Topics to be studied include: the genesis and development of Zionism, democracy and religion in Modern Israel, post-Zionism, the role of the Holocaust in Israel, Jerusalem and the settlements.
JCTC3601 Unravelling the Arab - Israeli Conflict

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points of one of the following (Jewish Civilisation,Thought and Culture; or History; or Ancient History; or Government and International Relations) Prohibitions: JCTC2008 or GOVT2702 or HSTY2607 or ARIS2674 or JCTC2608 Assessment: 1x500wd proposal/annotated bibliography (10%), 1x3000wd Research essay (60%), 1x1000wd test (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course examines the Arab-Israeli conflict from its early twentieth century origins to the present day. We analyse the conflict's origins, the British Mandate, the Arab-Israeli wars; peace process from Camp David to Oslo, the reasons for its failure, and present prospects for peace. You will be encouraged to understand the complexity of this conflict on three levels: the local, between Israel and the Palestinians, the regional, between Israel and the Arab World; and the international, involving the global players.
JCTC4011 Judaic Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Two seminars that meet weekly for two hours for each semester Assessment: A thesis of 20000 words and 5000 words of written work or its equivalent for each seminar Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Honours is an intensive year-long program of advanced study based around research. Honours is undertaken after successful completion of a Bachelor degree and where the overall mark is a minimum credit average (70%). Entry into Honours is selective and work at this level is challenging. Honours is available in most subjects areas taught in the Faculty, and which are listed under Tables A and B in the Handbook. Students will complete a thesis and coursework seminars throughout the year. For further information contact the Honours Coordinator in the department or consult the Handbook entry for the relevant subject area.
JCTC4012 Judaic Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: JCTC4011 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to JCTC4011
JCTC4013 Judaic Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: JCTC4012 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to JCTC4011
JCTC4014 Judaic Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: JCTC4013 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Refer to JCTC4011
WREL2001 World Religions in Context

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Studies in Religion Assessment: 1x1000wd field report (25%), 1x1000wd methodological exercise (25%), 1x750wd Essay plan presentation (10%), 1x1750wd Essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will investigate typologies of 'religion', distinguishing between 'world religions' and other 'religions' (particularly indigenous religions), and recognise that these classifications resulted from European colonialism and the encounter of Christianity with other religions (in Asia, the Americas, and Africa). Religions with scriptures, priesthoods, and institutions paralleling those of Biblical traditions were privileged over oral cultures and indigenous religions. Students study methods of textual criticism and historical investigation of the 'origins' of religion, from which emerged the discipline of 'religious studies'.