World Religions

World Religions

ANHS2605 Ancient Greek Religion

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julia Kindt Session: Semester 2,Summer Early Classes: 2x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of Ancient History, Classical Studies, Ancient Greek or History OR 6 junior credit points of Ancient History and 6 junior credit points of either Latin, Greek (Ancient), Classical Studies, History, Philosophy, Archaeology (Classical) or Archaeology (Near Eastern) Assessment: 1x2000wd class paper (40%), 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x500wd reading journal (15%) and participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores Greek religion as a defining feature of what it meant to be Greek. We will investigate similarities and differences between religious beliefs and practices throughout the ancient Greek world and trace how religion changed over time. Topics addressed include sacrifice, religious festivals and games, the use (and abuse) of divination, and shared notions of purity and pollution.
ANTH2667 The Anthropology of Religion

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Anthropology) or (12 Junior credit points from Religion Studies) Assessment: 10x100wd reflections (15%), 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x2000wd Research essay (45%), Tutorial participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit will examine various ways anthropologists have theorised religious belief and practice, and we will challenge these ideas by looking at the vast diversity of religious forms. Starting with the major theories of Durkheim, Weber and others, the Unit will focus on what anthropologists have identified as the key elements of religious forms cross-culturally. It will also look at debates around these ideas. Special emphasis will be put on the continuing salience of religious ideas and identities in modernity.
ASNS2621 Buddhist Philosophy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Prohibitions: : ASNS2313 Assessment: 1xtutorial presentation (equivalent to 500wds) (15%), 1xquiz (equivalent to 500wds) (15%), 1x2000wd written assignment (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will approach the core ideas of Buddhism on suffering, impermanence, non-self and interdependence in a systematic fashion and explore the implications for the Buddhist understanding of ontology (theory of being) and epistemology (theory of knowledge). The connection between philosophical ideas and the Buddhist path will be explored in relation to ethics, meditation and the cultivation of insight and wisdom. The connections between Buddhist philosophy and modern and postmodern Western philosophy will also be explored.
ASNS2625 Buddhism in Modern Asia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Allon Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Assessment: 1xtutorial presentation (equivalent to 500wds) (15%), 1xquiz (equivalent to 500wds) (15%), 1x2000wd written assignment (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the diversity and continued dynamism of Buddhism in modern Asia. The focus of the unit is social, cultural and political with an emphasis on the way Buddhism is influencing Asian societies and is, in turn, influenced by them. Buddhism's encounter with modernity and its role in the nation state, in lay and environmental movements and its influence on social and political discourses and practices will be examined.
ARBC2671 Transnational Muslim Women and Veiling

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week, commencing Week 2 Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Arab Language and Cultures, French Studies, Asian Studies, American Studies, History, Studies in Religion. Assessment: 1xTutorial Presentation (equiv to 500wd) (10%), 5x200wd Weekly Reflections (10%), 1x2000wd Research Project (40%), 1x500wd Experiential Veiling Project (20%), 2x250wd Film Reviews (10%), Tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the history of Muslim veiling, the religious discourses which are regularly cited as dictating a dress code for Muslim women, and the historical, political, regional, and cultural variations in veiling practices. We also consider the multiple meanings that the veil has had for Muslim women, and pay attention to Muslim women's voices of resistance toward stereotypical images of the veil as they are disseminated by the media and by fundamentalist Islamist regimes.
ARBC2672 Arab Diasporas

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week, commencing Week 2 Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Arab Language and Cultures, French Studies, European Studies, Asian Studies, American Studies, History, Government and International Studies, International and Global Studies Assessment: 1xTutorial Presentation (equiv to 500wd) (20%), 5x200wd Reading Reflections (20%), 1x1500wd Oral History (15%), 1x1500wd Blog (15%), Class Participation (10%), 1x 1500wd Research-based essay (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit traces the history and development of Arab diasporic communities over the past two centuries in Australia, Europe, and the United States. We explore the cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity of these communities both at national and local levels and examine the multiple ways in which Arab immigrants are maintaining and reconfiguring their cultural, ethnic, and religious identities through cultural and artistic productions. This unit also offers an experiential learning aspect through structured encounters with various Arab communities in Sydney.
ARBC2681 Gender and Politics in the Arab World

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucia Sorbera Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: Class participation (10%), Essay plan 1 1000wd (20%), Class presentation 1 500wd (15%), Final essay 1 2000wd (50%), Cultural portfolios 2 1000wd total (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the interplay between gender, culture and politics in the Arab world. Representations of gender and sexuality, and their politicization, will be studied through feminist, literary, and historiographical criticism, permitting a deep historical understanding of current debates.
BBCL2603 Messianism in Biblical Prophetic Texts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points including at least 6 from (BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or HBRW1111 or HBRW1112 or HBRW2631 or HBRW2632 or RLST1002) and 6 from (Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, Ancient History, History, English, Studies in Religion or Arabic Studies) Assessment: 1x1500wd tutorial report (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presents an overview of prophetic works of the Hebrew Bible, examining literary, socio-political, and religio-historical aspects of the texts, with special emphasis on the theme of Messianism in the biblical prophets.
BBCL2607 Biblical Poetic Books

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points including at least 6 from (BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or HBRW1111 or HBRW1112 or HBRW2631 or HBRW2632) and 6 from (Hebrew, or Biblical and Jewish Studies, or Ancient History, or History, or English, or Studies in Religion, or Arabic Studies) Prohibitions: BBCL2003 Assessment: 1x1500wd Tutorial report (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (60%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the Biblical Poetic Books such as Psalms, the Song of Songs and Lamentations. The main focus of the course is on how the literary conventions of the genre of Hebrew poetry are used by the poets to set out the theological and philosophical concepts the texts are designed to express. These literary conventions will be studied in the light of other Ancient Near Eastern literature of a similar genre.
BBCL2609 Historical Jesus to Written Gospels

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points including at least 6 from (BBCL1001 or BBCL1002 or HBRW1111 or HBRW1112 or HBRW2631 or HBRW2632 or RLST1002) and 6 from Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, Ancient History, History, English, Studies in Religion or Arabic Studies Prohibitions: BBCL2003 Assessment: 1x2000wd research essay 1 (40%), 1x2000wd research essay 2 (40%), 1xequivalent to 500wds short tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the relationship between the historical person of Jesus of Nazareth and the literary-theological achievement of the early Christian Gospels (including non-canonical Gospels). Students are encouraged to apply rigorous historical method and careful literary analysis in order to gain a nuanced understanding of how the leader of a Jewish renewal movement became the object of devotion in earliest Christianity. The unit will read Biblical texts in English translation.
BBCL3601 Daniel and Revelation as Apocalypses

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: BBCL2603 or BBCL2607 or BBCL2609 or BBCL2610 or BBCL3602 or HBRW2623 or HBRW2625 or HBRW2632 or HBRW3601 or HBRW3602 Prohibitions: BBCL2006 or BBCL2606 Assessment: 1x1500wd exegesis assignment (30%), 1x3000wd research essay (60%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The books of Daniel in the Hebrew Bible and Revelation in the New Testament are the only "apocalypses" found in any western Bible. In this unit students will apply advanced methods in analysis of biblical texts (literary, thematic, linguistic, and text critical) in order to analyse these texts in the context of the most relevant extra-biblical apocalyptic texts, such as 1 Enoch, 4 Ezra and 2 Baruch.
JCTC2604 From Expulsion to Regeneration

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Suzanne Rutland Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in one of of (Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture, or Studies in Religion, or History, or Ancient History) Prohibitions: JCTC2004 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), 1x500wd synopsis of a tutorial paper (20%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
One of the most traumatic events in Jewish history was the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492. Explore the reasons behind the expulsion and the ways in which new centres of Jewish life emerged, especially in Eastern Europe. Light will also be shed on the establishment of Jewish communities in the Netherlands and England on the eve of emancipation when the new ideas of the Enlightenment paved the way for the rise of the modern Jew.
RLST1002 A History of God, Deities and Demons

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Early Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Take-home paper (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x500wd early feedback (definition and referencing style) (10%), 1x1000wd Tutorial presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a general introduction to the history of religions, beginning with the emergence of religion in pre-literate societies as evidenced in art and archaeology. It then studies the ancient religions of Egypt and Mesopotamia, Persia, India, China, Israel, Greece and Rome; before turning to the growth and spread of world religions such as Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Buddhism. Students are expected to specialise in traditions and themes of their own choice in writing Essays.
RLST1005 Atheism, Fundamentalism and New Religions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1000wd Take-home research task (30%), 1x1000wd Oral Presentation (20%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What is the 'new' atheism? How have globalisation and new media affected religious practice? This unit considers a broad range of recent high-profile events and contemporary debates and controversies in religion. Topics include: the supposed rise of fundamentalism, arguments over 'the death of God', new forms of spirituality and enchantment. Through the use of case studies, from UFO-religions to The Gospel of Judas, students examine the overarching theme: What is the future of religion?
RLST2605 Christianity and the Medieval World

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Carole Cusack Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from Studies in Religion Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd take home exam (35%), tutorial presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the history of Christianity from the late Roman Empire to the close of the Middle Ages. A survey of the chief landmarks of the Christian religion in its social setting, in terms of its significant beliefs, experiences and diverse cultural expressions. A tutorial hour will be devoted to an exploration of some major philosophical and theological themes from Late Antique Christianity to the Middle Ages.
RLST2614 Philosophy of Religion: Reason & Belief

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Studies in Religion Prohibitions: RLST2014 Assessment: 2x2000wd word Essays (80%), 1x500wd Tutorial presentation (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Since the late 19th century, discussion within the philosophy of religion has shifted from the traditional arguments for God's existence to a broader set of themes concerning the relations of reason and faith. In this course, we will critically examine a range of philosophical approaches that are responsible for this shift, analysing how philosophers such as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Wittgenstein have understood these two concepts and the relations between them. We will ask: what is reason and what is its status? Is it sovereign or is faith autonomous from reason? Can they coexist or do they pose a threat to each other?
RLST2624 The Birth of Christianity

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from Studies in Religion) or (6 Junior credit points from Studies in Religion and (ANHS1600 or ANHS1601 or ANHS1602)) Prohibitions: RLST2024 Assessment: 1x1000wd Oral Presentation (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Take-home paper (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit discusses the textual, archaeological and socio-cultural evidence for the origins of Christianity; with a particular purpose to analyse how cults centred on the charismatic figure of Jesus of Nazareth led to the construction of such a powerful religious tradition. Tensions within that emergent tradition will be considered, and especially its struggle towards self-identity with both Judaism and the Greco-Roman world.
RLST2631 Celtic and Germanic Mythology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Carole Cusack Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from Studies in Religion Prohibitions: RLST2001 or RLST2002 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x1500wd text-based assignment (30%), 1x500wd equivalent tutorial presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit investigates the mythology and the religion of the Celtic and Germanic peoples. It ranges from prehistoric sites of Hallstatt (800 BCE) and Jastorf (350 BCE) to the Christian Middle Ages, when mythological collections (e.g. the Eddas and the Lebor Gebala) were complied. Sources used include archaeology, texts, folkloric survivals, and Indo-European mythology. It covers deities and the supernatural; sacred times and places; kingship and priesthood; goddesses; death and afterlife; and the conversion of the Celts and Germans to Christianity.
RLST2636 Ancient Egyptian Religion and Magic

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iain Gardner Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from studies in Religion Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd exam (30%), 1x1000 wd tutorial presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce the cosmologies, gods and religious structures of Pharoanic Egypt, including the imperial cult, sacred language, popular religion and magic. It will then consider the legacy of ancient Egyptian religion and magic in late antiquity, including the cult of Isis, Hermetic and Gnostic movements, the spiritual influence of the city of Alexandra, and the persistence of Coptic magic. Finally, there will be discussion of the abiding fascination with all things Egyptian in modern esotericism and popular culture.
RLST3601 Rethinking Religion

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr seminar Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points from Studies in Religion Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x3000wd research proposal (50%), 1x1000wd Oral Presentation (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit investigates pressing contemporary issues in the method and study of religion. It prepares students for advanced research, including honours. Historical analysis of religion and contentious key terms are debated, as students are introduced to field studies methodology and other complex research strategies. Theoretical work is more tightly integrated in this unit with research practice and the unit is structured to nurture the student in an extended research project, helping them to find a dynamic and assured academic voice.
RLST3602 Global Christianity

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 senior credit points from Studies in Religion Prohibitions: RLST2006 or RLST2606 Assessment: 1x1000wd textual analysis (15%), 1x1500wd site visit report (25%), 1x1000wd seminar participation (15%), 1x2500wd essay plan and annotated bibliography (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
From the fifteenth century Christianity spread to Asia, the Americas, Africa, and the Pacific. Students will interrogate the relationship between Christian doctrine and cultural accommodation within colonialism, the European domination of the 'Global South', and the contemporary re-evangelisation of the 'Global North' by former colonies. New trends explored include online Christianity, growing Pentecostal congregations, radical transformations caused by individualism, gender, and indigenous politics. Students' investigations will focus on global agendas, such as liberation theology, environmental ethics, and Christian popular culture.
SCLG2626 Sociology of Religion

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points in Sociology) or (12 Junior credit points in Studies of Religion) Assessment: 1x2500wd Field report (50%), 2000wd Take-home exercise (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the ways in which the religious impulse has been expressed socially, the role of religion in society, the way in which individuals form and change religious commitments, the ways in which religious groups have been organised and evolve, the nature of belief as it is expressed collectively and individually, and controversies over the role of religion in social life. Illustrations from contemporary events will be used to explore major religious policy issues and controversies.
WREL2001 World Religions in Context

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Studies in Religion Assessment: 1x1000wd field report (25%), 1x1000wd methodological exercise (25%), 1x750wd Essay plan presentation (10%), 1x1750wd Essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students will investigate typologies of 'religion', distinguishing between 'world religions' and other 'religions' (particularly indigenous religions), and recognise that these classifications resulted from European colonialism and the encounter of Christianity with other religions (in Asia, the Americas, and Africa). Religions with scriptures, priesthoods, and institutions paralleling those of Biblical traditions were privileged over oral cultures and indigenous religions. Students study methods of textual criticism and historical investigation of the 'origins' of religion, from which emerged the discipline of 'religious studies'.
WREL4011 World Religions Honours A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
WREL4012 World Religions Honours B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
WREL4013 World Religions Honours C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
WREL4014 World Religions Honours D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day