Unit descriptions C

CHSC6201 Ancient Chinese History Dissertation 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week (in weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 & 11) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6904, CHSC6907, CHSC6903, SCLG6902, SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6202 Prohibitions: CHSC6203 Assessment: 2500wd literature review (50%) and 2500wd dissertation proposal (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is seminar-based with two separate sections. The first is a discussion of the theories and literature on ancient Chinese history. The second is the exploration of methodologies for the study of ancient Chinese history. Throughout the semester students will be expected to work on a proposal for a dissertation, which will be developed throughout Ancient Chinese History Dissertation 1B and Ancient Chinese History Dissertation 2.
CHSC6202 Ancient Chinese History Dissertation 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meetings/week (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6904, CHSC6907, CHSC6903, SCLG6902, SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6201 Prohibitions: CHSC6203 Assessment: this unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18,000-20,000wd dissertation, to be completed in CHSC6203 (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents the first part of a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China studies more broadly and in ancient Chinese history more specifically. With the help of a specialist supervisor, students develop a dissertation based on a proposal produced in Ancient Chinese History
Dissertation 1A. This unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18- 20,000 word dissertation, to be completed in Ancient Chinese History Dissertation 2.
CHSC6203 Ancient Chinese History Dissertation 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meeting/week (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 & 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6904, CHSC6907, CHSC6903, SCLG6902, SCLG6918, CHSC6201, CHSC6202 Assessment: 18,000-20,000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China Studies more broadly and in ancient Chinese history more specifically. The unit involves the completion of the dissertation developed in Ancient Chinese History Dissertation 1B. The emphasis is on acquiring skills in research and the dissemination of results. The dissertation may be more or less academic research oriented depending on the needs and requirements of each candidate.
CHSC6204 Business in China Dissertation 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week (in weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 & 11) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6908, (LAWS6857 or LAWS6001), SCLG6902, SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6205 Prohibitions: CHSC6206 Assessment: 2500wd literature review (50%) and 2500wd dissertation proposal (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is seminar-based with two separate sections. The first is a discussion of the theories and literature on China's business environment. The second is the exploration of methodologies for the study of China's business environment. Throughout the semester students will be expected to work on a proposal for a dissertation, which will be developed throughout Business in China Dissertation 1B and Business in China Dissertation 2.
CHSC6205 Business in China Dissertation 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1 hr supervision meeting/week (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 & 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6908, (LAWS6857 or LAWS6001), SCLG6902, SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6204 Prohibitions: CHSC6206 Assessment: This unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18,000-20,000wd dissertation, to be completed in CHSC6206 (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents the first part of a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China studies more broadly and in China's business environment more specifically. With the help of a specialist supervisor, students develop a dissertation based on a proposal produced in Business in China
Dissertation 1A. This unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18- 20,000 word dissertation, to be completed in Business in China Dissertation 2.
CHSC6206 Business in China Dissertation 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meeting/week (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 & 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6908, (LAWS6857 or LAWS6001), SCLG6902, SCLG6918, CHSC6204, CHSC6205 Assessment: 18,000-20,000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China Studies more broadly and in China's business environment more specifically. The unit involves the completion of the dissertation developed in Business in China Dissertation 1B. The emphasis is on acquiring skills in
research and the dissemination of results. The dissertation may be more or less academic research oriented depending on the needs and requirements of each candidate.
CHSC6207 Chinese Law Dissertation 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week (in weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 & 11) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6908, (LAWS6857 or LAWS6001), SCLG6902, SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6208 Assessment: 2500wd literature review (50%) and 2500wd dissertation proposal (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Please see CHSC6209 for more information
This unit is seminar-based with two separate sections. The first is a discussion of the theories and literature on Chinese law. The second is the exploration of methodologies for the study of Chinese law. Throughout the semester students will be expected to work on a proposal for a dissertation, which will be developed throughout Chinese Law Dissertation 1B and
Chinese Law Dissertation 2.
CHSC6208 Chinese Law Dissertation 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meeting/week (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 & 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6908, (LAWS6857 or LAWS6001), SCLG6902, SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6207 Prohibitions: CHSC6209 Assessment: this unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18,000-20,000wd dissertation, to be completed in CHSC6209 (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China studies more broadly and in Chinese law more specifically. With the help of a specialist supervisor, students develop a dissertation based on a proposal produced in Chinese Law Dissertation 1A. This unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18-20,000 word dissertation, to be completed in Chinese Law Dissertation 2.
CHSC6209 Chinese Law Dissertation 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x1-hr supervision meeting/week (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 & 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6908, (LAWS6857 or LAWS6001), SCLG6902, SCLG6918, CHSC6207, CHSC6208 Assessment: 18,000-20,000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China Studies more broadly and in Chinese law more specifically. The unit involves the completion of the dissertation developed in Chinese Law Dissertation 1B. The emphasis is on acquiring skills in research and the
dissemination of results. The dissertation may be more or less academic research oriented depending on the needs and requirements of each candidate.
CHSC6210 Chinese Politics Dissertation 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Minglu Chen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week (in weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 & 11) Prerequisites: CHSC6901 and CHSC6903 and CHSC6907 and SCLG6902 and SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6211 Prohibitions: CHSC6212 Assessment: 2500wd literature review (50%) and 2500wd dissertation proposal (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is seminar-based with two separate sections. The first is a discussion of the theories and literature on Chinese Politics. The second is the exploration of methodologies for the study of Chinese Politics. Throughout the semester students will be expected to work on a proposal for a dissertation, which will be developed throughout Chinese Politics Dissertation 1B and Chinese Politics Dissertation 2.
CHSC6211 Chinese Politics Dissertation 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Minglu Chen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meeting/week (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 & 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901 and CHSC6903 and CHSC6907 and SCLG6902 and SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6210 Prohibitions: CHSC6212 Assessment: this unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18,000-20,000wd dissertation, to be completed in CHSC6212 (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents the first part of a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China studies more broadly and in Chinese politics in particular. With the help of a specialist supervisor, students develop a dissertation based on the proposal produced in Chinese Politics Dissertation 1A. This unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18-20,000 word dissertation, to be completed in Chinese Politics Dissertation 2.
CHSC6212 Chinese Politics Dissertation 2

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Minglu Chen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meeting/week (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 & 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901 and CHSC6903 and CHSC6907 and SCLG6902 and SCLG6918 and CHSC6210 and CHSC6211 Assessment: 18,000-20,000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China Studies more broadly and in Chinese politics more specifically. The unit involves the writing and completion of the dissertation developed in Chinese Politics Dissertation 1B. The emphasis is on acquiring skills in research and the dissemination of results. The dissertation may be more or less academic research oriented depending on the needs and requirements of each candidate.
CHSC6213 Chinese Society Dissertation 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Beatriz Carrillo Garcia Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week (in weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 & 11) Prerequisites: CHSC6901 and CHSC6903 and CHSC6907 and SCLG6902 and SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6214 Prohibitions: CHSC6215 Assessment: 2500wd literature review (50%) and 2500wd dissertation proposal (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is seminar-based with two separate sections. The first is a discussion of the theories and literature on Chinese society. The second is the exploration of methodologies for the study of Chinese society. Throughout the semester students will be expected to work on a proposal for a dissertation, which will be developed throughout Chinese Society Dissertation 1B and Chinese Society Dissertation 2.
CHSC6214 Chinese Society Dissertation 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Beatriz Carrillo Garcia Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meetings (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901 and CHSC6903 and CHSC6907 and SCLG6902 and SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6213 Prohibitions: CHSC6215 Assessment: this unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18,000-20,000wd dissertation, to be completed in CHSC6215 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents the first part of a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China studies more broadly and in social change in China more specifically. With the help of a specialist supervisor, students develop a dissertation based on a proposal produced in Chinese Society Dissertation 1A. This unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18-20,000 word dissertation, to be completed in Chinese Society Dissertation 2.
CHSC6215 Chinese Society Dissertation 2

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Beatriz Carrillo Garcia Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meetings (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901 and CHSC6903 and CHSC6907 and SCLG6902 and SCLG6918 and CHSC6213 and CHSC6214 Assessment: 18,000-20,000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China Studies more broadly and in social change in China more specifically. The unit involves the completion of the dissertation developed in Chinese Society Dissertation 1B. The emphasis is on acquiring skills in research and the dissemination of results. The dissertation may be more or less academic research oriented depending on the needs and requirements of each candidate.
CHSC6216 Health in China Dissertation 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week (in weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 & 11) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6903, CHSC6906, SCLG6902, (SCLG6918 or PUBH5500), (SCLG6918 or MEDF5005) Corequisites: CHSC6217 Prohibitions: CHSC6218 Assessment: 2500wd literature review (50%) and 2500wd dissertation proposal (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is seminar-based with two separate sections. The first is a discussion of the theories and literature on China's health system. The second is the exploration of methodologies for the study of China's health system. Throughout the semester students will be expected to work on a proposal for a dissertation, which will be developed throughout Health in China Dissertation 1B and Health in China Dissertation 2.
CHSC6217 Health in China Dissertation 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meetings (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6903, CHSC6906, SCLG6902, (SCLG6918 or PUBH5500), (SCLG6918 or MEDF5005) Corequisites: CHSC6216 Prohibitions: CHSC6218 Assessment: this unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18,000-20,000wd dissertation, to be completed in CHSC6218 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents the first part of a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China studies more broadly and in China's health system more specifically. With the help of a specialist supervisor, students develop a dissertation based on a proposal produced in Health in China Dissertation 1A. This unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18-20,000 word dissertation, to be completed in Health in China Dissertation 2.
CHSC6218 Health in China Dissertation 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meetings (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6903, CHSC6906, SCLG6902, (SCLG6918 or PUBH5500), (SCLG6918 or MEDF5005), CHSC6216, CHSC6217 Assessment: 18,000-20,000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China Studies more broadly and in China's health system more specifically. The unit involves the completion of the dissertation developed in Health in China Dissertation 1B. The emphasis is on acquiring skills in research and the dissemination of results. The dissertation may be more or less academic research oriented depending on the needs and requirements of each candidate.
CHSC6219 Modern Chinese History Dissertation 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week (in weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 & 11) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6904, CHSC6907, CHSC6903, SCLG6902, SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6220 Prohibitions: CHSC6221 Assessment: 2500wd literature review (50%) and 2500wd dissertation proposal (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is seminar-based with two separate sections. The first is a discussion of the theories and literature on modern Chinese history. The second is the exploration of methodologies for the study of modern Chinese history. Throughout the semester students will be expected to work on a proposal for a dissertation, which will be developed throughout Modern Chinese History Dissertation 1B and Modern Chinese History Dissertation 2.
CHSC6220 Modern Chinese History Dissertation 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meetings (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6904, CHSC6907, CHSC6903, SCLG6902, SCLG6918 Corequisites: CHSC6219 Prohibitions: CHSC6221 Assessment: this unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18,000-20,000wd dissertation, to be completed in CHSC6221 Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents the first part of a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China studies more broadly and in modern Chinese history more specifically. With the help of a specialist supervisor, students develop a dissertation based on a proposal produced in Modern Chinese History
Dissertation 1A. This unit is assessed through the research and writing towards an 18- 20,000 word dissertation, to be completed in Modern Chinese History Dissertation 2.
CHSC6221 Modern Chinese History Dissertation 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr supervision meetings (in weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12) Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6904, CHSC6907, CHSC6903, SCLG6902, SCLG6918, CHSC6219, CHSC6220 Assessment: 18,000-20,000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit represents a culminating academic experience for students in the Master of China Studies by bringing together their knowledge in China Studies more broadly and in modern Chinese history more specifically. The unit involves the completion of the dissertation developed in Modern Chinese History Dissertation 1B. The emphasis is on acquiring skills
in research and the dissemination of results. The dissertation may be more or less academic research oriented depending on the needs and requirements of each candidate.
CHSC6901 Fundamentals of China Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Beatriz Carrillo Garcia Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1500wd in-class presentation (25%) and seminar participation (10%) and 1000wd book review (25%) and 2500wd essay (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study provides an introduction to the main paradigms used to make sense of complexity and change in China. It examines the ways in which China's scale and social and cultural diversity have been theorised and conceptualised in order to explain China's political and socio-economic trajectory. An understanding of these perspectives is crucial to the examination of a wide range of issues of China's past and present processes of change.
CHSC6902 Chinese Enterprise Management

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Hans Hendrischke Session: Int August,Semester 1a Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2000wd case study research outline (15%) and 1000wd presentation of case study (25%) and class participation (10%) and 2000wd case study research paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Business (Business School)
This unit focuses on Chinese economic organisation from an enterprise perspective by analysing the way in which enterprises are embedded in their economic, social and political environment and the consequences that arise for enterprise management and entrepreneurship. The unit combines theoretical analysis with detailed, practical case studies that enable students to familiarise themselves with different types of enterprises including the local private sector, state-owned enterprises and foreign owned enterprises operating in China as well as Chinese-based enterprises expanding into global markets.
CHSC6903 Chinese Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Beatriz Carrillo Garcia Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Corequisites: CHSC6901 Assessment: 1000wd case study research outline (15%) and 1500wd presentation of case study (25%) and class participation (10%) and 2500wd case study research paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides a critical overview of social structures, social change and social movements in China. It examines the ways in which Chinese institutions and structures (social, cultural, economic, and political), individuals (catalysts of change such as Deng Xiaoping) and external forces interact with one another to effect social change. Conflict and cooperation between different societal actors in China are analysed in order to explain the nature of social movements and their impact on social change and stability since 1978.
CHSC6904 Ancient Chinese History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Corequisites: CHSC6901 Assessment: 1000 word tutorial assignment (15%) and 1500wd in class individual presentation (25%) and seminar participation (10%) and 2500wd final essay (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study offers an introduction to Chinese history from the first settlements to the end of the Tang Dynasty (later prehistory to 907AD). It begins with a consideration of the influences and factors that shaped the early periods of state conflict and state formation. It then continues with the development of the imperial system through the Qin, Han and subsequent dynasties, outlining continuity and change in the emergence of Chinese civilisation.
CHSC6906 Health in China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ying Zhang Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2000wd essay (25%) and 1000wd individual presentation (25%) and seminar participation (10%) and 2000wd case study research paper (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
This unit provides a critical overview of China's contemporary health system and health issues. It uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine the interaction between health and China's development process. Through the use of case studies this unit provides students with concrete examples of current and future issues faced by China's health system, including: health policy formation; health services financing, delivery and evaluation; ethical issues in health services delivery; health inequalities; and, China's epidemiological and demographic transitions.
CHSC6907 Modern Chinese History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: CHSC6901, CHSC6902 Assessment: 1000wd short essay (15%) and 1500wd individual presentation (25%) and class participation (10%) and 2500wd Research paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Other
This unit provides an examination of China's political and social history from the end of the Qing Dynasty up until 1978. Focusing on both national and more localised experiences in the search for modernisation, this unit will critically examine imperial collapse, the Republican revolution, the Sino-Japanese Wars, the conflict between Nationalists and Communists that resulted in the establishment of the People's Republic, and finally the Maoist era to the introduction of economic reform in 1978.
CHSC6908 Chinese Business Institutions

This unit of study is not available in 2014

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2000wd case study research outline (15%) and 1000wd presentation of case study (25%) and class participation (10%) and 2000wd case study research paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Business (Business School)
This unit uses an institutional economics approach to explain some of the characteristic features of the Chinese economy, such as the prevalence of networks, local autonomy and organisational choice. Economic institutions are understood as the rules that inform the behaviour of corporations, governments at different levels as well as their complex interactions. Through the use of case studies students will develop an understanding of how the combination of endogenous and exogenous institutional change contributes to China's highly dynamic economic environment.
CHSC6909 Government and Public Services in China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Minglu Chen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: CHSC6901 and CHSC6904 Corequisites: CHSC6908 Assessment: 2000wd case study research outline (15%) and 1000wd presentation of case study (25%) and class participation (10%) and 2000wd case study research paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit focuses on China's changing forms of government and the consequences of this for public services delivery. Public administration and management are examined in the context of changing governance practices, including fiscal and administrative decentralisation, the re-conceptualisation of the public goods framework, and the role of private provision. Emphasis is given to Central-local government relations and the policy networks that ensue. Public policymaking and implementation are then analysed to asses state capacity, policy efficacy and regulatory and accountability issues.
CISS6001 New Security Challenges

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Kamradt-Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2500wd essay (30%) and 3500wd essay (60%) and seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit considers the evolving nature of security in the context of global politics. It focuses on non-military challenges to security while acknowledging the relationships between these and traditional security concerns. Among the topics considered are: international law and security; the privatisation of security; economics and security; energy resources; environmental degradation; the burden of infectious diseases; population dynamics; gender and age perspectives on security; the dilemmas of fragile and failing states; transnational organised crime; and new modes of warfare. The overall objective of the unit is to engage with issues and arguments that challenge how security is traditionally understood. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, independent research, debates and case studies.
CISS6002 Strategy & Security in the Asia-Pacific

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Wilkins Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 3000wd essays (2x40%) and oral presentation (10%) and seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit focuses on the strategic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region and the security challenges it faces. It combines a grounding in International Relations theory, and concepts of strategy and security, with a series of dedicated country profiles. Issues such as great power rivalry, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, piracy, and environmental degradation are all considered. The overall objective of the unit is to engage with issues and arguments about strategy and security that relate specifically to the Asia-Pacific region. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, and independent research.
CISS6004 Health and Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Kamradt-Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2000wd issue brief (40%) and 4000wd research essay (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit assesses the political and security significance of disease-related events and developments. Whether one contemplates historical experiences with smallpox, the contemporary challenges posed by diseases such as HIV/AIDS and SARS, or the risks arising from new scientific developments such as synthetic biology, it is clear that diseases exercise a powerful influence over civilised humankind. The unit concentrates on areas in which human health and security concerns intersect most closely, including: biological weapons; fast-moving disease outbreaks of natural origin; safety and security in microbiology laboratories; and the relationships between infectious disease patterns, public health capacity, state functioning and violent conflict. The overall aim of the unit is to provide students with a stronger understanding of the scientific and political nature of these problems, why and how they might threaten security, and the conceptual and empirical connections between them.
CISS6006 Statebuilding and 'Fragile States'

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2500wd essay (40%) and 3000wd intelligence briefing paper (40%) and 500wd actor profile (10%) and seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the characteristics of so-called fragile and failed states, and the nature of donor and international community engagement with these states. It will explore the international community's gradual acceptance of the norms of humanitarian intervention and post-conflict reconstruction to assist civilians affected by civil war, insurgencies, state repression, institutional weakness and state collapse. The unit will expand upon the theoretical literature with evidence from case studies on Africa, the Middle East, South/Central Asia and the Asia-Pacific.
CISS6008 Population and Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Curson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1000wd demographic security review (20%) and 2000wd briefing paper (30%) and 3000wd seminar paper (40%) and oral presentation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit considers the importance of demographic factors in international security. It attempts to provide answers to the complex questions regarding how population changes affect security concerns. In particular it examines how population dynamics and characteristics such as growth rates, fertility, mortality, age and ethnic structure might be linked to national and international security. Among topics covered will be key global population trends, differing world population transitions, the significance of resource scarcity and environmental degradation, the role of natural disasters, and the significance of ethnic and religious divisions. Case studies will be presented with respect to how demographics may contribute to undermining the viability of modern states and the importance of population to security considerations in the Asia-Pacific region.
CISS6009 Research Essay 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Reilly Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8, or equivalent hours arranged by supervisor and student Assessment: 6000wd research essay (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit consists of a 6000 word research essay under the guidance of a supervisor from CISS. Normally it involves deeper study of a subject which the student has already covered in her/his degree. Entry into this unit is by permission only, and depends upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic and student's existing knowledge in the area. MCom, MBus, and MIntSec students can take this unit as a stand-alone elective unit. MIntSec students may also take this unit in conjunction with CISS6010 Research Essay 2, writing a supervised dissertation of 10000 - 12000 words.
CISS6010 Research Essay 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Reilly Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8, or equivalent hours as arranged by supervisor and student. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75% Corequisites: CISS6009 Assessment: 10000-12000 research essay (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is the second of a two-part, supervised dissertation of 10000 -12000 words to be taken in conjunction with CISS6009 Research Essay 1. Entry into this unit is by permission only and requires the completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75%, and upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic.
CISS6011 Special Topic in International Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof James Der Derian Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive hours Assessment: 3500wd essay (60%) and in-class exam (30%) and participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What is the cyber realm, and how do governments, militaries and the private sector interact in it? What do we mean by cybersecurity and who is responsible for it? What are the major threats faced in the cyber realm and how to they impact the way we govern, do business and interact with each other? Are we prepared for cyber conflict? CISS6011 will give students a theoretical and practical framework for the study of cybersecurity and discuss the vulnerabilities and capabilities of the Internet and the cyber realm. The first half of the unit focuses on the technical aspects of network and systems security. Students will be expected to understand the different technical tools that attackers use to breach cybersecurity and the context in which they do so. In the second half of the unit, students will discuss the different types of cyber threats, from cybercrime to cyberwar, and will be taught how to formulate and evaluate policy options in relation to different cyber threats. The unit will provide the opportunity to develop skills in team-based deliberative decision-making with the aim of converging on a mutually acceptable compromise. The assessment includes both team and individual tasks.
CISS6013 Middle East Conflict and Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Phillips Session: Int December Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Prohibitions: GOVT6154 Assessment: 3000wd essay (45%) and 3000wd policy brief (45%) and seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The Middle East has been plagued for more than a century by a series of national, ethnic and religious conflicts, reflecting shifting regional alliances, the unresolved legacy of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the end of colonial rule. This unit examines the causes and manifestation of intra and inter-state state conflict in the region today by starting with a theoretical framework for examining the process of state-formation in the region and the particularities of the Middle East as a region of developing states. The unit will focus first on some of the specific challenges to the state across the region (such as tribalism, political Islam, and the "oil curse") before examining several inter-state conflicts, with a view of considering the probability of the region becoming more peaceful in the foreseeable future.
CISS6015 Alliances and Coalition Warfare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Wilkins Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: 3000wd essay (80%) and oral presentation (10%) and seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Alliances and coalitions are pivotal features of International Security. This unit interrogates these closely-related phenomena using a combination of conceptual frameworks to analyse them, and empirical case studies to illustrate them. The unit starts with an investigation in the thorny definitional issues that surround the distinctions between 'alliance' and 'coalition', then outlines the major conceptual theoretical works pertinent to examining these phenomena, such as 'balance of power', 'intra-alliance politics', and 'multinational operations'. Equipped with these analytical tools the students will apply these concepts to a series of major cases studies of alliance management and coalition warfare operations. Case studies include World War I and II, The Cold War (NATO/Warsaw Pact), The Gulf War (1991), the Balkan Wars (Bosnia 1992-5, Kosovo 1999) and the current 'global war on terror' (i.e. operations in Iraq and Afghanistan). Through this process students will gain both a conceptual and practical understanding of peacetime alliance behaviour and the principles of conducting military operations alongside allies. Student presentations will include an emphasis upon Australia's role as an alliance/coalition partner in historical and contemporary conflicts.
CISS6016 Chinese Foreign and Security Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Jingdong Yuan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 4500wd research paper (60%) and 1000wd book report (20%) and 500wd equivalent class presentation (10%) and seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
China's rise to regional and global prominence has attracted growing attention in recent years. Scholars as well as policymakers debate and assess the implications of rising Chinese power for regional security and the international system. This seminar introduces students to Chinese foreign and security policy, including its handling of major-power relations, its active pursuit of multilateral diplomacy in regional organizations and participation in international peacekeeping operations, and its changing perspectives on arms control, disarmament, and non-proliferation. It begins with a brief history of phases in Chinese foreign and security policy and then gives an overview of major theoretical approaches to the subject. These theoretical perspectives are useful in examining a wide range of policy issues, ranging from Chinese strategic modernization, security trends in the Taiwan Strait, civil-military relations, the Chinese foreign policy process, and the domestic sources of Chinese foreign and security policy. The unit is taught as a seminar, with students expected to write a book review, a research design and bibliography, and a final research paper. Students will be required to do assigned reading, participate actively in class discussions, make oral presentations of their book review and research paper, and serve as a discussant for one of their classmates' papers.
CISS6018 Nuclear Arms Control & Non-proliferation

Credit points: 6 Session: Int March Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: 1000wd take-home exercise (20%) and 4500wd research essay (60%) and 500wd equivalent group presentation (10%) and seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces students to the basic knowledge of the issues, challenges, and policies related to nuclear arms control and non-proliferation. The principal objective is to give students a better understanding of the politics of arms control and non-proliferation and help them develop the analytical skills for undertaking policy-relevant research and the ability to develop policy recommendations. The unit is also designed to examine proliferation problems and the ways that arms control can contribute to national and regional security.
CISS6019 War and Strategy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Thomas Wilkins Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2000wd essays (2x40%) and 500wd seminar presentation (10%) and seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit aims to supply students with an introduction to military affairs and the conduct of war. It considers the complex relationship between politics and strategy and examines strategic thought, the application of land/air/space/naval power and military technologies. It applies this knowledge to interactive case studies before proceeding to investigate more contemporary strategic problems such as the 'revolution in military affairs', 'new' wars, and counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency.
CISS6020 Geopolitics of Energy Security in Asia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Lee Session: Summer Main Classes: The unit is taught over a 10-day period of 6-hrs each day Assessment: 500wd research outline (15%) and 4000wd research paper (60%) and 500wd equivalent seminar presentation (15%) and seminar participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Focusing on China and India, this unit of study examines why energy security is a critical security issue in the Indo-Pacific, and in international relations. The unit has two principle objectives: (1) developing an understanding of the domestic priorities, politics and economics of China and India, and examining how these factors play an important role in shaping energy security and foreign policy; (2) analysing the geostrategic implications of China and India's energy security policies on other key regional players.
CLST6007 Old Irish 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd translation exercise (20%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Old Irish was the language spoken and written in Ireland in the early Middle Ages, and is preserved in a range of records, from Ogham stones to manuscripts. In this unit students will develop a knowledge of Old Irish grammar and vocabulary, and learn to read texts in Old Irish.
CLST6011 Old Irish 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CLST6007 Assessment: 1x2000wd translation exercise (40%), 1x3000wd essay (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit seeks to give the students further insights about Old Irish, building on those achieved by taking Old Irish 1. The main focus remains on the grammar of the language, as well as its phonology and orthography; an outline is provided of the history of Irish. Further key texts are read and explicated; the complex metrical patterns of the magnificent poetry are presented.
CLST6012 Middle Welsh 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd translation exercise (20%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Middle Welsh was the language spoken and written in Wales in the Middle Ages (from about the twelfth to the fourteenth century). The most famous text surviving in Middle Welsh is the Mabinogion, a compilation of mythical and legendary material often of much earlier date. In this unit students will develop a knowledge of Middle Welsh grammar and vocabulary, and learn to read texts in Middle Welsh.
CLST6013 Middle Welsh 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Daniel Anlezark Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: CLST6012 Assessment: 1x2000wd translation exercise (40%), 1x3000wd essay (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Building on the knowledge acquired by following Middle Welsh 1, the unit seeks to give the students further insights about Middle Welsh. The main focus remains on the grammar of the language, as well as its phonology and orthography; an outline is provided of the history of Welsh. Further key texts are read and explicated; the complex metrical patterns of the beautiful poetry are presented.