Unit descriptions G - H

GCST5902 Natures and Cultures of Bodies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3x 2000 Case study (90%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The nature/culture distinction is under pressure today as relations to our bodies, the world and each other are transformed by technology, ecological crisis, gender practices and new forms of consumption. Thinking beyond this distinction by examining the practices of bodies, this unit combines theoretical reflection with case studies to give students new tools for cultural analysis.
GCST5905 Identity Place and Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd seminar paper with annotated bibliography (40%) and 1x3000wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit familiarises students with contemporary ideas and debates concerning cultural identity, community and location, with an emphasis on diversity and difference in contemporary Australian culture but placed in an international context by the wider field of cultural studies. It will focus on contemporary case studies to enable students to explore theories of identity, community and cultural location and develop appropriate and effective means of analysing contemporary cultural identities and practices.
GCST5906 Cultural Studies Internship Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: In addition to the internship placement, a WebCT online forum will host online journals for all students approved to participate in the internship program Assessment: weekly online journal equivalent to 2000 wds (40%) and 1x2500wd internship placement report (60%) Practical field work: 20 (7 hour) days (140 hours equivalent) in full time or part time blocks (to be negotiated) in an internship placement Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit offers an opportunity for direct work experience in a range of organisations, businesses and institutions undertaking or requiring cultural research or analysis, from education, legal, policy or popular culture research to consumer or community ethnography. Candidates will undertake an approved internship pending availability of an appropriate placement. Students should note that approval may be required from the host organisation to use material from the placement in subsequent publications.
GCST5907 Cultural Studies Internship Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: GCST5906 Assessment: 1x1000wd written proposal or Oral Presentation (pass/fail) and 1x4000wd Research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Following directly from GCST5906, this unit requires that students complete a research project based on their internship placement experience, developing their understanding of cultural research in theory and in practice and their capacity to conduct independent research.
GCST5909 Key Thinkers for Cultural Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd Seminar presentation (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%) and 1x2000wd reading journal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Based on close reading of individual authors, this unit introduces students with limited background in cultural theory to key thinkers for contemporary cultural studies. Students will learn about the influence of such theoretical fields as Western Marxism, psychoanalysis and feminism on cultural studies as well as how to relate cultural research to the cross-disciplinary traditions of structuralism and post-structuralism as these have been taken up in different intellectual contexts around the world.
GCST6901 Cultural Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1500wd policy analysis (30%), 1x3000wd Research essay (60%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines cultural policy across a range of sectors such as museums and heritage, the arts, media, and the 'cultural industries'. It will provide theoretical perspectives and practical insight into policy formation processes in Australia and internationally. The multiple actors and rationales that shape policy and ground claims for its relevance amid social change and cultural diversity are considered. Students learn how to analyse policies in relation to the institutional, social and political contexts of their emergence.
GCST6902 Contemporary Issues in Cultural Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students undertake a supervised project consisting of a series of tasks designed to build research skills. Students will benefit from fortnightly research seminars that will canvass issues of research conception, design, conduct and contribution to field. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Cultural Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd Presentation (20%), 1x2000wd Literature Review (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students explore issues, experiences and practical approaches in cultural research. Students undertake a supervised project consisting of a series of structured tasks designed to build research skills. This prepares students for a long essay written in the follow-on unit Cultural Research Project. This unit and Cultural Research Project may be taken as a capstone for the Master of Cultural Studies. Prospective candidates should consult the postgraduate coursework coordinator for Cultural Studies prior to enrolment in order to formulate a topic. This unit can be taken instead of completing a dissertation. Enrolment requires approval.
GCST6903 Debates in Cultural Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd seminar paper/presentation (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%) and 1x2500wd Research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores key debates in cultural studies as an exploration of its core concepts. Unit content will vary from year to year in response to current issues in Australian cultural studies, but will also cover foundational debates in the discipline, including the relation between ideology and mass culture, between taste and habitus, and between changing media technologies and models of subjectivity. It will also consider ethical debates over theory and practice and the institutionalisation of cultural studies.
GCST6905 Gender in Cultural Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (25%), 1x3500wd research project (60%) and 1x500wd seminar paper/presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What is the relation between femininity, masculinity and culture? Does sexual difference affect our identity and, if so, how and in what circumstances? Does it affect our relations with others? Is there any link between cultural and racial difference and sexual difference? What contexts may shape such links? Where does equality fit into all this? Drawing on the work of major cultural theorists and feminist thinkers this unit examines various theoretical conceptualizations and popular representations of gender; the issue of embodiment; and how sex and race are articulated within gendered conceptual frames.
GCST6912 Cultural Research Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Under the guidance of a supervisor, students will undertake a piece of independent research culminating in a long essay. Students will benefit from fortnightly research seminars that canvass issues of research conception, design, conduct and contribution Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Cultural Studies, including GCST6902 Assessment: 1x6000wd Research Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Following preparatory activities in Contemporary Issues in Cultural Research, students - under the guidance of a supervisor - will undertake a piece of independent research culminating in a long essay. Contemporary Issues in Cultural Research and Cultural Research Project may be taken as a capstone for the Master of Cultural Studies. Prospective candidates should consult the postgraduate coursework coordinator for Cultural Studies prior to enrolment, in order to formulate a topic.
GCST6922 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Prerequisites: 24 credit points Corequisites: Corequisites: WMST6902 Prohibitions: WMST6922 Assessment: 1x3000wd Dissertation Prospectus (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing towards a dissertation of 15,000 words on an approved topic, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. In this unit, students will be required to develop a 3,000 word dissertation prospectus. Prospective candidates should consult the postgraduate coordinator prior to enrolment, in order to formulate a topic.
GCST6923 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Prerequisites: GCST6922 Prohibitions: WMST6923 Assessment: 1x15000wd Dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing towards a dissertation of 15,000 words on an approved topic, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Prospective candidates should consult the postgraduate coordinator prior to enrolment, in order to formulate a topic. Enrolment requires approval.
GOVT6108 Democracy and Development in SE Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Oral Presentation and written assessment (30%), 2500wd analytical Essay/report (30%), 1500wd exam (30%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Southeast Asia's economic experiences and socio-political challenges will be examined within an historical and comparative context in order to better appreciate the economic continuities, understand the major socio-political dilemmas and changing patterns of development. Themes such as the significance of colonialism on post-colonial economies and polities, role of the state in the national and global economy, causes of the region's high-speed growth in the 1980s and 1990s, subsequent economic downturn and future prospects, changing complexion of foreign investment, significance and operational dynamics of the Overseas Chinese Business Networks, salience of socio-economic and ethnic tensions, contradictions associated with the promotion of open economies within authoritarian political structures, the relationship between economic and political corruption, prominence of political Islam, rise of civil society actors, implications of the national and regional reserve army of labour, efficacy of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the region's economic and security links with Northeast Asia will be analysed.
GOVT6111 Chinese Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Corequisites: CHSC6901 for Master of China Public Administration and Master of China Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent Oral debate (10%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), 1x2hr Examination (30%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the internal governance of the People's Republic of China and aspects of its external relations. It begins by tracing the emergence of the PRC's political system after 1949, focussing on key features of Maoism and the rationale of Post-Mao reforms. It then considers the remarkable economic, demographic and social changes that have occurred in recent years and how China's government has responded to a range of crucial challenges. In particular the unit will provide critical insights into how concepts like democracy, human rights, civil society and 'rule of law' have developed within the Chinese context. Finally the unit will analyse the impact of 'globalization' on China's political system.
GOVT6116 International Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent in intensive session Assessment: 4000wd Essay (50%) and 2hr exam (30%) and Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to how states and other actors in the international arena cooperate to build institutions as a response to common problems. After completing the unit students should be able to analyse contemporary international organisations to see how they work, whose interests they serve, and to what degree they attenuate or enhance the power of sovereign states.
GOVT6119 International Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week Assessment: 2x 2700wd Essay (90%), 1x600wd In-class quizzes (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit reviews developments in international security since before World War l, to recent events like September 11 and its aftermath. The principal focus is on developments since the end of the Cold War and the collapse of Communism. The unit takes account of traditional notions about the causes of war and the conditions of peace, as well as changes in the structure and process of contemporary international relations.
GOVT6121 Northeast Asian Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 4000wd Essay (50%) and 2hr exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the strategic relationship between the great powers in Northeast Asia, potential arenas of conflict, China and India's rise, Sino-Japanese tensions, North Korea as a potential nuclear weapon's state, inter-Korean relations and the US alliance system. Are we seeing the beginnings of a new security dilemma as Asia's rising powers extend their political and economic influence upsetting the established order? Will they challenge US strategic pre-eminence in the region ushering in a new age of super power competition, or can the region work together towards common security objectives?
GOVT6123 Globalisation and Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Research essay (40%), 3x 500wd Tutorial papers (30%), 1x1.5hr Examination (20%), 1x Tutorial participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
It is widely believed that we are entering a new era in which the transborder flows of capital, goods, ideas, and people are rapidly transforming human society. 'Globalisation', many claim, threatens the autonomy of nation-states and erodes the power of national governments to provide social protection and promote the nation's economic prosperity. This unit examines not only the causes and mechanisms of this process, but also assesses its social, economic, and political impacts. The views of radicals, transformationalists, skeptics, and institutionalists are compared and criticised. While globalisation is often viewed as a singular process, trending towards a global society, this unit offers a distinctive approach. Globalisation has uneven and highly differentiated impacts, whether harmful or beneficial, and this unevenness is closely associated with the nature of institutions of governance, at both the domestic and international levels.
GOVT6127 Research Project/Essay

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hrs over the semester as arranged with supervisor Assessment: 500 word proposal and 5,000 word Research essay/project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit consists of a Research essay OR project on a topic devised by the student and approved by the supervisor-marker. The student is responsible for finding a supervisor-marker, in consultation with the PG coordinator. The Essay/project is to be completed within one semester. It is strongly recommended that the students draft their proposal and seek a supervisor before the semester begins.
GOVT6135 Global Environmental Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Essay (50%), Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the environment as a political and policy issue. Although relatively recent, the environment has become a full-fledged public policy issue exerting influence in local, national and international arenas. The unit will first focus on the specific features of the policy that influences the capability of contemporary societies to enhance the management of environmental resources and of public goods in general. Second, it discusses the development of environmental policy in Western countries, with a particular emphasis on the European Union. Third, a grid for the analysis of environmental policy will be presented, with a discussion of the main actors (political, institutional and socio-economic) involved in it and of the factors (interests and ideas) influencing their positions. Fourth, the unit briefly discusses environmental conflicts and consensual approaches used for tackling them.
GOVT6136 Asia Pacific Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture-seminar/week Assessment: 1000wd issue brief (20%) and 2000wd research essay/two issue briefs (50%) and 2hr final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is organised around the upsurge in regional economic and security cooperation within East Asia and the more nebulous Asia Pacific in the last 15 years. It also looks at academic efforts to define East Asia and the Asia Pacific as regions. The first part of the unit covers the domestic similarities in East Asia and what these mean for East Asian and Asia-Pacific regionalism. The second part of the unit covers efforts to develop regional institutions like APEC and ASEAN and the role of these institutions in spurring regionalism. While the Asia Pacific and its sub-regions are the focus of the unit, both domestic and global economic and political forces are fully integrated into discussions. The unit provides critical insights into the reasons for the upsurge in regional economic and security cooperation, its likely trajectory and how East Asia and the Asia-Pacific are defined.
GOVT6137 Forces of Change in Int Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (40%), 1x1000wd Paper (10%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (30%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to some of the most important contemporary structural changes in the global political economy and power structure with special attention to non-state actors (including corporate ones) and global civil society. The unit begins with an outline of the dominant modes of thinking about international political and economic relations, surveys some of the main theoretical schools and then examines global politics and political economy in terms of those events and forces that have been or are capable of precipitating major change. The historical focus will be principally on the role of war (including the so-called War on Terror), globalisation, power shifts and ideological innovation (including American unilateralism and Islamic fundamentalism) in the post Cold War period. The new agenda of international politics will be explored in a theoretical perspective - including the climate change emergency and the issue of effective global governance; the struggle for global social and economic justice, and the global prospects of democracy. The unit is designed as an advanced introduction to international relations for students pursuing postgraduate studies.
GOVT6139 Research Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Proposal (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students with the fundamentals for constructing and conducting effective research projects in the social sciences. An overview of social science inquiry will be presented through an examination of the diversity in theoretical and methodological approaches used in research. This will include a focus on both primary research, using interviews and questionnaires, and secondary research, using statistical databases, content analysis and textual analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative methods will be covered in the unit, as will an overview of ethical practices associated with research design. The assessment will be based around constructing practical research projects that can be utilised in both university and workplace-based research.
GOVT6147 Foundations of International Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x2000wd Essay (60%), 1x2hr exam (30%) and Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Why do states behave the way they do? Using a historical perspective, this unit explores the ways in which the different theories of international relations account for what shapes the international system - who are its main actors, what are its determining forces and structures. It examines both how these theories have vied with one another within inter-paradigm debates and how they developed in relation to specific historical events. These theories include realism, idealism, neorealism, neoliberal institutionalism, Marxism, the English school, constructivism, poststructuralism, feminism, post-colonial approaches. While no prior study of international relations is required, a willingness to engage with theoretical thinking and grapple with complex questions of ontology and epistemology is essential.
GOVT6148 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4hrs over the semester in meetings as arranged with the supervisor Corequisites: GOVT6139 Assessment: Completion of a research proposal, and research and writing towards a dissertation of 10,000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study comprises part 1 of a 10,000 word dissertation for the degree of Master of International Studies. Students must seek the department's permission prior to enrolment.
GOVT6149 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4hrs over the semester in meetings as arranged with the supervisor Corequisites: GOVT6148 Assessment: Completion of a research proposal, research and writing towards a dissertation of 10,000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study comprises part 2 of a 10,000 word dissertation for the degree of Master of International Studies. Students must seek the department's permission prior to enrollment.
GOVT6150 Comparative Democratic Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4000wd Essay (45%), 2x 1000wd Seminar papers (40%), 1x Seminar participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the institutions, structures and conflicts of stable liberal democracies. It compares Australian patterns with those of Western Europe, North America and Japan. It considers theories of different types of democratic politics, especially Lijphart's contrast between consensual and majoritarian systems. In doing so the unit looks at the central democratic political institutions, such as legislatures, executives, party and electoral systems, and relates these to policy processes and to the broader socio-economic environments.
GOVT6156 Governance and Civil Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1.5hr Examination (20%), 1x4500wd Research report (60%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an overview of contemporary debates about policy making in democratic states, such as Australia. It examines how 'governance' is constituted by the interaction between the state and civil society. Governance is an emerging area of interest for both government and non-government organisations, and this unit analyses the way these social, economic and political organisations interact to both create public policy agendas and lead to social and political change. The unit covers the configurations of policy communities, political networks and social movements which shape both representative and participatory democratic practice. There is a particular emphasis on understanding the strategies that different political actors adopt.
GOVT6210 Special Topics in International Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Mackenzie Session: Winter Main Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1200wd literature review (35%) and 2800wd essay (50%) and 500wd in-class presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
State Security and Human Rights: This unit focuses on the interrelationship between state security and international human rights in the Post September 11 environment. Using a comparative approach to politics, it encourages students to identify similarities and differences in the response of western liberal governments to the threat of terrorism and to examine how these responses have influenced human rights practices, especially civil and political rights - in each country under review.
GOVT6220 The State, Secession, and Civil War

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x600wd Reading quizzes (10%), 2x 2700wd Essay (90%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Secession represents one of the most definitive challenges to the legitimacy and authority of the sovereign state. This unit will examine explanations for the causes of secessionism, why it has become more common over the last 60 years, and when it results in civil war. Consideration will also be given to normative questions such as: when do a people have the right to secede? These topics will be discussed in the context of a number of real world cases.
GOVT6222 Australian Enviro Politics & Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Schlosberg Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1000wd seminar papers (2x15%); 1x3000wd research paper (50%); seminar preparation and participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will offer a broad survey of environmental politics and policy in Australia. It will provide an introduction to the issues raised, the stakeholders and movements involved, analysis of the discourses used and potential policies to be implemented, an overview of the political issues and pressures involved, and reflection on the actual implementation of a range of policies at the local, state, and national level. Australian environmental politics will also be examined in comparative perspective.
GOVT6223 Topics in Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x 1000wd Seminar paper (30%), 1x3400wd Essay (50%), 1x600wd equivalent Oral Presentation (10%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will offer a broad overview of a key contemporary issue in environmental politics. Topics could include climate change policy, environmental justice, food security and politics, sustainable cities, or timely issues in the Australian or global context. The goal will be to ground these issues in the relevant literatures of politics and environmental studies. Check with the unit coordinator or Department for the particular topic to be addressed in any given semester.
GOVT6225 Essential Readings in Int'l Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: Seminar Presentation 1000wd (15%), Seminar Discussant 1000wds (15%), 1x 1500wd Literature Review (30%), 1x 2500wd Essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the students to the Theories of International Relations through an in-depth, close up and rigorous reading of the core texts that have shaped the discipline's history; ranging from classical realism, to various strands of liberalism, constructivism, post-structuralism and post-colonial approaches. Through an active engagement with the discipline's founding texts students will deepen their knowledge of the discipline and hot it has developed in relation to key events in world politics. Seminar discussions will be based on the method of textual analysis.
GOVT6301 Public Sector Ethics and Corruption

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x900wd Short paper (15%), 1x3600wd Essay (60%), 1x1500wd Reflective journal (25%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Much recent attention has focused on preventing corruption and improving ethics in public sector organisations around the world. This unit equips students to identify and analyse different forms of corruption and ethical failure, and to reflect critically on the best ways of combatting corruption and enhancing ethics in the public sector. The unit takes a comparative approach to these issues.
GOVT6304 Development and World Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Book review (20%), 1x3500wd Essay (50%), 1x1500wd equivalent Class presentation (20%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine critical perspectives on international development. It will explore key questions concerning development, including: Have efforts to 'reduce poverty' been effective? What are the various meanings associated with development concepts like 'building capacity' and 'empowerment'? Is there any consensus about what development is and how to 'do' it? The unit will include an analysis of how much has been learned about development over the last fifty years. Finally, the unit will consider what role might individuals take.
GOVT6311 Issues in Public Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will examine a current national or international public policy process, issue or sector. It will deal with contemporary themes and issues in terms of ground level policies, as well as wider conceptual frameworks to help explain them.
GOVT6313 Leadership in Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1200wd Leadership profile (20%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), 1x1800wd Reflective journal (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'The leader points the way.' Eleanor Roosevelt. Leadership is a story that resolves these questions: What is a leader? What kinds of leaders are there? Is democratic leadership different from other kinds? Is leadership in a local community similar to that in national politics or international politics? Are leaders made or born? Is leadership generic? Is it the same in Europe and Asia? What is the difference between a leader and a manager? This unit reviews and evaluates theories of leadership. Participants' experiences and perceptions of leadership are an important part of the unit.
GOVT6314 Terrorism and International Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Justin Hastings Session: Winter Main Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week or equivalent in intensive session Assessment: 1000wd essays/analytical briefs (3x25%) and 2hr final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a comprehensive theoretical and empirical introduction to the problem of terrorism worldwide and its impact on global security. It will cover the origins of terrorism, the structure and behavior of terrorist organisations, social, political, economic, and technological trends that impact terrorism and the threat it poses, and the complexities of counterterrorism policy. The knowledge and analytical skills acquired by students in this unit will be instrumental in understanding the challenge of terrorism.
GOVT6316 Policy Making, Power and Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Short Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Long Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the nature of public policy and the processes by which it is produced. Relevant issues are common to all nation states, although they take specific forms in each individual country. First, the unit takes an overview of public policy - dealing with basic themes such as 'What is policy?' through to different approaches to understanding the policy process. These include policy cycles, rationality, interest groups, institutions, and socio-economic interests. Second, it maps out and examines the main components of public policy making: actors, institutions and policy instruments. Third, it focuses on aspects of policy-making processes which often attract a high level of attention from analysts. These include problem definition, agenda setting, decision-taking, policy implementation, policy evaluation and crisis policy-making. Fourth, it examines wider issues in terms of the state and who ultimately holds power over the making and shaping of public policy. Finally, it examines the 'bigger pictures' of long term policy trends, and the extent to which national policy making capacities and processes have been affected by globalisation. Assessments offer a large element of flexibility, allowing students to concentrate on areas of particular interest.
GOVT6319 Governance and Public Policy Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6x3hr lectures-tutorials/weeks 1-6, 1x7hr weekend class, 1x4hr weekend class Assessment: 1x3000wd Case study (40%), 1x1500wd equivalent Group presentation (25%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (25%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is focused on two major concepts which are mobilised in the explanation of the way we are governed: 'public policy' and 'governance'. It aims to clarify what is meant by these constructs, and how they can be used in the analysis of governing. It examines the argument that 'governance' denotes a change in the way we are governed, and works through a combination of analytic development and detailed empirical cases to establish the significance of these concepts in both the analysis and the practice of governing.
GOVT6331 Public Management and Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr in-class group work/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Case study (50%), 1x1000wd Case study outline (10%), 1x2hr Examination (30%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit outlines some of the most important developments in contemporary public management and governance and how these relate to the everyday practices of those working in the public sector. It uses examples drawn from a number of OECD countries to: critically analyse the forces that have driven the move towards 'public management'; examine the theory and practice of 'public governance'; evaluate the merits of these developments; and apply this knowledge to better understand specific developments across different contexts.
GOVT6336 Media Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Chen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 3000wd essays (2x50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the politics of news, the institutional basis and processes of its production and how this influences its content. It will analyse the news media as an area of political conflicts and the consequent interests and strategies of various groups in affecting news content. It will examine the way in which news coverage impacts upon political processes and relationships. It will especially examine the role of the news media in election campaigns, policy formation and scandals. Our primary focus is Australia, but there are some comparisons with other affluent liberal democracies.
GOVT6340 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4hrs over the semester in meetings as arranged with the supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of 4 postgraduate units - 75% or above average and written permission from Postgraduate Coursework Coordinator Assessment: Completion of a research proposal and research and writing towards a dissertation of 10,000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study comprises part 1 of a 10,000 word dissertation for the degree of Master of Public Policy. Students must seek the department's permission prior to enrolment.
GOVT6341 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4hrs over the semester in meetings as arranged with the supervisor Corequisites: GOVT6340 (if enrolled full-time). Assessment: Completion of a research proposal research and writing towards a dissertation of 10,000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study comprises part 2 of a 10,000 word dissertation for the degree of Master of Public Policy. Students must seek the department's permission prior to enrolment.
GOVT6357 International Policy Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Short Essay (35%), 1x4000wd Depth Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (15%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the interplay between international and domestic policy making. It evaluates the international context of policy making and public management in domestic arenas, attending to the roles of international governmental organizations and treaties, pressure groups, and multinational corporations in shaping policy decisions. It evaluates the diffusion of policy ideas and programmes internationally and the transfers of policies from one country to another and interrogates the factors that facilitate or frustration implementation.
GOVT6358 Comparative Migration Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4500wd Research Paper (60%), 1x1.5hr Examination (25%), 1x Seminar participation (15%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers immigration policy debates in the world's three largest immigrant selecting nations - Australia, Canada and the United States - with additional reference to developments across the European Union. Students will analyse the regulation of skilled, family, asylum and illegal immigration and the determination of the size and composition of immigration programmes. Integration and citizenship policies are also considered. In all of these debates, the role of policy instruments, institutions and actors in the policy process are considered.
GOVT6359 US-China Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x15-20min Presentation (equiv 750wd) (25%), 1x750wd Policy Memo (15%), 1x4500wd Research Paper (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This seminar introduces students to the dynamics of US-China relations, regarded by many as the most significant bilateral relationship in the world. The seminar aims to give an overview of the history of US-China relations, to deepen the students' understanding of the strategic thinking and policy-making of both China and the US, and to discuss a number of key contemporary issues in the relationship in some detail. This bilateral relationship has arguably become the most complex and challenging for both Washington and Beijing.
GOVT6400 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT6401 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT6402 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT6403 Government Exchange

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GRKA7001 Classical Greek for Postgraduates I

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: GRKA1001, GRKA2301, GRKA2620, GRKA1600 Assessment: Weekly language assignments equivalent to 1250wd (30%) Weekly quizzes equivalent to 1250wd (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides the essential linguistic foundation to the study of Greek literature, philosophy, culture, and history. No previous knowledge of any foreign language is assumed and all grammatical concepts encountered will be explained. The unit introduces the basics of Greek through the study of grammar, and is valuable for students interested in all aspects of European history, archaeology, language, literature and philosophy.
GRKA7002 Classical Greek for Postgraduates II

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRKA7001 Prohibitions: GRKA2302, GRKA1002, GRKA2312, GRKA1601, GRKA2621 Assessment: Weekly language assignments equivalent to 1250wd (30%) Weekly quizzes equivalent to 1250wd (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in GRKA7001, enabling students to read Greek texts in the original. It concentrates on additional morphology, reading skills and the syntax of the sentence, while also introducing further grammatical concepts and constructions. Grammatical knowledge is reinforced by translation from and into Greek, while reading skills are further consolidated through the study of selected extracts from Greek prose and/or verse texts.
GSOG6001 Policy in Practice: Delivering Value

Credit points: 6 Session: Session 1 Early Census Classes: 1x8hr seminar/week, 8.30am-4.30pm Thursday, weeks 1 to 4 and weeks 8 to 10 Assessment: 2x500wd critical summaries (2x15%), 1500wd group proposal (10%), 20min group presentation (20%), 2000wd Essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who are not undertaking the award courses GDPA, MPAdmin or EMPA must have the permission of the Director, Graduate School of Government, to take this unit of study.
This unit examines the design, implementation and evaluation of policy in contemporary democracies. Reflecting the varying roles of the public sector - for example, regulator, service provider and law-maker - policy is approached as an exercise that occurs within specific institutional, historical, political and economic contexts rather than an abstract ideal. Through tailored case studies, this unit will explore issue-identification and framing, consultation, decision making, implementation and evaluation. Government is increasingly understood as a generator of public value, and effective policy is the central mechanism through which public value is delivered. Focusing on practitioner perspectives, the unit explores relevant theoretical and analytical frameworks. Throughout the unit there is an emphasis on the need for policy which is informed by the best available evidence and which, as much as possible, actively engages citizens and builds trust in public institutions and services. National and international policy transfer, the impact of globalisation and the challenges of the information explosion will be considered.
Textbooks
GSOG6001 unit reader; Althaus, C, Bridgman, P and David, G The Australina Policy Handbook 5th Edition.
GSOG6002 Public Sector Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Session 1 Early Census Classes: 1x8hr seminar/week, 8.30am-4.30pm Friday, weeks 1 to 4 and weeks 8 to 10 Assessment: 1x1500wd Leadership evaluation paper (20%), 1x20min presentation leader in action group project (40%), 1x3500wd reflective journal (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who are not undertaking the award courses GCPA, GDPA, MPAdmin or EMPA must have the permission of the Director, Graduate School of Government, to take this unit of study.
Leadership is made by followers and leaders together. It is a story that resolves these questions. What is a leader? What is the difference between leaders and managers? Are leaders made or born? What are the different kinds of leaders? Who follows leaders and why? Is democratic leadership different from other kinds? How is public-sector leadership different from leadership in business or community organisations? Is it different across different cultures? Do men and women lead in the same way? In this unit, we will review and evaluate theories of leadership. Emphasis will be on the application of theories to evidence, including participants' experiences and perceptions of leadership in different contexts. The theme of leaders as facilitators and agents of change will be explored, including real-world examples of what, how and when to make decisions. Similarly, the themes of ethical practice in managing and leading people and shaping organisational culture will be explored.
Textbooks
GSOG6002 unit reader.
GSOG6003 Strategic Administration

Credit points: 6 Session: Session 2 Early Census Classes: 1x8hr seminar/week, 8.30am-4.30pm Friday, weeks 1 to 4 and weeks 8 to 10 Assessment: 1x1000wd Comparative critical summary (30%), 1x1500wd Group proposal (10%), 1x20-min group presentation (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who are not enrolled in the GCPA, GDPA or MPAdmin must have the permission of the Director, Graduate School of Government, to undertake this unit of study.
Designed for advanced practitioners, this unit will explore six key strategic themes in public administration. The legislative and regulatory frameworks of NSW and other jurisdictions will be reviewed to provide a better understanding of how these affect macro-governance of the public sector. Case studies will be used to illustrate techniques and skills for managing and facilitating policy as well as delivering services within these frameworks. Explanations will be given of different models and techniques for negotiating agency, cross-agency and centre-of-government consultation and decision-making processes. Various theoretical and applied frameworks for ethics and policy will be examined as well as for personal and corporate responsibility, the political process and managing relationships with ministers. The notion of the 'contract state' will be reviewed, particularly in the context of designing and executing complex private-sector contracts. Consideration will be given to the nature and culture of organisations, particularly the ways they manage changes in their work force and workplace that have been introduced in response to external and internal stimuli. The impact of globalisation, and the response of various public sectors to terrorism will be reviewed as well as the influence these have had on international business dealings and trans-national contracting. Theories and practical examples will be presented of adjusting to, understanding and anticipating social, political and economic change and its impact.
Textbooks
GSOG6003 unit reader; Geoff Mulgan (2009) The Art of Public Strategy: Mobilizing Power and Knowledge of the Common Good.
GSOG6004 Managing Public Expenditure

Credit points: 6 Session: Session 2 Early Census Classes: 1x8hr seminar/week, 8.30am-4.30pm Thursday, weeks 1 to 4 and weeks 8 to 10 Assessment: 4500wd workbook & journal (50%), 3000wd budget briefing paper (30%), 2500wd Essay (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who are not undertaking the award courses GCPA, GDPA, MPAdmin or EMPA must have the permission of the Director, Graduate School of Government, to take this unit of study.
This unit examines contemporary budgeting and financial management practices in Australia and selected comparative jurisdictions (for example, Canada and the United Kingdom) as a continuing site of political, bureaucratic, and parliamentary conflict. In particular, it is framed around the continuing quest to increase the 'rationality' of resource allocation. The unit traces the shift from traditional cash-based financial management to the rise of accrual-based performance budgeting, and examines issues such as the nature of 'budgeting control', the place of non-financial performance information in resource allocation, the consequences of accounting reforms for public accountability and the contested orthodoxy of applying 'market discipline' in budget-dependent government services. Students will review the changing role of central budget agencies, in particular, the influence of the accounting profession, corporate interests and international organisations on the reform agenda. At a practical level the unit provides insight into techniques for budget management and preparation, including the strategies and issues involved in risk management, procuring capital works and managing assets and facilities. The role and application of pricing policy and strategies are addressed in case studies.
Textbooks
GSOG6004 unit reader.
GSOG6005 Work Based Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x8hr workshop February 2015, 1x4hr workshop March 2015, 1x4hr workshop May 2015 Prerequisites: GSOG6001, GSOG6002, GSOG6003, GSOG6004 Assessment: project application and contract (0%), 1500wd literature review and research methods paper (20%), 5000wd individual) or 10,000wd (group) written report (60%), 250wd learning impact statement (0%), 10min Oral Presentation (20%) Practical field work: Interviews, research, data collection and analysis as required; the main component of this unit is conducted within the workplace Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who are not enrolled in GCPA, GDPA or MPAdmin must have the permission of the Director, Graduate School of Government to undertake this unit of study.
A project, undertaken individually or with a group, that results in a written report with appropriate supporting material and documentation to aid implementation or progression to approval (for example, a draft Cabinet Minute, ministerial briefing note, internal or external discussion paper). The report should demonstrate primary research, the development of proposals based on independent research and an in-depth examination of the project theme. For students undertaking individual projects the expected length would be 5000 words or less, while group projects would be 10,000 words or less (including supporting and implementation documentation). The project report must include a Learning Objectives Impact Analysis (about 250 words) that demonstrates the manner and extent to which the completed project achieves the general learning objectives identified below for the Work Based Project unit of study. The project must also demonstrate the application of theory and practice with respect to policy development and the assessment of resource impacts of recommendations or proposed actions. The project report must also demonstrate the use of processes and techniques that engage others in consultation and feedback during the evolution of the report and the project. Each project will be assigned both an academic and work-based supervisor, underpinned by a formal commitment to complete the defined scope of the project. Milestones will be identified with feedback provided as the project develops.
GSOG6006 Internship Program

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings with academic supervisor Prerequisites: GSOG6001, GSOG6002, GSOG6003, GSOG6004 Assessment: 5000wd Essay (85%), 1000wd learning report (15%). Practical field work: 20 working days with the host agency Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students who are not enrolled in GCPA, GDPA or MPAdmin must have the permission of the Director, Graduate School of Government to undertake this unit of study.
The Internship in Public Administration is a capstone project - it brings together themes developed in the first four core units of study (Policy in Practice: Delivering Public Value; Public Sector Leadership; Strategic Administration and Managing Public Expenditure) and allows students to practise the application of theory to a real life situation, problem or issue. The Internship needs to be based on a 'real world' situation and should add value to the sponsoring agency. All Internship Projects require agreement between the student, the sponsoring agency and the Director, GSG. Depending on the nature of the project approval may also be required from the University's Human Research Ethics Committee.
HBRW6901 Classical Hebrew for Postgraduates I

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr seminars/week Prohibitions: HBRW1111, HBRW2401 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%), continuous assessment (40%) and Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this unit is to provide postgraduate students with a foundation for the Classical Hebrew language. It caters for postgraduate students in the Ancient World Studies program and others pursuing disciplines for which a knowledge of Classical Hebrew is valuable or indispensable. The unit uses Biblical Hebrew texts and grammatical exercises to teach grammar and the principles of translation which are the essential prerequisites for study of related cultural, social and historical issues.
HBRW6902 Classical Hebrew for Postgraduates II

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW6901 Prohibitions: HBRW2402, HBRW1112 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%), continuous assessment (40%) and Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit carries on the work begun in HBRW6901. It completes the coverage of the essential grammar and translation techniques needed for postgraduate study of Classical Hebrew texts.
HRTD6901 Human Rights: Norms and Mechanisms 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1000wd equivalent Participation in class exercises (30%), 1x1500wd reflection report (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a foundational understanding of the content and philosophical justifications of human rights norms. Philosophical, historical and positivist perspectives will be bought together in this unit to allow students to grasp the content of human rights and the justification for norms that become law and to think about how to develop other justifications in the different cultural and social contexts. Using a case study method it will cover institutional protection mechanisms, including UN treaty and charter bodies.
HRTD6902 Human Rights/Democratisation Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Research proposal (50%), 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x500wd Research practicum (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Using a case study approach, this unit provides students with the ability to understand and judiciously utilise a range of research methods relevant to human rights and democratisation, with a particular focus on fieldwork and interviewing. It provides students with information literacy with respect to key sources of information in these fields. It also focuses on the production of effective research for advocacy purposes. All students will produce a research proposal that can be utilised in further study.
HRTD6903 Dynamics of Human Rights Violations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Written Assignment (50%), 1x1500wd equivalent Reflection (40%), Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Using a case study approach, this unit helps students to analyse the causes and sustaining dynamics of human rights violations along a number of dimensions; cultural, economic, organisational, social and political. Students will then acquire analytic and practical capacities and skills to assess the merits and feasibility of different types of interventions and design intervention strategies. It considers the impact of different types of interventions and the processes available for assessing the human rights impact of other laws, policies or developments.
HRTD6904 Democratisation: Theory and Practices

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2500 Essay (60%), 1x2000wd equivalent short answer questions (40%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit exposes students to different theories of democracy/democratisation, raising issues of equality, justice, citizenship and popular sovereignty. Students learn about institutions and systems needed to maintain democracies such as the rule of law, constitutionalism, independence of the judiciary, accountability, impunity, electoral systems, and the role of civil society. The unit explores the relationship between human rights and democratisation and explores human rights and democratisation in different economic, social and cultural contexts, including times of emergencies and armed conflict.
HRTD6905 Human Rights & Democratisation Intensive

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive November Classes: 9am-5pm for a week Prerequisites: HRTD6901 and HRTD6902 and HRTD6903 and HRTD6904 Corequisites: HRTD6901 and HRTD6902 and HRTD6903 and HRTD6904 Assessment: 1x4500 wd equivalent Assignment (100%), Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This intensive unit will bring students together with human rights and democratisation practitioners from the Asia Pacific region and beyond to provide a focused engagement with issues of critical concern. Topics for the intensive will change annually subject to contemporary trends. The unit emphasises the translation of theory to practice and asks students to engage with the practicalities of application and importance of context. Examples of topics are: national human rights institutions, migrations and refugees and development. This unit may be taught offshore.
HRTD6906 The Philosophy of Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week Prohibitions: PHIL7607 Assessment: 1x1500wd Take-home exam (35%) and 1x3500wd Essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit addresses central themes from the history and philosophy of human rights. Topics may include the relationship between human rights and religion, natural law, moral and aesthetic justifications of human rights, claims and challenges to universality of the part of human rights, and tensions between human rights and state sovereignty. Thinkers may include Saint Paul, Kant, Burke, Tocqueville, Arendt, Schmitt, and Rawls.
HRTD6907 Human Rights: Norms and Mechanisms 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Teaching hours vary in different partner institutions, and will be notified to students at the beginning of the semester. Prerequisites: HRTD6901 and HRTD6902 and HRTD6903 and HRTD6904 Corequisites: HRTD6908 Assessment: 1x4500wd Assignment (100%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
This unit examines regional protection mechanisms and how they can be used to defend and promote human rights. It explores approaches designed to protect civil and political rights and new developments seeking to ensure that states fulfil their obligations in economic and social rights. It considers different models for translating international law into domestic law and policy and for mainstreaming human rights into various areas of judicial decision-making and policy. This unit is taught offshore in one of the MHRD partner institutions.
HRTD6908 Critical and Emerging Regional Issues

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Teaching hours vary in different partner institutions, and will be notified to students at the beginning of the semester. Prerequisites: HRTD6901 and HRTD6902 and HRTD6903 and HRTD6904 Corequisites: HRTD6907 Assessment: 1x4500wd Assignment (100%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
This unit examines a range of critical issues of concern in the region and areas where there is particular contestation over human rights and democracy. Issues examined may include but are not limited to: development, human rights and the environment, migration, trafficking, gender and human rights and the rights of indigenous peoples. Themes may include cultural difference and the challenges of promoting human rights in societies where the rule of law, freedom of the press and civil society may not be strongly developed. This unit is taught offshore in one of the MHRD partner institutions.
HRTD6909 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Semester 2a Classes: Approximately 6 x 1 hour supervision meetings or equivalent Prerequisites: a minimum of 24 credit points completed as part of either the Master of Human Rights (MHR) or Master of Human Rights and Democratisation (MHRD), or by departmental permission Corequisites: HRTD6907 and HRTD6908 and HRTD6911 Assessment: 1x12,000wd equivalent towards completion of MHRD dissertation of 15-18,000wd Dissertation (100%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
Students will conduct original independent research in the areas of human rights and/or democratisation under the academic supervision of a relevant expert.

For students completing the Master of Human Rights and Democratisation (MHRD), this unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.

Students enrolled in HRTD6909 are given a pass/fail grade and not numerically assessed on the basis of their progress towards the completion of their dissertation. This unit ensures that students are making adequate and timely progress towards completion of their 15,000-18,000 word dissertation.
HRTD6910 Internship

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Semester 2a Classes: Approximately 6 x 1 hour supervision meetings or equivalent Prerequisites: HRTD6901 and HRTD6902 and HRTD6903 and HRTD6904 Corequisites: HRTD6908 and HRTD6909 and HRTD6912 Assessment: 1xAt least 180 hours in an organisation working in the fields of human rights or democratisation. Practical Work (50%), 1x6000wd equivalent Contribution to an organisation (30%), 1x3000wd Reflection Essay on internship (20%), Practical field work: At least 140 hours in an organisation working in the fields of human rights or democratisation. Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
Students will be placed in an international, regional, non-government or government organisation that is working in the fields of human rights and/or democratisation. Placement will be negotiated with the student and relevant academics, taking into consideration the student's interests and learning objectives. Students will work on projects being undertaken by the organisation and will produce a portfolio of project based work that may include reports, press releases, strategic advice or other policy related documents or products. This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
HRTD6911 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Semester 2a Classes: Approximately 3 x 1 hour supervision meetings or equivalent Prerequisites: a minimum of 24 credit points completed as part of either the Master of Human Rights (MHR) or Master of Human Rights and Democratisation (MHRD), or by departmental permission Corequisites: HRTD6907 and HRTD6908 and HRTD6909 Assessment: 1x6000wd equivalent towards completion of MHRD dissertation of 15-18,000 words in length Dissertation (100%), Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
Students will conduct original independent research in the areas of human rights and/or democratisation under the academic supervision of a relevant expert.

For students completing the Master of Human Rights and Democratisation (MHRD), this unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
HRTD6912 Internship Research Report

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Semester 2a Classes: Approximately 3 x 1 hour supervision meetings or equivalent Prerequisites: HRTD6901 and HRTD6902 and HRTD6903 and HRTD6904 Corequisites: HRTD6907 and HRTD6908 and HRTD6910 Assessment: 1x6000wd Internship Report (100%), 1xAt least 180 hours Practical Work (0%), Practical field work: At least 140 hours in an organisation working in the fields of human rights or democratisation. Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
Students will be placed in an international, regional, non-government or government organisation that is working in the fields of human rights and/or democratisation. Placement will be negotiated with the student and relevant academics, taking into consideration the student's interests and learning objectives. Students will work on projects being undertaken by the organisation and will produce a contribution based work that may include reports, press releases, strategic advice or other policy related documents or products.
This unit is delivered at one of the MHRD partner institutions.
HRTD6913 Human Rights/Democratisation Elective 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: HRTD6901 and HRTD6902 and HRTD6903 and HRTD6904 Corequisites: HRTD6907 and HRTD6908 and HRTD6914 and HRTD6915 Assessment: 5000wds as established by partner institution (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
Students will pursue one of the electives in the areas of human rights or democratisation offered by the university they are attending in the second semester of the degree. Electives will reflect the particular expertise of the university and are likely to be available in a number of relevant disciplines.
HRTD6914 Human Rights/Democratisation Elective 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: HRTD6901 and HRTD6902 and HRTD6903 and HRTD6904 Corequisites: HRTD6907 and HRTD6908 and HRTD6913 and HRTD6915 Assessment: 5000wds as established by partner institution (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
Students will pursue one of the electives in the areas of human rights or democratisation offered by the university they are attending in the second semester of the degree. Electives will reflect the particular expertise of the university and are likely to be available in a number of relevant disciplines.
HRTD6915 Human Rights/Democratisation Theme Paper

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: HRTD6901 and HRTD6902 and HRTD6903 and HRTD6904 Corequisites: HRTD6907 and HRTD6908 and HRTD6913 and HRTD6914 Assessment: 5000wds as established by partner institution (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is delivered at one of the partner institutions.
Students in this unit will undertake independent research in the fields of human rights and/or democratisation under academic supervision. Students may undertake research in an area raised in another part of the degree that they wish to explore in greater detail or an area of particular concern or interest, subject to negotiation with their supervisor. Research will be written up as a 5000 word academic paper.
HRTG6901 The Idea of Heritage

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (45%), 1x2000wd project report (45%), in-Class presentation (peer-assessed) equivalent to 1000wd (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In contemporary society heritage is understood as a form of cultural practice and production that operates at local, national and global scales. Heritage has moved beyond the identification and conservation of 'things we want to keep' to incorporate ideas about intangible values, identity formation, the role of memory and different knowledge systems from critical and theoretical perspectives. This unit of study will examine how heritage is produced, consumed, negotiated and conserved through political processes, structures of governance and cultural practices.
HSTY6915 MA Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: Research and writing toward a dissertation of 10000-12000 words based on original source material - to be completed in HSTY6916 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: This unit should be taken together with HSTY6916
Candidates undertake research and writing toward a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words, based on original source material, on an approved topic. Research is carried out under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Prospective candidates should consult the postgraduate coordinator prior to enrolment in order to formulate a topic.
HSTY6916 MA Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Corequisites: HSTY6915 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 10000-12000 words, begun in HSTY6915 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Completion and submission of a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words on an approved topic. Research and writing are carried out under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
HSTY6962 Treatise Part 1

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2,4,6 and 8 Assessment: Research and writing towards a treatise of 20-25000 words, based on original source materials - to be completed in HSTY6963 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: This unit should be taken together with HSTY6963
Research and writing towards a treatise of 20-25,000 words, based on original source materials, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Candidates work on an approved topic - prospective candidates should consult the postgraduate coordinator prior to enrolment in order to formulate a topic.
HSTY6963 Treatise Part 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2,4,6 and 8 Corequisites: HSTY6962 Assessment: Completion and submission of a treatise of 20-25000 words on an approved topic Mode of delivery: Supervision
Completion and submission of a treatise of 20-25,000 words on an approved topic, following satisfactory progress in HSTY6962.
HSTY6992 Monuments, Memory and History

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4000wd Essay (60%) and 1x2000wd-equivalent monument guide Essay or presentation (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit looks at historical monuments - considered broadly to encompass ruins, statues, war memorials and other commemorative edifices, both formal and informal, as well as features of the natural landscape - and the role they play in the construction and conservation of historical identity and heritage. It will examine theoretical approaches to 'collective memory' and 'sites of memory' with examples drawn primarily from Europe, Australia and Asia. Students will write research papers on both specific monuments and thematic issues.