Linguistics

Linguistics

LNGS1001 Structure of Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof William Foley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: LNGS1004, LNGS1005 Assessment: 10x150wd short problem based assignments (30%), 1x1hr 1000wd equivalent mid-term exam (20%), 1x2hr 2000wd equivalent final exam (50%)
This unit is a comparative look at the general structure of human language. It looks at the sounds of human language: how the speech organs make them and their variety, in particular, a detailed description of English consonants and vowels and how to transcribe them. It investigates what is a possible word in English and other languages. It looks at the way speakers put words together to form sentences and how and why is English different from Japanese or even Irish.
LNGS1002 Language and Social Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jason Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 5x250wd short assignments (40%), 1x1hr 1000wd equivalent mid-term exam (20%), 1x2hr 2000wd equivalent final exam (40%)
This unit introduces the study of the interrelationship between language and society. It is concerned with phenomena of language change and how that leads to varieties in a language. How are these varieties linked to social differences? What distinguishes male speech from female speech or what are the linguistic styles of different social classes or ethnic groups? What is slang, or jargon, and what distinguishes a casual conversation from an interview?
LNGS2602 Syntax

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jason Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001 Prohibitions: LNGS2002 Assessment: 5x500wd problem sets (60%), 1x2hr 2000wd equivalent problem based exam (40%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Syntax deals with how we combine words into phrases, clauses and sentences and how we understand these combinations. Syntax is almost purely internal to language and plays a major role in organising the language system. We look at syntactic concepts in English, languages of Europe and Asia, and those of small traditional communities around the world. Using a problem solving approach, we develop explicit models to describe syntactic phenomena that allow generalisations leading to testable predictions about possible structures.
LNGS2603 Functional Grammar

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof James Martin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr workshop/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001 Prohibitions: LNGS2003 Assessment: 5x500wd term assignments (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%)
This unit takes a functional view of grammar, considering the ways in which English is organised to build up our picture of reality, to enable us to interact in conversation and to make our contribution coherent and relevant. It is designed to give students analysis skills in the analysis of ideational, interpersonal and textual meaning in the clause, the nature of inter-clausal relations, and the structure of nominal, verbal and adverbial groups and prepositional phrases.
LNGS2613 Computer Applications in Linguistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jason Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week Prerequisites: (LNGS1001) or (12 senior credit points from Digital Cultures) Prohibitions: LNGS2027, LNGS2007 Assessment: 6x1000wd written assignments (100%)
This unit of study introduces students to the many uses of computers in the humanities with specific reference to linguistics: computer lexicography; building and searching text corpora, examining speech signals, collocations, style, authorship, discourse structure and syntactic constructions. Accessing information on languages and linguistics through library catalogues, electronic mailing lists, FTP sites and the World Wide Web. Other linguistics units (like phonetics, field methods, historical linguistics and semantics) will benefit from some basic knowledge of the use of computers.
LNGS2615 Language, Brain and Mind

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points from (LNGS1001, LNGS1002, LNGS2620 and LNGS2621) Assessment: 1x3000wd research paper (50%), 1x2000wd mid-term paper (30%), 1x1000wd book review (20%)
We will discuss current findings in the field of psycholinguistics. How is language represented and processed or computed by the brain. We will look at experimental work considering the methods and results in an effort to understand the apparent ease with which language is used in everyday life as well as considering the implications of psycholinguistic research for linguistic theory. Topics discussed: language and the brain, speech perception, the mental lexicon and lexical retrieval, sentence and discourse comprehension, language production, language and cognition, nativism.
LNGS2617 Cross-Cultural Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Loy Lising Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points from (LNGS1001, LNGS1002, LNGS1003, LNGS1004, LNGS1005)) or (Credit average in 12 senior credit points from one of the foreign languages (French, Japanese, Chinese, Italian, Arabic, Spanish, German, Latin, Modern Greek, Ancient Greek, Indonesian, Malay, Korean, Thai, Yiddish, Hebrew, Syriac, Aramaic, Sanskrit) Prohibitions: LNGS3903, LNGS3923 Assessment: 1x1500wd presentation (25%), 1x1500wd problem set (25%), 1x3000wd essay (50%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
In today's globalized and multicultural societies, intercultural communication is common. It challenges people who engage in it, and theories of communication in different societies (i.e. cross-cultural communication). We consider approaches including conversation analysis, speech act theory, interactional sociolinguistics, the ethnography of communication, and discourse analysis. In analysing samples of cross-cultural communication we attend to how social relationships between participants are reflected in their linguistic practices. We explore applied perspectives on intercultural communication in educational, courtroom and workplace interactions.
LNGS2621 Phonology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jason Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001 Prohibitions: LNGS2601 Assessment: 5x400wd problem sets (45%), 1x1000wd mid-term exam (20%), 1x2000wd final exam (35%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit will provide a foundation in the principles and methods of linguistic argumentation particularly with respect to phonological analysis and the interaction of phonetics and phonology. Topics include: basic phonological analysis; distinctive features, underlying representations, abstractness, rules and constraints, the role and function of prosodic structure: the prosodic hierarchy syllables, tone and stress, markedness.
LNGS3601 Semantics and Pragmatics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Riemer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (LNGS1001, LNGS1002, (LNGS2620 or LNGS2621) and (LNGS2602 or LNGS2603)) or (18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature) Prohibitions: LNGS3026, LNGS3006 Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent exercise (15%), 1x1000wd equivalent exercise (25%), 1x3000wd essay (60%)
Note: Compulsory for Honours students; other students may select as an option. This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Semantics deals with the meaning of words, phrases, sentences and texts, and the relations between those meanings. Pragmatics deals with how speakers use context and shared information to convey information additional to the semantic content of what they say, and with how hearers make inferences on the basis of this information. Our goal is to explore the diversity of ways in which meaning can be expressed linguistically in different languages, as well as of what constitutes evidence for meaning.
LNGS3605 Structure and Use of a Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof William Foley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001, LNGS1002, (LNGS2620 or LNGS2621) and (LNGS2602 or LNGS2603) Prohibitions: LNGS3904 Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent tutorial paper (20%), 2x1000wd problem sets (30%), 1x3000wd essay (50%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
A language other than English is chosen for analysis (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and discourse), and for description of the ways it is used (ethnography of speaking including speech acts, speech events, registers and genres). It is examined in its areal, genetic, historical, social and typological context. We also examine sources of data and their reliability, and the way findings are presented (reference and teaching grammars and linguistic papers).
LNGS3608 Computers, Discourse, Language

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Monika Bednarek Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (LNGS1001, LNGS1002, (LNGS2620 or LNGS2621) and (LNGS2602 or LNGS2603)) or (LNGS1001, (LNGS2602 or LNGS2603) and 6 senior credit points from Digital Cultures) Assessment: 1x1000wd corpus design, building and discussion (20%), 1x2000wd corpus analysis (30%), 1x3000wd research essay (50%)
'Language looks different when you look at a lot of it at once'. This unit of study introduces you to the use of computer software to look at a lot of language at once: Do we refer to 'men' and 'women' equally often? What are the five most frequent words in the English language? What is the difference between 'pure' and 'sheer'? How does television dialogue differ from real-world dialogue? And how does a computer help us to answer these and similar questions?
LNGS3609 Analysing Discourse

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof James Martin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: LNGS1001, LNGS1002, (LNGS2620 or LNGS2621) and (LNGS2602 or LNGS2603) Prohibitions: LNGS2004, LNGS2604 Assessment: 1x1000wd discourse analysis (20%), 1x1000wd discourse analysis (20%), 1x2500wd essay (60%)
Discourse analysis is concerned with analysing how people create meaning(s) in a given social context. In this unit students will learn to apply linguistic methods to the analysis of discourse. 'Discourse' includes both spoken and written language as well as images. Students will learn to apply a range of advanced linguistic methods to explore different discourse varieties and to study their organisation above the sentence level. A particular focus will be on the kinds of insights provided by different analytical techniques.
LNGS3692 Media Discourse

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Monika Bednarek Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: LNGS2602 or LNGS2603 or LNGS2604 Prohibitions: LNGS3912 Assessment: 1x1500wd assignment (20%), 1x2000wd assignment (30%), 1x2500wd assignment (40%), participation (10%)
'Sexy, healthy and 100% Australian-owned!' This unit examines linguistic approaches to media discourse. The language of news texts and television series will form a special focus of the unit, along with how images are used to construe meaning. We will explore general aspects of media institutions (news and television), the ways in which social identities are constructed in the media, differences between the language of various types of media texts, the rhetoric of persuasion and the discourses of popular culture.
LNGS3694 Language and Identity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Monika Bednarek Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar Prerequisites: Credit average in 18 senior credit points from Linguistics and the following foreign languages (French, Japanese, Chinese, Italian, Arabic, Spanish, German, Latin, Modern Greek, Ancient Greek, Indonesian, Malay, Korean, Thai, Yiddish, Hebrew, Syriac, Aramaic, Sanskrit, Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse). Other language units require department permission. Prohibitions: LNGS3907, LNGS3927 Assessment: 1x1000wd assignment (15%), 1x2000wd assignment (30%), 1x3000wd assignment (45%), participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
The unit explores expressions of social identities and relationships through language, including the connection between social groups (e.g. gender, ethnicity, age) and language use. It familiarises students with theories that explore relationships between language and identity construction/perception. The unit also equips the students with the necessary tools to critically engage with and analyse the issues of language and identity in various contexts.
LNGS3699 Linguistics Research Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof William Foley (Sem 1), Prof James Martin (Sem 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 18 senior credit points from Linguistics including 12 credit points from (LNGS2601, LNGS2001, LNGS2602, LNGS2002, LNGS2603, LNGS2003, LNGS2604, LNGS2004, LNGS2620, LNGS2621) Prohibitions: LNGS3940 Assessment: 1x6000wd research paper which will be done in stages and reported on through each stage and presented formally in seminar (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This seminar aims to prepare students for research in linguistics through critical reading and discussion of current issues and approaches in research and criticism, focussing on a particular subfield of linguistics.
LNGS4011 Linguistics Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof James Martin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: Credit average in 48 senior credits points from Linguistics including 18 credit points from (LNGS3601, LNGS2602, LNGS2604, LNGS2620, LNGS2621) Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis (50%) and 2 seminars x 6000-8000wds of written work or its equivalent per seminar (50%) OR 1x12000-15000wd thesis (40%) and 3 seminars x 6000-8000wds of written work or its equivalent per seminar (60%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Linguistics consists of:
1) a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff, which may include members of staff from other departments for students undertaking joint honours.
2) two (or three) seminars that meet weekly for two hours for one semester.
3) an unassessed support seminar that meets weekly for one hour for one semester
If you chose the two seminar option you write a thesis of 18000-20000 words. The thesis is worth 50% of the final Honours mark in this option.
If you chose the three seminars option you will write a shorter thesis of 12000-15000 words. The thesis is worth 40% of the final Honours mark in this option.

Students considering further academic work in the field should choose the longer thesis.
Each seminar requires 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent.
LNGS4012 Linguistics Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof James Martin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: LNGS4011
Refer to LNGS4011
LNGS4013 Linguistics Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof James Martin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: LNGS4012
Refer to LNGS4011
LNGS4014 Linguistics Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof James Martin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: LNGS4013
Refer to LNGS4011