Social Policy

Social Policy

SCLG1001 Introduction to Sociology 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1hr video lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 500wd precis (15%) and 1500wd Essay (35%) and 2hr exam (35%) and participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an introduction to the discipline of sociology through an analysis of contemporary Australian society. After an outline of the main theoretical perspectives in sociology, students will be drawing on key sociological perspectives and concepts to analyse a range of different social phenomena, including: globalisation, the mass media and the network society, family life, childhood and education; work, leisure and sport, and health and the body.
SCLG1002 Introduction to Sociology 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Late,Winter Main Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1hr video lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 500wd data analysis report (15%) and 1500wd Essay (35%) and 2hr exam (35%) and Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an introduction to the discipline of sociology through an analysis of contemporary Australian society. Students will become familiar with the basics of doing social research as well as a number of key sociological perspectives and concepts in relation to a range of different social phenomena, including: class and inequality, gender and sexuality, national, racial and ethnic identity, the experience of Indigenous Australians, power and the state, social control, crime and deviance.
SCLG2602 Social Inquiry: Qualitative Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from Gender and Cultural Studies) or (12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations) or (12 Junior credit points from Socio-legal Studies) Prohibitions: SCLG2002, SCLG2521 Assessment: 1x1250wd Research ethics Essay (30%), 1x2000wd Qualitative interview exercise (40%), 1x1250wd Content analysis exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to a range of qualitative research methods in common usage throughout the social sciences. The unit has both analytical and practical components. With regard to the former, students are introduced to the methodological issues in contemporary sociology and their impact on the research process. An emphasis will be placed on developing a critical ability to read sociological research, with an eye to understanding its methodological adequacy, the political and ethical issues that arise whilst conducting research, and debates over interpretation and the production of knowledge. With regard to the latter component, students will undertake practical exercises in order to learn to appreciate and use a selection of research approaches, methods and techniques.
SCLG2604 Social Inequality in Australia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr or equivalent intensive Summer session Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2529, SCLG2010 Assessment: Tutorial participation (15%) and 2000wd autoethnography (40%) and 2500wd Take-home exercise (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines sociological approaches to social inequality. Questions about social inequality are integral to contemporary notions of equality, citizenship, human rights, social justice and emancipation. A central theme of the unit (and a central preoccupation of sociologists) is ways in which social relations of inequality are shaped, represented, experienced, negotiated and challenged in everyday life. Some important questions for this unit are: How do sociologists understand and explain patterns of inequality? What are the enabling and constraining factors shaping people's 'life chances'? How are social relations of inequality, experienced, challenged and disrupted? Is social inequality an inevitable condition of human existence?
SCLG2605 Social Justice Law and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points in Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points in Socio-Legal Studies) Prohibitions: SCLG2017, SCLG2536 Assessment: Class facilitation (20%), 2500wd reflective journal (50%), 1500wd Take-home exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines a range of approaches to social justice, including distributive and recognition or identity theories. We ask how one works out what a socially just society would look like, considering guiding principles such as desert, need, merit and equality of resources, opportunity or capabilities. We then link these ideas with principles and practices of legal equality and human rights law and specific contemporary social justice topics such as racial, gender, environmental and international justice.
SCLG2607 Social Movements and Protest Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points in Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points in Socio-Legal Studies) Prohibitions: SCLG2570 Assessment: 1x1000wd Photo Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Research essay (40%), 1x1500wd Take-home Exercise (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Drawing on contemporary sociological analysis, this unit critically explores participation, organisation and outcomes of social movements and protest. The unit considers major theories and concepts, and addresses links between societal, political and cultural arrangements and movements for change. Students will explore the theoretical ideas in this unit by investigating a range of historical and contemporary movements, including the American civil rights movement, Greenpeace, Pussy Riot, indigenous peoples' movements, liberation theology, precarity protests, Occupy, Tea Party, and Arab Spring.
SCLG2610 Science, Technology and Social Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (6 Senior credit points from Digital Cultures) or (12 Junior credit points from GCST, SCLG, ANTH, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Prohibitions: SCLG2504 Assessment: 1xOral Presentation (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-home exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines a range of sociological theories and debates concerning science and technology. Students will investigate the two-way relationship between science/technology and society (ie. the social shaping of science and technology, and the impact of science and technology on society). Issues to be examined include the social production of science and technology, the science-technology relationship, the politics and economics of science and technology, science and technology in medicine, in reproduction, in the workplace, and the role of science and technology in environmentalism and the environmental movement.
SCLG2611 Welfare States: A Comparative Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2509 Assessment: tutorial facilitation (10%) and 1500wd Essay (30%) and 3000wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How do most industrialised countries publicly manage social risks? What are the principles that underpin these arrangements and how can we explain the differences between countries? Why do we want to compare the social policies of different countries? How can we meaningfully compare such policies? This unit examines these questions by comparing welfare state activity in particular spheres and explores some of the key practical, methodological and theoretical issues facing those comparing welfare states.
SCLG2613 Sociology of Childhood and Youth

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Sociology Prohibitions: SCLG2522 Assessment: 1x1500wd annotated bibliography (30%), 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the main sociological approaches to childhood and youth in modern industrial societies, as well as the ways in which particular perspectives on childhood are central to all social theory. It will examine the debates surrounding the historical development of childhood, and the various approaches to the impact of state intervention and social policies on both the experiences of childhood and youth and the transition to adulthood. Specific topics discussed include; the social construction of child abuse, youth homelessness and youth criminality as social problems, the stolen generations, children and the law, the fertility decline, and the differentiation of childhood experience along lines of class, gender, race and ethnicity.
SCLG2621 Power, Politics and Society

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies) Assessment: 1x1500wd Research essay (35%), 1x2500wd Take-home exercise (55%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: this unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
The unit explores how power and politics shape our lives across the different social arenas we inhabit. Drawing on the work of Castells, Sennett, Foucault, Bourdieu, Chomsky, the Frankfurt School, among others, the unit explores: changes in the world of work; global effects of information and communication technologies; power of corporations; the surveillance society; education's role in shaping society; culture, fashion and the media; consumerism and rebellion; and how economic, political and scientific practices meet in the climate change debate.
SCLG2624 Human Rights and Social Protest

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies) Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Explores the rise of human rights discourse and its relationship to moral and religious discourses on suffering and social justice across cultures. Focuses on victims of human rights abuse, the formation of communities of suffering and social movements around victimhood. Examines 'rights talk' as a global discourse and language of protest against social injustice and claims. Examines global human rights machinery and the ethics of humanitarian intervention. Case studies from Latin America, Africa and the Middle East.
SCLG2630 Economic Sociology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Sociology Assessment: 1x1500wd Discussion Essay (40%), 1x3000wd Research Essay (50%), Tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Economic Sociology considers how social order, institutions and power relations shape economies, and how economic phenomena like markets, money and property relations shape society. This course will begin with the foundational texts of economic sociology (Simmel, Weber, Veblen, Marx), and then consider sociological approaches to commodities and consumption, money and finance, labour and the workplace, neoliberalism and the bioeconomy.
SCLG2632 Quantitative Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr lab/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology or Socio-Legal Studies) or (12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations) Prohibitions: SCLG3603 Assessment: 2x750wd homework problem (40%), 1x1hr midterm test (20%), 1x2hr final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended to prepare undergraduate students to undertake independent quantitative analyses of social science data. Topics include: basic statistical numeracy, how to achieve quantitative results, how to write about quantitative analyses, and basic literacy in generalised linear models. The unit of study is writing intensive. No specific prior mathematical training is assumed, though a basic grasp of simple algebra is expected. By the end of the course, students should be able to approach quantitative social science data with confidence.
SCLG2634 Crime, Punishment and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from GCST, SCLG, SLSS, ANTH, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, LAW1100, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Prohibitions: SCLG2566 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%) and 500wd paper and tutorial facilitation (20%) and 1500wd Essay (30%) and 2500wd Take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit introduces students to the analysis of crime, detection and punishment in their historical, social, political and cultural contexts. It discusses the major theoretical perspectives on the explanation of crime as well as the role and functions of punishment. It examines a range of issues in understanding crime and criminal justice, including the cultural life of crime, forensic knowledge, policing and prisons, and youth and juvenile justice.
SCLG3602 Sociological Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (12 Senior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from Socio-legal Studies and SLSS2601) Prohibitions: SCLG3003 Assessment: 1300wd group Oral Presentation (30%) and 1000wd project report (20%) and 2200wd research proposal (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit addresses the political, ethical and practical problems that may arise during the process of conducting research. It will also examine the social and logical links between theory, method, data and analysis. In the seminars we will critically examine the work of other researchers to identify the strengths and weaknesses of their approaches. As part of their assessment, students will select a topic of their own and develop a theoretically informed research proposal.
SCLG4011 Sociology Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week in semester 1 Assessment: 18000-20000wd thesis (60%) and 6000wd equivalent written work for each seminar (2x20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Honours is an intensive year-long program of advanced study based around research. Honours is undertaken after successful completion of a Bachelor degree and where the overall mark is a minimum credit average (70%). Entry into Honours is selective and work at this level is challenging. Honours is available in most subjects areas taught in the Faculty, and which are listed under Tables A and B in the Handbook. Students will complete a thesis and coursework seminars throughout the year. For further information contact the Honours Coordinator in the department or consult the Handbook entry for the relevant subject area.
SCLG4012 Sociology Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: SCLG4011 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
refer to SCLG4011
SCLG4013 Sociology Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: SCLG4012 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
refer to SCLG4011
SCLG4014 Sociology Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: SCLG4013 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
refer to SCLG4011
SCPL2601 Australian Social Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Sociology Prohibitions: SCPL3001 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%) , 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (45%), 1x450wd equivalent participation in on-line discussions (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study Australian social policy is explored: the legal and administrative framework; relationships between family and the state; employment, unemployment, unpaid work and welfare; the public/private mix; aged care policies, the culture of welfare state provision, indigenous policies, migration, multiculturalism and the formulation and delivery of social welfare services in Australia.
SCPL2602 The Principles of Social Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Sociology Prohibitions: SCPL3002 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%) and 2000wd Essay (40%) and 2000wd Take-home exercise (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is essentially conceptual and theoretical, emphasising the contested principles of social policy - discourse, theories, ideas and ideologies - around which the contemporary welfare state was, is and continues to be organised, discussed and debated. This unit focuses on the application of concepts and theories in practical social policy arenas. In particular, the emphasis will be on the debated, sometimes contested, nature of concepts and theories in social policy discourses in contemporary societies.
SCPL3604 Social Policy and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points in Social Policy Assessment: 500wd equivalent Oral Presentation (10%) and 1500wd Essay (40%) and 2000wd research paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How and why do some ideas about social justice, distribution and inequality get translated into social policy while others do not? This unit explores concepts that feature prominently in the contemporary configuration of welfare states. It examines how key social policy ideas are translated (or not) into policy practice and the conditions under which these ideas become materialised and changed over time. Through the use of case studies, students are given the opportunity to explore the policy dynamics that underpin the emergence, development and demise of social policies.