Peace and Conflict Studies

Coursework

A degree in Peace and Conflict Studies prepares candidates to engage with issues of conflict, violence, peace, justice and human rights on a local and global scale.

You will learn about peace journalism with the Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies Director, Associate Professor Jake Lynch, a former presenter on BBC World News; the challenges of building peace after mass violence with leading transitional justice scholar, Dr Wendy Lambourne; and from expert commentators on everything from ‘weapons of mass destruction’ to community mediation, non-violence and the psychology of peace.

Informed by the latest research, the coursework program focuses on developing theoretical understanding and practical skills that can be applied to the increasingly diverse field of peace and conflict studies. The master's degree can be studied via a combination of distance learning and intensive face-to-face teaching, as well as full or part-time study in Sydney. Graduates can go on to enjoy challenging and rewarding careers as consultants or employees with the United Nations, non-governmental organisations, universities, the private sector and government departments and agencies.

Contact
Dr Lucy Fiske (Semester 1)
Phone: + 61 2 9351 3971
Email:

Dr Wendy Lambourne (Semester 2)
Phone: + 61 2 9036 9286
Email:

MPACS by Distance
Assoc Prof Jake Lynch
Phone: +61 2 9351 5440
Email:


Requirements
Please refer to the degree resolutions in this Handbook for information on the specific admission requirements for different coursework award courses.


Graduate Certificate in Peace and Conflict Studies
To be awarded the Graduate Certificate in Peace and Conflict Studies, students complete a total of four units of study (24 credit points), comprising:

  • one core unit of study (6 credit points)
  • three elective units (18 credit points) chosen from the Table of Postgraduate Coursework Units of Study.

Graduate Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies
To be awarded the Graduate Diploma in Peace and Conflict Studies, students complete a total of six units of study (36 credit points), comprising:

  • one core unit of study (6 credit points)
  • five elective units (30 credit points) chosen from the Table of Postgraduate Coursework Units of Study.

Master of Peace and Conflict Studies
To be awarded the Master of Peace and Conflict Studies, students complete a total of eight units of study (48 credit points), comprising:

  • one core unit of study (6 credit points)
  • five or seven elective units (6 credit points each) chosen from the Table of Postgraduate Coursework Units of Study
  • an optional dissertation of 12,000 - 15,000 words (12 credit points).

Master of Letters (Peace and Conflict Studies)
To be awarded the Master of Letters (Peace and Conflict Studies), students complete a total of twelve units of study (72 credit points), comprising:

  • one core unit of study (6 credit points)
  • seven elective units (42 credit points) chosen from the Table of Postgraduate Coursework Units of Study
  • a treatise of 25,000 – 30,000 words (24 credit points).
    The treatise is a compulsory component in the Master of Letters and may not be undertaken by candidates for other award courses.

Important note: Master of Peace and Conflict Studies – Distance learning and intensive face-to-face delivery

The following units will be offered online in 2014:

  • PACS6901 United Nations, Peace and Security (Semester 2b)
  • PACS6915 Human Rights, Peace and Justice (Semester 1)
  • PACS6922 Peaceful Conflict Transformation (Semester 1)
  • PACS6923 Human Right to Food (Semester 1 and 2b)
  • PACS6924 Democracy and the Developing World (Semester 1 and 2b)
  • PACS6925 Peace and the Global Compact (Semester 2b)
  • PACS6930 Ethics for a Sustainable Peace (Semester 1).

This mode of delivery is not CRICOS registered and is not available to international students on a student visa who come to Sydney to study onshore.

Students wishing to undertake the course in this delivery mode must apply to the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences instead of the International Office. Please consult the Australian High Commission for advice about the appropriate visa to come to Sydney to undertake a unit of study.

The MPACS by distance is also available to local students (Australian citizens, Australian permanent residents, citizens of New Zealand) residing outside the Sydney metropolitan area. Applicants should contact the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences office directly for advice or to request an application pack.

The MPACS course is also offered as an onshore course (CRICOS registered) for international students on a student visa who must apply through the International Office for admission.

International students in Sydney may undertake a maximum 25 percent of their course requirements online and may not enrol in exclusively distance or online study in any compulsory study period.

Research

Students must have a substantial background in a relevant academic discipline to be eligible to enrol in research degrees in Peace and Conflict Studies.

Contact
Dr Lucy Fiske
Phone: + 61 2 9351 3971
Email:

Requirements
Please refer to the degree resolutions in this Handbook and to the Faculty Admissions Policy and Procedure for: Doctor of Philosophy: Pathways to admission, for information on the specific admission requirements for different research award courses.

The Master of Arts (Research) is designed to develop students’ disciplinary knowledge and research skills through a program of postgraduate coursework (up to two units of study) and a supervised research project culminating in a thesis of 26,000 – 30,000 words. This degree is suitable for students who have a major in a relevant field but who do not have an honours degree.

The Master of Philosophy is a research degree in which candidates undertake an extended piece of original research, which is the basis for an individually supervised thesis of 40,000 – 60,000 words. Candidates for the Master of Philosophy may apply to upgrade to the Doctor of Philosophy after the first year.

The Doctor of Arts and Doctor of Social Sciences are professional doctorates intended for students with employment or professional experience in a relevant field. Candidates complete five postgraduate coursework units of study and a 50,000-word individually supervised thesis based on an original research project, which makes a significant contribution to the field.

The Doctor of Philosophy degree has the most stringent requirements for entry. Candidates are required to undertake a major original research project and to write an individually supervised thesis of 70,000 – 100,000 words, which makes an original and significant contribution to the field.