Unit descriptions D - F

DVST6901 Development: Civil Society and Wellbeing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SSCP6900 Assessment: Weekly online exercises 1000wd in total (15%),1x500wd Research essay proposal (10%), 1x3000wd Research essay (45%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
The post-1949 era of 'development' has seen a philosophical and policy shift from nation-building projects of 'modernisation' to the local responsiveness of market forces and civil society. An anthropological emphasis on cultural and local difference and a sociological understanding of state and civil society provide a critical perspective on both this history and current debates. Case studies raise questions of health, gender and childhood, project success or failure, and of the hopes and skepticism development evokes.
DVST6902 Development: Communication and Education

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SSCP6901 Assessment: 5x600wd critical reviews (50%) and 3000wd Research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
Development is an international and intercultural process that seeks to both implement projects with specific objectives, and change the way people live and think. Language, as communication both enables such projects and is a source of incomprehension, misunderstanding and exclusion within them. Education as the longer term attempt to change the thinking and values of people and communities also has language at its heart. This unit examines the nature and politics of language and education and their relationship within development.
DVST6904 Rethinking Poverty

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (35%), 1x1hr Exam (15%), 1x1000wd Reading notes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
Poverty reduction has always been a central development goal. Major international programs such as the UN's Millennium Goals place poverty at their centre. New explanatory concepts such as social exclusion, capability, social capital and sustainability have considerably expanded our thinking about its nature. Students will examine cases from many parts of the world of the way discourses, policies and development practices operate together, enabling an evaluation of contemporary approaches to poverty and their effects on those most vulnerable.
DVST6905 Development Project Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1800wd Qualitative analysis project (38%), 1x3500wd Project evaluation proposal (50%), 1x700wd Seminar presentation (12%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project design, dynamics and evaluation are key elements of the management and delivery of development initiatives. This unit focuses on the history, significance, context and design of evaluation in that process. The unit addresses debates about participatory approaches to evaluation, quantitative and qualitative methodologies. Assessment is organized around the design of a proposal for a project evaluation.
DVST6906 Culture and Politics of Health Development

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd Research essay proposal (10%), 1x3500wd Research essay (60%), 1x1000wd equivalent Class presentation (15%), 1x1000wd Online weekly reading notes (15%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit of study provides an integrated and interpretive approach to understanding the culture and politics of health development in middle and low-income countries. The structures and processes that inform the politics and culture of health development are global, regional and local, and encompass and operate at different social and institutional levels in diverse settings. The articulation of these will be studied, along with the processes and transitions to local worlds that unfold in embedded cultural and social contexts.
DVST6911 Dissertation Part A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Fortnightly 30min supervision meetings Assessment: Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000 words in length (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
DVST6911: Dissertation Part A is the first part of a two semester dissertation project of 12,000 words through which students engage in independent scholarly research about an issue of their own choosing and relevant to the field of development studies.
DVST6912 Dissertation Part B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Fortnightly 30min supervision meetings Prerequisites: DVST6911 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000 words in length (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
DVST6912: Dissertation Part B is the second and final part of a two semester dissertation project of 12,000 words through which students engage in independent scholarly research about an issue of their own choosing and relevant to the field of development studies.
ECMT5001 Principles of Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 500wd (10%), 1xGroup assignment equivalent to 1000wd (15%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit develops the basic principles of data description and analysis, the idea of using the concept of probability to model data generation, and the statistical concepts of estimation and statistical inference, including hypothesis testing. It then develops these concepts and techniques in the context of the linear regression model to show how econometric models can be used to analyse data in a wide range of potential areas of application in economics, business and the social sciences. The unit combines theory and application. The emphasis is upon the interpretation of econometric estimation results and requires software for hands-on experience.
ECMT6002 Econometric Applications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT5001 Prohibitions: ECMT5002 Assessment: 1x1500wd equivalent Group project (25%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit illustrates how econometric methods can be applied to economic data to solve problems that arise in economics and business. Econometric theory provides the techniques needed to quantify the strength and form of relationships between variables. Applied econometrics is concerned with the strategies that need to be employed to use these techniques effectively; to determine which model to specify and whether the data are appropriate. Guidelines for undertaking applied work are discussed. Case studies drawn from economics, marketing, finance, and accounting are also discussed. The unit includes a major econometric modelling project.
ECMT6003 Applied Business Forecasting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prerequisites: ECMT6002 Assessment: 1x1500wd equivalent Take-home assignment (30%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to provide an introduction to the practice of forecasting in business. Forecasting requires both practical experience in model building and some statistical theory. To blend the theory and practice, many business forecasting examples are discussed. Excel is used to do useful preliminary calculations and plotting. At the end of this unit, students should be able to understand the major techniques of forecasting and be able to intelligently forecast actual business time series using Excel and its extensions. Topics covered include: the aims of forecasting and relation to time series analysis; types of time series; plotting and charting time series; practical examples of forecasting and forecasting issues; growth curve methods; least squares (what you need to know for forecasting); decomposition of time series; elementary exponential smoothing with Excel; serial correlation (and Durbin Watson statistic); applied ARIMA modelling and identifying seasonality and "hidden" periodicities.
ECMT6006 Applied Financial Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prerequisites: ECMT6002 Assessment: Take-home assignments equivalent to 1500wds (30%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to some of the widely used econometric models designed for the analysis of financial data, and the procedures used to estimate them. Special emphasis is placed upon empirical work and applied analysis of real market data. The unit deals with topics such as: the statistical nature of financial data; the specification, estimation and testing of assets pricing models; the analysis of high frequency financial data; and the modelling of volatility in financial returns. Throughout the unit, students are encouraged (especially in assignments) to familiarise themselves with financial data and learn how to apply the models to these data.
ECMT6007 Analysis of Panel Data

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prerequisites: ECMT6002 Assessment: 1xGroup assignment equivalent to 1000wds (20%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Recently, empirical research in economics, finance, marketing and accounting has been enriched by the increasing availability of new sources of data, known as panel data. A 'panel' refers to the pooling of observations on a cross section of households, countries, firms etc. over several time periods. Panel data sets possess several major advantages over conventional cross-sectional or time series data sets. This unit aims to offer a comprehensive treatment of the analysis of panel data, which will allow students to deal in a pragmatic way with fundamental issues, such as controlling for individual heterogeneity, reducing collinearity among regressors, addressing statistical hypotheses and identifying effects that are simply not detectable in pure cross-section or time series data.
ECON5001 Microeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5040 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1000wd (10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (35%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level microeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Microeconomics studies how economic agents make choices in a variety of environments. The unit covers theory and applications of the principles of consumer choice, of firm behaviour, and of strategic interaction among economic agents. Equipped with these theories of decision making, students can address a range of interesting and important questions. Examples are: What market strategy should a firm adopt with its competitors? How might one create a market to deal with externalities such as pollution? What are the implications of different kinds of taxes? What compensation scheme will provide the right incentives to work?
ECON5002 Macroeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5003 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1500wd (20%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level macroeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behaviour. The unit covers theories of the engines of long-run economic growth, of unemployment, of money, inflation, the interest rate and the exchange rate, as well as consumption, saving and investment behaviour. The unit also studies a number of applications of the theory and addresses contemporary macroeconomic problems and policy.
ECON5004 Communication in Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Assessment: 2x1500wd assignments (35% each), 1x10min (1500wd equivalent) oral presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is graded on a pass/fail basis.
This unit of study aims to enhance oral and written communication skills and improve understanding of how to engage with academic economics. A series of tasks will consider economics academic texts in context and require learners to understand, analyse and produce appropriate spoken and written texts. Concepts in critical analysis will provide the basis for improved persuasive communication, including the difference between convention, fact, opinion and preference; deductive and inductive proof; validity and truth; evidence; and the ethics of persuasion.
ECON5005 Quantitative Tools for Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5004 Assessment: 5x200wd Online Quizzes (15%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester Test (35%), 1x2hr Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is graded on a pass/fail basis.
This unit of study aims to enhance mathematical ability to provide a skill set that enables students to thrive in their study of economics. Themes such as algebra, the plotting of points, lines, and functions in two and three dimensional space, differential calculus and simultaneous equations are the basis on which the skills are taught.
ECON5006 Economics of Law and Public Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: in class participation (15%), 1x10 min presentation (15%), 1x1500wd policy evaluation report (30%), 1x2hr final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study introduces tools to study the impact of laws and public policy on individual behaviours. We will critically evaluate empirical research produced by economists, sociologists, criminologists, and legal scholars. Topics will focus on criminal justice policy but will also cover other areas of law such as labour and social policy.
ECON5007 The Economics of Financial Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5040 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester exam (30%), 1x1000wd assignment (20%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Financial markets play a fundamental role in a modern economy. In this unit of study we analyse how financial markets function, with a particular focus on: the factors underlying demand and supply; risk and uncertainty; incomplete contracts and renegotiation; and asymmetric information and its implications. In doing so, we identify the key features of markets for financial assets. The unit also examines the development of financial institutions and current issues in financial markets.
ECON5026 Strategic Business Relationships

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd assignment (25%); 1x1hr mid-semester test (25%); 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A firm's success depends on both its internal and external strategic relationships. This unit of study analyses how a firm can manage these relationships. We examine agency problems within the firm, outlining ways that firms try to mitigate these issues. Strategic relationships with input suppliers examined. We discuss how firms can establish a strong bargaining position in these relationships. The optimal boundaries of the firm are also analysed. We also study how a firm's product-market strategy affects its relationship with its rivals in the output market.
ECON6001 Microeconomics Analysis 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5040 Assessment: 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), 1xTake-home Mid-semester task equivalent to 1000wd (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to modern microeconomic theory and as such has three purposes: (i) to introduce students to the major ideas of modern microeconomics and to develop their understanding of these ideas; (ii) to develop students' facility with analytic economic models; and (iii) to develop students' ability to solve economic problems with the ideas, techniques, and models available to professional economists. Topics covered include (i) individual decision-making by economic agents, (ii) the determination of prices and resource allocation in competitive general equilibrium models, (iii) strategic behaviour by firms under imperfect competition, and (iv) contracting with imperfect information.
ECON6002 Macroeconomics Analysis 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON5002 Assessment: Problem Sets equivalent to 1000wd (10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is aimed at providing students with a sound and comprehensive knowledge of modern macroeconomic theory, an ability to formulate and solve problems analytically, and a general appreciation of how policymakers can use the analysis in practice. Topics covered include (i) micro-foundations of macroeconomics, focusing on consumption, investment, money demand, and credit rationing; (ii) equilibrium macroeconomics, focusing on the conventional prototype as well as on recent stochastic macroeconomic models; and (iii) dis-equilibrium macroeconomics, concepts, issues, and models.
ECON6003 Mathematical Methods of Econ Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 and ECON5002 Assessment: Assignments equivalent to 1000wds(10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to mathematical economics. It has three purposes. First, to introduce students to the mathematical concepts and methods that are central to modern economics. Second, to give a set of economic applications of the mathematical methods. Third, to develop the students' ability to formulate logical arguments with the degree of precision and rigour demanded in modern economics. The mathematical topics covered include introductory analysis and topology, convex analysis, linear algebra, calculus of functions of several variables, optimisation, and introduction to dynamic programming and dynamical systems. The particular economic applications presented may vary from year to year, but usually include demand theory, production theory, and growth theory.
ECON6006 Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 or ECOF6080 Assessment: 1x750wd equivalent Mid-semester test (20%), 1x750wd equivalent Group presentation (20%), 1x1000wd Essay (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (40%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of this unit is to examine the nature of inter-firm rivalry in industries with market power. The unit begins with an exploration of the various ways in which firms can increase their market power by extracting more surplus from consumers by colluding with rivals or by excluding entrants. The topics for this part of the unit include price discrimination, product differentiation, advertising, research and development, predation and mergers. The unit also attempts to explain the various contractual and ownership linkages that exist between various stages of production. The latter involves a discussion of exclusive territories agreements, resale price maintenance, exclusive dealing, franchising and divisionalisation.
ECON6008 International Money and Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5002 Assessment: 1x1hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x1000wd Essay (15%), 1x2.5hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the following topics: overview of the International Monetary System; foreign exchange markets, spot and future markets; swaps and options; arbitrage; covered and uncovered interest parity; exchange rate determination; forecasting exchange rate movements; exchange rate intervention; and the role of central banks.
ECON6009 Economics of the Labour Market

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 or ECON6002 Assessment: Take-home assignments equivalent to 1000wds 20%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of this unit is to study some of the major issues in modern labour markets. Trends such as the increase in part-time work, the growing inequality in income and earnings, changes in the returns to education, and the simultaneous increase in hours of work and unemployment are addressed. The material consists of both empirical facts relating to the labour markets and the theories which are used to understand these facts. Part of the unit is devoted to the study of wage and employment contracts in the presence of uncertainty and other information problems. Imperfect information will have implications for the level of employment and unemployment, the structure of wages, and the use of particular forms of compensation such as bonuses, trust funds, and performance bonds.
ECON6010 Public Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 Assessment: 1x2hr Final exam (50%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), Take-home assignments equivalent to 1000wds 20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Recent innovations in public economics have overturned previously accepted policy rules. This unit focuses on the modern treatment of public policies relating to taxation, pricing of public sector outputs and public investment. Emphasis is placed on how different informational capabilities and jurisdictions of the government impact on the design of policy. The areas of application in taxation include the design of efficient and equitable consumption taxes, the structure of income taxation and the appropriate mix of income and consumption taxes. In response to market failures, pricing and investment rules for public enterprises, the provision and pricing of public goods, and policy responses to externalities and information problems are covered.
ECON6016 Trade and Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5002 or ECON5040 Assessment: 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x1500wd equivalent Seminar paper and presentation (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to highlight the relation between trade and development from an institutional and structural perspective, with appropriate modifications of received general economic principles, theories and policies. It closely studies the integration process of traditional segment of a developing society into its modern counterpart in countries selected from Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific regions. It examines role of the state and international institutions (like the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, World Trade Organization), rationale for trade, planning and market mechanisms in developing economies, and also socio-cultural preconditions and economic requirements for a market economy. It focuses on a wide range of developmental problems and issues (such as foreign aid, debt, investment, technology transfer) from both national and international points of view.
ECON6018 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5040 Assessment: 1xSeminar paper and presentation equivalent to 1000wd (25%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study emphasis is exclusively concerned with market failures that impact on the natural environment. Attention is given to why these market failures occur and what role there is for regulation and government policy. Topics covered include efficiency and markets, market failure, externalities (e.g. pollution), various methods of regulating pollution, and measuring the demand for environmental quality.
ECON6021 Financial Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 Assessment: 1x2hr Mid-semester test (40%), 1x2.5hr Final exam (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an understanding of the economic foundations of financial theory and the economic framework upon which that theory is based. Much of the work covered is an application of both microeconomic and macroeconomic theory to the special problems encountered in the study of the financial side of an economy. The relevance of these foundations is illustrated with empirical research using Australian and international data.
ECON6023 International Trade

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 Assessment: 1x1500wd equivalent Written report (30%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit develops the modern theory of international trade and commercial policy and examines some empirical applications. Topics covered include competitive trade theory; comparative advantage and theories of international trade patterns; the gains from trade; empirical evidence and methodology; imperfectly competitive trade theory and economies of scale, differentiated products, and technology; analysis of the effects of tariffs and trade quotas upon trade under competitive and imperfectly competitive market structures; the formation and design of regional trade agreements and the strategic behaviour of multinational enterprises. It will be suitable for those with an interest in international trade and business issues as well as those who may wish to pursue PhD research in these areas. It will be taught at a graduate level and so presumes knowledge of advanced undergraduate microeconomics.
ECON6024 Private Equity

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5040 Assessment: 2500wd written assignments (50%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Private equity (PE) is crucial in developing new business ventures & promoting innovation. This unit investigates how PE firms operate, analysing the key strategic issues they face during the fundraising, investing & exit stages of the PE cycle. Topics covered include: the determinants and types of PE fundraising, the organisational structure of PE firms, the PE firm's investment decision, the PE firm-investee company relationship and the design of exit strategies. The role of PE in the broader economy is also discussed. Finally, we introduce some of the ethical issues PE firms face.
ECON6025 Strategic Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 or ECOF6080 Assessment: 1x1.5hr Mid semester test (40%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Tutorial assignments equivalent to 1000wds (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Decision makers face two types of uncertainty: uncertainty about the state of nature (how much oil is in an oilfield) and uncertainty about the strategic behaviour of other decision makers (how many oil wells they will drill). This unit of study focuses on strategic uncertainty and the uses decision makers can make of the concepts of game theory to guide their decisions. Game theory studies situations where a) agents have conflicts of interests and b) agents can take actions that directly affect their payoffs and the payoffs of others. A very broad range of applications from business and economics fit the above description and therefore can be studied by the methods of game theory. Applications include, firm pricing and output decisions, market entry and exit, hold-up, collusion, bargaining, auctions, and signalling.
ECON6027 Experimental Economics

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 Assessment: Seminar participation (20%), 1x1350wd Take-home exercise (30%), 1x2250wd Take-home exercise (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study deals with the use of laboratory and field experiments in order to help assessing economic problems. Economic experiments are becoming a useful tool for the validation of theory, the development of new theory, the generation of advice to decision makers, and the design of new economic institutions. Economics aims to explain the 'real world' behaviour of agents. The lectures will provide opportunities to identify apparent contradictions between the predictions of economic models and experimental outcomes. The classes on experimental economics will follow a learning-by-doing approach. Most topics will be introduced in the experimental lab. Outcomes will be discussed in the following class and compared with theoretical predictions and previous experimental research.
ECON6029 Health Economics and Policy Evaluation

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 and ECMT5001 Assessment: 1x1500wd assignment (20%); 1x1hr mid-semester test (20%); 1x2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit, students will engage in discussing major health care issues and applying econometric tools to assess the (cost)-effectiveness of health care policy reforms. The following topics are likely to be covered: (1) international health care systems and finance, (2) determinants of the demand and supply of health care and behaviours, (3) inequalities in health and access to care, and (4) current policy reforms such as the introduction of provider incentives and co-payments. Each topic will be accompanied by an empirical application and replication assignment.
ECON6101 Special Topic in Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive May,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 and ECON5002 Assessment: Depends on topic Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must seek written permission from the School of Economics Postgraduate Coordinator to enrol in this unit.
Study of a special topic in postgraduate Economics. Topics will vary from semester to semester according to staff availability and the presence of visitors. If taught in both semesters, the topic in Semester 2 will be different to that in Semester 1.
ECON6501 Economics Postgraduate Exchange 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON postgraduate level unit.
ECON6502 Economics Postgraduate Exchange 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON postgraduate level unit.
ECON6503 Economics Postgraduate Exchange 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON postgraduate level unit.
ECON6504 Economics Postgraduate Exchange 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON postgraduate level unit.
ECON6505 Economics Postgraduate Exchange 5

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON postgraduate level unit.
ECON6506 Economics Postgraduate Exchange 6

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON postgraduate level unit.
ECON6507 Economics Postgraduate Exchange 7

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON postgraduate level unit.
ECON6508 Economics Postgraduate Exchange 8

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students wishing to undertake a Study Abroad program must enrol in this unit to receive credit for a unit equivalent to an ECON postgraduate level unit.
ECON6904 Topics in Labour Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 and ECON6003 and ECMT6002 Assessment: 2500wd equivalent assignments (50%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study surveys contemporary research in labour economics. The field of labour economics is very broad, dealing with fundamental issues ranging from resource allocation to distributional equity and social welfare. The subject matter covers the determinants of wages, employment and unemployment; insurance and incentive mechanisms; and the behavioural effects and welfare impacts of institutions and public policies. In this unit students will have the opportunity to analyse theoretical models and their empirical applications.
ECON6905 Topics in Industrial Organisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 and ECON6003 and ECMT6002 Assessment: 2500wd equivalent assignments (50%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an understanding of some of the current developments in the field of industrial organisation. The focus is both on theoretical understanding and practical application. A central aim of this unit of study is to enable students to undertake further theoretical or empirical research in the area of industrial organisation.
ECON6906 Topics in Economic Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 and ECON6003 and ECMT6002 Assessment: 2500wd equivalent assignments (50%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an understanding of some of the current developments in the field of development economics. The focus is both on theoretical understanding and practical application. A central aim of this unit of study is to enable students to undertake further theoretical or empirical research in the area of development economics.
ECON6907 Topics in History of Economic Thought

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 and ECON6003 and ECMT6002 Assessment: 2500wd equivalent assignments (50%), 1x1.5hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study revolves around the intensive study of key elements of selected classic works in the development of economic thought. This course of lectures and seminars is not intended to be of purely historical or antiquarian interest; it is animated by the belief that such classic works remain highly relevant, in a fundamental way, for contemporary theoretical and policy debates. In particular, the aim is to: (i) demonstrate the evolutionary and temporal nature of current economic theory, (ii) indicate the attitudes which have developed in the field of policy, and how these are related to past theory, environment, and action; and (iii) make the student aware of the literary, philosophical and cultural elements underlying economic knowledge and practice. Another aim of this unit of study is to enable students to achieve a critical command of conceptual machineries of thought and analysis.
ECON6909 Topics in Microeconomic Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 and ECON6003 and ECMT6002 Assessment: 2500wd equivalent assignments (50%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an understanding of some of the current developments in the field of microeconomics. The focus is both on theoretical understanding and practical application. A central aim of this unit of study is to enable students to undertake further theoretical or empirical research in the area of microeconomics.
ECON6910 Topics in Macroeconomic Analysis

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 and ECON6003 and ECMT6002 Assessment: 2500wd equivalent assignments (50%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide an understanding of the latest theoretical and empirical policy-relevant developments in the field of advanced macroeconomics. The focus is on both theoretical understanding and the practical application of state-of-the-art modelling techniques. A central aim of this unit of study is to enable students to undertake further theoretical or empirical research in the area of macroeconomics.
ECON6948 Special Topic in Economic Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 and ECON6003 and ECMT6002 Assessment: 2500wd equivalent assignments (50%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Study of an advanced topic in Economics. Topic may vary from semester to semester according to staff availability and the presence of visitors. If taught in both semesters, the topic in Semester 2 may be different to that in Semester 1. Students must seek written permission from the School of Economics Postgraduate Coursework Coordinator to enrol in this unit.
ECON6998 Special Topic in Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 and ECON6003 and ECMT6002 Assessment: 2500wd equivalent assignments (50%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Study of an advanced topic in Econometrics. Topic may vary from semester to semester according to staff availability and the presence of visitors. If taught in both semesters, the topic in Semester 2 may be different to that in Semester 1. Students must seek written permission from the School of Economics Postgraduate Coursework Coordinator to enrol in this unit.
ECON7010 Economics Research Dissertation A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Regular individual consultation with academic supervisor Prerequisites: ECON6001 or ECON6002 or ECON6003 or ECMT6002 Prohibitions: ECON7030 Assessment: Research dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the first capstone unit in the MEcAnalysis. Students develop a detailed research proposal for a dissertation, which will be developed throughout Economics Research Dissertation B. Students are expected to take part in a research methods seminar series while receiving individual assistance from a specialist supervisor. This unit is assessed through the research and writing towards a 12,000 word dissertation, to be completed in Economics Research Dissertation B.
ECON7020 Economics Research Dissertation B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Regular individual consultation with academic supervisor Prerequisites: ECON6001 and ECON6002 and ECON6003 and ECMT6002 and ECON7010 Prohibitions: ECON7030 Assessment: 12,000wd research dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the second of two capstone units in the MEcAnalysis. This unit involves the writing and completion of a 12,000 word dissertation, the proposal for which was developed in Economics Research Dissertation A. The emphasis is on students acquiring skills in implementing a research proposal and disseminating the results while under the guidance of a specialist supervisor.
ECON7030 Economics Research Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: regular workshop meetings throughout semester to assist with project management Prerequisites: 24 credit points from Economics elective units of study Prohibitions: ECON7010 or ECON7020 Assessment: 1x6,000wd research project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit represents a culminating academic experience for students in the MEc by bringing together their knowledge in Economic theory and methodology to analyse an economic problem of their choice. This unit involves the writing and completion of a 6,000 word report. The emphasis is on students acquiring skills in identifying an economic problem, undertaking the required analysis using appropriate tools and disseminating the results.
ECOP6010 International Trade Regulation

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (20%), 1x3000wd Essay (45%), 1x1.5hr Exam (25%), Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to competing perspectives on business regulation, then to familiarise students with the main elements of governance and regulation as they affect international business and, in particular, international trade.
ECOP6011 USA-Europe-Japan: From Growth to Crisis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3500wd Essay (60%) and 1500wd report (25%) and 1000wd equivalent Seminar presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will address the formation and breakup of the triad formed by the USA, Europe, and Japan that defined world capitalist relations from the end of the Second World War until the early 1990s. The contradictions of the triad will be analysed as well as the impact of China's post 1978 transformations. The unit will study those processes with the objective of understanding the dynamics of the financial crisis of 2008 and its impact on the European Union.
ECOP6012 Country Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (25%), 1x3000wd project (40%), 1x1000wd Presentation (20%), Seminar participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The impacts of volatility are an ever-present concern for policymakers, firms and households. This unit looks at a diverse range of methods and techniques for assessing country risk (e.g., economic risk, financial risk, sovereign (default) risk, socio-political risk, etc). This entails an overview of the (political) economic frameworks and connecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches to the current research on leading indicators and early warning systems.
ECOP6015 Global Employment and Migration

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1250wd short Essay (20%), 5x 250wd diary digests (20%), 1x1000wd Presentation and write-up (20%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the evolution of international employment opportunities as a feature of the globalisation of economies. Different approaches to the analysis of labour markets provide conceptual frameworks for examining the changing character and structure of global employment and international migration. Case studies examine the effects of state regulatory arrangements and international institutions governing cross-border labour migration and cross-border employment in multinational firms, including professionals, skilled and unskilled workers.
ECOP6015 Global Employment and Migration

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1250wd short Essay (20%), 5x 250wd diary digests (20%), 1x1000wd Presentation and write-up (20%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the evolution of international employment opportunities as a feature of the globalisation of economies. Different approaches to the analysis of labour markets provide conceptual frameworks for examining the changing character and structure of global employment and international migration. Case studies examine the effects of state regulatory arrangements and international institutions governing cross-border labour migration and cross-border employment in multinational firms, including professionals, skilled and unskilled workers.
ECOP6016 China in the World Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1xTeam Oral Presentation (10%), 1x1500wd report (20%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study analyses the modern economic development of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and its role in the international economic system, including the World Trade Organisation. It examines the internal political economy of the PRC; the political economy of transition; and China's transformation into a major centre of foreign direct investment and global exports. In the unit, students will learn the differential impact of China's transformation on the USA, East Asia and Japan, and the European Union. The policy of free trade agreements of China will also be studied. An understanding of these issues is important for people concerned both with investment and trade with China and the global political economic implications of China's emerging market economy under socialism.
ECOP6018 Economic Development: Growth and Wellbeing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
ECOP6031 Research in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Paper (25%), 1x1000wd Paper (25%), 1x4000wd Report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on conducting research in political economy. Weekly seminars examine a range of topics including research design, literature review, data collection and analysis, and writing a research proposal. The seminars provide an opportunity for critical discussion to identify, debate and reflect on the nature and challenge of undertaking research. The assessment is structured to assist the progressive development of a research proposal. Completion of this Unit of Study is a pre-requisite for a Masters dissertation.
ECOP6033 Research Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit involves a supervised writing project. It is supported by a designated unit co-ordinator who will supervise the projects, receive and comment on a project plan and first draft. This is combined with two in-class seminars in which all student are expected to present and discuss their work. Prerequisites: 24 Credit Points Assessment: 4500wd research project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit is offered as a capstone for the Master of Political Economy, as an alternative to the units Dissertation Parts A and B. It provides students with the opportunity to conduct a supervised research project of their own design, drawing on the theoretical perspectives in Political Economy introduced earlier in the course and exploring issues previously encountered in greater depth. Students will be given the opportunity to present and discuss the progress of their work during the semester.
ECOP6101 Core Concepts in Political Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 4x4x500wd seminar papers (40%), 1x4000wd essay (45%), seminar participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit explores the core concepts of Political Economy through the lens of the principal schools of economic thought which comprise the social science discipline of economics. The historical origins of each school are identified along with their methodological approaches and analytical tools, policy prescriptions and insights. This examination illuminates the different views about the dynamics of the capitalist economy and lays the foundation for the application of political economic reasoning to a wide range of contemporary issues.
ECOP6103 Strategic Debates on Economic Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Essay (60%), 1xGroup presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the processes of socioeconomic change, and the forces involved in bringing about such change. It introduces several theoretical perspectives and - using a number of contemporary case studies - considers the interests, the relationships and the constraints involved in socioeconomic change. Students consider a range of issues and debates, and make a detailed study in one such area.
ECOP6108 Economic Management for Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent Seminar presentation (15%), 1x1000wd seminar paper (15%), 1x2500wd Research essay (30%), x 1.5hr examination (30%), Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to environmental economic theory, ecological economics, and other critical perspectives in order to develop an understanding of the parameters that define management of economy-environment interactions. Students will develop a critical appreciation of the systemic nature of the pressures imposed on environmental/ecological systems and the intractable problems this presents. The unit examines the different tendencies that inform environmental management and sustainable development; and the relative merits/weaknesses of the strategies and policies advanced.
ECOP6121 Dissertation Part A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised independent study Prerequisites: 24 credit points of units Corequisites: ECOP6031 Assessment: 10,000wd dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Together with 'Dissertation Part B', this unit involves the supervised writing of a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of the student's choosing as part of the Master of Political Economy.
ECOP6122 Dissertation Part B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised independent study Prerequisites: ECOP6121 Assessment: 10,000wd dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Together with 'Dissertation Part A', this unit involves the supervised writing of a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic of the student's choosing as part of the Master of Political Economy.
ECOP6130 Human Rights and International Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCLG6912 Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1.5hr exam (30%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
This unit links debates over social rights and democratic legitimacy to structural economic arguments. It introduces the competing arguments over social rights and the struggles that have created them, and promotes the use of evidence in these conceptual arguments. The approach of economic liberalism to rights is examined. Important global issues involving rights and economic argument - such as self-determination, land rights, food security, fair trade and economic governance - are examined.
ECOP6130 Human Rights and International Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCLG6912 Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1.5hr exam (30%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
This unit links debates over social rights and democratic legitimacy to structural economic arguments. It introduces the competing arguments over social rights and the struggles that have created them, and promotes the use of evidence in these conceptual arguments. The approach of economic liberalism to rights is examined. Important global issues involving rights and economic argument - such as self-determination, land rights, food security, fair trade and economic governance - are examined.
ECOP6901 Finance and Economic Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1x1000wd Presentation (30%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Foreign exchange, security and other derivative markets have expanded dramatically over the past 20 years. More recently, they have been associated with the largest economic crisis in 80 years. This unit develops a political economy perspective on these markets, including their vulnerability to crisis, and the intrusion of financial calculation into wider social and personal calculation. The unit also addresses the regulation of financial markets and institutions, including key regulatory and monitoring agencies, and arguments for new regulatory regimes.
EDPA5001 Organisational Theory, Managemnt and Admin

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr George Odhiambo Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd review (40%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Organisation theories provide us with different lenses through which we can understand what an organisation is and what it means to be part of one. This unit explores the development of organisation theory from its beginnings to the present day. Concepts, theories and models from the perspectives of the Historical, Modern, Symbolic Interpretive and Postmodern periods are studied through selected original works by key writers in the field. From the early writings to Taylor and Weber, through to the words of Greenfield and Morgan different approaches to management and administration are investigated.
EDPA5011 Organisational Culture and Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr George Odhiambo Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week; Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Institutions throughout most parts of the world are confronted by a period of rapid and dramatic change. The external demands placed upon them to change and improve are considerable. The key elements of leadership, vision and mission and their relationships to the development of a unique organisational culture are essential ingredients for organisational effectiveness, excellence and continuous improvement. This core unit focuses upon the internal and external forces that influence the culture of a variety of organisations and uses the competing theories and alternative approaches to management development in the core unit EDPA5001 to build upon the basic concepts.
EDPA6016 Organisations as Learning Communities

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr George Odhiambo Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1xhr seminar/week and 1hr on-line/week Assessment: 1x2000wd review (35%) and 1x3000wd essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In a rapidly changing world the necessity for an organisation to improve performance in order to keep pace and even be in the forefront of changes is an imperative for long-term survival. This unit explores the concepts of the learning organisation, organisational learning and communities of practice and professional learning communities. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of dialogue in organisational learning. The use of scenario analysis, scenario planning and learning histories as means of supporting organisational learning is studied. Please note that intensive delivery is only available to Scots College Cohort.
EDPA6018 Social Policy Process

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Anthony Welch Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: class attendance and participation, including discussion and mini-presentations (15%); presentation (35%) and essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The world of policy is changing, from a centralised model to a decentralised one, in which you may be involved, at least at institutional level. Whether you work in the public, private, or third sector as an educator, social worker, civil servant or in another capacity, it is important to understand the changing world of policy. Another change that we examine is the rise of neo-liberalism and its effects on the policy process. Critics charge that policy is now framed with economic rather than social good in mind, and that the success of policies is measured by the same calculus. How is policy made, and by whom? How does Australian federalism influence the making and implementation of policy? What kinds of transnational influences affect the policy process, and to what extent? Do different countries respond to difference (class, ethnic, gender, age), in a world of increasing diversity, migration and mobility?
EDPB5002 Globalisation and Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Nigel Bagnall Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: on-line Assessment: 500wd minor overview (10%) and 1200wd review essay (20%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 2500wd case study (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Concepts of global integration and culture. Economic political and cultural dimensions of globalisation. Major interpretive approaches to globalisation. Major world trends in education assessed in light of globalisation. Globalisation of labour markets; marked forces in education; cross-cultural and trans-national trends in education provision; knowledge as a global construct; global organisations and agenda in education; emerging global and regional structures in education, students, educational professionals and knowledge workers in a globalising world. Investigation and report on a special study.
EDPB5014 Intercultural Ed: Principles and Strategy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Nigel Bagnall Session: Semester 1 Classes: on-line Assessment: 500wd minor overview (10%) and 1200wd review essay (20%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 2500wd case study (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Concepts of culture, cultural diversity and inter-cultural communications. Education and culture in the context of globalisation. The homogenisation and heterogenisation debate. Case studies of cultural diversity and inter-cultural education in the domains of policy, management, curriculum teaching and learning. Special study of cultural diversity and intercultural education in a selected international education context.
EDPB5016 Global Poverty, Social Policy and Ed

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Nigel Bagnall Session: Semester 2 Classes: on-line Assessment: 500wd minor overview (10%) and 1200wd review (10%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 2500wd case study (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Investigation and analysis of: basic indicators of global poverty; key theories of poverty and development and their implications for social policy and education; western paradigms and their effects in non-western contexts; alternatives to westernisation; education as a form of foreign aid and development co-operation in multilateral, bilateral and non-government programs; multisectoral approaches to poverty alleviation strategies.
EDPB6013 Internationalisation of Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Anthony Welch Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: on-line Assessment: 500wd minor overview (10%) and 1200wd review essay (20%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 2500wd case study (50%). Mode of delivery: Online
An investigation of major developments in internationalisation of education, at schooling, technical and further education, and higher education levels. Historical developments of internationalisation; contrasting interpretations and 20th century developments. Contemporary trend analysis including a detailed case study of a specific policy or program.
EDPC5024 Systems, Change and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lina Markauskaite Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignments (2x25%) and 1x3000wd group project and presentation (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this core unit we will use 'systems inquiry' as a conceptual framework to explore change and learning processes, on the individual, group and organisational level. We focus on a theory-based approach to change management and organisational learning, so that students can come to appreciate the complexity and non-linearity of bringing about change in schools, corporations and other organisations. Drawing on contemporary research in the learning sciences, we will explore group and individual learning and conceptual change processes. Students will apply modern conceptual change approaches to investigate their own learning process, and will gain hands-on experience as they apply systems inquiry concepts and methods to analyse change problems in their own professional environment.
EDPE5002 Human Development in Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Minkang Kim Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x seminar presentation (30%) and 2000wd review paper (30%) and 1x2500wd reserch projectl proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A core unit of study that critically examines theories from developmental psychology in the light of contemporary theory and research, drawing especially on insights provided by Dynamic Systems Theory and neurobiology of the brain development. The aim is to understand the complexity of cognitive, emotional, social, moral and languate development as children engage with the multiplicities of their experience of being in the world. Seminars also focus on research in human development and learning, how to conduct research and how to read research findings with critical minds.
EDPE5011 Motivation for Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Richard Walker Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd seminar paper (50%) and 1x3000wd integrative review (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The major focus of this core unit centres on recent psychological study of motivational processes in the learner and on ways in which learning environments may be seen to foster student motivation for learning and thereby facilitate the attainment of desired learning objectives. The unit will consider the balance between intrinsic and extrinsic sources of motivation, teacher expectations and learner motivation, self-concept and self-system processes in learning and issues of success and failure and anxiety in learning settings. Emphasis will be placed on goal setting and feedback in establishing a facilitative learning environment, student interaction in cooperative learning and the development of motivational components of self-regulation in the learner.
EDPE6013 Learning and Teaching Thinking Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Annishka Oksa Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd seminar paper (30%) and 1xseminar presentation (20%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit of study centres on examination and evaluation of a number of approaches to the development of higher order cognitive skills. Consideration will be given to the structuring of knowledge to facilitate explanation, problem-solving and creativity and to the use of internalised self-regulatory control strategies in fostering cognitive outcomes. Ways in which thinking and cognition can be supported and extended in educational contexts will be examined in some detail. Particular attention will be given to factors that influence thinking, the role of tools and technologies in facilitating thinking, and perspectives on thinking and cognition generated by contemporary research in cognitive science.
EDPE6016 Adult Learning and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Ginns Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd learning-contract based essay and reflection exercise (40%) and 1x3000wd seminar essay (40%) and 1x45 minute seminar presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines selected issues relating to adult development and adult learning. Concepts of growth and decline are explored, particularly in relation to cognitive development, transitions in the workplace, within families, and in other social contexts. Considerations of adult learning focus on adult conceptions of learning, higher education, and the development of expertise. It considers contexts for adult learning, and concepts of self-directed and self-regulated learning.
EDPJ5020 Literacy and Language Teaching

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marie Stevenson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Assessment: 1 assignment (40%); and 1 assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, literacy and its relationship to second and foreign language teaching are examined from different perspectives. Reading, writing and the teaching of these in the English language classroom are examined in detail. However, the unit goes further than viewing literacy as only being about reading and writing. In an age of increasingly sophisticated information technologies and the spread of English as a global language, ideas about literacy are changing rapidly, and these changes have consequences for language teaching. The unit takes up-to-date ideas about what literacy involves and looks at how these ideas and issues are relevant to second and foreign language teaching. In particular, the unit has a focus on the use of technology to develop second and foreign language learners' literacy.
EDPJ5022 Research Methods in Language Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Aek Phakiti/ Professor Brian Paltridge Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Assessment: 1 x2000wd comparative review of quantitative and qualitative studies (20%); 4500wd research proposal (made up of 2 sub assignments) (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces a range of approaches to research in the area of languate studies. The unit provides frameworks with which students can review and critique previous research as well as framework for writing a research proposal. This is a required unit of study for students who wish to include a Dissertation in their MEd TESOL degree.
Textbooks
Paltridge, B and A. Phakiti (eds) (2015). Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. London: Bloomsbury.
EDPJ5026 Language Testing and Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Aek Phakiti Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week commencing week 2 Assessment: 1x2500wd review of major test techniques for assessing a language skill (35%); 1x1000wd development of rating scales for an extended language production task (25%); 1x2500wd developing test specifications for an individual language test task (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a broad overview of the major principles involved in second and foreign language testing and assessment. The focus of the unit is on both theoretical and practical issues in testing and assessment. The design of language tests and assessment appropriate to particular learning settings is addressed with reference to communicative language teaching and task-based methodology. Issues concerning the influence of testing on teaching and recent developments in research in testing and assessment will be considered.
EDPK5003 Developing a Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachel Wilson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x4 hr Saturday workshops, plus online lectures and activities Assessment: online exercises (40%) and class presentation (20%) and research proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit is seen as the foundation unit in research methods and it provides an overview of the research process, with a focus on critical evaluation of research reports and the design of research projects. It covers a wide range of basic research techniques and introduces other research methods that are the focus of more in-depth study in other search methods units. Research design issues and various methods of data collection examined. Students explore the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches; various research strategies; observation, documents, questionnaires and assessments. The assessment in this unit is developed around students' own research interests and by the end of the unit students will have developed their own research proposal document.
ENGG5812 Project Delivery Approaches

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Seminars Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit develops skills in critically evaluating different project management methods and tools in relation to the complex systems environments that they are required to manage. Students will work on project case studies and be given the opportunity to consider different contemporary project delivery frameworks and methodologies including Lean Six Sigma, the PMBoK Project Lifecycle, Agile methods and others.
The unit targets the higher analytical capabilities required at Practitioner to Manager levels (Levels 3 to 4) on the Project Management Learning Progression Table, addressing the critical thinking and systems thinking dimensions of Project Methods, Project Development, Project Communication and Project Delivery. The distinguishing quality of thinking at this level is its systematic character, working from a broad-based theoretical and practical understanding of the project delivery environment.
The aim at this level is not only to formulate reasonable and critical responses to a given problem, but also to articulate thorough and conclusive assessments for the development of tailored project delivery approaches that combine elements from different project delivery systems and methodologies. You need to identify key elements of the project and organise them into a coherent and persuasive argument about the recommended project delivery approach, encompassing consideration of the various risks, benefits, costs and processes involved.
The unit builds upon the skills of complex problem analysis developed at a more basic level in Critical & Systems Thinking and together with this unit forms a two-part sequence dealing with the analytical abilities required in determining specific project delivery approaches for complex projects with different characteristics. Students enrolling in this unit are expected to have already developed a basic level of ability in forming and communicating critical judgments regarding complex problem situations through completion of the Critical and Systems Thinking unit or equivalent.
ENGL6040 Introduction to Old English

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd translation exercise (20%), 1x3000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Old English was the language of England from the fifth century until the twelfth. This earliest phase of the English literary tradition evolved against a background of cultural encounters: as the Anglo-Saxons encountered the culture of Rome, as they adopted and adapted the Christian religion, and as they reflected on their origins on the European continent. This unit introduces students to the language spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons, and presents the opportunity to translate and read Old English texts.
ENGL6041 Old English Texts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ENGL6040 Assessment: 1x2000wd translation exercise (40%), 1x4000wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The literature of the Anglo-Saxons offers an insight into a range of understandings of the place of human beings in the world and its history. This unit of study will build on students' elementary knowledge of the Old English language, and offer students the opportunity to translate and read a range of texts including historical prose, love poetry and religious texts. These texts will be studied in a range of contexts, from the cultural and historical to their manuscript setting.
ENGL6100 Approaches to Literary History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd critical assessment (20%), 1x2000wd archival report (30%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core unit for the Master of English Studies. How do literary texts relate to history? When we divide time into different periods ("Renaissance" "Romantic" "Modernist" etc.), what are the implications for interpretation? Focusing on one or two literary periods, this core unit for the Master of English Studies introduces students to historicist literary criticism, developing skills in relating literature to historical context. We read key texts from the designated period(s), conduct research into appropriate archives (including online databases), and identify the theoretical questions that underpin those investigations.
ENGL6101 Approaches to Genre

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd written assignment (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core unit for the Master of English Studies. In this unit students will critically examine significant theoretical definitions of and debates about genre through time. They will apply an advanced understanding of genres (or 'kinds' or 'forms') to representative and problematic texts in order to develop a deep appreciation of the function, limitations and transformations of genre in literature. The complex relationship between formal properties, creativity and historical context will be explored.
ENGL6102 Approaches to Critical Reading

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%), 1x1000wd equivalent Oral Presentation (20%), 1x4000wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core unit for the Master of English Studies. This unit will introduce students to a variety of critical approaches to literature. In addition to developing critical and theoretical literacy, the unit aims to develop advanced skills in identifying how and why such strategies might be brought to bear on reading literary texts, and to evaluate how effective and/or appropriate such strategies might be in specific cases. The unit also aims to critically examine theories of the text as a physical and conceptual object.
ENGL6103 Approaches to Global English Literatures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4000wd Research essay (55%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (35%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core unit for the Master of English Studies. Students will familiarise themselves with critical approaches to a range of literary works written throughout the world in the English language, and they will critically examine ways in which theories of globalisation and place have come to inflect paradigms of local and national identity. Students will evaluate contemporary understandings of the meaning and significance of "English" literature in a new global environment.
ENGL6105 Poetry of Meditation

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd close-reading assignment (15%), 1x4000wd Essay (70%), 1x1000wd Tutorial presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a study of the meditative poetry of the early seventeenth century. It examines the traditions and manuals of meditation on which the poets drew, and places their poetry more broadly in religious and historico-cultural contexts, and also in the contexts of Early Modern literature at large. Detailed study of writers such as John Donne and George Herbert establishes the framework for study of their meditative poetry and that of later writers.
ENGL6106 The Idea of the South

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x5000wd Essay (80%), 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The American South is frequently conceived as the Problem South, defined by its experiences of military defeat and occupation, economic backwardness and a brutal slave legacy. In this unit, we will investigate the idea of the South in a range of literary and visual texts by examining its most compelling tropes - the southern belle, poor whites, the plantation - to contemplate the region's fundamental importance to conceptions of the nation itself and the value of thinking regionally.
ENGL6107 Sentiment and Sensation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x5000wd Essay (75%), 1x1000wd Class presentation and write-up (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will focus on the narrative and rhetorical strategies used to depict and engage emotion. It will examine the ways in which feeling is both conceptualised and motivated in literary texts, and relate developments in the fictional understanding of emotion to those in philosophy and the natural sciences. It will ask whether emotion can be historicised; how affective responses are engaged in the service of ethical agendas; to what extent do the feelings produced by fiction elude narrative control.
ENGL6108 Modern Australian Poetry and Poetics

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Oral Presentation plus summary (30%),1x4500wd Research essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Critical discussion of Australian poetry has long been preoccupied by the status of its modernism, as a function of wider questions regarding the meaning of Australian modernity. Was modernism only belatedly taken up in the 1970s, or were certain older Australian poets modernist avant la lettre? In this unit students will evaluate a selection of key poems and statements about poetry by Australian writers from 1900 to the present, taking in themes such as: Romantic absence and negativity, the Symbolist inheritance, high and vernacular modernisms, avant gardism and reaction, the Generation of 68, and the fate of postmodernism.
ENGL6109 Modern and Contemporary Drama

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%), 1x1000wd seminar presentation (20%), 1x4000wd critical essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course develops a critical evaluation of modern drama from its roots in the nineteenth century and its legacy in a selection of contemporary play texts. The course situates developments in dramatic theory and practice alongside dominant social and intellectual trends of the past century (political tyranny/liberation, class structure, women's emancipation, censorship, technological change, the rise of global capital). Students will critically evaluate dramatic texts and performance using a variety of theoretical frameworks.
ENGL6110 The 18th Century Novel: Theory and Example

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Research essay proposal (15%), 1x500wd discussion paper (10%), 1x4500wd Research essay (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study investigates the development and circulation of the novel during the eighteenth century. We will read novels that have since been canonised as well as material normally excluded from the story of the novel's rise, such as whore narratives and the popular genre of it-narratives (stories told from the point-of-view of an object or animal). We will consider this material through a number of theoretical lenses, including those provided by Michael McKeon, Lennard Davis and Catherine Gallagher.
ENGL6111 History Writing in English, 1500-1900

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd assignment (34%), 1x4000wd Essay (66%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We pose two interdependent questions. First, how and why have English authors from Tudor to Victorian times narrated and analysed historical matters in different literary genres - verse, prose, prose-drama, and verse-drama? Second, how and why have these authors and their audiences deemed such historical writings to be literary or not? To determine the interdependence of these questions we pose a third. What are the literary and historical relations between literature and history?
ENGL6112 Wooing Women in Middle English Romance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Annotated Bibliography (25%), 1x1000wd Discussion Paper (20%), 1x3500wd Research Essay (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Heroines of medieval romance were not all swooning damsels waiting to be chosen by daring knights. A strong alternative current is the figure of the wooing woman, who used a range of strategies to realise her desires. In this unit students will apply advanced critical methods to readings of wooing women in Middle English romance. Students will reflect upon these readings alongside medieval theories of feminine sexuality and contemporary reconsiderations. Texts include selections from 12th to 15th centuries.
ENGL6113 American Romance

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4500wd Essay and annotated bibliography (75%), 1x1500wd Seminar presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'Romance' refers to both a passion and a textual form, and this course will focus upon the passionate American and the forms in which this figure appears in texts ranging from the classic 19th century novel through to 20th century film and music. We will explore the Gothic and Romantic heritage of American culture and the ways in which this adapted to the pressures of realism and modernization as the American imagination ranged from the transcendental to the popular.
ENGL6114 Language and Subject

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course explores twentieth century attempts to understand the relation of language and linguistic meaning to the individual subject. We will consider two traditions: a 'naturalistic' approach centred around Chomsky's 'generative enterprise', and the phenomenological/hermeneutic tradition in Merleau-Ponty and Gadamer. Students will familiarize themselves with various putatively scientific attempts to understand the place of language in the world and will explore some general features of the relation between meaning and experience. No prior acquaintance with these fields is assumed.
ENGL6115 Reading Suburbia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd written assignment (30%), 1x500wd Research essay proposal (10%),1x3500wd Research essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Suburbia is a bad object in Australian literature. Neither city nor bush, suburbs can seem culturally bland zones of consumerist domesticity from which artists and writers want to escape. Yet loathing of suburbia can be mixed with desire. This unit explores various topographies of suburbia in fiction, poetry, non-fiction and film. Why do writers return to suburbia? How do suburbs give shape to settler modernity, or stimulate literary modernism? Is the suburb a national or transnational scene in Australian writing?
ENGL6116 Life & Literature in the Age of Chaucer

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (15%), 1x1000wd discussion paper (20%), 1x4000wd Research essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Geoffrey Chaucer was a courtier, a bureaucrat and a diplomat. He was also a most prolific poet, and was to become arguably the most important literary figure of his age. The fourteenth century was a time of transformation in English language and literature, and Chaucer was a key innovator of the time. In this unit students will consider a sampling of key texts from the period within the context of this shifting landscape.
ENGL6901 Creative Writing: Fiction Workshop

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 4x500wd writing exercises (30%), 1x1000wd critical analysis/reflection (20%), 1x1000wd short fiction piece and redraft (20%), 1x2000wd longer fiction piece (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the practice, craft skills and critical reflection involved in writing fiction (particularly the short story form). Narrative writing skills will be explored and developed through close readings of a range of short fiction, as well as in-class and at-home writing exercises, building towards more sustained pieces of work. Writing and critical skills are developed through discussion and participation in the workshop process, focusing on reading and creative strategies to generate new material as well as processes of editing and revision.
ENGL6902 Creative Writing: Poetry Workshop

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1xportfolio of 10-12 poems (including drafts) either written from the suggested writing exercises or developed independently (60%), 10x small weekly writing tasks (20%), 1xSeminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is a workshop in writing poetry conducted by a distinguished poet. Students are required to produce their own works throughout the unit and these works will provide the basis for constructive discussion aimed at developing different methods of writing.
ENGL6903 Creative Writing: Screenwriting Workshop

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd original written work by the end of the semester (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit in writing film, television and/or theatre scripts taught by an established script writer. Students are required to produce their own work or works throughout the semester. These works will provide the basis for discussion in class.
ENGL6907 Essay (English)

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervisory meetings/semester Assessment: 1x6000wd piece of written work (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission required from the Department of English Postgraduate Coordinator.
Essay on an approved topic.
ENGL6908 Creative Writing: Supervised Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervisory meetings/semester Prohibitions: ENGL6907 or ENGL6929 or ENGL6930 or ENGL6935 Assessment: To be negotiated with supervisor; normally this will be work deemed equivalent to 1x6000wd Research essay Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit will enable approved candidates to pursue an extended creative project under the supervision of an established author, poet, script- or children's-writer. Students will be expected to discuss and plan the project with their supervisor, then submit drafted material to an agreed timetable, and to discuss this drafted material with their supervisor before submitting a revised final draft.
ENGL6913 Critical Contexts for Creative Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4500wd Essay (70%), 1x1500wd Seminar Paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a compulsory core unit in the Master of Creative Writing. It complements the other core units by focussing on how creative writing connects with major scholarly and critical debates in literary and cultural theory, focussing in particular on writers, like Susan Sontag, whose work is both creative and theoretical. Indicative topics include: theories of authorship; the history of the book; the ethics and politics of writing; aesthetic hierarchy and value; close and distant reading; form, genre and style; writing, sex and embodiment.
ENGL6914 Research Methods for Creative Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (35%), 1x3000wd Creative Work (50%), 1x1000wd Research Plan (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to introduce the principles of practice-led research and research-led practice. We will consider what it means to pursue creative writing in an academic environment. It will equip students with the skills necessary to create individual projects and conduct creative research. Seminars will focus on building research skills, formulating individual projects and considering the means and ends of creative research.
ENGL6917 Literary Culture: Sydney

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4500wd Creative Project (70%), 1x1500wd Seminar Presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores Sydney as a significant literary city in the context of influential debates on community, cosmopolitanism and the poetics of place. We will read key Sydney texts and explore Sydney's major cultural institutions and events, including the Sydney Writers Festival. Students will produce their own creative project in response to Sydney and its storied locales.
ENGL6929 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervised meetings/semester Assessment: Research and writing towards a 12000 word dissertation (100%) to be completed in ENGL6930 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing towards a 12000 word dissertation. Candidates must formulate a topic and seek permission for enrolment from the Postgraduate Coordinator. Approval is subject to availability of appropriate supervision by an academic staff member. Must be followed by enrolment in ENGL6930.
ENGL6930 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervised meetings/semester Prerequisites: ENGL6929 Assessment: Completion and submission of a 12000 word dissertation (100%) following on from ENGL6929 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Completion and submission of a 12000 word dissertation. Candidates must formulate a topic and seek permission for enrolment in the preceding unit, ENGL6929, from the Postgraduate Coordinator. Approval is subject to availability of appropriate supervision by an academic staff member.
ENGL6935 Research Essay

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd piece of written work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students will workshop, plan and execute their own research based project. They will participate in a series of specialised research seminars in which they will integrate their previous learning with research skills. This will culminate in a project that engages with the current state of the field while reflecting on their encounter with the discipline.
ENGL6936 Writers at Work: Fiction

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Four major contemporary Australian writers of fiction (to be announced) take participants through the process of composition of their recent works, sharing their techniques and their philosophies of writing.
ENGL6937 Major Movements in Contemporary Prose

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the rationale, principles and techniques of a selection of four major movements in contemporary prose (largely but not exclusively fiction), the particular movements in any one semester being dependent upon the expertise of the staff available. Sample components: the postmodern novel; ecritures feminines; magic realism; metafiction; contemporary realism; narrative non-fiction; ficto-criticism; the feminist detective; contemporary Australians; cyberfiction; life writing. Each movement is taught by way of two exemplary texts, one Australian and one drawn from other writing in the English language.
ENGL6944 Writers at Work: Poetry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4500wd Essay and annotated bibliography (75%), 1x1500wd Seminar presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Four major contemporary Australian writers of poetry (to be announced) take participants through the process of composition of their recent works, sharing their techniques and their philosophies of writing.
ENGL6945 Major Movements in Contemporary Poetry

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4500wd Essay and annotated bibliography (75%), 1x1500wd Seminar presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the rationale, principles and techniques of a selection of four major movements in contemporary poetry. The particular movements introduced in any one year may be determined by the expertise of staff available. Each movement is taught by way of two exemplary texts, one Australian and one drawn from other writing in the English language.
ENGL6960 The Cold War

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit investigates the Cold War through a representative sample of literary and cinematic works. In the course of the unit we investigate the shifting and shifty geopolitics of the postcolonial period, national and international cultures of paranoia, questions of ideology, gender, nationality, truth and love. We also explore the absurdly humorous possibilities activated by the war that may well be thawing out. The unit suggests that the imaginative representation of the Cold War has significantly altered public perceptions of the war and government approaches to manipulating those perceptions.
ENGL6969 Writers at Work: Screenwriters

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended that students also enrol in ENGL6903
Four contemporary Australian screenwriters are highlighted, each presenting three 2-hour sessions. In the first session, a film scripted by the writer will be shown. In the second and third, the screenwriter will explain the genesis of the film, the process of writing it, and the triumphs and tribulations of transferring the script to the screen. In some of the sessions, a key figure associated with the production, e.g. the producer, director, or a lead actor may be present for the students to question.
ENGL6970 Reading Magazines

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Early Classes: Intensive mode Assessment: 1x2000wd Critical analysis of a magazine (40%), 2x 1000wd Oral Presentation (20%), 1x2000wd Critical analysis of a magazine (40%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Cross-listed for Master of Publishing students.
This unit celebrates magazines as an important but often over-looked part of Australian print and digital culture. Starting with an overview of the history of print culture in Australia and the role of iconic magazines like the Bulletin and Women's Weekly in constructing literary and popular culture, we then examine a cross-section of publications from 'little' literary magazines to fashion, gossip, sports, special-interest, custom and online magazines.
ENGL6982 Shakespeare and Modernity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Penny Gay, Drs Liam Semler and Kate Flaherty Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours per week Assessment: 4000 word essay Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores selected works of Shakespeare in the historical context of the 20th and 21st centuries. It provides an introduction to the modern Shakespeare industry with particular focus on recent developments in theatrical performance, film, and other adaptations, and theoretical approaches. Detailed attention will be paid to both the texts of the plays and to their modern manifestations.
Textbooks
A selection of Shakespeare texts, to be announced
ENGL6984 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Creative non-fiction story (40%), 1x2000wd Exegesis/critical reflection (40%), 4x 500wd Participation & in-class writing (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the principles and practices of creative non-fiction, also known as literary journalism. This diverse genre includes travel, memoir, biography, essays, historical, medical or investigative narratives. The unit provides a scholarly framework to creative non-fiction and the work of writers such as essayists and literary journalists. In addition to the content provided by the coordinators, three major contemporary non-fiction writers take participants through the process of composition of their recent works.
ENGL6985 Shakespeare and his Contemporaries

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Huw Griffiths Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4000wd essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit explores important works by Shakespeare and his contemporaries in the contexts of late-sixteenth- and early-seventeenth-century England. The unit will analyse the texts and authors in relation to one another to uncover key discourses of the period relating to politics, humanism, drama, poetry, gender and genre. Students will gain valuable insights into the literary and cultural richness of the period and come to a deeper understanding of Shakespeare's relevance and significance in his day.
ENGL6986 Advanced Workshop: Poetry

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ENGL6902 Assessment: 15x poems (60%), 5x assessment tasks (15%), 1x1500wd Essay (20%), Seminar participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who have already begun the practice of writing poetry, and who wish to work on a large portfolio of poems which has been developed to an advanced stage of composition. In the seminars, students will use this portfolio to refine and develop their writing style and technique in dialogue with the seminar leader.
ENGL6987 Advanced Workshop: Novel

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ENGL6901 Assessment: 1x3000wd writing exercises and redrafts (20%), 1x1500wd critical reflection (15%), 1x1500wd presentation of writing project (15%), 1x2000wd fiction workshop piece (15%), 1x4000wd new or redrafted fiction piece (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on the introductory creative writing fiction workshop ENGL6901 and assumes that students are familiar with the craft skills, writing practice and critical reflection involved in producing quality fiction. The focus is on developing narrative writing skills toward the production of larger prose forms (a novel or linked stories), through writing exercises, critical reading, the workshop process, and exposure to advanced areas of writing craft. Students also learn to develop a sustainable writing practice, present their project and engage in processes of critiquing, editing and revision.
ENGL6988 Advanced Workshop: Screenwriting

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ENGL6903 Assessment: 2x6000wd screenwriting exercises (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who have already begun the practice of scriptwriting, and who wish to work on a large script for stage, television or screen, which has been developed to an advanced stage of composition. In the seminars, students will use this piece of work to refine and develop their writing style and technique in dialogue with the seminar leader.
ENGL6991 Aust Lit and the Canonical Imaginary

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay based on critical analysis of selected texts (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines a selection of Australian works that have - or have not - achieved the status of 'classics'. It will explore both theoretically and historically the processes of literary canon formation and the economy of literary prestige, developing techniques of close reading while also attending to the wider social contexts of reception and reputation-making both nationally and internationally.
ENGL6992 Henry James and the Art of Fiction

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd seminar presentation (20%), 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%), 1x4000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In addition to writing distinctive short stories and novels, Henry James was a voluminous critic whose writings on the art of fiction have shaped modern approaches to the novel. In this unit, we read selections from James's critical writings alongside his novels and tales to compare the author's evolving theory of fiction with his practice of it. Matters of special interest include Anglo-American literary culture; strategies of characterization and narration; experiments in literary style; the purpose of fiction; and the ethics of representation.
ENVI5801 Social Science of Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Robert Fisher Session: Semester 1 Classes: One hour lecture and one hour seminar per week plus directed reading. Assessment: Essays and seminar participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides both a conceptual and an empirical foundation for the analysis of relationships between society, the environment and natural resources. In our recent past the rapid rate of global environmental change has necessitated a breakdown of traditional disciplinary boundaries in research and social scientists are increasingly called upon to work alongside natural scientists in unraveling the complexities of the human-environmental nexus. Students will examine a number of environmental issues and consider a variety of social science academic perspectives about environmental management.
ENVI5903 Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jeff Neilson Session: Intensive July Classes: Two pre-departure lectures, 14-day field intensive. Assessment: Essay and presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: This unit of study involves additional costs.
This unit of study constitutes an international field-based experience held in Southeast Asia during the July semester break. It explores the contested notions of sustainable development and sustainability through exposure to real world development dilemmas in Southeast Asia. We explore fundamental issues such as urbanization, sustainable livelihood, resource scarcity and economic globalization. The unit of study involves lectures, in-situ readings and discussion groups, introduction to field methods, stakeholder meetings and experiential learning. Students interested in this unit should confirm their interest to the Unit Coordinators by the end of March of the year the field school will be held. There will be additional costs associated with this unit to cover food, accommodation, local transport and field assistance of about $1,200. Students will also be required to arrange their own international travel to the starting point (either Vientiane or Jakarta depending on the specific location of the course).
EUST6904 Dissertation Part A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1 day induction week 2 or 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000-15000wd in length (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12-15000 words on an approved topic in the field of European Studies, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Candidates should consult the postgraduate coordinator for the European Studies program prior to enrolment in order to formulate a topic.
EUST6905 Dissertation Part B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1 day induction week 2 or 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Prerequisites: EUST6904 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000-15000wd in length (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12-15000 words on an approved topic, written under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
EUST7010 European Language Acquisition 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminar/week Assessment: quizzes and writing assignments (equivalent to 2500wds) (60%), Oral Presentations (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit gives students an opportunity to begin or improve proficiency in a European language so as to deepen their understanding of the culture and society involved. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and it's sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilized. Students who are studying an area cognate with a European language are especially encouraged to take this unit.
EUST7010 European Language Acquisition 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminar/week Assessment: quizzes and writing assignments (equivalent to 2500wds) (60%), Oral Presentations (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit gives students an opportunity to begin or improve proficiency in a European language so as to deepen their understanding of the culture and society involved. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and it's sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilized. Students who are studying an area cognate with a European language are especially encouraged to take this unit.
EUST7011 European Language Acquisition 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminar/week Assessment: quizzes and writing assignments (equivalent to 2500wds) (60%), Oral Presentations (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This follow-on unit gives students an opportunity to improve proficiency in a European language so as to deepen understanding of the cultures and societies involved. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and it's sociocultural context will enhance knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilized. Students undertaking postgraduate studies in an area that is cognate with a European language would be especially encouraged to take this unit.
EUST7011 European Language Acquisition 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminar/week Assessment: quizzes and writing assignments (equivalent to 2500wds) (60%), Oral Presentations (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This follow-on unit gives students an opportunity to improve proficiency in a European language so as to deepen understanding of the cultures and societies involved. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and it's sociocultural context will enhance knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilized. Students undertaking postgraduate studies in an area that is cognate with a European language would be especially encouraged to take this unit.
EUST7012 European Language Acquisition 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminar/week Assessment: quizzes and writing assignments (equivalent to 2500wds) (60%), Oral Presentations (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit gives students an opportunity to achieve or improve proficiency in a European language and to deepen their understanding of the cultures and societies involved. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills in the four areas of acquisition. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and its sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilized.
EUST7013 European Language Acquisition 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminar/week Assessment: quizzes and writing assignments (equivalent to 2500wds) (60%), Oral Presentations (equivalent to 2000wds) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit gives students an opportunity to achieve or improve proficiency in a European language and to deepen their understanding of the cultures and societies involved. Students will develop comprehensive linguistic skills in the four areas of acquisition. In addition, analysis of the structure of the language and its sociocultural context will enhance their knowledge and understanding of the society in which the language is utilized.
FASS5001 Innovation: Past, Present, Future

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd essay proposal (15%), 1x1000wd presentation (15%), 1x4000wd research essay (60%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically considers concepts of innovation, their evolution and benefits. Divided into 3 sections, it examines great innovations in thought and practice in the past and what determined success or failure then turns to the present and the future to explore the frameworks and policies that make innovation possible.
FASS7001 Academic English for Postgraduates

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x500wd Annotated Bibliography (15%), 1x2500wd Reflection Journal (25%), 1xSeminar Presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective is designed for International postgraduates who are new to study in an English language university. It supports the development of study, research, and critical thinking abilities, spoken English and academic language. Knowledge acquired in this unit will strengthen written and spoken English to help meet the standards necessary for successful completion of FASS Masters by coursework degrees. It is recommended that this elective be taken during the first semester.
FASS7002 Critical Literacies for Postgraduates

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: weeks 1-3: 2x1hr lecture/week, 2x2hr tutorial/week; Weeks 4-9:1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd critical review (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), seminar presentation (20%),1x2500wd reflection journal (20%), tutorial participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective supports development of skills in critical analysis, writing in different genres, research, presentation, and developing individual scholarly 'voice'. While valuable for all commencing postgraduates, it is of particular benefit to those returning to academia after an extended break, or for International students wishing to orient themselves to local standards of practice for academic communication. This unit is structured to have additional seminars and lectures early in the semester and fewer later in the semester so students have the opportunity to apply new skills to all their coursework. The unit is ideally taken in the first semester of study.
FASS7003 Group Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr seminar, 1x2hr seminar, 3x0.5hr meetings with academic coordinator Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assessment: 1x800wd Group presentation (25%), 1x5200wd Group Project Report (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
he group project allows students to apply discipline specific knowledge and professional, strategic and leadership skills to a real-world scenario.
FASS7004 Industry Internship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr seminar, 1x2hr seminar, 3x0.5 meetings with academic co-ordinator, 90-105 hours industry placement Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Prohibitions: FASS7003 Assessment: 1x700wd Project journal (20%), 1x800wd Short oral presentation (30%), 1x3000wd Internship Report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The internship is a project-based industry placement of 20 days minimum in an appropriate organisation in Sydney, elsewhere in Australia or overseas. Internships invite critical reflection on concepts learned during the coursework component of their Arts and Social Sciences postgraduate degree. Internships also foster the acquisition of essential knowledge and skills (including strategic skills) and greatly enhance students' employment prospects. Projects are supervised by a professional from the host institution and an academic co-ordinator.
FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid semester-test (20%), major assignment (25%), and final examination (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit provides an introduction to basic concepts in corporate finance and capital markets. It is designed to equip students to undertake further studies in finance. After reviewing some very basic ideas in finance and financial mathematics, the unit provides an introduction to the valuation of equity and debt securities and companies. The unit then examines issues related to pricing in capital markets and ends with a discussion of theory and practice related to capital structure and dividend policy.
FINC6000 Quantitative Finance and Derivatives

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Prohibitions: FINC5002 Assumed knowledge: This unit requires students to have some background in calculus, matrices, statistics and probability. Assessment: assignment (20%), mid-semester exam (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides students with an introduction to quantitative models and techniques in finance. Topics covered include basic stochastic calculus, probability measures and the role of numeraires, Black-Scholes and Hull-White models, and the theoretical and numerical techniques for valuing derivatives. There is a focus on both the intuitive and mathematical understanding of these topics, as well as their application to problems in quantitative finance.
FINC6001 Intermediate Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (30%), major assignment (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit extends some of the fundamental concepts introduced in FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance, and develops a rigorous framework for the analysis and understanding of key aspects of corporate financial decision making. Fundamental concepts in corporate finance are extended to more complex settings. The unit examines more advanced approaches to asset pricing and capital budgeting. New topics are covered in relation to derivative securities and real options applications in capital budgeting. The issues of the cost of capital, corporate capital structure, and corporate dividend policy, are extended to cover the interaction of corporate and personal taxation, agency problems, and information signalling.
FINC6005 Advanced Asset Pricing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 or FINC5002 or FINC6000 Assessment: 2 x In class test (2x15%), assignment (20%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Only students with strong quantitative/mathematical skills should attempt this course
This unit covers the fundamentals of asset pricing and valuation, under equilibrium conditions and under no-arbitrage restrictions. It reviews the main themes in modern asset pricing, and introduce ideas of importance to the evolution of the discipline, and consequently of relevance to a practitioner's long term perspective. The unit emphasises quantitative methods, so students are required to have fairly strong mathematical skills. Nevertheless, the mathematical tools needed in the unit are adequately reviewed.
FINC6007 Financial Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: individual assignment (20%), group assignment (30%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores value investment principles used in investment strategies. Both investment strategies and company strategies are analysed to examine how to translate a company's strategy into shareholders' profit. The unit also provides students with the skill set of analysing and interpreting financial reports, identifying good investment and avoiding financial scandals. Great investment practitioners' (Benjamin Graham, Warren E. Buffett and Charles Munger) works are studied in detail.
FINC6009 Portfolio Theory and its Applications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 or FINC5002 or FINC6000 Assessment: mid semester exam (20%), individual assignment (15%), group assignment (15%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers several aspects of modern/post modern portfolio theory.An introduction to mathematical optimisation techniques in the presence of uncertainty is covered and results from modern portfolio theory to the Capital Asset Pricing Model derived. The unit also examines other popular models such as the Arbitrage Pricing Theory and Black-Litterman Model and concludes with some topical examples from industry. There is a degree of mathematical sophistication associated with this unit and consequently students should be comfortable with a mathematical approach. However, the required mathematical tools are covered in the unit.
FINC6010 Derivative Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides an introduction to the rapidly-growing area of options, futures and swaps. These securities are derived from fundamental securities such as equities and bonds. The unit examines the nature of each of type of derivative security before a thorough treatment of the pricing and use of these securities for investment management and risk management purposes.
FINC6013 International Business Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In our highly globalised and integrated world economy, understanding international dimensions of financial management is essential for businesses. This unit provides a greater understanding of the fundamental concepts and the tools necessary for effective financial decision making by business enterprises, within a global setting.
FINC6014 Fixed Income Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), group assignment (25%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the concepts required for investment in fixed income securities, managing bond portfolios and understanding debt markets. Topics covered include duration, convexity, interest rate risk, bond volatility and the term structure of interest rates. The more complex types of debt securities studied include mortgage backed securities, corporate bonds with embedded options such as convertible bonds and interest rate derivatives.
FINC6015 Trading in Securities Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (30%), 2x group assignments (2x10%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to core concepts of fundamental market design and structure, focussing on the processes that turn orders into trades in securities markets, and the forces that mould and effect order flow and execution. The unit provides insights into how the study of securities market microstructure can improve our understanding of today's global financial markets in order to: (a) facilitate better financing and investment decisions; (b) understand when, where and how to transact in financial instruments; and (c) make better use of the ever increasing flow of market information. An improved understanding of today's diverse financial markets allows for successful trading strategies to be developed in different instruments and across many markets, today and in the future.
FINC6016 Financial Instruments and Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: 2x mid-term exams (2x15%), assignment (20%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an introduction to Australian financial markets and an evaluation of the institutions, instruments and participants involved in the industry. The main markets evaluated include the equity, money, bond, futures, options, and foreign exchange markets. The relationship between the economic environment and these markets is examined.
FINC6017 Mergers and Acquisitions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Prohibitions: ACCT6011 Assessment: mid-semester exam (20%), assignment (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Mergers and acquisitions have become perhaps the most important activity of investment banks today. They provide a fundamental way for businesses to secure growth. To analyse mergers and acquisitions, most tools from modern financial economics are needed. The unit commences with a review of how existing businesses are valued, continues with an analysis of capital structure decisions, considers management incentives and examines issues in corporate control. It then examines the motives for mergers and acquisitions. Some acquisitions are motivated by value improvements created by correcting incentive problems, some acquisitions however are motivated by bad incentives that decrease value.
FINC6019 Financial Modelling

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5002 or FINC6000 Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), group assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
It is important for practitioners of finance, at all levels, to be able to evaluate the applicability of a range of models for a given problem and to effectively implement and use the model that is selected. This unit presents methods for model design, implementation and evaluation in the context three fundamental financial models; the discounted cash flow valuation model, the portfolio selection model and the options pricing models. Spreadsheet engineering methods for designing, building, and testing spreadsheet models and for performing model-based analysis are presented. There is a concise coverage of optimization, sensitivity analysis and simulation featuring a strong spreadsheet orientation and a modelling emphasis.
FINC6021 Corporate Valuation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit applies all aspects of finance theory to the general problem of valuing companies and other financial assets. This requires a synthesis of the fundamental concepts of present value, cost of capital, security valuation, asset pricing models, optimal capital structures, derivative pricing and some related accounting concepts. The unit aims to reach a level of practical application that allows students to understand both the theoretical frameworks and institutional conventions of real world corporate valuations. Basic valuation concepts from accounting are reconciled with the finance theory on which firm value ultimately stands. Students are asked to make extensive use of Excel or similar software in valuation exercises.
FINC6022 Behavioural Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-term exam (30%), group assignment (20%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Behavioural finance examines how individual financial decision making and behaviour affect outcomes in financial markets. The unit begins with a review of the foundations of efficient markets, and then draws comparisons between the efficient ('economically rational') market and the less understood but possibly more realistic behavioural ('partially rational' or 'irrational') understanding of markets. The philosophy of the unit is that both viewpoints have advantages and each adds something new to our understanding of investor behaviour, both at the level of individual traders and at the level of the market interpreted as a mechanism for aggregating opinion and attitudes to risk.
FINC6023 Financial Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: Lab exercises (20%), group project (20%), mid semester exam (20%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Risk is an integral part of financial decisions. Following the rapid evolution of the discipline of financial risk management, analysts must be prepared to access the level of risk in the marketplace. This unit explores the basic concepts of modelling, measuring and managing financial risks within the regulatory framework. Topics covered include market risk (value-at-risk and expected loss), credit risk (single name, portfolio, ratings and market based models, credit derivatives), liquidity risk and operational risk. To overcome the rather quantitative nature of the topics, the unit relies heavily on practical based lab exercises with emphasis on simulations, real life examples and case studies.
FINC6024 Real Estate Finance and Investment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), group project (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Real Estate Finance will provide graduates with the knowledge and skills to value and manage real estate within the context of a mixed-asset portfolio. In particular, this unit will explore the micro-economic and macro-economic foundations of real estate, real estate valuation techniques, property derivatives and securities, real estate portfolio management, capital management and listed real estate firms. Graduates can seek employment in the property management industry, funds management industry and financial analysis roles.