Unit descriptions A - B

ACCT5001 Accounting Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Semester 1: Roel Boomsma; Semester 2:Janine Coupe Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: individual assignment (10%), group assignment (10%), mid-semester test (30%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides an introduction to the generally accepted accounting principles and practices underlying financial accounting and reporting. The unit introduces students to the concepts and skills required to prepare, analyse, and interpret financial statements.
Textbooks
Trotman, K, Carson, E; and Gibbons, M., Financial Accounting: An Integrated Approach, 6th Ed, Cengage Learning, 2016
AFNR5110 Crop Improvement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor R Trethowan/Professor P Sharp Session: Semester 2 Classes: The equivalent of 3 lectures and 3hrs practical work per week Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of plant genetics and breeding, similar to that covered by GENE4012 and GENE4013. Assessment: One 2hr exam (50%), essay/assignment (20%), practical reports (20%), presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Lectures, practical work and field trip(s) covering advanced aspects of the theory, philosophy and practice of plant breeding. Included are extended discussions of screening techniques (in the field, glasshouse and laboratory), conservation and exploitation of diversity, disease resistance, tissue culture, plant cytogenetics of relevance to pre-breeding and breeding. Also considered are the role of biotechnology processes and products in plant breeding; genetic engineering and the use of molecular marker technologies. This course will use examples from the full range of crops; broad-acre cereals and legumes, pastures, turf and horticultural crops, both perennial and annual. The main base of the course may vary between the ATP and Camden campuses. Field trips (mainly to the IA Watson Grains Research Centre, Narrabri) will be used especially to examine trial procedures and field-based operations, and to interact with commercial plant breeding.
AFNR5512 Water Management and Variable Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort (Coordinator), Dr Floris van Ogtrop, Dr Daniel Tan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hr workshop/week, practical work, project work during workshops Assumed knowledge: UG Maths or Physics or Hydrology. Assessment: Assignments (50%) 2 hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on knowledge gained in undergraduate science units to develop an understanding of how climate variability affects water resources. Particular focus will be on the effect of climate variability and drought and how this affects plant production and water storage. At the completion of this unit student would be able to: Quantify drought and understand the different dimensions of drought; understand how climate variability impacts plant production and what stages; understand the memory of drought and the impact on resilience; understand how climate change can impact climate variability in the future. Open source sofwater pakages such as R and SWAT will be used for most analysis.
AFNR5701 Plants and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Margaret Barbour Session: Semester 1 Classes: 24 hrs lectures and in-class discussion, 36 hours practical Assessment: One 2hr exam (40%), in-class discussion (10%), research manuscript (25%), either research proposal or research manuscript (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The focus of this unit is the response of plants to the environment, drawing examples from both managed and natural ecosystems. Students will develop advanced-level understanding of plant-environment interaction at scales from leaves to whole ecosystems through presentation and discussion of current research papers. Practical sessions will provide students with hands-on experience of state-of-the-art measurement techniques. Understanding of basic biophysical processes will be applied to inform discussion about the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystem services, including crop productivity.
Textbooks
Copies of research papers for each lecture/discussion will be provided, as will review papers where appropriate.
AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Franks (Coordinator), Dr Dan Penny, Dr Malcolm Possell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 18 hrs lecture/tutorial, 12 hrs practical/field classes, 9 hrs field trip preparation Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: 2hr exam (40%), tutorials (20%), practical report from field exercise (manuscript format) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales. This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites managed by the University of Sydney where students will be introduced to cutting edge, ongoing climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
AGEC5403 Agricultural Trade

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shauna Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Prerequisites: (AGEC2001 or AGEC2101) and (AGEC2003 or AGEC2103) Prohibitions: AGEC4003 Assessment: 1x1hr exam (25%),1x essay (15%) and 1x2hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study the basic economic principles underlying international trade in agricultural and resource commodities and the policies involved will be presented. Issues related to trade and development will also be considered. The main topics covered will include: trends in agricultural and resources trade; economics and politics of protection, economic integration and impacts on international commodity trade; international trade policy making. An understanding of globalisation, including foreign direct investment, will also be required. Extensive reading will be required.
Textbooks
Krugman and Obstfeld. International Economics: Theory and Policy, 9th Ed. (Pearson Addison Wesley), New York.
ANHS6901 Ancient Rome: Space and Power

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathryn Welch Session: Summer Main Classes: 25 day residential school in Rome Assessment: 1x2500 word paper (50%), 3x short site studies (900 words equivalent) (20%), 3x short book reviews (900 words equivalent) (20%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: May be taken concurrently with ANHS6902.
Throughout the Republic and Empire the public spaces of Rome were political capital. First triumphant generals, then emperors used them for advertisement, persuasion and coercion of a heterogeneous and massive population. This course explores the politics of space in Classical Rome, how different individuals interpreted the needs of their times in different ways and how they responded to the city populations at different times. Can the history of the built environment show us new aspects of an individual's principate and relationship to the population of Rome? Particular (but not exclusive) attention will be paid to topographical and architectural developments in the time of Caesar's dictatorship, Augustus, Domitian, Trajan, Hadrian and Constantine.
ANTH6910 Supervised Reading I

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: ANTH3921 Assessment: 1x2000wd Literature review (40%), 1x4000wd Research essay (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is designed to consolidate an understanding of contemporary debates within the discipline of anthropology and give students the skills required to frame a specific research project. Key issues covered include: a consideration of cultural processes in space and time; the relevance of place, locality and community in cultural transformation; cultural politics of place, identity and subjectivity; and, new understandings of 'locality' and 'the local' as part of an anthropological methodology based on fieldwork.
ANTH6911 Supervised Reading II

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: ANTH3922 Assessment: 1x2000wd Literature review (40%), 1x4000wd Research essay (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
What is culture? One of the most influential concepts of the twentieth century has also been a central idea in anthropology. This unit will trace some major twists and turns in definition of the concept of over the past century. We will then consider how contemporary shifts in the idea of culture can inform a critical anthropological understanding of global and planetary processes in the 21st century.
ANTH6916 Culture and Development: Key Concepts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x750wd review (25%), 1x750wd essay (25%), 1x2000wd take-home exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit introduces students with no background in the social sciences to key social science concepts relevant to a critical understanding of intercultural contexts of communication and project development. The unit will enable students to better conceptualise the social and political contexts within which inter-cultural relationships develop and the enabling and constraining aspects of those contexts.
ANZG6006 Delivering Public Value

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Mode of delivery: External
Note: ANZSOG EMPA students only eligible for this unit. The unit is taught at another Institution.
ANZG6007 Decision Making under Uncertainty

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Mode of delivery: External
Note: ANZSOG EMPA students only eligible for this unit. The unit is taught at another Institution.
ANZG6008 Designing Public Policies and Programs

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: External
Note: ANZSOG EMPA students only eligible for this unit. The unit is taught at another Institution.
ANZG6009 Government and the Market Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Mode of delivery: External
Note: ANZSOG EMPA students only eligible for this unit. The unit is taught at another Institution.
ANZG6010 Leading Public Sector Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1b Mode of delivery: External
Note: ANZSOG EMPA students only eligible for this unit. The unit is taught at another Institution.
ANZG6011 Governing by the Rules

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Mode of delivery: External
Note: ANZSOG EMPA students only eligible for this unit. The unit is taught at another Institution.
ANZG6012 Work Based Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x4hr workshop February, 1x12hr workshop (over 2 days) June, 1x12hr residential component (over 2 days) November Prerequisites: ANZG6006 and ANZG6008 Assessment: 1x200wd Research Methodology, 1x10000wd Project Team Applied Research Report (60%), 1xProject Team Presentation (20%), 1x2000wd Individual Reflection Essay (20%) Mode of delivery: External
Note: ANZSOG EMPA students only eligible for this unit. The unit is taught at another Institution.
WBP is the final capstone subject of the EMPA degree. WBP bridges the worlds of classroom and practice by having students undertake an applied research project on a policy or management topic of current importance to public organisations, which is capable of making relevant findings.
ARCH9028 Conservation Methods and Practices

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cameron Logan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 4 hrs/wk + site visits Assessment: Two assignments (2 x 50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aims of this unit are to develop skills in the methods and practices of conservation at an accepted professional level, and to interpret and apply the theory taught in the mandatory core of the course in practical, on-site projects. The unit focuses on culturally significant structures and cultural landscapes and includes: methods of survey and documentation (locating, describing and recording components with possible heritage value; identifying and reading historic fabric; historic and archival research methods; thematic history methods; pattern recognition; natural systems; settlements; cultural mapping; aesthetic analysis; material and stylistic analysis); evaluation methodology (assigning heritage significance); assessment methodology (establishing conservation priorities); and appropriate conservation actions (conservation and management plans, policies and strategies). At the end of the unit the student will successfully demonstrate: an understanding of the Australia ICOMOS Burra Charter and the ability to prepare, in accordance with current accepted professional practice, a conservation plan of a place or places of cultural significance; skill in methods and techniques of analysis, assessment and documentation of cultural significance; and the ability to develop relevant policies and strategies for the conservation of a variety places of cultural significance. The intended outcomes are achieved through inquiry, individual study and research and are demonstrated by each student upon the successful completion of set assignments. The assignments are constructed to allow each student to demonstrate his or her level of understanding of the accepted professional methodology and practice in the preparation and presentation of a conservation plan. Assessment criteria based on unit outcomes are used for the examination of the assignments.
ARCH9081 Heritage Law and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cameron Logan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Test (25%), Short Paper (25%), Long Paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit students will become familiar with the system of legal protections and policy instruments that underpin heritage conservation activity. They will explore the idea of cultural property and of shared environmental resources and the ways in which these are balanced with private property rights in heritage policy and law. Classes will address the varying levels at which heritage protections operate, from international protocols down to local planning schemes. Students will become familiar with legislation, regulations, planning instruments and policies as well as the use of registers, inventories and other records of significant items. The unit will also address the roles of various government agencies involved in heritage conservation and develop an understanding of how such agencies utilize heritage studies and assessments, and how they develop heritage law and policy. Students in this unit will consider how different instruments and heritage protections relate to different scales and types of place including landscapes, streetscapes, archaeological resources, gardens and individual buildings. They will also consider how different sanctions and incentives achieve policy aims and support statutory obligations. Finally, together, staff and students will explore innovative legal and policy mechanisms for preventing or redressing the destruction of historically significant places and encouraging the meaningful protection of culturally significant places.
ARCH9082 Conservation of Traditional Materials

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cameron Logan Session: Intensive March Classes: Lectures:2 hrs/wk (11 wks), site visits: 2hrs/wk (2 wks) Assessment: 1x 4000 word essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aims of the course are to introduce students to broad range of specialists from the related fields of architectural conservation and related disciplines who specialize in the conservation of traditional building fabric; to introduce students to the appropriate and accepted methods traditional construction and of the conservation traditional architectural materials; and to familiarise students with the relevant literature pertaining to the domain. The objectives of the course are to allow the student to develop a broad understanding of excellent contemporary conservation practice in the conservation of traditional materials; to develop a broad understanding of traditional building methods; to develop an understanding of good and bad practice in the conservation of traditional materials. Students will be expected to demonstrate the ability to research and prepare academic paper related to the domain.
Class preparation: 1hour/week, assessment preparation: 15-20 hours/semester
ARCL6902 The Archaeology of Athens

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lesley Beaumont with Dr Stavros Paspalas, Deputy Director of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens (AAIA) Session: Summer Early Classes: 15 hours of formal lectures at the AAIA + approx 45 hours of on-site teaching in Athens, Attica and Delphi. Assessment: Oral presentation (20%), 4000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit takes the form of an intensive 3 week Summer School based in Greece. Formal lectures are combined with visits to key ancient monuments and museums in Athens and Attica. The aim is to provide students with a vivid opportunity to explore at first hand the material culture of Athens in the sixth and fifth centuries BC and to develop an understanding of Athenian society during these two extraordinary centuries.
ARHT5902 Art Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4000wd research essay (60%), 1x2000wd seminar paper (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Australian Art writing/criticism: theories and methods. The unit explores the varieties of art writing, particularly those which engage with the ongoing production of art and its institutions. This will be pursued through:
(i) a study of the practice of individual critics of modern art;
(ii) examination of the work of recent and current art writers, particularly in Australia;
(iii) direct practice in a number of different writing genres. The results of (i) and (ii) will be presented in the form of both class papers and essays; (iii) will take the form of writing exercises with stipulated frameworks.
ARHT5908 The Business of Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd case study report (20%), 1x4000wd research essay (60%), 1xseminar presentation (500wd equivalent)(20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the history and current practices of the business of art through site visits, case studies and lectures. The unit includes the study of established and emerging art markets, auction houses, concepts of authenticity, aesthetic and monetary value, collecting and exhibiting art for private, corporate public and satellite art collections, artist run and alternative spaces, corporate sponsorship and grants, art museums and tourism, and the principles of law and ethics.
ARHT5909 Death and Disease in Renaissance Art

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Louise Marshall Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4500wd total essay and class presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the interplay between art and disease in Renaissance Italy. Issues to be investigated include: the religious and psychological effects of catastrophic disease, such as the Black Death, and the possible effects on art; images of death and disease before and after the plague; the prophylactic role of images; Renaissance conceptions of the workings of the celestial court; civic, corporate, familial and individual patronage of plague images.
Textbooks
Recommended Readings: P. Ziegler, The Black Death, London, 1969 ; M. Meiss, Painting in Florence and Siena after the Black Death, Princeton, 1951 (and later reprintings) ; L. Marshall, Manipulating the Sacred: Image and Plague in Renaissance Italy, Renaissance Quarterly, 47, 1994, 485-532
ARHT6914 Art and Curatorship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd seminar paper (40%), 1x3500wd research or exhibition project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to object-based skills and issues in the history of art. It considers issues and problems related to connoisseurship, conservation, display and interpretation in the context of museums and art galleries. The unit also provides an introduction to the materials and techniques of art production. Much of the material is presented on-site by curators of the Art Gallery of NSW.
ARHT6920 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Consultation with supervisor as arranged Assessment: Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must also enrol in ARHT6921 the following semester.
Master degree candidates only may undertake research and writing on an approved topic towards a dissertation of 12000 words under the supervision of an academic staff member. The topic is elective. Art Curatorship students have the option of writing a thesis in the form of an exhibition plan and catalogue Essay. The dissertation is equivalent to two units of study. Students enrol in ARHT6920 Dissertation 1 in their first semester of research and complete by enrolling in ARHT6921 Dissertation 2 in the following semester.
ARHT6921 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Consultation with supervisor as arranged Prerequisites: ARHT6920 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Master degree candidates only may undertake research and writing on an approved topic towards a dissertation of 12000 words under the supervision of an academic staff member. The topic is elective. Art Curatorship students have the option of writing a thesis in the form of an exhibition plan and catalogue Essay. The dissertation is equivalent to two units of study. Students enrol in ARHT6920 Dissertation 1 in their first semester of research and complete by enrolling in ARHT6921 Dissertation 2 in the following semester.
ARHT6923 Capstone Art Curating Internship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr seminar/semester, 2-4 x1hr tutorial/semester Assessment: 1x1500wd project journal (20%),1x4000wd critical essay (40%), 1x internship presentation (500wd equivalent) (10%), workplace supervisor's report (30%), Practical field work: internship of 20 days Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The capstone internship for Master of Art Curating students is a project-based placement of 20 days minimum in an art gallery, museum or appropriate art organisation in Sydney, Australia or overseas. Internships invite critical reflection on art curatorial practice, foster the acquisition of essential knowledge and skills, and enhance students' employment prospects in the sector. Projects are supervised by a professional from the host institution and focus on specific areas of work eg. curatorial or collection research, exhibition development and installation, public programs or registration.
ARHT6930 Film Theory: Art, Industry, Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x2000wd Essays (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The relation of film to industrial modernity is an ongoing issue for film theorists. With the advent of digital image processes and production the relation of art and industry has re-emerged with a new set of problems. How do we conceptualise the new forms? What theoretical and aesthetic language(s) do we draw on? And how best to rethink film in the face of rapid technological, formal and cultural change? These issues will be investigated via an examination of the history of film theory's attempts to formulate concepts adequate to the age of industrial modernity.
ARHT6933 Australian Art: A World Upside Down

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anita Callaway Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd assignment (20%), 1x3000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit considers the special significance of ephemeral art as the cultural thread that linked the European hub to its periphery. It will examine how, in colonial situations where the academic canon could not apply, Western high-art traditions were encoded in innovative and less rarefied imagery. In identifying the classical and theatrical rhetoric embodied in popular art and public spectacle, the unit will consider the practical, theoretical and historiographical implications of this Antipodean inversion of the traditional hierarchy of art.
ARHT6935 The Art Museum: Past, Present and Future

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (50%), 1x2000wd seminar paper (40%), 1xseminar presentation (500wd equivalent) (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores the art museum from its origins in Renaissance and Baroque princely and aristocratic collections, through to the creation of new public spaces and institutions for exhibiting art in the 18th and 19th centuries, including national Academies and international exhibitions. Shifting conceptions of the role of the art museum will be addressed: from public instruction to nation building and mass entertainment. The final section explores current debates, including those posed by an expanding range of new media and changing audience perceptions.
ARHT6936 Biennales, Triennales and Contemporary Art

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Please consult department for class schedule Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (75%), 1x1000wd Class presentation in situ at the Biennale (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the historical emergence and rapid growth of contemporary international surveys of art since the 1960s. The Biennales, Triennales, Documentas and related international exhibitions are a spectacular cornerstone of today's global art industry. The proliferation of museums, exhibitions, art fairs and cultural events at the international level are now competing with other areas of mass entertainment. In particular, the international contemporary art survey has become a pre-eminent, critical platform for art, trade and cultural politics. The unit is run in conjunction with the Biennale of Sydney. It is an intensive class, with a large component held in situ at Biennale exhibitions, performances, conferences and satellite events.
ARHT6937 Curating Asian Art

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2400wd curatorial research portfolio (40%), participation and seminar workshop (20%), 1x2000wd exhibition proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit investigates the development of Asian art exhibitions and the role of the curator of Asian art. Course material will be based on the broad range of activities of local curators, including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the Museum of Contemporary Art and the Asian Australian Arts Centre. Issues examined include museum policy, research resources, staffing structures, publicity and educational activities. Comparative case studies will be made of pre-modern, modern and contemporary Asian art exhibitions.
ARHT6939 The Documentary Film

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week pre film screening, 1x2hr film screening/week,1x1hr seminar/week post film screening Assessment: 1x1500wd seminar paper (25%), 1x2500wd Research essay (60%), participation and Seminar presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the theory, practice and criticism of documentary filmmaking from its inception to the present. It will focus on key movements and filmmakers as a means of tracking and assessing critical changes to the status and value of the 'truth claims' of the documentary. The unit will move towards a critical assessment of the slow erosion of the distinction between the documentary image and the fiction image in its place in new media.
ARHT6941 Aesthetic Debates and Curatorial Practices

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd seminar paper (40%), 1x4000wd research project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Art curatorship is both a practical and theoretical activity, one that could be said to itself create rather than simply respond to the aesthetic debates within art history and film studies. This unit critically analyses the practical decisions curators, exhibition designers and educators make in staging and framing art exhibitions, developing the various aesthetic implications of these decisions. Students will be encouraged to apply a range of critical methodologies from art history and visual theory to the study of recent art exhibitions, addressing different curatorial display strategies.
ARHT6942 Elective Art Curating Internship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr seminar/semester, 2-4x1hr tutorial/semester Assessment: 1x1500wd project journal (20%), 1x4000wd critical essay (40%), 1xinternship presentation (500wd equivalent)(10%), workplace supervisor's report (30%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The elective internship for Art Curating students is a project-based placement of 20 days minimum in an art gallery, museum or appropriate art organisation in Sydney, Australia or overseas. Internships invite critical reflection on art curatorial practice, foster the acquisition of essential knowledge and skills, and enhance students' employment prospects in the sector. Projects are supervised by a professional from the host institution and focus on specific areas of work eg. curatorial or collection research, exhibition development and installation, public programs or registration.
ARHT6953 Backstage at the Mitchell Library

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Seminar presentation paper (40%), 1x4000wd Research project/essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit engages with the special collections of the Mitchell Library, which is renowned as a repository for both Australasian art works and the historical documentation that supports them. Integrating the practical and scholarly elements of art history and art curatorship, it provides hands-on training in combining visual analysis with primary research. Relevant issues include the relationship of object and text, the comparison of contemporary perspectives with historical records, and the reliability of primary and secondary sources.
ARHT6956 The Politics of Curating Indigenous Art

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd object analysis (35%), 1x3500wd research paper (55%), 4x250wd exhibition diary (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit engages students with the particular sensitivities and protocols involved in caring for historic and contemporary collections of Indigenous art and culture in Australia and overseas. Shifts in the balance of cultural power have compelled many museums to critically reflect on the way that Indigenous collections and objects are stored, handled, interpreted and displayed and this unit will examine the theories and methodologies of Indigenising museums.
ARHT6957 Fakes and Forgers: Art and Authenticity

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: seminar participation (10%), 1x1000wd seminar presentation (15%), 1x2000wd analytic essay (25%), 1x3000wd final project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit investigates questions of authenticity in art and art production. Through the lenses of connoisseurship exhibition, the market, scholarship, and manufacture, students will explore the different forms authenticity takes in art historical and curatorial practices, both past and present.
ARIN6901 Network Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Online activities (20%), 1x1500wd Report and network analysis (25%), 1x1000wd equivalent Responses to readings (20%), 1x500wd Abstract (5%), 1x2000wd Major Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Is the network the distinctive mode of organisation for the 21st century? The Internet is the paradigmatic mode of decentralised many-to-many communication that interconnects with the century-old telecommunications and broadcasting networks. Geopolitical networks have displaced left/right Cold War oppositions. Social and professional networks extend influence beyond traditional institutional and family allegiances. Network models have challenged rationalist rule-governed models of thought and practice. The interdisciplinary critical analysis of current research, theory and debates will allow students to understand and evaluate the significance of networks in the contemporary world.
ARIN6902 Internet Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd journalism piece (40%), 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd tutorial exercise (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The internet plays an increasingly important role in all aspects of social, cultural and economic life. This unit of study explores cultures and governance of the online world and investigates how politics manifest not only in public debates and policy, but also in the struggle to develop new information architectures and digital ecosystems.
ARIN6904 Mobile Media and Games

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Review and presentation (25%), 1x3000wd Critical Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Game/app concept (25%), Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Networked mobile devices and computer games are increasingly prominent in today's mediascapes, supporting practices of individualised mobility and play. This unit of study critically examines the aesthetics, politics and everyday uses of these emerging cultural technologies. It draws on new media studies, game studies and platform studies to explore themes such as the complication of leisure and work spaces, new media industries, gamification, playbour and mobile social media.
ARIN6905 New Media Audiences

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: ARIN6903 Assessment: 1x1500wd Seminar presentation (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd case study reviews (blog) (30%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Media audiences are experiencing knowledge, art and entertainment in novel ways as cultural industries increasingly take up emerging technologies. New Media Audiences investigates the range of contemporary practices of production, distribution and consumption associated with digital tools. We examine the sites where audiences experience digital media: art galleries, cinemas, theatres, homes, mobile devices, public spaces, workplaces and online. We analyse how these spaces and interfaces structure audience experience, afford interaction and encourage participation.
ARIN6912 Digital Research and Publishing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 250wd Research Abstract (5%), 2x500wd Referee's Reports (20%), 1750wd Draft Article (5%), 2500wd Journal Article (40%), 500wd Presentation and report (20%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces desktop and Internet skills for conducting research, managing peer review and publishing an online journal. It also addresses the wider social and epistemological transformations in cultural practices of knowledge generation, management and consumption associated with new technologies. It offers essential skills for all students interested in contemporary research and a reflexive view of the historical and cultural contexts of networked digital research technologies.
ARTS7000 Academic Communication for Postgraduates

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd critical analysis exercise (20%), 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x2500wd reflection journal (20%), 1xSeminar presentation equivalent to 500 words (20%), participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is strongly advised that all students enrolling in this elective complete it during their first semester of study, or in Summer or Winter school when available. ARTS7000 is recommended for two main groups: 1) International postgraduate students who have not completed their Bachelor award at a university where English was the medium of instruction. 2) Domestic postgraduates who have not been in an academic environment for a prolonged period of time.
This unit of study is designed to support International students in developing an understanding of critical analysis and its use as an effective basis for argument. Students will be introduced to the critical and communication practices appropriate to postgraduate study in the humanities. They will develop key attributes in the areas of research and inquiry, ethical, social and professional understanding, and communication relevant to their academic studies and in preparation for their professional lives.
ASNS6010 Asian Language Acquisition 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Assessment: Written assignments and quizzes equivalent to 3000wds (70%), class tests equivalent to 2000wds (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives students an opportunity to begin or improve their proficiency in an Asian language in order to deepen their understanding of Asian cultures and societies. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and its sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilised.
ASNS6010 Asian Language Acquisition 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Assessment: Written assignments and quizzes equivalent to 3000wds (70%), class tests equivalent to 2000wds (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives students an opportunity to begin or improve their proficiency in an Asian language in order to deepen their understanding of Asian cultures and societies. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and its sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilised.
ASNS6011 Asian Language Acquisition 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Assessment: Written assignments and quizzes equivalent to 3000wds (70%), class tests equivalent to 2000wds (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives students an opportunity to improve their proficiency in an Asian language in order to deepen their understanding of Asian cultures and societies. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and its sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilised.
ASNS6011 Asian Language Acquisition 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Assessment: Written assignments and quizzes equivalent to 3000wds (70%), class tests equivalent to 2000wds (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives students an opportunity to improve their proficiency in an Asian language in order to deepen their understanding of Asian cultures and societies. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and its sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilised.
ASNS6012 Asian Language Acquisition 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Assessment: Written assignments and quizzes equivalent to 3000wds (70%), class tests equivalent to 2000wds (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives students an opportunity to further develop their proficiency in an Asian language in order to deepen their understanding of Asian cultures and societies. Students will advance to intermediate levels of Asian language study to develop comprehensive linguistic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and its sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilised.
ASNS6013 Asian Language Acquisition 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Assessment: Written assignments and quizzes equivalent to 3000wds (70%), class tests equivalent to 2000wds (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study gives students an opportunity to further develop their proficiency in an Asian language in order to deepen their understanding of Asian cultures and societies. Students will advance to higher intermediate levels of Asian language study to develop comprehensive linguistic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. in addition, analysis of the structure of the language and its sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilised.
ASNS6091 Dissertation in Asian Studies (1)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-day induction week, 2 or 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: Research and writing towards a dissertation of 10000-15000wds in length (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing towards a dissertation of 10-15000 words on an approved topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Students should consult the postgraduate coordinator to formulate a topic prior to enrolment. Agreement of a supervisor must also be secured before enrolment. This unit is followed by ASNS6092.
ASNS6092 Dissertation in Asian Studies (2)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1 day induction week, 2 or 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Prerequisites: ASNS6091 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 10000-15000wds in length (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Completion and submission of a dissertation of 10-15000 words on an approved topic, written under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Follows ASNS6091.
ASNS6097 Supervised Reading in Asian Studies (1)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x5000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An opportunity, subject to special authorisation, to pursue individual interests under the direction of a qualified staff member in the relevant department. Students authorised to enrol in a supervised reading unit will complete a program of readings selected in consultation with the supervisor, that will be equivalent to the total workload for a normal 6 credit point postgraduate unit. Students will be required to produce 5000 words of written work in English and to meet regularly with the supervisor to report on and discuss the agreed readings.
ASNS6098 Supervised Reading in Asian Studies (2)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x5000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An opportunity, subject to special authorisation, to pursue individual interests under the direction of a qualified staff member in the relevant department. Students authorised to enrol in a supervised reading unit will complete a program of readings selected in consultation with the supervisor, that will be equivalent to the total workload for a normal 6 credit point postgraduate unit. Students will be required to produce 5000 words of written work in English and to meet regularly with the supervisor to report on and discuss the agreed readings.
ASNS6900 Contemporary Asian Societies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3xEssays (equivalent to 5000wds total) (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a compulsory core unit for the Master of Asian Studies. The unit will explore some of the most challenging and sensitive issues confronting Asian societies today while providing training in the conceptual methods used to critically and objectively examine those issues. Where do globalization and rapid economic change leave human rights, minority groups, women, civil society, environment, the poor and the ideals of religious and cultural integrity? Case studies will be used to illustrate concepts, theories and critical methods that can help our thinking on such issues.
ASNS6903 Theory and Method in Asian Studies

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Mid-semester Essay (30%), 1x3000wd final Essay (50%), class performance including Oral Presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is open only to MA (research) and Honours students. Students will be introduced to the theories and intellectual perspectives in humanities and social sciences that are important in the Asian context. They will also learn different methodological approaches to Asian Studies, including archival and library research, ethnographic fieldwork, and interview techniques. Students will pursue their own research projects to apply and demonstrate some of the theories and research methods they have learned.
ASNS6905 Asian Popular Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wds + 500wd equivalent oral component (30%), 1x500wd equivalent oral component (10%), 1x500wd online discussions (10%), 1x3500wd major essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Asia is fast becoming the centre of new developments in the mass media. Focusing on East and Southeast Asia, this unit will introduce major regional trends in film and television, differences in media systems, and cross-cultural understandings of Asian media. Particular focus will be on the analysis of feature films and television from Japan, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand and/or China, and on pan-Asian developments. These analyses will include discussions of the social, cultural and political roles of media.
ASNS6905 Asian Popular Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wds + 500wd equivalent oral component (30%), 1x500wd equivalent oral component (10%), 1x500wd online discussions (10%), 1x3500wd major essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Asia is fast becoming the centre of new developments in the mass media. Focusing on East and Southeast Asia, this unit will introduce major regional trends in film and television, differences in media systems, and cross-cultural understandings of Asian media. Particular focus will be on the analysis of feature films and television from Japan, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand and/or China, and on pan-Asian developments. These analyses will include discussions of the social, cultural and political roles of media.
ASNS6906 Communicating in Asian Contexts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd group work presentation (15%), 1x2000wd report on presentation (30%), 1x2500wd essay (45%), online and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit takes a cross-cultural approach to analysing the interactions of speakers of Asian languages and other language backgrounds, both Asian and non-Asian. Theoretical approaches are introduced through case studies, focusing on cultural key words, language systems and interaction styles. Students will reflect on their own cultures, languages and interaction styles, and undertake cross-cultural research, using primary and secondary sources. This is not a language unit; no knowledge of Asian languages is assumed.
ASNS6908 Media Industries in East Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1xpresentation (equivalent to 1000wd) (20%), 1x1500wd industry report (30%), 1x2500wd major Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the development and challenges of media industries in East Asia; Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong SAR, and China. It takes a broad comparative approach to identify political, economic, social, cultural and technological factors that affect the industries in this dynamic region. The unit covers various aspects of old and new media in the region, such as development and transformation of media industries, state regulation and policy, and the implications of the emergence of new communications technologies.
BETH5000 Critical Concepts in Bioethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Irvine Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13x2hr seminars or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode Assessment: 1x 750wd review (15%) and 1x 1500wd essay (30%) and 1x 2000-2500wd essay (45%) and 1x online work/class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Note: This is a capstone Unit for the Master of Bioethics. If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only. Students will be contacted if this occurs.
This unit of study offers a critical review of the field of bioethics. The course canvasses different ways that bioethics is 'made-up' in discourse, thought and practice, and the meaning of 'bioethics' historically and in contemporary society. Mapping some of the key literature on current on-going debates and contentions, the seminars explore different perspectives that people have of bioethics from points within and outside of the discipline and why bioethics and bioethical dilemmas have become important objects of popular and professional concern. Topics include the moral and ethical dimensions of advances in biomedical science and biotechnology, the virtuous bioethicist, narrative in bioethics, going public in bioethics, bioethics across cultures, feminist bioethics, bioethics and non-human animals, and, climate change and environmental bioethics. Learning activities will include seminars and small group discussion.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a book of readings (in digital format). Supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
BETH5101 Introduction to Ethical Reasoning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ian Kerridge Session: Semester 1 Classes: 13x2hr seminars or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode Assessment: 1x 2000wd essay (35%); 1x 4000wd essay (55%); participation in seminars or online (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Note: If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only. Students will be contacted if this occurs.
In this unit of study students gain the background in ethical philosophy necessary to engage in advanced analyses of issues in bioethics. Introduction to Ethical Reasoning familiarises students with classical theoretical frameworks such as virtue ethics, Kantian deontology, and utilitarianism that have been influential in the history of Western philosophy. The unit also examines more contemporary approaches to ethics, such as the capabilities approach, feminist ethics, human rights doctrines, and poststructuralist approaches. Across these different theoretical frameworks, discussions will focus on topics such as cultural relativism, universalism in ethics, difference and power.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a book of readings (in digital format). Supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
BETH5103 Biomedicine and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Christopher Jordens Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures plus 12x1.5hr seminars, or fully online Assessment: 1x1200wd exercise (30%); 1x3000-4000wd essay (60%); Participation in seminars or online (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Note: If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only. Students will be contacted if this occurs.
How does biomedicine both influence and reflect the broader society of which it is a part? This unit of study addresses this general question by examining a set of issues relating to sex and drugs. A key theme in the course is the "medicalisation" of human experience in the domains of gender, reproduction and sexual behaviour. The course aims to widen the scope of bioethical inquiry through readings that explore the issues from a range of different perspectives including history, sociology, politics, health policy, philosophy, religion, feminism, public health, and personal experience. Each topic introduces specific concepts which students are encouraged to apply. Students are also encouraged to draw on their own disciplinary and/or professional background. Seminars, online discussions and coursework will provide opportunities to learn from other students, and apply learning from other units of study in bioethics.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
Required readings are available through the unit of study website. Supplementary readings can be accessed through the university library.
BETH5201 Ethics and Biotechnology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Savard Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance Education (online). Assessment: 2x400wd tasks (2x10%); 1x1500wd essay (30%); 1x2500wd essay (40%); participation in seminars or online (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study introduces students to the ethical, social and legal issues that underlie a wide range of biotechnologies, including: genetics, genomics, human reproduction, stem cell research, nanotechnology and emerging biotechnologies. Key concepts influencing debates in this area are covered, such as 'procreative beneficence', personhood, risk, consent, public engagement, and property in the body (including gene patenting). Topical case studies are included to keep up with recent developments in the field. Students will explore the ethical limits to research and knowledge in biotechnology.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Stacy Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x7hour intensives; or Distance Education (online). Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assessment: 5xOnline Quiz (50%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit provides students with an overview of the ethical and political issues that underlie public health and public health research. The unit begins with some fundamentals: the nature of ethics, of public health (and how it might be different to clinical medicine) and of public health ethics. It introduces key concepts in public health ethics including liberty, utility, justice, solidarity and reciprocity, and introduces students to different ways of reasoning about the ethics of public health. A range of practical public health problems and issues will be considered, including ethical dimensions of communicable and non-communicable diseases in populations, and the ethical challenges of public health research. Throughout, the emphasis is on learning to make sound arguments about the ethical aspects of public health policy, practice and research. Most learning occurs in the context of five teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format).
BETH5206 Introduction to Public Health Ethics

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Stacy Carter Session: Semester 2a Classes: 2x7hour intensives; or Distance Education (online) Prohibitions: BETH5203 Assessment: 2xOnline Quiz (40%); 1x1500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: Students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma or Master of Public Health may choose to take BETH5203 (6CP) instead of BETH5206 (2CP).
BETH5206 Ethics and Public Health introduces you to a range of ethical issues that arise within the practice of public health. It begins with an orientation to the field: we will discuss conceptualisations of public health, what ethics is, and how ethics relates to evidence. We will talk about the origins and development of public health ethics as a (relatively new) field, and how it is distinguished from other areas of ethics. Your learning will then be structured around three sets of important concepts. The first are concepts central to utilitarian reasoning: benefit, harm and cost. The second cluster of concepts relates to the proper relationship between the citizen and the state (including public health as an institution): they are autonomy, liberty and paternalism. The third cluster includes fairness, justice and equity, concepts that are often used rhetorically in public health, but not always carried through into practice. We will focus on two main case studies to apply what you learn. Throughout this unit you will be encouraged to ask questions, and to compare and debate competing answers to those questions. What is public health? What does it mean to say that something is harmful? To what extent should we each be free to engage in practices that harm our health? What is the proper role of the state in attempting to change the health of populations? What is equity and why does it matter (and if it matters, why aren't we doing more about it)? This is a Core Unit for Graduate Diploma and Master in Public Health students. Most learning occurs in the context of two teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
BETH5207 Arts in Health

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode, 2x2 days (4 hour combined lectures/tutorials) Assessment: 2x300-400wd online tasks (25%), 1x1,500wd essay (25%), 1x2,500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The 'art of health' is more than an historic catchphrase; it is a literal phenomenon. Arts based approaches to health promotion, social determinants of health and to a range of health issues (including mental health, dementia and aging, disability, childhood development and cancer) can have stunningly powerful effects. In the past century the visual, literary and performing arts have emerged as vital components of a community based approach to human health and wellbeing. This unit gives students practical examples of how to incorporate the arts into public health and health care. The course offers a rich and detailed exploration of varying debates in the scholarly and practice-based fields of arts-and-health, which include but are not limited to: status and uses of art therapy; music and medicine; narrative, literature and the 'narrative medicine' movement; hospital art, design and architecture; and the role of art in health research and social marketing campaigns. Students will learn design thinking as a crucial skill in creative problem solving and social innovation, the new approaches taken up to meet the demands of difficult and rapidly shifting social circumstances. In addition to refining skills, this unit requires that students come to grips with the affective and experiential elements of health. This course will appeal to students of public health; literary, visual and performing arts; social work; psychology; and related disciplines, who want to understand more about the interconnectedness of the arts with human health.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
None specified
BETH5209 Medicines Policy, Economics and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Lipworth Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode (2x2 days) and online or fully online Assumed knowledge: A degree in science, medicine, pharmacy, nursing, allied health, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, history, law, communications, public policy, business, economics, commerce, organisation studies, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: Online work (15%) 1x minor essay (35%) 1x major essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Medicines save lives but they can be costly and can have serious adverse effects. Value-laden decisions are continuously being made at individual, institutional, national and international levels regarding the medicines we need, want and can afford. In this unit of study, we will explore and critique global and national policies and processes related to medicines, examining how research and development agendas are set; how medicines are assessed and evaluated; and how new technologies are translated into practice. We will also explore broader trends such as globalisation, commercialisation and changing consumer expectations. By the end of the course, students will understand the forces shaping the development, regulation, funding and uptake of medicines both nationally and internationally, and the political, ethical, legal and economic issues that are at stake. This course is designed to appeal to a wide range of students from ethics, law, public health, health care, policy, communications, economics, business, politics, administration, and biomedical science. Students will be encouraged to focus on issues of most relevance to their own area of study or work.
Textbooks
Readings will be provided