Socio-legal Studies

Socio-Legal Studies

ECOP3017 Human Rights in Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECOP2011 or ECOP2012 or ECOP2612) and (ECOP2613 or ECOP2614 or ECOP2616 or ECOP2617 or ECOP2618 or ECOP2619 or ECOP2911) Prohibitions: ECOP3007 Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) , Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit studies human rights in development. International debates about human rights and democratic legitimacy are linked to structural economic arguments and to cultural and structural debates over the process of socioeconomic change. This introduces the competing arguments over rights, the distinction between formal and effective rights and the social struggles that have created them. The approach of economic liberalism, emphasising property rights and the role of competition as an arbiter of equal opportunities in society, is discussed. The unit also includes international studies of indigenous rights and labour rights, the globalisation of capital and citizenship, and structural and cultural arguments over the nature of socio-economic change.
GOVT2111 Human Rights and Australian Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations, or 12 Junior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies Prohibitions: GOVT2101 Assessment: 1x2500wd briefing paper (30%), 1x2hr exam (50%), Tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
This unit introduces students to the notion of human rights, outlines international human rights enforcement mechanisms and the application of human rights standards in Australia. Throughout the unit we consider the evolution of human rights in Australia and raise questions about the adequacy of Australia's existing human rights machinery, and examine the reasons for Australia's reluctance to adopt a Bill of Rights. We examine government policies toward the indigenous Australians, women and refugees. We also consider current legislative changes to combat terrorism and consider the implications of these changes on Australian's civil rights.
GOVT3986 Gender, Security and Human Rights

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2336 Assessment: 800wd Essay proposal (15%) and 2000wd Essay (35%) and 1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) and 4x175wd tutorial quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit offers a gender perspective on human rights, with a focus on gender and insecure international contexts. The unit covers themes related to the challenges of pursuing human rights, violations of human rights, and the role of civil society groups in advocating human rights. Attention will be given to the gendered nature of human rights and to specific issues that impact men and women differently when it comes to human rights protection and promotion.
HSTY2631 Sin City? A History of Sydney

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History or 12 Junior credit points of Socio-Legal Studies Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x250wd Research essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Research essay outline (5%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From its beginnings as a convict colony, Sydney had to deal with an unsavoury reputation. This course explores the history of the city we live in, its people and its places. Distinct communities and neighbourhoods emerged as battles were fought over who belonged in Sydney, and how they should behave. Topics include Aboriginal resistance, convict scandals, poverty and plague, the 'Razor Gang Wars', Mardi Gras protests, the 'Emerald City' excesses of the 1980s, and the Cronulla riots.
HSTY2671 Law and Order in Modern America

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Assessment: 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%), 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores crime in the United States from Civil War to the present. It begins by examining historical approaches to crime, using murder as a case study. We look at the development of the criminal justice system, focusing on the police, the FBI, and extra-legal justice and lynching, and explore specific crimes: morals offenses; sex crimes; white-collar crime; and organized crime. Our focus is on the changing incidence, definitions and representation of crime in modern American culture and society.
SCLG2601 Sociological Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from Gender and Cultural Studies) or (12 Junior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies) Prohibitions: SCLG2001, SCLG2520 Assessment: 5x 1000wd equivalent Reading presentation (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (45%), 1x1000wd Critical Analysis (25%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study we will examine the main strands of sociological thought and identify the key concepts, debates and issues in the development of sociological theory. It will focus on the writings of leading social theorists and sociologists, their contribution to the development of a distinctly sociological theory, and their continuing impact on current theoretical debates in sociology. Topics covered will include: the origins of sociology; industrialism; classical theorists; sociology of urban society; interactionism and everyday life; psychoanalysis; sociology of knowledge and culture; feminist challenges to sociological paradigms; postmodernity and the future of society. This unit is mandatory for Sociology majors.
SCLG2602 Social Inquiry: Qualitative Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from Gender and Cultural Studies) or (12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations) or (12 Junior credit points from Socio-legal Studies) Prohibitions: SCLG2002, SCLG2521 Assessment: 1x1250wd Research ethics Essay (30%), 1x2000wd Qualitative interview exercise (40%), 1x1250wd Content analysis exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to a range of qualitative research methods in common usage throughout the social sciences. The unit has both analytical and practical components. With regard to the former, students are introduced to the methodological issues in contemporary sociology and their impact on the research process. An emphasis will be placed on developing a critical ability to read sociological research, with an eye to understanding its methodological adequacy, the political and ethical issues that arise whilst conducting research, and debates over interpretation and the production of knowledge. With regard to the latter component, students will undertake practical exercises in order to learn to appreciate and use a selection of research approaches, methods and techniques.
SCLG2605 Social Justice Law and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points in Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points in Socio-Legal Studies) Prohibitions: SCLG2017, SCLG2536 Assessment: Class facilitation (20%), 2500wd reflective journal (50%), 1500wd Take-home exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: this unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
This unit of study examines a range of approaches to social justice, including distributive and recognition or identity theories. We ask how one works out what a socially just society would look like, considering guiding principles such as desert, need, merit and equality of resources, opportunity or capabilities. We then link these ideas with principles and practices of legal equality and human rights law and specific contemporary social justice topics such as racial, gender, environmental and international justice.
SCLG2608 The Sociology of Deviance and Difference

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week, or equivalent intensive Winter session Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Sociology, Anthropology, Gender and Cultural Studies, Socio-legal studies, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013 Prohibitions: SCLG2523, SCLG2004 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%) and 1500wd Research essay (35%) and 2500wd Take-home exercise (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on understanding 'deviance' and 'difference' from a sociological perspective. The unit covers a range of theories, from classic sociological theories of deviance to more recent critical theories of difference, and explores the key issues involved in this change of term. These theories are employed to explore a series of areas of contemporary debate in society, including youth subcultures, the construction of outsiders, rebellion, the body, and mental health.
SCLG2615 Law and Social Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (SCLG2601) or (6 Senior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies) Prohibitions: SCLG2535 Assessment: 1x1000wd Workbook (20%), 1x2000wd Research essay (50%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: this unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
This unit provides a detailed understanding of how the work of a broad range of social theorists contributes to a specifically sociological understanding of legal ideas, institutions and practices. After beginning with classical sociology - Durkheim, Marx and Weber, the unit will then discuss the contributions of the Frankfurt School, Habermas, Foucault, Bourdieu, Luhmann, Elias, and Selznick, as well as the more recent perspectives of postmodern and feminist social theory.
SCLG2621 Power, Politics and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies) Assessment: 1x1500wd Research essay (35%), 1x2500wd Take-home exercise (55%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: this unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
The unit explores how power and politics shape our lives across the different social arenas we inhabit. Drawing on the work of Castells, Sennett, Foucault, Bourdieu, Chomsky, the Frankfurt School, among others, the unit explores: changes in the world of work; global effects of information and communication technologies; power of corporations; the surveillance society; education's role in shaping society; culture, fashion and the media; consumerism and rebellion; and how economic, political and scientific practices meet in the climate change debate.
SCLG2623 Sociology of Terror

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Early Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies) Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the relationship between terrorism and globalisation. Explores themes of massacre, ethnic cleansing, and terrorism in the context of social uncertainty and crises in nation states. Examines the production of victims and the process of cultural symbolisation of the body and the new social and political imaginaries emerging. Examines the uses of victimhood in trying to escape terror and achieve reconciliation. Draws on the work of Scarry, Kristeva, Appadurai, Nordstrom, Foucault, Zulaika and Taussig.
SCLG2624 Human Rights and Social Protest

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies) Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Explores the rise of human rights discourse and its relationship to moral and religious discourses on suffering and social justice across cultures. Focuses on victims of human rights abuse, the formation of communities of suffering and social movements around victimhood. Examines 'rights talk' as a global discourse and language of protest against social injustice and claims. Examines global human rights machinery and the ethics of humanitarian intervention. Case studies from Latin America, Africa and the Middle East.
SCLG2632 Quantitative Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr lab/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology or Socio-Legal Studies) or (12 Junior credit points from Government and International Relations) Prohibitions: SCLG3603 Assessment: 1x2000wd research paper (35%), 1x500wd homework problem (20%), 1x2 hours final exam (35%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended to prepare undergraduate students to undertake independent quantitative analyses of social science data. Topics include: basic statistical numeracy, how to achieve quantitative results, how to write about quantitative analyses, and basic literacy in generalised linear models. The unit of study is writing intensive. No specific prior mathematical training is assumed, though a basic grasp of simple algebra is expected. By the end of the course, students should be able to approach quantitative social science data with confidence.
SCLG2634 Crime, Punishment and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points from GCST, SCLG, SLSS, ANTH, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, LAW1100, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Prohibitions: SCLG2566 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%) and 500wd paper and tutorial facilitation (20%) and 1500wd Essay (30%) and 2500wd Take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit introduces students to the analysis of crime, detection and punishment in their historical, social, political and cultural contexts. It discusses the major theoretical perspectives on the explanation of crime as well as the role and functions of punishment. It examines a range of issues in understanding crime and criminal justice, including the cultural life of crime, forensic knowledge, policing and prisons, and youth and juvenile justice.
SLSS1001 Introduction to Socio-Legal Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%) and 1500wd Take-home exercise (40%) and 3000wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an introduction to the understanding of legal ideas, institutions and practices in their social and historical contexts. It will provide an historical overview of legal institutions and forms of law in Australia, the place of the idea of the rule of law in state-formation, liberalism, processes of civilisation and colonialism, law and the public/private distinction, changing conceptions of human rights, as well as outlining the central features of the various fields of law.
SLSS1003 Law and Contemporary Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%) and 2000wd Essay (40%) and 2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an understanding of the central themes and issues in social scientific analyses of the operation of law in society. After briefly outlining the various ways in which social life is organised in terms of law, the unit will examine a range of key concerns in the development of legal ideas, institutions and processes today, including the increasing legal regulation of private life, law and science, human rights, the globalisation of law, terrorism, risk and security, law and social inequality and citizenship.
SLSS2603 Medico-Legal and Forensic Criminology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Sociology or Socio-Legal Studies Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%) and 500wd tutorial paper plus in-Class presentation (15%) and 1500wd Essay (35%) and 2500wd Take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the relationship between crime, law, medicine and science in society by specifically examining the history of criminal detection practices, death investigation systems and the coroner's office, the role of medicine and science in criminal justice and socio-legal management of the dead. Students will be introduced to developing areas in medico-legal and forensic criminology, and will explore specific issues and case studies such as human tissue and organ controversies.
SLSS2605 Crime, Media and Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies) and (SLSS2603) Corequisites: SCLG2634 Assessment: 1x1000wd Photo Essay and/or critical commentary and/or book review (20%), 1x2000wd Research essay (50%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines criminological approaches that explore intersections between crime/criminal justice, media forms and cultural dynamics. Topics include delinquent gangs, youth, subcultures and the law, folk devils and moral panics, cultural criminology, graffiti, edgework, television and fictional crime, serial killers, dark tourism, new technologies and social protest, surveillance, high crime, crime without frontiers.
SLSS3601 Doing Socio-Legal Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr qualitative workshop/week,1x1hr quantitative computer lab/week Prerequisites: 6 Senior credit points from Socio-Legal Studies and (SCLG2602 or SCLG2632) Prohibitions: SLSS2601 Assessment: 500wd quiz (20%) and 2x250wd data analysis exercise (2x10%) and 2x1500wd research report (2x30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will develop an understanding of social science research methods as they apply to quantitative and qualitative socio-legal studies. The unit will consider the epistemological, ontological and theoretical aspects of qualitative and quantitative research design and methodology and provide an overview of the main research methods applicable in both qualitative and quantitative socio-legal studies. Students will learn about the different stages involved in the development of both qualitative and quantitative socio-legal research projects.
SLSS4011 Socio-Legal Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week in semester 1 Assessment: 18000-20000wd thesis (60%) and 6000wd equivalent written work for each seminar (2x20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Honours is an intensive year-long program of advanced study based around research. Honours is undertaken after successful completion of a Bachelor degree and where the overall mark is a minimum credit average (70%). Entry into Honours is selective and work at this level is challenging. Honours is available in most subjects areas taught in the Faculty, and which are listed under Tables A and B in the Handbook. Students will complete a thesis and coursework seminars throughout the year. For further information contact the Honours Coordinator in the department or consult the Handbook entry for the relevant subject area.
SLSS4012 Socio-Legal Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: SLSS4011 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
refer to SLSS4011
SLSS4013 Socio-Legal Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: SLSS4012 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
refer to SLSS4011
SLSS4014 Socio-Legal Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: SLSS4013 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
refer to SLSS4011
WORK2219 Managing Organisational Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Leanne Cutcher Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1 hour tutorial hour per week Prerequisites: 40 credit points worth of units of study Assessment: individual reflection (15%), individual essay (25%), poster (25%), exam (25%), and tutorial attendance and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Managing organisational sustainability is critical to for effective, contemporary managers. This unit focuses on how to conceptualise and to practice sustainability in its broadest sense. Topics covered include the ethical aspects of management and organisational practice, corporate social responsibility, governance models in organisations and managing in diverse environments. Students will be encouraged to enhance their understanding of the roles and responsibilities of management and the impact of organisations on stakeholders including staff, government and community.