Unit descriptions I - M

IBUS5002 Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (20%), short essay (20%), group assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This foundation unit provides an introduction to the essential concepts and frameworks relevant to the fields of strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship. Topics covered include the key elements of business strategy, including developing a business mission, understanding the external environment, reviewing internal resources and capabilities, and business and corporate strategy. The importance of entrepreneurial activity and the challenges faced by startup ventures, as well as examples of successful and unsuccessful business innovations, are highlighted. The emphasis of the unit is on understanding the strategic activity of both startup and established businesses with a focus on issues relevant to entrepreneurs as well as business managers.
IBUS6001 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stefan Volk Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hr lecture and 1x 1hr seminar per week Corequisites: IBUS5003 Prohibitions: ECHS6008 Assessment: Individual assignments (70%) and group assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit analyses how multinational firms leverage their capabilities and competencies to create competitive advantages in international and global markets. Topics include assessing foreign market attractiveness; understanding the impact of differences in legal, cultural, political and economic regimes; evaluating international political and economic risk; building and operating global networks, including entry mode choice; understanding how managers design organisational architecture and implement internal control and incentive mechanisms; and assessing the challenges of global citizenship, ethical behaviour and social responsibility for international business. Problem-based learning, with case study workshops, is an integral part of the unit.
IBUS6002 Cross-Cultural Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBA Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: group project (25%), individual assignments (35%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
An understanding of cultural differences and how to manage such differences is critical to effective management in international and multi-cultural business environments. The aim of this unit is to provide conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that will develop an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact on management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management, the meaning and dimensions of culture, comparative international management and leadership styles, managing communication across cultures, ethics and social responsibility in global management, cross-cultural negotiation and decision-making, forming and managing global teams, and developing the international and global manager.
IBUS6016 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jarrod Ormiston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1: 1x 3h lecture/workshop per week; Intensive sessions: 2 x 3hr lecture/workshops pre- departure (Sydney), 30hrs lecture/workshops in country, 1 x 3hr seminar post trip (Sydney) Assumed knowledge: IBUS5002, or completion of at least 24 credit points Assessment: individual report (25%), practice and final pitch (25%), final report (25%), reflective piece (15%), workshop engagement and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Social entrepreneurs are committed to furthering a social mission through enterprises that rank social, environmental or cultural impact on a par with, or even above, profit. Intersecting the business and not-for profit worlds, social entrepreneurship addresses many complex local and global problems. This unit critically introduces the concept and develops frameworks for understanding social entrepreneurship (also referred to as social enterprise and social innovation). Teaching and learning utilises case studies, and includes the opportunity to apply theory to real-world experiences. Topics include creating innovative social enterprises, sustainable business models, philanthropy and funding, impact assessment, and leadership. The unit is structured around learning from engaged practice, and provides the opportunity to work with social enterprises.
IBUS6018 Business Negotiations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Quintin Rares Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Assessment: in-class exercises (33%), assignment (33%), final exam (34%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Note: this unit requires participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of the grade, will require time-pressured reading of material in class.
This course is aimed at making you feel more comfortable and confident with the negotiation process. The course is taught as a 'flipped classroom', meaning that the content of the course is primarily taught outside of class, through brief written lectures, and class time is used to assimilate that knowledge through at least a dozen marked role-play negotiations, debriefs of those negotiations, problem-solving workshops and international negotiation case study analysis. You will also be taught how to develop your own negotiation strategies and tactics using a combination of multiple psychological, economic and legal concepts from the course.
IBUS6019 Strategy and Emerging Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1X 3 hour lecture/seminar per week Assessment: case analysis (20%), class leadership presentation (10%), in-class activity & quiz (10%), mid-term exam (15%), final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Do you have an Emerging Market Strategy? This is a question that an increasingly large number of company managers, especially in the developed western world, are trying to answer. This unit lays the foundations of strategy making in emerging markets, with an emphasis on four of the largest emerging markets of the world today - Brazil, Russia, India and China - often termed as the BRIC countries. Utilising frameworks from mainstream strategy and international business disciplines, the unit analyses emerging markets from the perspective of primarily two simultaneous phenomena - multinationals from developed markets trying to tap into emerging markets, and companies from emerging markets globalising their operations and consequently changing the global competitive landscape.
IBUS6020 Enterprise Management in China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Hans Hendrischke Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Prohibitions: CHSC6902 Assessment: class participation (10%), group presentation (10%), in-class exam (10%), group case project (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on China's globalising business environment from an enterprise perspective by analysing the way in which enterprises are embedded in a dynamic economic, legal and political environment and the consequences that arise for enterprise management and entrepreneurship. The unit combines theoretical analysis of the interrelationship of markets, firms and institutions with detailed, practical case studies of domestic and transnational business activities. Students are able to familiarise themselves with different types of enterprises including the local private sector, state-owned enterprises and foreign owned enterprises operating in China as well as Chinese enterprises expanding into global markets through joint ventures, strategic alliances and mergers and acquisitions.
IDEA9103 Design Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Nathaniel Fay Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, Tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Quizzes (20%), Assignments (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to introduce students to computer programming, both as a tool for design computing and as a medium of expression in digital media. It will focus on the practical application of computer programming as a way to expand the students' abilities to use computers in creative design and research tasks. Topics covered include object-oriented programming concepts such as classes, methods, object creation, instance and local variables, primitive and object types, simple I/O, and control flow; and implementation techniques such as editing, using libraries, and compilation and runtime environments. Students will develop their programming skills through lab exercises and individual assignments, to explore creative applications of software. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.
IDEA9105 Interface Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, Tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Participation (10%); Design Assignments (90%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the fundamentals of user interface design. Interface design is an important element of a human-centred design approach to the development of interactive computational systems. Students will learn about industry standard user interface design and usability principles and guidelines, based in visual design theory and visual perception. They will acquire practical knowledge through the application of tools and techniques for designing and evaluating user interfaces for web and mobile products. The unit increases awareness of good and bad design through observation and evaluation of existing technology, and develops appreciation of visual design principles and their impact on the user experience of interactive products. The knowledge and skills developed in this unit will equip students with the essential capabilities for working in the interaction design and user experience profession. This unit is a foundational core unit in the Master of Interaction Design and Electronic Arts program.
IDEA9106 Design Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lian Loke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, Tutorial 2 hrs/wk Assessment: Design assignments (90%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an overview of a human-centred approach to the design of products and systems. It introduces students to design thinking and how it can be productively applied to different design situations. The theoretical concepts, methods and tools for the key stages of interaction design are covered including user research, ideation, prototyping and user evaluation. It provides students with the principles, processes and tools for working collaboratively on design projects in studio. Students learn to build empathy with users, identify and reframe the problem space, develop value-driven design concepts and persuasively communicate design proposals with an emphasis on the user experience through visual storytelling.
INFO5990 Professional Practice in IT

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in INFO5990 are assumed to have previously completed a Bachelors degree in some area of IT, or have completed a Graduate Diploma in some area of IT, or have many years experience as a practising IT professional. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: The main focus of the subject is to provide students with the necessary tools, basic skills, experience and adequate knowledge so they develop an awareness and an understanding of the responsibilities and issues associated with professional conduct and practice in the information technology sector. This unit is for MIT, MITM, MIT/MITM students only.
This unit of study introduces the students to some of the concepts, standards and techniques associated with the current professional practice in information technology in the business environment.
Students will encounter a range of concepts, techniques and professional issues including interpersonal and organisational communication, human resources and conflict resolution, globalisation, professional ethics, social impacts of IT, data security, data quality assurance, system audit, investigative research and project management practice. Practical and real world case studies will be used as part of the learning to enhance the in-class teachings to the needs of industry.
INFO5991 Services Science Management and Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Seminars Assumed knowledge: INFO5990. Students are expected to have a degree in computer science, engineering, information technology, information systems or business. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The service economy plays a dominant and growing role in growth and employment in most parts of the world. Increasingly, the improved productivity and competitive performance of firms and nations in the services arena relies on innovative and effective design, engineering and management of IT-centric services. In response to industry needs, this unit offers IT professionals a social, economic and technical perspective of service-oriented IT.
In this unit we investigate:
- Service fundamentals: context and strategy (the service economy and the nature of service systems; IT-centric services in a social, economic and business context; IT-centric services: optimisation and innovation).
- Modelling, Designing and Engineering IT-centric services (business process modelling and management; service oriented architecture).
- Sourcing, governing and managing IT-centric services (outsourcing IT-centric services; services in the cloud; IT-centric services governance and management frameworks (COBIT, ITIL and eSCM); service level agreements).
This unit involves reading business and academic articles and writing a consultant's report. Students need to be able to read, critically analyse, and report on an article or case study every three weeks. If you are not confident of your skills in these areas, you can enrol in the free courses provided by the University's Learning Centre in Academic Reading and Writing and Oral Communication Skills. Some of these courses are specifically designed for students with a non-English speaking background. Familiarity with using Library reference tools and the ability to locate scholarly resources in the Library's electronic databases is also necessary. See the Library's Research and information skills page for help with this http://www.library.usyd.edu.au/skills/
INFO5992 Understanding IT Innovations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: PMGT5875 Assumed knowledge: INFO5990. Students are expected to be fluent in English and capable of participating in group discussions, and capable of producing an individually written paper of 5-9 pages (double spaced) of high quality and clarity. Although some work experience is ideal in adding value to the case discussions, allowing students to pull from their personal experiences, those students with no work experience will be expected to do appropriate research on the discussion topics in order to contribute. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An essential skill for an IT manager is the ability to keep up-to-date with emerging technologies, and be able to evaluate the significance of these technologies to their organisation's business activities. This unit of study is based around a study of current technologies and the influence of these technologies on business strategies.
Important trends in innovation in IT are identified and their implications for innovation management explored. Major topics include: drivers of innovation; the trend to open information ("open source") rather than protected intellectual property; and distribution of innovation over many independent but collaborating actors.
On completion of this unit, students will be able to identify and analyse an emerging technology and write a detailed evaluation of the impact of this technology on existing business practices.
INFO6007 Project Management in IT

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lecture Workshops, Assignments, Exam Preparation Prohibitions: PMGT5871 Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in INFO6007 are assumed to have previously completed a Bachelors degree in some area of IT, or have completed a Graduate Diploma in some area of IT, or have three years experience as a practising IT professional. Recent work experience, or recent postgraduate education, in software project management, software process improvement, or software quality assurance is an advantage. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers the key components of successfully managing a wide variety of Information Technology projects. The course covers both quantitative and qualitative aspects of project management. Topics include the management of time, scope, budget, risk, quality, and resources through each of the phases of a project.
INFS5001 Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petri Hallikainen Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1 and Semester 2: 1 x 3hr seminar per week; Summer School: 3 x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFS6014 Assessment: Semester 1 and Semester 2: group assignment (25%), individual assignment (30%), exam (45%); Summer School: individual assignment (50%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block mode
Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) this unit introduces the end-to-end project management lifecycle. Students learn how to select appropriate projects based on their alignment with an organisation's strategy and then how to manage those projects successfully from initiation through execution to completion. The unit covers the essential components of effective project management and how to apply them in an integrated manner. The unit also explores both the technical and behavioural aspects of project management - including Microsoft Project - and students gain experience in critically analysing the application of concepts in specific project contexts. As organisations increasingly structure their activities on a project basis, the unit is of value to a range of discipline specialisations. The unit can also contribute to achievement of internationally recognised accreditation from the Project Management Institute (PMI).
INFS6001 Managing Information and Systems

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-semester test (30%), tutorial work (10%), research (group) essay (25%), and final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces you to the organisational foundations of information systems and their emerging strategic role. You will develop an understanding of critical information management and systems issues in organisations. The unit provides you with a solid understanding of the senior management decisions relating to organisational information and systems and how various information technologies work together to create infrastructure for electronic commerce and electronic business. You will explore the role of information systems in capturing and distributing organisational knowledge and in enhancing management decision making. You will gain a deep understanding into how the information systems function or processes in organisations can be managed. Finally, you will have the opportunity to explore the special management challenges and opportunities created by the pervasiveness and power of information systems.
ITLS6007 Disaster Relief Operations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jersey Seipel Session: Intensive July Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr workshops. Prohibitions: TPTM6390 Assessment: Individual essay (25%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Large scale, sudden onset disasters strike with little or no warning. In their wake they leave shattered infrastructure, collapsed services and traumatised populations, while the number of dead, injured and homeless often reaches staggering proportions. Humanitarian aid organisations, such as the Red Cross, Doctors without Borders or Oxfam, to name just a few, are usually amongst the first responders, but depend on extremely agile supply chains to support their worldwide operations. Successful disaster relief missions are characterised by the ability of professionals to cope with time pressure, high uncertainty and unusual restrictions. This unit is designed as an introduction to the coordination and management of humanitarian aid and emergency response logistics. Case studies of real events, such as the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake provide the framework for analysis and research, while discussion of operational factors, simulations, workshops and group exercises offer students an interactive learning environment.
Textbooks
Christopher M and Tatham P (2011) Humanitarian Logistics
ITLS6301 Ports Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Bell Session: Summer Main Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit conveys the fundamentals of port management and thus develops each student into a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods for the port industry. The unit comprehensively covers all aspects of management from planning and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact for all types of port. Technological changes and their implications for the port industry, in particular container terminal automation, are studied. The role of ports in global supply chains is analysed. The relationship of ports with their hinterlands as well as the concept of port-centric logistics is looked at in detail. The port-city interface as well as waterfront redevelopment is covered, with examples drawn from a number of countries. Port policy and the importance of competition and/or regulation are presented. Talks by port professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Review of Maritime Transport, 2013 and 2014; World Bank (2011) World Bank Port Reform Toolkit
ITLS6401 Airport Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaowen Fu Session: Semester 1 Classes: 5 x 3.5 hr lectures, 2 x 3.5 hr seminars, 5 x 3.5 hr workshops. Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 Assessment: individual report (40%), quiz (20%), group presentation (20%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Airports play an integral role in the aviation system, and contribute significantly to the economic growth of a region, or even a country. This unit covers major aspects of airport management, operation and public policy. The unit's learning objectives are two-fold. Firstly, it provides students with the core knowledge and insights concerning the key issues and decisions involved in the operation and management of airports in a rapidly changing regulatory environment. Secondly, it develops the skills for applying various applied economics and management knowledge to the airport industry. The unit assists students to understand more fully the business related problems encountered by commercial, industrial and public organisations in the airport industry. It also develops an ability to interpret results from relevant economic / management studies.
Textbooks
De Neufville R, Odoni A, Belobaba P and Reynolds T (2013) Airport Systems; Planning, Design and Management; Ashford N, Stanton M, Moore C, Coutu P and Beasley J (2012) Airport Operations; Belobaba P, Odoni A and Barnhart C (2009) The Global Airline Industry
JCTC6100 Sites of Trauma, Landscapes of Genocide

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2a Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1xcritical assessment (1500wds) (20%), 1x1000wd learning journal (20%), 1x3500wd Essay (50%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Holocaust and genocide museums and memorials continue to grow in number and appeal. This unit tracks their evolution as a 'genre', the theoretical and political debates that have accompanied their development and their increasingly influential public and political roles. We examine both purpose-built institutions and those developed at former sites of mass murder, reflecting on how these 'sites of trauma' both shape our understanding of past events and contribute to contemporary debates concerned with genocide prevention and other related issues.
JCTC6908 Exhibiting Jewish Australia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr seminars/week Assessment: 1x500wd Essay abstract (10%), 1xOral Presentation (equivalent to 500wds) (10%), 1x5000wd Essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will demonstrate how the evolution of Australian Jewry has been visualised in various museums run by the Jewish community, local communities in country areas and national museums. It will analyse government policies toward Jewish refugees before and after the Holocaust, and other key issues. It will also discuss how ethnic museums can contribute to Australia's broader multicultural history.
JCTC6915 Contemporary Response to the Holocaust

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr seminars/week Assessment: 1x5000-6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Holocaust, unprecedented in history, has proved to be an ongoing story, and not one that ended in 1945. The magnitude of events during the Holocaust has created enormous debate but despite this it still eludes full comprehension. Issues such as the failure to deal with Nazi war criminals, Holocaust denial, and the question of how to effectively memorialize the Holocaust continue to challenge people today. This unit seeks to analyse a wide range of contemporary responses to the Holocaust.
LAWS6001 Chinese Laws and Chinese Legal Systems

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Coordinator: Prof Vivienne Bath Session: Intensive November Classes: Nov 27-Dec 15 Prohibitions: LAWS6857 or LAWS3014 or LAWS3068 or LAWS5368 Assumed knowledge: undergraduate law degree from a common or civil law jurisdiction or LAWS6252 Assessment: 2hr exam to be completed in Shanghai (30%) and 8000wd essay (70%) due in February Practical field work: field school in Shanghai, China Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is not available to students who have completed a law degree in the People's Republic of China. Master of Law and International Development students may undertake this unit as an elective or capstone unit conditional on (i) students must write an essay that focuses on a development topic and (ii) that topic being pre-approved by the Unit Coordinator. Pre-enrolment registration is required. For further information, please visit Sydney Law School website http://sydney.edu.au/law/
This unit will provide students with an overall picture of the modern Chinese legal system. It will develop a perception of its unique character by tracing its role through major social epochs and the role of law in a socialist market economy. It will examine the concept of law as a political function and the implementation of law, not so much through courts, as through administrative fiats and authority, making law essentially a function of politics and administration. The unit will illustrate these perceptions through the study of various legal regimes. Lecture topics may include: Chinese legal history; Chinese legal system; criminal law and procedure; constitutional law; civil law and procedure; legal profession; environmental law; contract law; property law; company law; intellectual property law; foreign joint ventures; arbitration and mediation; foreign trade law and taxation law. The coursework component of the unit is residential and is conducted on the campus of the East China University of Politics and Law in Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Lectures will be given in English in Shanghai by professors from the East China University of Politics and Law. There will also be a visit to a Chinese law firm.
LAWS6011 Administrative Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Margaret Allars Session: Intensive March Classes: Mar 17, 18 & Apr 21, 22 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS2010, LAWS5010 Assumed knowledge: undergraduate law degree or LAWS6252 (core unit for MALP and Environmental Law students) Assessment: 7500wd essay or 2 x 3750wd essays (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Core unit for MALP students.
The aim of the unit is to develop a critical perspective upon the accountability of government decision-makers. The unit examines theoretical frameworks for analysis of a range of issues concerning accountability, with reference to relevant principles of administrative law. Part 1 of the unit examines the concept of administrative discretion, alternative theories of the rule of law, human rights, ethics and managerialism. Part 2 of the unit is concerned with the accountability of the executive branch of government. It includes analysis of separation of powers and the doctrine of ministerial responsibility, merits review tribunals, investigative tribunals and tribunal procedure. Part 3 of the unit examines theories of participatory democracy, with reference to relevant legal principles drawn from procedural fairness, rules of standing and consultation requirements in rule making. Part 4 examines theories of open government, with reference to statutory duties to give reasons for decisions and freedom of information legislation. Part 5 examines the proper scope of administrative law by discussion of the issue of its extension to government business enterprises which are corporatised, privatised or contracted out.
LAWS6032 Crime Research and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Judith Cashmore Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 2000wd research problem (30%) and 4000wd research proposal (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for MCrim and GradDipCrim students and co-requisite for other criminology units.
This unit provides an examination of research methods in the context of criminology. The relationship between theory and methodology is explored. The production of knowledge about crime is critically assessed. Sources and forms of crime data are discussed and their significance is assessed. Research design, evaluation and analysis are also studied.
LAWS6034 Criminal Liability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Graeme Coss Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: 3000wd essay (50%) and 2hr open-book exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for MCrim students. This unit is an introduction to aspects of criminal law for non-lawyers and is therefore not available to students who have completed a law degree or completed criminal law at a tertiary level.
In this unit, students will examine the ways in which criminal liability is established, and the central factors governing liability; analyse the general principles of criminal law, constituent elements of particular offences and the definition of a range of defences from historical, theoretical and practical context perspectives, with a special focus on male violence; and gain an appreciation of the tensions and perceived prejudices inherent in the criminal law and the criminal justice system.
The unit will cover the following: phenomenon of criminal law; violence; capacity; proof; attempts and accessorial liability; offences: sexual and non-sexual assault, murder and manslaughter; defences: provocation and self-defence, 'insanity' and substantial impairment, automatism, infanticide, intoxication, necessity and duress.
LAWS6035 Criminal Procedures

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Nicholas Cowdery Session: Intensive March Classes: Mar 6, 7 & 27, 28 (9-5) Assessment: take-home exam (60%) and 3000wd essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to examine the processes of the criminal justice system through a consideration of its successive and main stages and of the roles of the principal participants in the system, particularly the police, suspects, accused persons, prosecutors, defence counsel, judges and experts. The focus of the unit will be the processes of criminal justice in New South Wales as well as the rest of Australia. The unit cover a range of topics, and these are likely to include: coronial proceedings; the interrogation of suspects and accused persons; search and seizure; the issue of arrest and custody; electronic surveillance; committal proceedings; the parties in a trial; the admissibility of confessions; the question of illegally and improperly obtained evidence; the jury; sentencing; and appeal proceedings.
LAWS6039 Discrimination in the Workplace

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Belinda Smith Session: Intensive May Classes: Intro Class: Apr 26 (6-8) then May 13, 14 & 27, 28 (9-5) Assessment: Three components of assessment and students can choose the weighting: Regime A - class participation (0%), online short-answer quiz (35%) and 5500 wd essay (65%); or Regime B - class participation (15%), online short-answer quiz (25%) and 5500 wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: MLLR students may enrol in this unit before completing LAWS6071 Labour Law
In this unit we examine the nature of discrimination in the workplace and the legal response to it in Australia. We start by considering the theoretical perspectives on equality that underpin our legislation and ideas about effective regulation. We then examine how anti-discrimination law is applied in respect of a number of different grounds of discrimination - such as sex, race, disability, and family responsibilities - reviewing recent cases and current issues. We will also discuss enforcement mechanisms and processes under anti-discrimination legislation and what, if any, effect the legislation has had on workplace processes and culture. While NSW law will be considered, the focus will be on federal legislation, looking at anti-discrimination laws, anti-discrimination provisions in the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth), and the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012 (Cth).
LAWS6044 Environmental Law and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Ed Couzens, Dr Gerry Bates Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: Group A (S1CIMR): Mar 15-18 (9-5) and Group B (S2CIAU): Aug 9-12 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3430 or LAWS5130 Assumed knowledge: LAWS6252 or law degree from a common law jurisdiction Assessment: class presentation and 2000wd essay (25%) and 6000wd essay (75%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Environmental Law students must complete LAWS6252 and this core unit prior to enrolling in other law elective units.
The aim of the unit is to introduce students to overarching themes in environmental law and policy as a foundation to their more detailed studies for the Environmental Law Program. This is an overview unit addressing a number of environmental issues at various levels of analysis; such as policy making, implementation of policy and dispute resolution. The concept of ecologically sustainable development and its implications for environmental law and policy is a continuing theme. The unit is designed to develop multi-dimensional thinking about environmental issues and the strategies needed to address them. The unit provides a broad background of the political and economic issues in so far as they are related to the legal issues involved.
LAWS6045 Environmental Planning Law

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Edgar Session: Intensive October Classes: Sep 11, 12 & 15, 16 (9-5) Prohibitions: : LAWS3430 or LAWS5130 Assessment: class participation (20%) and 7000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit examines the legal and institutional structures for land-use regulation and the resolution of land-use conflicts. The focus is on environmental planning, development control and environmental impact assessment. The unit will examine the design of environmental planning systems, the various types of development assessment systems, the opportunities for public involvement in decision-making processes, and the role of courts and tribunals in resolving land-use disputes.
LAWS6047 Law of the Sea

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Tim Stephens Session: Intensive October Classes: Oct 12, 13 & 18, 19 (9-5) Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and take-home exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The oceans cover two-thirds of the world's surface, and are vital to international commerce, are a store of important living and non-living resources, and provide indispensable environmental services including stabilising the global climate system. This unit reviews the major areas of the law of the sea as it has developed over the centuries. The unit takes as its focus the 'constitution' of the oceans, the 1982 UN Convention on the Law of the Sea and also considers a range of other international conventions and agreements, and current state practice. Each of the major maritime zones is assessed, and there is also a detailed review of several sectoral issues, including the protection of the marine environment, fisheries, navigational rights and freedoms, and military uses of the oceans. Where appropriate, reference will be made throughout the unit to relevant Australian law and practice, and to other state practice in the Asia Pacific Region.
LAWS6048 Explaining Crime

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Gail Mason Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: take-home exam (30%), class presentation (10%) and 3500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for MCrim and GradDipCrim students and co-requisite for other criminology elective units.
This unit examines the relevance of theory to the process of explaining crime as a social phenomenon. It will selectively analyse the history of criminological thought. Special attention will be given to the cross-disciplinary nature of efforts to understand crime, criminality and their causes. A significant section of the unit will deal with contemporary approaches to criminological explanation including the influence of feminism and postmodernism. Contemporary theorists such as Foucault, Garland and Braithwaite will also be considered. The unit will endeavour to make explicit the links between criminological theory and the development of public policy.
LAWS6052 Govt Regulation, Health Policy and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Cameron Stewart Session: Intensive October Classes: Sep 28, 29 & Oct 5, 6 (9-5) Assessment: 7500wd essay (100%) or 2x3750wd essays (2x50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: MHL students may select this unit as one of the three core units required in addition to LAWS6252 or LAWS6881.
This unit examines government regulation of health care, drugs, resource allocation, medical research and professional practice. With regard to each area of government decision-making, issues are analysed by reference to the interplay between social goals, human rights, legal rights and ethical considerations. Topics covered include the constitutional and statutory sources of government power with respect to health care: regulatory models and reform of public health legislation; therapeutic goods administration; health insurance; pharmaceutical benefits and the pharmacy industry; immunisiation, notifiable diseases and public health emergencies; human tissue legislation; discipline of health professionals; health care complaints tribunals; a right to health care; ethical theories in law and medicine; the ethics of human experimentation; and ethics committees.
LAWS6059 International Business Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Gabriel Moens Session: Intensive September Classes: Sep 8, 9 & 15, 16 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3438, LAWS5138 Assumed knowledge: LAWS6252 or law degree from a common or civil law jurisdiction Assessment: 3500wd essay (50%) and 1hr exam (50%) or 2hr exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Core unit for MIntBus&L students. This unit is available as one of the core units for GradDipIntBusLaw students.
The objective of this unit is to provide students with an introduction to a number of areas of international business law and to provide an opportunity to study some of those areas in more detail. The unit begins with an overview of the scope of the law relating to international transactions. The core topics are international sale of goods, carriage of goods, international payments and financing of international sales and methods of doing business in foreign markets, including through agents and distributors and international licensing transactions. Other topics may vary from year to year and may include an introduction to international tax, elementary customs law and international dispute settlement.
Textbooks
Burnett and Bath, Law of International Business in Australasia (Federation press, 2009)
LAWS6061 International Environmental Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive May Classes: Apr 28, 29 & May 1, 2 (9-5) Assessment: class participation (20%) and 8000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students seeking further study in international environmental law may undertake LAWS6922 Advanced International Environmental Law.
This unit aims to provide an introduction to the framework, concepts, sources and techniques of international environmental law, and to provide an overview of international law responses to current and emerging environmental challenges. The history and framework of international environmental law will be examined before exploring a range of topical international environmental law issues, including atmospheric protection and climate change, hazardous substances and wastes, biodiversity and GMOs, the protection of marine living resources, the protection of freshwater resources and issues concerning trade. The unit will also survey the influence of international environmental law on domestic environmental law through case studies. Overarching themes will include the interdependence of environmental issues, the effects of scientific uncertainty on international environmental regulation, implementation of international environmental obligations between states at difference levels of economic development and the need for effectiveness in implementation and enforcement.
LAWS6062 International Law-the Use of Armed Force

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alison Pert Session: Intensive April Classes: Apr 8, 9 & 15, 16 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3483 or LAWS5183 Assessment: 3000wd problem question (40%), 5000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The objectives of this unit are to understand and gain a sound knowledge of the legal principles and rules governing the resort to armed force by States; be able to analyse a complex factual situation, recognise the issues arising, and determine the international legal rights and responsibilities of the parties involved; and gain awareness and understanding of current issues relating to the use of force and United Nations practice in matters affecting international peace and security. The course looks at the legal principles and rules governing the resort to force by States; operation of the relevant provisions of the United Nations Charter dealing with the use of force, self-defence and collective security; relevant state practice in interpreting the UN Charter; the legal issues arising from the use of force against terrorism; the "Bush Doctrine" of pre-emptive self-defence and its legality under international law; legality of the use of force to assist rebels; the role of the United Nations in peace-building, peace-making, peace-keeping, and peace enforcement; and the legal issues arising from humanitarian intervention and the emerging principle of the responsibility to protect. This unit does not cover the law regulating the conduct of armed conflict (jus in bello), which is the subject of the separate unit LAWS6218 International Humanitarian Law.
LAWS6066 Discretion in Criminal Justice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Nicholas Cowdery Session: Intensive August Classes: Aug 4, 5 & 18, 19 (9-5) Assessment: take-home exam (60%) and essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit looks at the ways in which the exercise of discretionary judgment arises for consideration in the course of the criminal justice process and the ways in which that judgment should be exercised at each step. It deals with each stage from the reporting or observation of crime, through investigation, arrest, charging, bail, plea, hearing, appeal, retrial and publicity. It describes how actors at each step (citizens, police, prosecutors and judges) confront decision making, the laws (legislation, common law) and rules (prosecution guidelines, memoranda and procedures) that apply and provides examples of the exercise of such discretions. It also looks at the place of public commentary (personal, the media and political) in the process. The unit explores nuances in the conduct of any criminal prosecution aside from the application of the letter of the law.
LAWS6071 Labour Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Shae McCrystal Session: Intensive March Classes: Intro Class: Feb 28 (6-8) then Mar 17, 18, 31 & Apr 1 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS5146 Assumed knowledge: MLLR students must either have completed or be concurrently enrolled in LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System (core) as well as this unit before undertaking the labour law elective units Assessment: assignment (20%) and 1.5hr in-semester exam (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: The unit is compulsory for students enrolled in the MLLR. However, the requirement to take this unit may be waived upon application to the Program Coordinator if the student can demonstrate proficiency in the unit objectives gained through completing a recent undergraduate law unit in labour law or work experience. Credit will not be granted for WORK6116 Employment and the Law and completion of this unit will not be sufficient to obtain an exemption from this MLLR compulsory unit.
The purpose of this unit is to introduce students to the principles of labour law. It is designed specifically for MLLR students who do not have a law degree or for any students with a law degree who have not recently undertaken an undergraduate labour law course. The goal of the unit is to equip students with the fundamental principles of labour law that they will need to undertake more advanced labour law units within the MLLR and LLM Degrees. It provides an introduction to the contract of employment and the relevant principles governing the employment relationship, including termination of employment. It then introduces students to the workplace relations framework including collective bargaining and industrial conflict; the modern role of awards and statutory regulation of wages and conditions.
LAWS6091 Chinese International Taxation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jinyan Li Session: Intensive August Classes: Aug 23-25 & 28, 29 (9-3.30) Assumed knowledge: Available to students who have successfully completed an undergraduate/postgraduate unit of study in tax law. Assessment: class participation (20%) and 6000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The object of this unit is to provide an overview of the income tax system of China and a detailed analysis of the most important legislative and treaty rules of China in the area of international income tax, especially in dealings with Australia. Upon successful completion of the unit, students will have an advanced understanding of the policies underlying the Chinese rules for taxing international transactions as well as a detailed knowledge of the principles of income tax law applicable to inbound and outbound transactions. This unit includes a study of: overview of the Chinese income tax system; taxation of inbound investment into China; taxation of outbound investment from China; transfer pricing issues, and China's tax treaties.
LAWS6112 Law of Tax Administration

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Celeste Black Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week. First class will commence on Jul 20. Assessment: class work (30%) and 2hr exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Tax Administration is a study of the theoretical and practical issues that arise in the administration of the Australian tax system, concentrating primarily on the income tax. The unit of study is structured around the key design features of any system of tax administration, namely ascertainment of liability (particularly self assessment), dispute resolution, and collection and recovery of tax. Particular emphasis will be given to the reforms implemented as a result of the Government's Review of Self Assessment. Wherever relevant, the interaction of administration issues with the substantive provisions of the tax law will be considered. Students should gain an understanding of the foundational rules underlying the administration of the income tax laws and a detailed knowledge of the application of those laws to a variety of common dealings between taxpayers and the tax administration.
LAWS6119 The State and Global Governance

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Mowbray Session: Intensive September Assessment: 1000-2000wd critique of a selected reading (25%), 250wd essay abstract and one page reading list (10%) and 5000-6000wd essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Note: This unit replaced LAWS6119 Theories of International Law. Master of Law and International Development students may undertake this unit as an elective or capstone unit.
The sorts of questions with which the unit is concerned may include the following: Does global governance comprise a system and, if so, what are its critical features? What is the role of states in this system? In what sense is this system lawful? Is global governance democratic? What is the role of violence in the contemporary global order? How does/should international law seek to address pressing transnational issues, such as poverty, environmental degradation, global health threats and human rights abuses?
LAWS6128 Comparative International Taxation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Dirkis, Assoc Prof Celeste Black Session: Intensive September Classes: Sep 13-15 & 18, 19 (9-3.30) Assessment: class work (30%) and 2hr exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Comparative International Taxation is a detailed study of the basic principles of international taxation (residence, source, relief from international double taxation, anti-deferral rules, withholding tax, transfer pricing, thin capitalisation, and tax treaties). The unit is taught from a global perspective with the emphasis being on comparative analysis (focusing particularly on Anglo, US and continental European approaches, and also developed and developing country approaches). The unit examines the core issues in developing international tax rules and identifies different approaches countries have taken in dealing with these issues. As part of this study, recent trends in international tax rule development will be identified (particularly in the context of globalisation) and critiqued. Students should gain an understanding of the different approaches that countries have taken in the development of their international tax rules.
LAWS6161 International Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Irene Baghoomians Session: Intensive August Classes: Aug 11, 12 & 18, 19 (9-5) Prohibitions: GOVT6117 Assessment: 2000wd assignment (30%) and 5000wd essay (70%) or 7000wd (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Available to MLLR students who commenced after Jan 2015.
This unit introduces students to the principles and practice of international human rights law - a field of public international law and policy of ever-expanding dimensions. It will introduce students to some key concepts, debates, documents and institutions in this field, while encouraging critical examination of these from a variety of angles. In summary, this unit considers the question: what happens when we regard a situation or predicament as one involving a breach of international human rights law - what possibilities and problems does this entail? Addressing this question, students in this unit will examine: (a) forums where international human rights law is being produced (international tribunals, domestic courts, multilateral bodies - including United Nations organs - regional agencies, non-governmental organisations, academic institutions, and the media); (b) settings where international human rights law is being deployed (in Australia and elsewhere); and (c) particular identities/subjects that international human rights law aspires to shape, regulate or secure. By the end of this unit, students should be able to formulate written and oral arguments by reference to key international human rights law instruments and principles; give strategic advice as to available avenues of recourse in international human rights law; and advance an informed critique of particular dimensions of international human rights law scholarship and practice, by reference to contemporary literature in this field.
LAWS6163 Energy and Climate Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive September Classes: Sep 1, 2 & 8, 9 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6863 Assessment: class participation (20%) and 8000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit adopts an inter-disciplinary and integrative approach to understanding the dynamics of one of the most pressing global environmental concerns ecologically sustainable energy use. Working loosely within the framework of the Climate Change Convention, the unit relies on the perspectives of scientists, lawyers and economists to develop an integrated approach to sustainable energy use. The unit identifies current patterns of energy use in Australia and examines Australia's response to the Climate Change Convention. It also analyses the strengths and weaknesses of various political, legal and economic mechanisms for influencing the choice of energy use. The initiatives of the Commonwealth and New South Wales governments, as well as local councils, to promote sustainable energy use and to combat global warming are scrutinised.
LAWS6167 International Law II

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alison Pert Session: Intensive May,Semester 2 Classes: S1CIMY (Group A): May 5, 6 & 12, 13 (9-5); S2C (Group B): 1x2-hr lecture/week Assumed knowledge: LAWS6243 Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and take-home exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Compulsory core unit for MIL and GradDipIntLaw students. This unit replaced LAWS6167 International Law and Australian Institutions.
This unit of study consolidates and builds upon knowledge gained in LAWS6243 International Law I. The relationship between international law and domestic law is explored in depth, both in a comparative perspective and with reference to the impact of international law on Australian law and legal institutions. The unit also addresses specialist topics not covered, or only briefly covered, in LAWS6243 International Law I, which may include a more detailed examination of the limits of state jurisdiction, the role of the individual in international law, international human rights, and the right of states to respond to international wrongs. Other topics of current interest in public international law will also be examined, with students given an appreciation of the role and relevance of international law in major events in contemporary international affairs.
LAWS6192 Young People, Crime and the Law

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Garner Clancey, Prof Murray Lee Session: Intensive August Classes: Aug 12, 13 & 26, 27 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6069 Assessment: class presentation (10%), 3000wd essay (40%), take-home exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit replaced LAWS6069 Juvenile Justice
The unit aims to provide a broad overview of the functioning of the juvenile justice system and its relationship to juvenile offending. There is a specific emphasis on NSW in terms of understanding the operation of a particular system, however reference is frequently made to the wider Australian and international context. The unit analyses the historical development of a separate system of juvenile justice and the system of ideas about juvenile delinquency as distinct entities separable from broader notions of criminality and criminal justice. The unit also analyses the contemporary nature of juvenile crime and specific issues in relation to offending, policing, community-based corrections and detention centres. Social relations which mediate between the juvenile justice system and young people will be investigated through a focus on gender, race and class. The broader political determinants surrounding the operation of the juvenile justice system and moral panics in relation to juvenile offending will also be examined. The unit aims to develop a critical understanding of the link between theory and juvenile justice policy, and to develop an appreciation of the multi-disciplinary nature of criminological explanation.
LAWS6197 Policing: Crime, Control and Security

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mark Findlay Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 28, 29 & Sep 4, 5 (9-5) Assessment: class discussion leadership (20%), essay (50%), group scenario exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit replaced LAWS6197 Policing Australian Society
This unit critically examines the power relations that are policing (public and private). It recognizes and builds upon the essential and often problematic role of policing in crime control and security. Major aspects of police work and the discretion on which it depends, are analysed in order to understand the dynamics of social control in an age of risk and security.
LAWS6198 Refugee Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mary Crock Session: Intensive September Classes: Sep 1, 2 & 15, 16 (9-5) Assessment: class participation (30%) and 6000wd essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Refugee Law provides students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the development and operation of international refugee law, and forced migration more broadly. Forced migration is not a new phenomenon. What has changed over the last century is the scale and frequency of the conflagrations causing the mass movement of peoples and the ease with which individuals have become able to move around the world in search of protection. Although Australia's experience of direct refugee flows has been limited, it has not escaped the phenomenon of mobile refugees. Non-citizens who come uninvited and thereafter seek protection as refugees are the source of inordinate public concern and debate. The controversy arises in part from a sense of loss of control of immigration, and also from the cost of the processes available to asylum seekers fighting to remain here. Having signed and ratified the key international treaties, Australia has assumed certain international legal obligations with respect to refugees. The most important is the obligation not to return or 'refoule' a refugee to a place where she or he faces persecution on one of five grounds. This unit is designed to give students a critical understanding of the international legal regime of refugee protection. It begins with an overview of the evolution of refugee law at the international level, considering the various conceptualizations of refugeehood that have characterized international agreements from the period of the League of Nations through to the present day. The unit then turns to issues such as the definition of the term 'refugee' under international (and regional) law, the express exclusion of certain persons from refugee status, the rights and obligations accorded to refugees, the broadening of international protection through principles of human rights and humanitarian law ('complementary protection'), and the impact of terrorism on asylum procedures and eligibility. It considers attempts by States to restrict access to asylum through mechanisms such as carrier sanctions, interdiction, transit processing centres, detention, and 'safe third countries' to which asylum seekers may be removed. Contemporary protection concerns, such as mass influx situations and temporary protection, flight from generalized violence and civil war, internal displacement, burden-sharing, and the question of 'economic migrants' and 'environmental refugees', are also addressed. These considerations necessarily require an understanding of the role of international organizations such UNHCR, the mechanisms in place for refugee status determination and appeals in Australia and abroad, and the jurisprudence that has developed internationally and in Australia relating to the qualification and rights of asylum seekers, refugees and other persons in need of protection.
LAWS6218 International Humanitarian Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kimberley Trapp Session: Intensive March Classes: Mar 17, 18 & 31, Apr 1 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3483 or LAWS5183 Assessment: class participation (20%) and 8000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
How to limit and regulate violence in times of war is one of the most pressing challenges for international law. This unit explores the origins and purposes of humanitarian law; its scope of application (spatial, temporal and personal); the different types and thresholds of armed conflict (including international and non-international conflicts); the permissible means and methods of warfare (including the principles of distinction and proportionality, and specific weapons such as chemical, biological and nuclear weapons, cluster munitions, and landmines); the status and treatment of combatants and non-combatants and other categories (such as spies, mercenaries, 'unlawful combatants' and 'terrorists'); the protection of cultural property and the environment; the relationship between human rights law and humanitarian law; and the implementation, supervision and enforcement of humanitarian law (including the prosecution of war crimes, the role of Protecting Powers and the International Committee of the Red Cross, and national military law).
LAWS6219 International Criminal Law

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Helen Brady Session: Intensive July Prohibitions: LAWS6896 Assessment: class participation (10%), take-home exam on hypothetical and practical question-solving (40%) (exam released 14 July and answers due 21 July), 4000wd essay (50%) (due 22 August) Mode of delivery: Block mode
In the past twenty years international criminal justice has had a resurgence as a key way to address war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide. Since the early 1990s the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) have prosecuted a number of high level perpetrators of international crimes. These courts paved the way for the multilateral treaty establishing the permanent International Criminal Court in 1998. More recently, hybrid or internationalised criminal courts like the Special Court for Sierra Leone, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon have dealt with crimes of international concern. This unit will examine how these institutions use the rule of law to help stop the cycle of impunity for perpetrators of mass atrocities. Using cases before the international courts and tribunals, the course will examine both substantive and procedural international criminal law. The elements of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity (including crimes of sexual and gender violence) and terrorism, modes of liability and defences will be covered, as will international criminal procedures from the investigation through to the pre-trial, trial, sentencing and appeal stages. Students will gain an overall understanding of international criminal law, as well as exposure to some of the interesting issues confronting the international criminal courts and tribunals today.
LAWS6223 Immigration and Nationality Law

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Mary Crock Session: Semester 2a Classes: Oct 11, 12 & 25, 26 (9-5) Assessment: class participation (10%), 3000wd essay (50%) and take-home exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This is a survey unit designed to introduce students to one of the most fast moving and engaging areas of public law. Immigration law is all about government regulation of the entry of persons into Australia. As such, it is a branch of applied administrative law that concerns the very make-up of our society, affecting both who we live with and how we live our lives. Statistics show that nearly one in four Australians were either born overseas or had an overseas-born parent. In spite of this, controversy persists over whether Australia should have an immigration program and the extent to which the government is doing enough to control both unlawful entry and the quality of the (lawful) migrants. With Sydney receiving the lion's share of the migrants who come to Australia each year, migration law has become a growth area for both lawyers and migration agents. By placing the current mechanisms for controlling migration in their legal, social, historical and economic contexts, this unit provides an opportunity to explore the 'big' issues raised by immigration and to look at why the subject has assumed such a central role in the development of Australia's identity as a nation. The unit of study is designed to foster the following skills: skills of statutory interpretation and problem-solving, through the study and use in practical situations of the Migration Act 1958 and its associated Regulations; skills of legal analysis and evaluation, gained through the examination and synthesis of relevant legislation; of court decisions and of rulings by the Migration Review Tribunal; the Refugee Review Tribunal; and the Administrative Appeals Tribunal in its migration division; and oral and written skills, through class participation, simulation exercises and the preparation of a major research paper.
The survey unit does not consider the area of refugee law, which is the subject of a separate postgraduate offering. It is designed as a foundational unit for students who have no background in migration law and who wish to move into the area. The unit complements the more specialised units of Refugee Law and Immigration and Labour Law.
LAWS6243 International Law I

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alison Pert Session: Intensive March,Semester 2 Classes: S1CIMR (Group A): Mar 24, 25 & Apr 7, 8 (9-5); S2C (Group B): 1x2-hr lecture/week Prohibitions: LAWS1023, LAWS5005 Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and take-home exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This unit replaced LAWS6243 Public International Law. This unit is compulsory for MIL and GradDipIntLaw students who have not completed any previous study in international law and must be taken during the first semester of candidature. This unit is not available to MLawIntDev students who have been granted a reduced volume of learning. This unit is available as one of the core units for GradDipIntBusLaw students.
This unit provides an introduction to public international law. Its purpose is to ensure that students have a thorough understanding of the core principles and problems of, and contemporary issues in, international law. The unit covers the following topics: nature and scope of public international law, sources of public international law, international legal personality, the law of treaties, how title to territory is acquired, state jurisdiction in international law, immunity from jurisdiction, state responsibility for international wrongs, dispute settlement, and the legality of the use of force.
LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Alexandra Fowler, Ms Mehzabin Farazi (except Group C) Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive March,Intensive September Classes: S1CIMR (Group A): Mar 6, 7 & 9, 10 (9-5); S1CIAP (Group B): Mar 24, 25 & Apr 7, 8 (9-5); S2CIAU (Group C): Jul 31-Aug 4 (9-5); S2CISE (Group D): Sep 1, 2 & 15, 16 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6881 Assessment: in-class test (30%) and take-home exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students are recommended to enrol well in advance of classes in order to complete pre-class readings (normally available to enrolled students 3 weeks prior to the first class). Law graduates from a non-common law jurisdiction are also recommended to complete classes for this unit during the first week of their commencing semester.
This is a compulsory unit for all postgraduate students who do not hold a law degree or equivalent from a common law jurisdiction entering the: Master of Administrative Law and Policy; Master of Business Law; Master of Environmental Law; Master of Environmental Science and Law; Master of Global Law; Master of Health Law; Master of International Business and Law; Master of Labour Law and Relations; Master of Law and International Development as well as Graduate Diplomas offered in these programs. The unit has been designed to equip students with the necessary legal skills and legal knowledge to competently apply themselves in their chosen area of law. Instruction will cover the legislative process; the judiciary and specialist tribunals; precedent; court hierarchies; legal reasoning; constitutional law; administrative law; contracts; and torts. Some elements of the unit will be tailored in accordance with the requirements of the particular specialist programs.
LAWS6257 Public Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Patricia Apps Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 31, Sep 1 & 7, 8 (10-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6139 or LAWS6042 or LAWS6113 or LAWS6984 Assessment: problem-based assignment and class presentation of a case study (10%) and 5000wd essay (90%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Core unit for MALP students.
The aim of the unit is to provide an understanding of the role of government policy within the analytical framework of welfare economics. Questions of central interest include: What are the conditions that justify government intervention? How can policies be designed to support basic principles of social justice? What kinds of reforms promote economic efficiency? Applications will range from taxation and social security to environmental regulation and protection, and will cover the following specific topics: The structure of the Australian tax-benefit system; Uncertainty and social insurance; Unemployment, health and retirement income insurance; Externalities, environmental taxes and tradeable permits; Monopoly and environmental regulation; Utility pricing and access problems; Cost benefit analysis, intergenerational equity and growth. The unit will provide an overview of the main empirical methodologies used in evaluating policy reforms in these areas. Students may select to specialise in one or more of the policy areas.
LAWS6301 Corruption and International Development - Departmental permission is required for this unit

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Alexandra Mills, Dr Michael Nest Session: Intensive August Assessment: class participation (10%), 2 x 1000wd class paper (15% each) and 6000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: The unit will be taught as a skills-based unit with class exercises. To make this workable, numbers to be capped at 25 students. The unit replaced Introduction to Anti-Corruption: Policy, Law and Practice.
Anti-corruption efforts have continued to grow rapidly in recent years prompted both by international developments, such as the UN Convention Against Corruption, the OECD Bribery Convention and the UK's 2010 Bribery Act, as well as by popular demand, domestically, for integrity in government. The spectrum of methods for dealing with the problem of corruption in the government sector now includes international cooperation, law enforcement, administrative instruments, system design, behavioural change, professional ethics, and transparency mechanisms created by activists and civil society. This unit is an introduction to the array of domestic and international approaches currently applied to address the complex nature of corruption including the intersection between the private and public sectors, (especially as regards the actions and impact of corporations), and increasing efforts to control corruption through aid and development programs. It is intended to have a practical focus, comprising discussion of the pressures, precedents and scandals that influence public policy choices about anti-corruption against the theoretical and historical background to current initiatives, including whether and how to combat corporate corruption domestically and overseas. Relevant themes to be considered include the impact of scandals on shaping initial laws, policies and instruments, the effect of political pragmatism and ideology, difficulties of policy evaluation and outcome measurement, and the implementation challenges posed by context. Specific cases will be used to demonstrate the reasons for controlling corruption, the types of corruption usually targeted by prevention measures and common methods of corruption control in law and practice.
LAWS6302 Human Rights and Environmental Law

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Em Prof Ben Boer Session: Intensive April Classes: Apr 6-9 (9-5) Assessment: 2500wd assignment (30%) and 7000wd essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The unit aims to provide students with an overview of the recent development of links between environmental law and human rights at both international and national levels. It will initially introduce the principles of international environmental law, and the relationship between the environment and human rights, with both ecocentric and anthropocentric approaches to be canvassed. The right to development, and especially the linkage between poverty, development and the environment, will be explored. Individual topics will include the relationships between human rights and pollution, land degradation, climate change, water security, implications of international trade, Indigenous peoples, biodiversity, genetic resources and access to nature. The human rights dimensions of environmental, cultural and social impact assessments will also be included. The unit will conclude with a discussion of the issue of access to environmental justice as an aspect of human rights, and the institutions relevant to achieving environmental justice.
Textbooks
DK Anton and DL Shelton, Environmental Protection and Human Rights, Cambridge 2011
LAWS6308 Philosophy of Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Wojciech Sadurski Session: Intensive July Classes: Jul 13-19 (9-5) Assessment: Assessment: Pre-class reaction note (20%), class participation (20%) and take-home exam (60%). Attendance at all classes is compulsory. Students will not be eligible to submit their exam unless they have attended all classes (except in the case of serious illness or misadventure) Practical field work: Sydney Law School in Europe Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Pre-enrolment registration is required. For further information, please visit Sydney Law School website http://sydney.edu.au/law/
The main objective of this unit is to provide a critical understanding of the fundamental principles of legal theory and philosophy of law. The unit will discuss, in particular, the concept of law, the notions of obligation, authority, and legitimacy of law; the main theories of legal interpretation; the special role of the concept of "rights" in legal theory, and the principles determining the moral limits of legal coercion.
LAWS6320 Climate Disaster Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rosemary Lyster, Prof Michael Faure Session: Intensive July Classes: Jul 5-8 (9-5) Assessment: class participation (20%) and 8000wd essay (80%) Practical field work: Sydney Law School in Europe Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Pre-enrolment registration is required. For further information, please visit Sydney Law School website http://sydney.edu.au/law/
Recent extreme weather events and disasters around the world have resulted in loss of life, property, infrastructure and livelihoods and have severely disrupted the normal functioning of the societies which they have impacted. Worldwide insured losses alone from weather-related disasters have risen from US$5.1 billion per year between 1970-1989 to US$27 billion annually over the past two decades. International climate change negotiations have, over the past five years, delivered outcomes that are entirely inadequate to meet the goal set by the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change of keeping the rise in average global temperatures below 2 degrees C above pre-industrial temperatures. This unit of study adopts a climate justice approach to assess the respective roles and responsibilities of government and insurers to avoid, prepare for, respond to, recover from, and compensate for, the risks of climate disasters. The questions of avoidance and recovery will rely heavily on traditional Environmental Law mechanisms such as environmental planning and assessment and pollution and waste regimes, as well as the protection of biodiversity. The unit will also assess the viability of tort law and strict liability regimes for hazardous activities to compensate those who are impacted by climate disasters. The strict liability regimes include: global oil pollution spills, hazardous chemicals, asbestos and nuclear disasters. The unit will be taught by an esteemed international team of climate lawyers and individuals with experience in the insurance industry.
The objectives of this unit of study are to: Understand the science presented in two recent scientific reports, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's 2012 Special Report Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX), published in 2012, and the Australian Climate Commission's (CCC) 2013 The Critical Decade: Extreme Weather, (Extreme Weather Report, Understand the foundations of climate justice in the context of climate disasters, Understand the relevance of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, including the loss and damage mechanism, and the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015: Building the Resilience of Nations and Communities to Disasters, The role of governments in enacting climate disaster risk reduction laws including: The role of Environmental and Planning Assessment Law and Building Codes in attempting to prevent climate disasters, Pollution, waste and contamination laws in the post-disaster phases, Biodiversity Law that is expected to protect species from the impacts of climate change and disasters, as well as promote ecosystems as disaster prevention measures, Governance arrangements between levels of government during and post the disaster, Compensatory regimes including those provided by government and the private sector through ex-post disaster relief, insurance and the capital markets; and The strengths and weaknesses of tort and strict liability regimes for compensating the victims of disaster.
LAWS6325 Crime, Responsibility and Policy

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Thomas Crofts Session: Intensive May Classes: May 13, 14 & 27, 28 (9-5) Assessment: Take-home exam (30%), 5000wd essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit critically examines the theoretical and policy issues underlying the formulation and implementation of criminal law and the treatment of certain groups by the criminal justice system. Following analysis of the principles of criminalisation and theories of criminal responsibility a number of contemporary topics will be explored to foster an understanding of the policies and pressures that shape criminal law. Such topics include, how the law responds to violence (e.g. one-punch deaths, provocation, duress); sexuality and sex work; sexting by adults and young people; and anti-social behaviour.
LAWS6825 Introduction to Australian Business Tax

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: S1CIMR (Group A): Assoc Prof Celeste Black and S2CIAU (Group B): Prof Graeme Cooper Session: Intensive August,Intensive March,Semester 1a Classes: Classes: S1CIMR (Group A): Mar 15, 17 & 20, 21 (9-5); S2CIAU (Group B): Aug 9-11 & 14, 15 (9-3.30) Assessment: class work/test (30%) and 2hr exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit introduces the basic elements of Australia's income tax (including fringe benefits tax and capital gains tax), with an emphasis on their impact on businesses, whether conducted directly or via a partnership, trust or company.
The unit covers the following topics: the main structural features of the tax system; assessability of business revenue; treatment of business expenses; timing rules for revenue and expense recognition; trading forms (companies, partnerships, trusts), capital raising and costs of servicing invested capital; cross-border issues; anti-avoidance rules.
The unit is intended for participants who have not undertaken a recent and thorough undergraduate unit (or postgraduate equivalent) in Australian income tax. Participants are primarily from two groups: (a) foreign students who have studied their own domestic tax system and now wish to acquire a detailed knowledge of the operation of the Australian tax system; and (b) Australian graduates in law, commerce, accounting, or other disciplines, who have not previously studied income tax. This unit is suitable as both an entry-level precursor to the more specialised units offered in the Tax Program and as a unit for practitioners and others who do not seek to be tax specialists but want to improve their general understanding of the tax ramifications of commercial operations.
LAWS6827 Legal Responsibility & Philosoph of Mind

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Christopher Birch Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: class participation exercise (30%) and 6000wd essay (70%), or 7500wd essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Many legal doctrines in both criminal and civil law depend upon being able to characterise conduct as intentional, leading to ascriptions of fault, blame or responsibility. Most serious criminal offences depend upon establishing mens rea as a relevant mental element. Civil liability is often dependent upon whether conduct was intended, or whether the cause of loss was brought about by either intentional conduct or conduct involving some lesser notion of fault. All of these doctrines make important assumptions about the nature of our mental states and the operation of mind. Many of these assumptions are philosophically controversial and current developments in the philosophy of mind may lead us to reconsider or radically revise our attitudes to the law. The unit will look at contemporary philosophical work on free will consciousness, mind, and causation and apply this work to present problems in regard to concepts of legal responsibility.
Textbooks
Lowe, EJ An Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind, Cambridge U.P., Cambridge 2000
LAWS6839 Critical Issues in Public Health Law

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roger Magnusson Session: Intensive September Classes: Intro Class:Aug 29 (6-8) then Sep 5, 6 & Oct 6, 7 (9-4.30) Assessment: short response question (20%) and 6000wd essay (80%) or short response question (20%), 3000-3500wd essay (40%) and take-home exam (40%) or short response question (20%) and two 3000-3500wd essays (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Core unit for GradDipPubHL students. MHL students may select this unit as one of the three core units required in addition to LAWS6252 or LAWS6881.
This unit provides an introduction to key topics in public health law, and a foundation for further study in this field. It begins by exploring the use of law - both historically and conceptually - as a tool for protecting the public's health, for responding to health risks and implementing strategies designed to promote public health. It reviews the sources of public health law, considers the strategies that law can deploy to protect and promote health, as well as debates about the appropriate limits for law in the protection of public health in a liberal democracy.
The unit also provides a review of the law's role within several critical areas, including: acute public health threats (with a focus on SARS, pandemic influenza, and bioterrorism); sexual health and STIs; and tobacco control.
Key topics include: The definition and role of public health law; Case studies illustrating the sources of public health law; The legal framework for managing pandemic influenza and other acute public health threats; An introduction to tobacco control law; and Law's role in promoting sexual health.
Throughout the unit, students will be trained to identify legal issues and to explore their health significance, or impact on population health. Students will be encouraged and expected to critically evaluate the success of public health laws and their underlying strategies for protecting and promoting health. Students will also explore the tension between the public health interest, and competing public and private interests.
Students wishing to extend their knowledge of public health law can enrol in the companion unit, LAWS6848 Law and Healthy Lifestyles. These units comprise a core program in public health law.
LAWS6846 Human Rights and the Global Economy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Kinley Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 25, 26 & Sep 8, 9 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS5178 or LAWS3478 Assessment: class participation (20%), 5000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Master of Law and International Development students may undertake this unit as an elective or capstone unit
The questions of whether and how the global economy and human rights interrelate and interact have excited much recent controversy on the streets, in the courts and legislatures, in corporate board rooms and in the corridors of the UN and the international trade and financial organizations. It is a controversy that will almost certainly intensify over the next few years. The debate is controversial because it is important, and it is important because it involves two great globalizing forces namely, the promotion of free market ideology through trade liberalization and the protection of human rights through the universalization of the norms that underpin human dignity. On the face of it the two projects do sit easily together. Are they, in fact, implacably opposed to each other? Where or how do they overlap and what are the consequences or opportunities presented thereby? What role can the law play in regulating their interaction whether it be domestic or international law, 'hard' or 'soft' law. And what or who are the real actors behind the economic and human rights power blocs on the global stage? This unit seeks both to frame these questions and to address them by reference to the most recent discussion, thinking and action in the area.
LAWS6848 Law, Business and Healthy Lifestyles

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roger Magnusson Session: Intensive March Classes: Intro Class: Mar 7 (6-8) then Mar 10, 11 & Apr 18, 19 (9-5) Assessment: one short response question (20%) and 6000wd essay (80%) or one short response question (20%), 3000-3500wd essay (40%) and one take-home exam question (40%) or one short response question (20%) and two 3000-3500wd essays (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit replaced LAWS6848 Law and Healthy Lifestyles (formerly: New Directions in Public Health Law and Policy). This unit may be substituted for LAWS6839 Critical Issues in Public Health Law as a compulsory unit in the MHL.
This unit is about legal and regulatory responses to tobacco use, obesity, poor diet, harmful use of alcohol and sedentary lifestyle - the leading causes of preventable disease in Australia, in high-income countries generally, and increasingly, in developing economies. Cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes and tobacco-related diseases (known as 'non-communicable diseases' or NCDs) are society's greatest killers. But what can law do - and what should law be doing - to prevent them? Unlike other health threats, NCDs and their risk factors are partly caused by consumer choices that are lived out every day across the country. The challenge of encouraging healthier lifestyles cannot be separated, then, from the regulation of the businesses that all too often have a vested interest in unhealthy lifestyles. Law's relationship with smoking, alcohol and food is complex and contested. Nevertheless, governments around the world are experimenting with a wide range of legal strategies to encourage healthier lifestyles. This unit will focus on developments in Australia and the United States, placing legal developments in these countries in an international context. During the course, we will confront some important over-arching questions. What are the global determinants of NCDs, and to what extent are global solutions needed? What do global solutions look like? To what extent should law intervene to influence the behaviour of populations-as distinct from treating lifestyle-related risk factors as the personal responsibility of each individual? Does a regulatory approach to the prevention of NCDs imply coercion? Does it signal the emergence of the 'nanny state'? Does progress depend on motivating people to consciously improve their habits and lifestyles? Is it possible to regulate business without micro-managing or dictating commercial decisions and 'legislating the recipe for tomato ketchup?' Throughout the unit, students will be encouraged to explore the tension between personal responsibility and freedom, and the broader public interest in a healthy population and a productive economy. Key topics include: Frameworks for thinking about law, and environments that support healthier lifestyles; Global health governance and the prevention of non-communicable diseases; Tobacco control: where to from here? Personal responsibility for health, and law's role; Regulating alcohol; Obesity prevention; and Law's role in improving diet and nutrition, and encouraging active living.
LAWS6852 Doing Business in China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Vivienne Bath Session: Intensive August Classes: Aug 11, 12 & 25, 26 (9-5) Assumed knowledge: undergraduate law degree from a common or civil law jurisdiction or LAWS6252 Assessment: 3500wd essay (50%) and take-home exam (50%) or take-home exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to provide an introduction to the legal and practical aspects of doing business in China. The unit will commence with an overview of the Chinese legal, political and economic system and will then move on to an examination of the system of commercial regulation in China, including contracts, land use, regulation of private and state-owned businesses and Chinese companies and securities laws. The unit will focus on Chinese contract law and the foreign investment regime and the related structuring and regulatory issues related to foreign participation in the Chinese market. Areas covered will discuss the principal issues relating to the establishment of a corporate or other presence in China and the related negotiation process. The unit will conclude with an examination of methods of resolution of disputes arising under contracts entered into in China. More specialized topics which may be covered include intellectual property, labour law, regulation of financial institutions and Chinese investment overseas.
LAWS6856 Anti-Terrorism Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ben Saul Session: Intensive May Classes: May 18, 19 & 25, 26 (9-5) Prohibitions: CISS6011 or LAWS3483 Assessment: 6000wd essay (70%) and take-home exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to introduce you to the diverse range of anti-terrorism laws and policies which have developed at the international, regional and domestic levels, and which proliferated after the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001. Laws will be evaluated in the light of their profound and complex political, ideological and ethical implications for political order, legal systems, human rights, and international relations. In essence, the study of terrorism (and the law's response to it) is the study of the timeless philosophical question of when political violence is justified, against whom, and for what purposes - whether it is 'freedom fighters', or 'State terrorism', that is at issue.
LAWS6857 Introduction to Chinese Law

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bing Ling Session: Intensive May Classes: Apr 29, 30 & May 13, 14 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6001 Assumed knowledge: undergraduate law degree or LAWS6252 Assessment: 2000wd essay (30%) and take-home exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Prohibition: Students who have completed a law degree in the People's Republic of China
This unit covers the legal system of the People's Republic of China. It will address Chinese legal history and tradition and the development of modern Chinese law, and will look at the Chinese court system and dispute resolution, constitutional law and the judicial system, the civil and criminal systems and other specific areas such as land law, labour law and intellectual property. Practical aspects of the implementation of a legal system in China and attitudes towards the rule of law will also be considered. The assessment will address Chinese law or a comparative analysis of Chinese law and the legal systems of one or more other countries.
LAWS6864 New Tech, Risk and Environmental Law

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rosemary Lyster, Prof Johannes Somsen Session: Intensive September Assessment: class participation (20%), 7000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit replaced LAWS6864 Genetically Modified Organisms & the Environment.
The objective of this unit of study is to assess the regulation of new technologies from a risk regulation and Environmental Law perspective. Key questions that are elaborated include: What is regulation, who are the regulators and who are the regulatees?; what is the ideal-type of regulatory environment?; how do regulators engage with risk?: the precautionary principle; how are ideas of the possibility of impending catastrophe likely to affect the balance between legitimacy and effectiveness? Ethical and human rights principles are also discussed. The technologies analysed include GMOs, chemicals and geoengineering. A comparative analysis of how these technologies are regulated in the European Union, the United States and Australia is included.
LAWS6865 International Dispute Resolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Chester Brown Session: Intensive August Classes: Aug 17, 18 & 24, 25 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6202 Assessment: take-home exam (30%) and 6000wd essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study aims to provide an in-depth analysis of international dispute resolution as a technique for resolving public international law disputes. The United Nations Charter provisions for the peaceful settlement of international disputes will be taken as creating the basic framework for the review of dispute resolution techniques. These include negotiation, good offices, mediation, conciliation, arbitration, and adjudication. Particular attention will be given to in-depth analysis of certain disputes and the legal and political techniques used in their resolution. These disputes may include the Tehran Hostages case, the Nuclear Tests case, the East Timor case, and dispute over the status of Kosovo.
LAWS6877 Mental Illness: Law and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Duncan Chappell Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 28, 29 & Sep 4, 5 (9-5) Assessment: 3000wd assignment (40%) and 4500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit deals with the law relating to mental health issues in Australia including human rights principles. Background material on the nature and incidence of mental illness, psychiatric and medical issues, as well criminological and public policy literature will be considered where relevant. The unit covers substantive issues from civil treatment, welfare law, and criminal law. Topics covered will include: the social context of mental illness and the current and historical approaches to treatment of the mentally ill; contemporary State, Territorial and Federal involvement in mental health policy and legislation; the present framework of NSW mental health law and related welfare law including the Mental Health Act, Guardianship Act, Protected Estates Act and Mental Health (Criminal Procedure) Act; the process of scheduling persons with a mental illness; review mechanisms including the roles of the medical superintendent, magistrates, the mental health review tribunal and the Supreme Court; longer term detention of the mentally ill; community treatment and community counselling orders; protected estates and guardianship orders; electroconvulsive therapy; consent to surgery and special medical treatment; the defence of not guilty on the grounds of mental illness, the review of forensic patients and the exercise of the executive discretion; the issue of unfitness to be tried; the involuntary treatment of prisoners in the correctional system; and proposals and options for reform.
LAWS6888 Risk, Fear and Insecurity

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Murray Lee Session: Intensive October Classes: Oct 7, 8 & 14, 15 (9-5) Assessment: topic summary (compulsory but not assessed) and 3000wd essay (40%) and 4000wd policy assessment assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit considers the significance of anxiety, 'fear of crime', risk and insecurity in the late modern world. It uses sophisticated analytical tools to discuss both the supposed growth in 'fear of crime' and the emergence of an array of technologies aimed at the reduction of crime risks. It also critically examines just what 'fear of crime' might actually be and how newspapers, security products, and insurance can be sold to us using the hook of our own anxieties. It also examines the anxieties related to terrorism and threats to national security and sovereignty.
Textbooks
Lee, M (2007) Inventing Fear of Crime, Willan, Devon
LAWS6893 Environmental Criminology: Space and Place

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Murray Lee, Dr Garner Clancey Session: Intensive May Classes: May 5, 6 & 19, 20 (9-5) Assessment: 4000wd essay (50%) and research project (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The unit examines traditions of criminological theorising, research and public intervention that focus on the socio-spatial context(s) and determinants of crime and its governance. It explores the principal sources of data collection, the methodologies and theoretical underpinnings concerned with the spatial and social ecological dispersion of crime and deviance and its techniques of management and control. It also explores the relationship of public safety and crime prevention to public policy/interventions in areas such as urban and regional planning, housing, local government and community services.
LAWS6916 International Investment Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Chester Brown, Assoc Prof Sergio Puig Session: Intensive March Classes: Mar 16, 17 & 30, 31 (9-5) Assessment: 6000wd essay (70%) and assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit introduces students to the international regulation of foreign investment. It examines core principles of international investment law, regional and bilateral investment treaties, the settlement of investment disputes, and the international economic and political context in which the law has developed. The unit considers the origins and evolution of international investment law through to the recent formation of the current international legal framework for foreign investment through bilateral and regional investment treaties. It examines the substantive standards of protection contained within investment treaties (such as the fair and equitable treatment standard, and the prohibition on expropriation without compensation), recent arbitral awards, and considers controversial issues surrounding investor-state arbitration. It examines the procedural framework for investment treaty arbitration under the auspices of the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) and the UNCITRAL Rules. This unit also considers the increased focus on investor responsibility in relation to environmental protection, human rights, development issues, and labour standards. It also examines recent developments including the negotiation of mega-regional trade and investment agreements, such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement and the negotiations towards the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership.
LAWS6920 Global Health Law

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lawrence Gostin Session: Intensive July Classes: Jul 19-22 (10-5.30) Assessment: 6000-7000wd essay (80%) and compulsory question (20%) or 3500-4000wd essay (50%), assignment (30%) and compulsory question (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Today, domestic health and global health are recognized as intertwined and inseparable. The determinants of health (e.g. pathogens, air, water, goods, and lifestyle choices) are increasingly international in origin, expanding the need for health governance structures that transcend traditional and increasingly inadequate national approaches. In this intensive unit, students will gain an in-depth understanding of global health law through careful examination of the major contemporary problems in global health, the principal international legal instruments governing global health, the principal international organizations, and innovative solutions for global health governance in the 21st Century. Class sessions will consist of a combination of lecture, interactive discussion, and case simulation and/or role-play. The class will cover naturally occurring infectious diseases (e.g. extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, malaria, and HIV/AIDS), past (e.g., SARS) and future (e.g., Influenza (A) H5N1) epidemics, bioterrorism events (e.g., anthrax or smallpox), and/or major chronic diseases caused by modern lifestyles (e.g., obesity or tobacco use).
Textbooks
Primary: A Collection of readings from primary and secondary sources Supplemental: Lawrence O. Gostin, Global Health Law (Harvard University Press, March 2014)
LAWS6928 Law, Justice and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Livingston Armytage Session: Intensive April Classes: Apr 12, 13 & 19, 20 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3478, LAWS5178 Assessment: class participation (20%), 2x3000wd essays (2x40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit is compulsory for MLawIntDev students.
This unit provides a critical overview to law and justice reform in international development. It analyses the global reform experience over the past half-century. It interrogates the nature and justification(s) of reform 'theory', studies the empirical evidence of various approaches, and examines the conceptual/practical challenges of evaluating development endeavour, using case studies from the Asia/Pacific region. Students enrolling in this unit will develop an evidence-based understanding of the use of law and justice reform in broader development strategies.
LAWS6940 Theories of Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin Walton Session: Intensive June Classes: Jun 2, 3 & 9, 10 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS5169 or LAWS3469 Assessment: class participation (20%) and 8000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit seeks to facilitate critical reflection on prominent responses of theorists to a single question: what is law? Among the notions to which their answers refer (and on which the unit focuses) are the following: power, norms, rules, principles, convention, morality, adjudication and interpretation.
LAWS6945 Doing Business in Emerging Markets

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Paul Stephan Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 30, 31, Sep 1 & 4, 5 (9-3.30) Assessment: class participation (30%) and take-home exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The unit examines common commercial, tax and regulatory issues that arise from doing business in emerging market economies. Topics to be examined include: the special challenges of investing in emerging market economies; organisational forms commonly used in emerging market economics; financing options; host state regulatory regimes and limits on the activities of foreign investors; dispute resolution systems, and sovereign risk issues; tax issues in developing countries; home state regulatory issues, including domestic anti-corruption measures, money laundering and human rights regimes. The unit has a special focus on issues associated with investing into and doing business with former Soviet Union countries, and the famous Yukos case will be considered.
LAWS6970 Forensic Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Paterson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prohibitions: PSYC1001 or PSYC3020 Assessment: class participation (10%), 3500-4000wd essay (40%) and 2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Forensic psychology is the application of psychological knowledge and theories to all aspects of the criminal and civil justice systems. It is currently one of the fastest developing and most popular aspects of psychology. In this unit we will draw upon psychological evidence to explain and understand some of the people and processes involved in the legal system. Through a series of interactive seminars we will discuss topics such as lie detection, profiling, interviewing, jury deliberation, eyewitness memory, criminal offenders, victims of crime, and police officers.
LAWS6974 Development, Law and Human Rights

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ben Saul Session: Intensive January Classes: Jan 23- Feb 3 Assessment: assignment (30%) and 8000wd essay (70%) Practical field work: field school in Nepal Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Pre-enrolment registration is required. For further information, please visit Sydney Law School website http://sydney.edu.au/law/
This unit exposes students to the role and limits of law in addressing acute problems of socio-economic development and human rights in developing countries, through an interactive field school conducted over two weeks in Nepal, one of the world's poorest countries. The themes to be explored are likely to include: The transition from armed conflict to peace in the aftermath of a Maoist insurgency and the end of the monarchy in Nepal (including issues of transitional criminal justice, the drafting of a new constitution, and building a new legal and political system in light of Nepalese legal traditions and foreign legal influences); The protection of socio-economic rights (including rights to food, water, housing, and livelihoods), minority rights (of 'tribals', and 'dalits' in the caste system), and the 'right to development' under constitutional and international law; The interaction between local disputes over natural resources, human displacement caused by development projects, environmental protection and climate change in the context of fragile Himalayan ecologies; The legal protection of refugees (Tibetan or Bhutanese) in camp or mass influx situations, in the context of the limited resources of a developing country and the causes of, and solutions to, human displacement; and The experience of women in development and human rights processes. The issues will be drawn together by reflection upon the influence of, and resistance to, human rights and international law in developmental processes.
LAWS6977 Law of International Institutions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Dr August Reinisch Session: Intensive February Classes: Feb 13-15 & 17 (9-5) Prohibitions: GOVT6116 Assumed knowledge: LAWS6243 International Law I or equivalent unit in public international law Assessment: take-home exam (20%) and 8000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will examine the principal legal issues concerning organizations composed of states. These include the legal status and powers of organizations, membership and participation, norm-creation, dispute settlement, enforcement of decisions, peace and security activities, and finally the organizations' privileges and immunities as well as their legal status and powers under national law.
At the same time, the unit will also address such real world problems as the creation of international criminal courts, the "succession" of Russia to the USSR's seat on the UN Security Council, the response to the break-up of Yugoslavia, targeted sanctions and the possibility of judicial review of acts of the UN Security Council, the success of WTO dispute settlement, NATO action against Serbia in 1999, the military intervention in Afghanistan and Iraq in the aftermath of 9/11, etc.
Primary consideration will be given to the development of the United Nations. Other universal as well as regional organizations will also be dealt with. This unit aims at helping students to understand the common legal problems faced by international institutions.
Textbooks
Jan Klabbers, An Introduction to International Institutional Law. Cambridge (CUP, 2nd ed., 2009) Paperback (ISBN-13: 9780521736169)
LAWS6985 Indigenous Peoples and Criminal Justice

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Tanya Mitchell Session: Intensive August Classes: Jul 17, 18 & 24, 25 (9-5) Assessment: class participation/presentation (20%) and 7000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will focus on how the criminal law and its institutions are inextricably connected to the process of colonisation. The place of contemporary criminal justice in NSW and other States will be reviewed against the background of colonisation and introduced law. There will also be some comparison with other settler states including the US and Canada and New Zealand. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of understanding history in order to provide a context for viewing the current relationship between indigenous Australians and non-indigenous Australians involved in the criminal justice process (including police, lawyers and the judiciary). Students will analyse reasons for the over-representation of indigenous Australians in all stages of the criminal justice process. Specific areas for consideration include juvenile justice, policing and police discretion, alternative court process such as the circle sentencing, and issues around Aboriginal customary law and the extent to which it is, or should be taken into consideration.
LNGS7001 Structure of Language

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3x667wd equivalent assignments (30%), 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x3000wd final essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The fundamental tool for human communication is language. This unit explores the fundamental properties of human language, with examples from languages spoken in every part of the world. We look at the sounds of human language: how the speech organs make them, and how different they can be across languages. We gain a detailed understanding of English consonants and vowels. We investigate the ways in which sounds can convey meanings, through the formation of words and sentences in English and many other languages.
LNGS7002 Language, Society and Power

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x4000wd Research project (80%), 1x1000wd Online discussion (10%), 1x1000wd Quiz (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Language is a symbolic currency: mastery of the standard language can buy institutional power, mastery of urban teenage slang can buy street cred. This course introduces students to key issues in sociolinguistics and language sociology such as the political economy of language, language variation and change, and critical discourse analysis. Members of the class will undertake empirical research.
LNGS7004 Register and Genre in English

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3x 2000wd each Text analysis (100%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to current research in the theory of genre and register with a focus on English. It will explore how choices in grammar and discourse (e.g. speech function, conjunction, cohesive devices, methods of development and argumentation, schematic structure) impact on the ways in which people engage with different types (genres, registers) of texts. The framework for the unit derives from a variety of linguistic approaches, including corpus linguistics and functional linguistics.
LNGS7006 Cross-Cultural Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Linguistic Relativity (20%), 1x2000wd Mid-semester exam (30%), 1x3000wd Final paper (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In today's globalised and multicultural societies, cross-cultural communication is common enough. Even so, it continues to be a challenge, both for people who engage in cross-cultural communication on a daily basis, and for researchers trying to describe and understand it. In this unit of study we will consider a variety of discourse-analytic approaches to studying cross-cultural communication, including conversation analysis, speech act theory, interactional sociolinguistics, the ethnography of communication, and critical discourse analysis. In our analyses of actual samples of cross-cultural communication we will pay particular attention to the social positioning of participants in an interaction, and the ways how social relationships (particularly of power and intimacy) between participants are reflected in their linguistic practices. The unit will end with exploring applied perspectives, particularly on cross-cultural communication in educational, courtroom and workplace interactions.
LNGS7101 Bilingualism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x5000wd assignments, including a group research project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The role of institutions, social contact and language attitudes in language maintenance and shift. Bilingual and multilingual proficiency: deficit and assets, social, educational and psychological aspects. Bilingual/multilingualism programs and the bilingual/multilingual classroom.
LNGS7102 Educational Linguistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminars/week Assessment: 1x5000wd of assessment tasks (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The relation of linguistics to education. Language teaching. Language and educational disadvantage. Language across the curriculum. The development of oral and written skills. Sociolinguistic factors.
LNGS7109 Language and Identity

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x6000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the expression of social identities and relationships through language, including the connections between social group style-shifting and registers.
LNGS7272 Additional Lang Learning:TESOL/SLT/LOTE

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminars/week Assessment: 1x5000wd assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit will provide an overview of the various theories of Additional Language Learning or "Second Language Acquisition" as the field is more widely known. Although traditionally psycholinguistic theories have been most influential in the study of additional language learning, this unit will place a stronger emphasis on more recent sociocultural perspectives on additional language learning, which have mainly emerged from the study of English as a second language. We will discuss examples of language learning processes, products and outcomes in a variety of contexts from around the world. The unit also has a practical component in which applications of the research findings in L2 teachings will be explored. An additional or second language (L2) is any language the learning of which takes place somewhat later than the acquisition of the first language. This means that this class will not deal with infant bilingualism and it also means that an L2 may in fact be the third, fourth or fifth language a person is working with.
LNGS7274 Media Discourse

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd Summary (5%), 1x2500wd Image analysis/interpretation (35%), 1x3000wd Text Analysis (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"Sexy, healthy and 100% Australian-owned!" This unit examines linguistic approaches to media discourse. The language of news texts and television series will form a special focus of the unit, along with how images are used to construe meaning. We will explore general aspects of media institutions (news and television), the ways in which social identities are constructed in the media, differences between the language of various types of media texts, the rhetoric of persuasion and the discourses of popular culture.
LNGS7275 World Englishes

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x5000wd Research project (90%), 10x 100wd each Learning journals (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
If you are interested in issues of globalization and language and/or the role of English in today's world, then this unit is for you. We know that English is now the global language of politics, trade, commerce, media, research, and higher education. In this unit, we examine how these processes impact the English language, how people around the world relate to and adapt the language, and how this impacts the linguistic, pedagogical, and political landscapes.
LNGS7276 Discourses of Globalisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x 3000wd each Text analysis and interpretation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit considers the discourse of globalisation from the perspective of critical discourse analysis (CDA) as informed by functional linguistics and multimodal discourse analysis. Both discourses about globalisation and discourses enacting globalisation will be considered in relation to power and ideology, including case studies of virtual communities, language policy, discourses of war and terrorism, globalisation and the media, climate change, popular music, diplomacy, tourism and international business communication. Resistant discourse strategies promoting local identity will also be reviewed.
LNGS7301 Functional Grammar

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd equivalent Grammar assignment (50%), 1x3000wd equivalent Final assignment (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will focus on Halliday's functional grammar, including coverage of transitivity, mood, theme, clause-complexing and nominal group and verbal group structure (including functional structures and introductory accounts of the systems from which they derive). The unit will focus on English but include exemplification from other languages where appropriate. In addition the place of grammar in functional models of language will be considered, and critical aspects of system/structure theory introduced.
LNGS7501 Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar /week Prerequisites: 48 credit points from the Cross-Cultural Communication table of units including 24 credit points of core units Assessment: 1x6000wd project (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The field of Cross-Cultural Communication studies how people from differing cultural backgrounds communicate. The Masters degree in Cross-Cultural Communication enables students to specialize in this field and through coursework students will gain a well-rounded approach to the required knowledge, concepts, and methods. This unit is the capstone experience for the degree, allowing students the chance to integrate and put into practice their previous learning.
LNGS7521 Essay 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4-5x1-2hr supervisor meetings/semester Assessment: 1x5000wd Research essay on an approved topic (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Candidates research and write an Essay on an approved topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
LNGS7528 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5-6x1hr consultations/semester Assessment: Research and writing toward a dissertation of 12000wds (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Independent research and writing toward a dissertation of 12000 words on an approved topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
LNGS7529 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5-6x1hr consultations/semester Prerequisites: LNGS7528 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000 words on an approved topic, written under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
MECO6900 News Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: MECO4101 Assessment: 1x4500wd News reporting portfolio (50%), Seminar participation (10%), 1x1500wd News Story reporting package (40%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit introduces students to news writing skills required by print media, including the elements of journalistic style, the structure of news and feature articles, interviewing, researching, news gathering and editing skills. The unit of study focuses on journalistic news writing but will also be useful to anyone seeking to work in fields that require professional communication skills, such as public relations and communication management, or corporate roles that require strong writing ability.
MECO6901 Dealing with the Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd communication plan (30%), 1x500wd media release (20%), 1x500wd presentation to client (15%), 1x3000wd essay (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Dealing with the Media provides students with practical experience in seeking media coverage for a specific issue on behalf of a non-profit organisation. It requires students to research, design, present, implement and evaluate a communication strategy, and to develop key tactical elements including media releases for distribution across multi-media platforms.
MECO6902 Legal and Ethical Issues in Media Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Presentation (20%), 1x1500wd Online comment piece (30%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
MECO6902 will introduce students to key legal and ethical issues relevant to journalism and the professional fields of public communication. Students will be given an introductory survey of the main ethical theories in Western thought to establish a framework within which to examine specific ethical issues that relate to media systems. They will also be introduced to the structure of Australia's legal system in comparison with other legal systems, and explore selected law, regulation and policy issues.
MECO6904 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6x0.5hr supervisor consultations/semester Assessment: A completed research proposal and, where necessary, an ethics application, together with research and writing contributing to a dissertation of 12000 words, for completion in MECO6905. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit requires students to commence the conduct of their own research projects under the supervision of a member of staff and write a dissertation of 12000 words (completed in the second semester of enrolment in MECO6905). In some cases these projects will give students the opportunity to extend lines of enquiry suggested by units of study already completed for the degree. In other cases, students may have an interest in an area not covered by the coursework programs offered during their candidature that can be developed as a supervised project.
MECO6905 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6x0.5hr supervisor consultations/semester Prerequisites: MECO6904 Assessment: Completion of writing for a dissertation of 12000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit requires completion of a dissertation of 12000 words, begun in the previous semester. Together with MECO6904, the unit allows students to conduct their own research projects under the supervision of a member of staff.
MECO6906 Literary Journalism: History and Theory

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent Seminar presentation (15%), 1x1500wd Seminar paper (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1000wd Reflection journal (20%), Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gives students an overview of the history and theory of literary journalism, as well as a critical understanding of key writers and genres. Topics studied include early journalisms, the Essay form, memoir, New Journalism, travel writing, blogging and the profile.
MECO6908 Strategy Selection in Corporate PR

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd communications plan (30%), 1x PR tactics presentation (group) (2000wd equivalent per student) (30%), 1x2000wd essay (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit of study analyses corporate communication strategy selection in organisations to determine effectiveness. Students examine the strategic intent of a national or international corporation by studying its corporate communication tactics, specifically its annual reports and other marketing collateral. The unit will equip students to determine the effectiveness of the organisation's communication with stakeholders and strategic publics including customers, employees, environmental groups, governments and shareholders.
MECO6909 Crisis Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1000wd short-answer essay (30%), 1x3000wd research report (50%), 1x500wd group project presentation (10%), 1x500wd weekly comments (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit will examine how organisations use public relations (PR) to deal with crisis situations. Throughout the unit we will use case studies to explore frameworks, risk prioritisation, issues management, planning, response and evaluation strategies for diverse organisations and topics from environmental and corporate to health and social.
MECO6911 Financial and Investor Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x750wd Story analysis (20%), 1x1500wd Story creation and rationale (25%), 1x750wd Slide presentation (20%), 1x3000wd Major Essay (35%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Effective communication of financial and business information stems from an understanding of how corporations should communicate and the environment in which they operate. This course links public relations theory with the practice areas of financial communication and investor relations. It combines an understanding of how investment markets work from a communications perspective with how to communicate with key stakeholders such as the media, investment community, shareholders and consumers of financial products.
MECO6912 Political Public Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x Seminar participation (10%), 1x2000wd Campaign proposal (30%), 1x2000wd Campaign presentation (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study analyses and examines the convergence of public relations, advertising and political consulting in the history of political campaigning. The unit's objectives are to demonstrate an understanding of the relationships that exist in the political process between politicians, the media and public relations. It develops student skills specific to the delivery of political public relations and political campaigns. Its focus is the process of professionalisation and internationalisation of electioneering and campaign practices in media-centred democracies.
MECO6913 Public Opinion, Policy and Public Sphere

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Report (20%), 1x1500wd Stakeholder position paper (20%), 1x500wd Presentation (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (45%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit analyses the relationship between professional communication and public opinion. It focuses on theories of influence and persuasion in the context of the development of policy, and how these are reflected in the public sphere. It develops the notion of the public sphere as represented by Habermas, Fraser, Schudson and others, focusing in particular on the transformation of the public sphere in terms of postmodern public relations.
MECO6914 Making Magazines

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Corequisites: MECO6930 Assessment: 1x225wd feature pitch (5%), 1x225wd group magazine pitch (5%), 1x1250wd feature article (25%), 1x225wd equivalent group magazine presentation (5%), 1x675wd equivalent feature layout (15%), 1x2000wd equivalent group magazine (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Making Magazines explores practical and theoretical aspects of contemporary magazine culture. Students work in small groups to conceive, plan, write and design a small 'dummy' (prototype) magazine using InDesign software. The unit emphasises writing, editing and design rather than marketing, although students will learn the importance of producing a magazine for the commercial media landscape.
MECO6915 Writing Features: Narrative Journalism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x700wd pitching assignment (15%), 1x1500wd draft first feature (20%), 1x1500wd final first feature (20%), 1x2000wd second feature (40%), 1x300wd market report (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit teaches students the basic principles of short-form narrative journalism or feature writing suitable for publication in magazines, websites and newspapers. Genres covered include the profile, the Essay, travel, memoir, investigative journalism, cultural commentary and behind-the-news stories. Skills in pitching story ideas, interviewing, research, structure and style will be covered in workshop-based classes, providing opportunities to critique work and become familiar with editing processes prior to submission of assignments.
MECO6916 Editing and Manuscript Preparation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent hard copy copyediting (25%), 1x1000wd equivalent on screen copyediting (25%), 1x4000wd equivalent structural report (40%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit of study offers core skills of copy and structural editing for trade, academic, scholarly and cross-over markets. It also analyses the editor's role in different compositional practices, the process of manuscript evaluation, development and preparation, and the relationship with the author and publisher. Students will have the option of working in an editing team that will select, shape and prepare an anthology of writing, published on completion of MECO6917 at the end of the following Semester.
MECO6917 Book Production and Publishing Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Class presentation and submission of reprint project (production schedule, budget including justification, sales and marketing campaign outline, and dummy copy of a reprint title done in groups of 5-7) (45%), 1x3000wd Essay on a set topic, or on a topic of the student's own choice (to be approved by lecturer) (45%), attendance and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit offers core skills in the book production process, including costings, contracts, printing, distribution, digital archiving, repurposing and marketing. Additionally, it offers a socio-historical analysis of the role of publishing in cultural formation. Students enrolled in this unit will inherit the page proofs from MECO6916 for production into book form. The book will be published by Sydney University Press in a small print run in traditional format with further copies available via print-on-demand.
MECO6919 Health Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd commentary and critique (20%), 1x500wd discussion leadership (15%), 1x1500wd research project on health issue (25%), 1x3000wd research paper (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces key concepts in health communication. Students will explore micro- and macro-level theories of health (behaviour) communication that inform the design and implementation of health communication campaigns, planned and unplanned effects of communication campaigns, and the evaluation of such campaigns. It aims to give students a critical and practical understanding of theory and research concerning the role of communication in health promotion efforts.
MECO6924 Broadcast Journalism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr workshop/week Corequisites: MECO6900 Assessment: 1x500wd Reader Voice Over (10%), 1x2000wd Audio News Package (45%), 1x2000wd Video News Package (45%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will give students a grounding in reporting for Broadcast Journalism from the idea to final story. Students will learn how to record video and audio using professional standard equipment. Students will also learn how to script and edit sound and vision for TV and Radio packages. Students will learn about production planning - including multi-camera TV Studio operations - as well as the ethical and legal considerations which underpin current multimedia and convergent working environments.
MECO6925 Online Journalism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assumed knowledge: MECO6900 Assessment: 1x1700wd comparative journalism analysis (30%), 1x600wd research blog posting (25%), 1x2200wd equivalent feature story production package (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to reporting for online news and information services, with a focus on web and mobile delivery. It is a practical unit involving writing exercises in different genres, including news, feature and opinion pieces. Students will also examine theoretical issues in convergent media publishing and be encouraged to develop basic skills in text, image and audio-visual production for the web. They will be encouraged to publish to a range of participatory journalism publications.
MECO6926 International Media Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Critical review (25%), 1x1500wd Media commentary (25%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the theory and practice of international media. It considers variation among international media practice by studying media institutions, occupations, contents and audiences across the world, including China, India, USA, Europe, Africa, Australia and the Middle-East. Students will have the opportunity to deepen their understanding of international media practice and to develop knowledge and skills that will assist them in facing the challenges of the global media work environment.
MECO6926 International Media Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Critical review (25%), 1x1500wd Media commentary (25%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the theory and practice of international media. It considers variation among international media practice by studying media institutions, occupations, contents and audiences across the world, including China, India, USA, Europe, Africa, Australia and the Middle-East. Students will have the opportunity to deepen their understanding of international media practice and to develop knowledge and skills that will assist them in facing the challenges of the global media work environment.
MECO6927 Organisational Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1250wd in-class essay (40%), 1x3000wd group research project (50%), 1x500wd discussion facilitation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces key concepts in organisational communication. Students will explore various structures of organisations and how those structures affect the flow of communication within workplaces. Upon the completion of the unit, students will develop their understanding of key concepts in organisational communication and apply them to analyse communication problems in organisations. Students will also be able to offer well-grounded criticism on selected organisational issues.
MECO6927 Organisational Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1250wd in-class essay (40%), 1x3000wd group research project (50%), 1x500wd discussion facilitation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces key concepts in organisational communication. Students will explore various structures of organisations and how those structures affect the flow of communication within workplaces. Upon the completion of the unit, students will develop their understanding of key concepts in organisational communication and apply them to analyse communication problems in organisations. Students will also be able to offer well-grounded criticism on selected organisational issues.
MECO6928 Media and Communication Internship

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive June,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 20 day internship placement Prerequisites: 48 credit points Assessment: 1x20day internship placement, 1x1500wd reflective journal (and folio) (40%), 1x1500wd industry research report (40%), 1x1500wd social media participation (20%) Practical field work: 20 day (140 hours) full-time internship in an approved organisation Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This capstone unit of study offers students of a Master degrees in the Department of Media and Communications (MECO) 20 days (140 hours) work experience in roles relating to their degree. Internships require critical reflection on professional practice and foster skills, knowledge and experience that enhance employment prospects. Placements may include reporting, editing, producing, designing, researching, publishing, public and media relations, campaigns, and other tasks. Available to MECO Master students only, following the completion of at least two core units of study.
MECO6929 Chinese Media Studies in Global Contexts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (50%), 1x1000wd News digest (10%), 1x1000wd Critique presentation (20%), 1x500wd Reply to peer questions (10%), 1x500wd Peer questions (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the systems, regulation and uses of Chinese media. Designed for all students, with or without knowledge of the Chinese language, it draws on theories and concepts of global media studies for understanding situations in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Chinese communities in other countries. Implications of media uses by the Chinese authorities, professionals, and ordinary citizens, in the context of globalized communication, are discussed with regard to a range of media, including the Internet.
MECO6930 Publication Design

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x250wd equivalent Text title design (15%), 1x250wd equivalent Mood board (15%), 1x1000wd equivalent Production print draft layout (20%), 1x3000wd equivalent Digital magazine (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is co-taught between the Department of Media and Communications and the Sydney College of the Arts (SCA).
Publication design focuses on the design and production of magazines and other small-scale publications in print and online form. The unit of study explores the visual language of contemporary magazines and introduces students to basic design principles. Students learn about the complex interplay of text, image and sequence occurring in magazine design through the practical experience of creating their own publication using Adobe InDesign software. The unit links creative design processes to current digital and print practice.
MECO6932 Advanced Media Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: MECO6900 and (MECO6924 or MECO6925 or MECO6931) Assessment: 1x1500wd production and research briefs for 2 factual topics (30%), 1x2500wd major factual media project teamwork (50%), 1x1000wd peer-reviewed weekly log of student project activity (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Open to Masters' students only
This is a project-based unit that focuses on specific publication and project outcomes. It builds on the knowledge, techniques, professionalism and skills acquired by students who have satisfactorily completed the prerequisite units, and further opportunity to enhance that knowledge, and practice the skills acquired in prior units. Students will produce a substantial factual audio/video media project and experience many facets of production and problem solving encountered in delivering a major media project in a convergent production environment.
MECO6934 Social Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (25%), 1x2500wd team project report (45%), 1x1000wd team project presentation (15%), 1x1500wd weeekly discussion (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Social Marketing integrates marketing concepts with other approaches to influence behaviours that benefit individuals and communities. Examples include smoking cessation, HIV prevention and recycling. Key elements include research, theory, competition and segmentation. This unit builds students' knowledge of how social marketing can be used to facilitate behaviour change and improve social outcomes, including health, environment, economic and education programs. It will include how to design, manage and communicate social and behaviour change programs in Australia and internationally.
MECO6935 Professional Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr meetings/week Assessment: 1x1000wd research proposal (20%), 1x5000wd project essay/report (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide students with the opportunity to integrate their learning over their degree and apply this to a project relevant to their professional discipline. This unit is one of the capstone units for MECO masters level students, and is designed to be taken in their final semester of study. Working with the coordinator, students alternatively choose a research essay or an industry-focused critical report or project. Learning is supported by writing/data collection training, group meetings (face-to-face and online) and independent consultations.
MECO6936 Social Media Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a Classes: 26hrs seminar in Intensive mode (equivalent to 1x2hr seminar/week) Assessment: 1x2000wd equiv Social Media Design Brief (25%), 1x2500wd Social Media Project (45%), 1x1500wd Online Article and Comments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the fundamentals of strategic social media use for professional and organisational communication, media practice and cultural production. It aims to equip students with the knowledge and skills to become competent, ethical social media communicators and to critically analyse social media forms, services and cultures. Students will explore online, mobile and locative platforms for interacting with audiences, publics and online communities, including professional networks.
MECO6937 Making eBooks and Digital Magazines

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar Prerequisites: MECO6930 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x group project (2000wd equivalent) (40%), 1x1000wd reflection (20%), participation (class and digital) (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit enables students to acquire sought-after skills in digital content production for the book and magazine publishing industries and to gain a broader theoretical and practical understanding of the ever-changing digital publishing landscape. Topics include digital publishing formats, tools and platforms, markup languages, digital asset and rights management, and metadata. Using various digital content development tools, students will develop publishing projects for delivery on iPad, Kindle and other devices.
MECO6938 The Interview

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a Classes: Intensive sessions: 26hrs seminar/semester Assessment: 1x2000wd report (30%), 1x1000wd research brief (20%), 1x3000wd or equivalent major project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Interviewing covers a range of styles from the performative to the investigative and is a fundamental skill for media work and much scholarly research. This unit will introduce students to interview research, design and practice for both media and academic outlets. Students will examine best practice examples of a range of interview approaches and techniques, as well as delivering a substantial interview project.
MECO6939 Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd research design task (50%), 1x1500wd methodology review (25%), 1x1500wd dissertation critical review (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will develop students' knowledge of key research methods used in media, communications and digital cultures research. Students will be introduced to a range of research techniques and methods, including quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods, and will have the opportunity to reflect critically on these methods through practitioner presentations and directed discussion. The assessment tasks will help students develop their skills to design and undertake a supervised research dissertation and enhance their abilities as researchers and practitioners.
MECO6940 Theoretical Traditions and Innovations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd class paper (25%), 1x1000wd wikipedia theory entry (20%), 1x3500wd critical essay (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gives students an advanced understanding of the foundational traditions in communications, media, and digital cultures. It relates these traditions to contemporary innovations, rethinking ideas to grasp current and future media and communications forms, practices, structures, and meanings. The unit features detailed reading and analysis of key ideas, texts, thinkers, and contexts.
MEDF5005 Health Research Methods and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Timothy Schlub Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x compulsory in person interactive full day workshops, 4x optional in person 3hr tutorials, 5x online lectures and discussions, 2x online elective module readings Assessment: Study design and ethics assignment (40%), statistics assignment (20%), statistics exam (20%), online self-study elective task (10%), online quizes (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study introduces students to the fundamental skills that are required for postgraduate research in medicine and health. Students will learn how to conduct research that is scientifically and ethically sound, and be able to critically appraise and review literature. Students will understand the strengths and limitations of common study designs and develop simple but important statistical analysis skills, including how to present and interpret data, basic data management skills, and how to determine the required sample size for a study. Obtaining ethics approval is necessary for any study involving the collection or analysis of data involving humans, animals or their tissues. Hence, this unit will also cover ethics in research and when and how to apply for ethics approval. These fundamental skills promote a scholarly attitude towards knowledge and understanding, and are essential for engagement with the research community.
MFDI9303 Digital Effects for Film and Video

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project proposal (25%) and class presentation (15%) and project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to equip you with a conceptual understanding and technical expertise in the use of digital effects for film and video projects. You will be introduced to the use of software programs such as Adobe After Effects to explain how moving images can be transformed over time in combination with text, masks, animation, filters, effects and sound. You will learn how to author in After Effects through an intensive series of tutorials film/video screenings and practical studio workshops. This will culminate in the production of a studio project. The project is to be developed in consultation with an academic adviser.
MFDI9313 Digital Editing for Film and Video

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project proposal (25%) and class presentation (15%) and project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to equip you with a conceptual understanding and technical expertise in the use of digital editing for film and video projects. You will be introduced to the use of software programs such as Final Cut Pro HD to explain how edit moving images in to a project and how moving images can be transformed over time in combination with text, masks, filters, effects and sound. You will learn how to edit and master in Final Cut Pro HD through an intensive series of tutorials film/video screenings and practical studio workshops. This will culminate in the production of a studio project. The project is to be developed in consultation with an academic adviser.
MHST6901 Museum and Heritage: History and Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prohibitions: MUSM7033 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x2500wd Essay (45%), 1x500wd Seminar presentation (10%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The historical, cultural and social roles of museums, heritage places and collections are the focus of contemporary debate. This unit examines the relationships between the production of cultural material, its management and display, and audience to understand museum and heritage sites as places of knowledge, politics and power. Current critical and theoretical perspectives incorporate ideas about the production, consumption, contestation and conservation of intangible values, identities, memories, cultural practices and different knowledge systems.
MHST6902 Museum and Heritage: Engaging audiences

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prohibitions: MUSM7029 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x2500wd project proposal (45%), 1x500wd Seminar presentation (10%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Presenting collections, objects and places to the public is a major focus for museums, galleries and heritage organisations. The development of interpretation strategies and public programs to engage, educate and entertain audiences are regarded as key to the long-term viability of cultural institutions. This unit examines the theories and practices of museum education, heritage interpretation, audience research, communication and learning. The development and delivery of education, interpretation and visitor programs are examined in case studies and through practical work.
MHST6903 Managing Collections and Heritage Sites

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prohibitions: MUSM7031 Assessment: 1x1500wd research project (35%), 1x2500wd Essay (45%), 1x500wd Seminar presentation (10%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How museum collections and heritage places are managed and listed is a core function of cultural institutions. From global contexts, such as World Heritage, to national, regional and local museum collections and heritage lists, understanding how objects and places are documented, assessed, and registered is important for both museum and heritage practice. This unit introduces students to the theories and practices of collection and heritage management through current issues in the development, policy and maintenance of cultural collections and places.
MHST6904 Museum and Heritage: Objects and Places

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Prohibitions: MUSM7033 Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (45%), 1x1500wd object or place assessment (35%), 1x500wd seminar presentation (10%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objects and heritage places (such as indigenous sites, historical buildings, parks, gardens, ruins, archaeological sites, memorials, cultural landscapes) can be studied from a range of multi-disciplinary approaches. In this unit students are introduced to different theoretical and methodological frameworks used in object and place analysis. Changing ideas about the roles and meanings of objects and places from historical, contemporary and cross-cultural perspectives will be introduced. Practical work and case studies will used to examine these issues.
MHST6905 Internship Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students undertake a supervised project in consultation with the needs of the workplace and the student's desired experience. Assessment: 1x1000wd research proposal (15%), 1x500wd photographic Essay (10%), 1x4500wd Research essay (45%) and workplace supervisor report (30%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The internship unit allows students to gain hands on experience by undertaking a supervised project based in a recognised, gallery, museum or heritage or arts organisation. Projects are developed in close consultation with the institutions needs and the student's desired experience. The internship unit offers hands on experience of museums, heritage or cultural organisations and allows for a broadening of skills and expertise as well as an opportunity to gain an understanding of the relationship between theory and institutional practice. The capstone internship unit is designed to offer an experience that encourages students to synthesize their experience of theory and practice and includes a major Essay allowing you to consider a specific topic of your choice.
MHST6906 Internship Professional Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students undertake a supervised project in consultation with the needs of the workplace and the student's desired experience. Prohibitions: MUSM7004 Assessment: 1x1500wd project journal (15%), 1x500wd presentation (10%), 1x3500wd major report (35%), 1x500wd photographic Essay (10%), supervisor's report (30%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The internship unit allows students to gain hands-on experience by undertaking a supervised project based in a recognised, gallery, museum or heritage or arts organisation. Projects are developed in close consultation with the institutions needs and the student's desired experience. The internship unit offers hands on experience of museums, heritage or cultural organisations and allows for a broadening of skills and expertise as well as an opportunity to gain an understanding of the relationship between theory and institutional practice.
MHST6907 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: MUSM7007 Assessment: 12,000wd dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000 words on an approved topic, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Department permission required. Approval is subject to the availability of appropriate supervision and the department's discretion.
MHST6908 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MHST6907 Prohibitions: MUSM7008 Assessment: 12,000wd dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research, writing, Completion and submission of a 12000 word dissertation on an approved topic, supervised by an academic member of staff. Department permission required. Approval is subject to the availability of appropriate supervision and the department's discretion
MHST6913 Indigenous Museums and Heritage

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (45%), 1x2000wd Blog (35%), 1x750wd Presentation (10%), 1x750wd On-line Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Globally, Indigenous peoples have challenged museums, heritage agencies and professional practitioners over issues of ownership, control, management, display and interpretation of Indigenous culture, history and cultural property. We will examine how Indigenous communities, scholars and practitioners are decolonising museum and heritage practices and spaces.
MHST6914 Heritage Studies in Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd critique of a heritage study or conservation management plan (35%), 1x3000wd significance assessment (45%), 1x500wd seminar presentation (10%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The laws, policies and charters governing heritage across the globe share some commonalities but there are also different national approaches to the philosophies and practices underlying heritage management. In this unit of study we will examine how heritage is documented, classified, identified, assessed and managed in different parts of the world through case studies and practical work.
MHST6915 Heritage Studies and Communities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (45%), 1x2500wd photo Essay (35%), 1x500wd Seminar presentation (10%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How do different community groups create a sense of belonging and attachment to the historical and archaeological sites, memorials, protected areas, and landscapes they live in and around? How do communities create meaning and maintain identities through heritage places? What research methods and approaches are used in heritage studies to investigate these connections? In this unit of study students will be introduced to the research methods used to identify, document and assess social significance, intangible heritage, attachment and belonging.
MIPH5008 Travel and Tropical Medicine

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Manalo, Dr Paula Fogarty Session: Intensive October Classes: 1x 2day intensive lectures Assessment: 1x 2000word individual essay (80%) and attendance (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to provide an overview of common health issues and emerging travel-related diseases, with a general look at prevention and control of these problems for travellers or those intending to work in tropical or resource-poor settings for a significant period of time. Travel/public health regulations associated with outbreaks and disasters are also addressed. During the short course, students will also explore issues such as pre-travel preparations, protection from vector-borne diseases and vaccinations. The teaching method is face-to-face teaching only. Attendance is compulsory.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
MIPH5014 International Health Promotion

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week for 11 weeks; 1x 1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: PUBH5033 Assessment: 1500 word essay (30%), 2500 word report (50%), tutorial participation and attendance (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have enrolled in PUBH5033 should contact the unit co-ordinator to seek permission before enrolling in MIPH5014, as there is some overlap between the two units of study.
This unit of study aims to provide students with an understanding of the principles, values/ethics, theories and methods that are employed in health promotion and prevention.. The unit will critically examine diverse characteristics of disese prevention and health promotion programs, including behaviour change programs, community-based, environmental and policy-based programs. It will have a strong practical and methodological focus, with the objective of enabling students to develop knowledge and skills for planning, implementing and evaluating health promotion programs. Models and methods that are commonly used in health promotion and disease prevention will be described and discussed by using real life examples. Among the major issues examined are the health impact of social and economic development at the national and global levels, prevention and control of non-communicable and communicable diseases, including cigarette smoking, hygiene practices, capacity building and workforce development for health promotion and prevention.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5112 Global Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5 hr lecture per week for 13 weeks; 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks plus 1x 1 day peer-learning session through group presentations; also offered fully online. Assessment: 1 x group presentation (25%), 1x2500 word written essay (50%), tutorial facilitation (20%) and peer evaluation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit gives candidates an insight into the prevention and control of communicable diseases in developing countries using country-specific examples presented by professionals with field experience. The unit covers tropical diseases (including schistosomiasis and leprosy), as well as vector-borne conditions (including yellow fever and dengue), zoonoses and emerging infectious diseases such as pandemic influenza and Ebolavirus disease.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5115 Women's and Children's Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Camille Raynes-Greenow and Dr Ying Zhang Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks, 1x1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x2000 word individual assignment, (50%), 1x group report (30%), tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit gives an introduction to the health status of women and children in low and middle income countries and highlights the interconnectedness of women's and children's health. It presents some of the major causes of mortality and morbidity and interventions and approaches to improving outcomes from a public health perspective. Issues covered include perinatal mortality, contraception, nutrition, HIV, cancer, diarrhoeal disease, vaccine preventable diseases and childhood disability.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5116 Culture, Health, Illness and Medicine

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cynthia Hunter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 day workshop; 1 x 2hr seminar per week for 7 weeks; also offered fully online. Assessment: 1x3000 word essay (65%) and 1x1hr class facilitation (25%), class participation 10%. Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to provide an integrated and interpretive approach to an understanding of health-related behaviours of populations in international settings, by synthesizing anthropological knowledge and methodology, and the interactions of culture, biology, psychology and environment. The teaching process is by student-led, lecturer-guided, discussion based review and critical analysis of relevant topics. During the unit, students will explore a range of issues in global and multicultural health from an anthropological perspective. Methodological approaches will encompass ethnography and other anthropological data collection methods. The issues covered will include cultural influences on health, illness and healing, such as indigenous and traditional beliefs and systems, gender and cultural change and the impact of modernization and development on illness and healing. The impact examines disease and illness patterns - their distribution and persistence, mental illness and culture and attitudes towards the use of medications; and the provision of culturally sensitive and appropriate services. The emphasis will be on covering a range of topic areas relevant to the students enrolled, and those of particular importance in contemporary international and multicultural health contexts.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5117 Global Non-Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Rohina Joshi Session: Semester 2a Classes: 1x2hr-lecture/week for 7 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x 2000word written assignment (90%) and class participation (10%) or online discussion (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit aims to provide candidates with an understanding of the causes and control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) with a focus on low and middle income countries (LMIC). These diseases are associated with social and economic development and the demographic and health transitions. Topics covered in the unit include cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, primary health care in relation to NCDs, health promotion for NCDs and approaches to NCD research in developing countries. Lectures are given by health professionals with direct experience of NCD control in LMICs.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5124 Health Issues and Humanitarian Emergencies

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Bronwen Blake, Professor Michael Dibley, Professor Lyndal Trevena Session: Intensive November Classes: 1x 4day workshop Assessment: Workshop activities (40%), 1x 2500word written assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gives students an overview of public health aspects of humanitarian emergencies in developing country situations and the range of appropriate responses. This includes considering problems faced by government and non-government organisations in humanitarian emergency relief efforts. Topics covered in the unit include international and human rights law, the role of donor agencies, refugee health, nutritional emergencies, site planning for refugee camps, water and sanitation, sexual violence, protection of vulnerable groups, and communicable disease surveillance and control.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5127 Mental Disorders in Global Context

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Maree Hackett Session: Intensive September Classes: 1x 2day workshop Assessment: 1x 2000 word essay (90%) plus class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to present an overview and critique of mental disorders in an international context. It covers broad issues related to the classification of disorders, their prevalence and population burden and their determinants. While the focus of the module is on international epidemiology, the course also aims to promote understanding of the economic and humanitarian implications of the burden of mental and substance use disorders for prevention, treatment and health policy. The unit will cover what a mental disorder is, how frequent and how disabling mental disorders are and what the major correlates and determinants of mental disorders are,with a focus on health policy.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
MIPH5129 Dissertation B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Minimum 70% or greater WAM in the first 24 credit points of coursework Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: This unit is only available after completion of 48 credit points. This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
MIPH5131 Foundations of International Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Robert Cumming, Associate Professor Joel Negin, Dr Sarah Bernays Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 12 weeks; 2x1 day seminars and 1x1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (25%), 1xgroup presentation (25%), 1x2500 word assignment (40%) and tutorial discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Departmental permission required for non-MIPH students
The unit aims to provide candidates with a multidisciplinary perspective of the interplay between health and development in low- and middle-income countries from a range of social science and public health disciplines. The unit will cover the following themes: health and development, Millennium Development Goals, poverty and health, gender and health, , climate change and health, population ageing,, human rights and health, health systems, human resources for health, and primary health care. At the end of the unit, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relation between health and development; demonstrate an understanding of how health systems operate in developing countries; and demonstrate an understanding of the role played by the various international organisations and agencies in health in less developed settings.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearnng site.
MIPH5132 Global Disease Burden and Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Manalo, Professor Michael Dibley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 13 weeks;1x1hr tutorial per week for 10 weeks (face to face students only); 10xonline tutorials that each run for one week (online students only); plus 1x1 day seminar on qualitative methods (face to face students only) and 1x1 day seminar on quantitativemethods (face to face students only); week long online qualitative and quantitative methods seminars (online students only) Assessment: 1x 1500 word case scenario based research methods written assessment (20%), qualitative and quantitative methods exercises (10%), 1x 3000 word individual essay (50%), and tutorial discussion (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Departmental permission required for non-MIPH students
This unit introduces candidates to the methods used to assess disease priorities and identify those diseases or risk factors that contribute most to the burden of disease in low- and middle-income countries. It provides candidates with an understanding of the major conditions responsible for illness, disability and premature mortality. The design and implementation of disease control and health promotion programs for developing country populations will be discussed based on an understanding of the biological, environmental, behavioral, social and cultural aspects of major health problems. Topics covered in the unit include the global burden of disease; methods for conducting both quantitative and qualitative applied field research; and the epidemiology, and control and prevention strategies for communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis; non-communicable diseases - cardiovascular diseases, mental health; injury; malnutrition, childhood infectious diseases reproductive and perinatal conditions.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearnng site.
MIPH5135 Health Systems in Developing Countries

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Joel Negin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks; plus 2x 0.5 day workshops; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x1500 word research paper (40%), 1x2000 word solution proposal (50%), and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Health systems are complex and multi-faceted. Successful health systems require attention to political economy, governance, institutions, and local context. This unit will cover health systems in developing countries to equip students with a conceptual understanding and a set of tools to address major public health challenges from a health systems perspective. With a focus on evidence-based decision making, the unit will provide an understanding of health systems including specific topics such as health workforce, financing, service delivery, information systems and policy, and how these impact health interventions and health status in less developed countries. A multi-sectoral, integrated model will be used to understand the varied aspects of development challenges related to health systems. A case study approach will then provide students with concrete examples of health systems challenges and will strengthen students' ability to view health problems in a holistic, multi-faceted manner. The unit will provide students with the tools needed to make a practical difference in health systems in less developed countries with emphasis on implementation of health projects and bringing interventions to scale.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5219 International Health Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Mu Li Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks; 1x1 day workshop; 1x1hr tutorial per week for 8 weeks; 1x1 day peer learning session through group presentations Prohibitions: MIPH5220 Assessment: 1x 40minutes (30 minute presentation plus 10 minutes questions and answers) group presentation (20%), peer evaluation on group participation (15%), 1x group written assignment (40%) and 1x short individual written assignment (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Effective international health projects management contributes to the achievement of health and development in developing countries. The Unit aims to give students a good understanding of the concepts and key elements of project design and evaluation, and to demonstrate tools and techniques used in effective project management at different stages. A detailed step by step application of the Logical Framework Approach (LFA) in project design will be presented, including stakeholder analysis, problem and objective analysis, and the logframe matrix. The Unit also gives students an opportunity for hands-on practice through the design of a project in an international setting and allows them to consider the challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management. The key topic areas covered include: concepts and principles of international project management; context and situation analysis; the LFA for project design; project management functions including managing information, resources, risk, quality and change; and project monitoring and evaluation. At the end of the course, students should be able to: identify the key aspects of the LFA to project design; develop a project proposal in international settings; recognise challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management; and apply a systematic approach to project planning and management in international settings.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
MKTG5001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: in-semester exam(s) (25%), final exam (35%), team project (30%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces students to basic principles and language of marketing theory and practice. Marketing principles are examined in relation to a wide variety of products and services, in both commercial and non-commercial domains. An emphasis is placed on strategy planning and the marketing decision process. It is an introduction to the issues and terminology of marketing that can serve as a standalone understanding of the basics of marketing or as a foundation unit for further study in marketing. The unit focuses on the practical analysis marketing and the marketing management process and the development of the marketing mix the components that make up a marketing plan.
MKTG6003 Marketing Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: final exam (40%), team project (20%), presentation (10%), class and blackboard particiapation (20%), reflection (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a survey of marketing strategy and planning. It critically evaluates key marketing strategy concepts such as SWOT analysis; alternative identification and evaluation; marketing research to inform strategic decision making; selection of alternatives and implementation of strategy and the role of the marketing mix elements in marketing strategy. It also critically evaluates sustainable and non-sustainable advantages.
MKTG6005 Marketing Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: Intensive - 6 days, 9:30am-5pm Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: in-class participation (10%), assignment (25%), assignment (30%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit provides a theoretical and practical perspective on the role of integrated marketing communications in the marketing process, planning and implementation. The unit focuses on the role of different media (e.g. television, radio, print, outdoor, cinema, Internet, mobile and social media) and covers various aspects of advertising and promotions management including: mass media advertising, online, mobile, social media, in-store advertising, sales promotion, public relations, sponsorships, and personal selling.
MKTG6013 International and Global Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: midterm (15%), participation (15%), written report and reflection (23%), oral presentation (10%), research component (2%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to give students an understanding of international marketing concepts by using the framework of marketing mix elements of product, price, distribution and promotions, and highlights their importance in a rapidly changing global economy. Topics include the 'scope and environmental factors (PEST)' including 'culture'; 'globalisation verses internationalisation and multinational corporations'; 'international and global products, services and brands', 'market size assessment'; 'foreign market selection'; 'foreign market entry mode'; 'pricing for international markets'; 'international distribution channels'; and 'international promotions (global vs. multinational approaches) and strategies'. Understanding these concepts help students develop skills in designing and implementing marketing strategies in diverse international country contexts.
MKTG6206 Regulatory Environment and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: attendance/participation (10%), media file compilation (25%), media file presentation (15%), meida file assignment (10%), major assignment presentation (20%), major assignment (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit is only available to students enrolled in the Master of Marketing and Graduate Certificate of Marketing
In today's highly competitive and uncertain business environment, it is critical for marketing professionals to have a clear understanding of marketing issues and the impact of possible regulatory and ethical factors. Marketing programmes and strategies have greater chances of success if they are developed with an awareness of regulatory and ethical guidelines. This unit considers the regulatory and ethical environment of the marketing of goods and services, with particular reference to product development and management, pricing, promotion and distribution. The unit also investigates issues and implications of new media. Topics include marketing regulation in the digital environment and other technologies used in the promotion and sale of products and services.
MMDE5001 Interactive Media Project Major 1

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hour lecture and 1x2 hour tutorial/week Corequisites: MMDE5011 Assessment: 1x15min oral examination of presentation of major studio project (70%) and 2 x development presentations and production documentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study delivers a strong basis in the processes associated with the design, development and implementation of an interactive website. The unit provides you both with a historical and conceptual framework in which to conceive of and develop your own online projects.
Over the course of this unit you will learn a range of approaches to interactive authoring for the web, including models of visual communication, principles of effective screen design as well as the principles of user-interface design and navigational architecture for web-based work. In this unit you are encouraged to critically engage with the implementation of media and interactivity in the online environment.
You are expected to produce a website that engages current web technologies in a creative and explorative manner and a set of professional standard production documents as well as a final dossier that documents the development and implementation of your major project.
MMDE5002 Interactive Media Project Major 2

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hour lecture and 1x2 hour tutorial/week Prerequisites: MMDE5001 Corequisites: MMDE5012 Assessment: 1x15min oral examination of presentation of major studio project (60%) and 2 x development presentations (20%) and production documentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study delivers a strong basis in the processes associated with the design, development and implementation of interactive applications for handheld interactive devices such as the iPad. The unit provides you both with a historical and conceptual framework in which to conceive of and develop your own projects.
You will learn a range of approaches to interactive authoring including models of visual communication and the principles of effective screen design for multimedia as it relates to touchscreen devices. You will also explore a range of approaches and methodologies related to ePublishing and newly emergent workflows. In this unit you are encouraged to critically engage with the implementation of media and interactivity in relation to the multimedia experience.
You are expected to produce an application that engages current technologies in a creative and explorative manner and a set of professional standard pre-production documents as well as a final dossier that documents the development and implementation of your major project.
MMDE6001 History and Theory of New Media 1

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hour lecture and 1x2 hour tutorial/week Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (50%) and 1 x tutorial seminar (30%) and participation in class exercises (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this unit of study is to provide you with a theoretical understanding of New Media forms. The concept of New Media is explored in relation to interactivity, narrative, networked space and, more specifically, the Internet. The unit provides both an historical overview and critical perspective to a range of approaches and forms that have emerged in direct relationship to the possibilities of digital technology and networked space. A range of digital, interactive and internet-based art and design projects will be examined and discussed in relation to key concepts surrounding new media. This unit will allow you to conceptualise and situate your practice both in terms of media-specific debates and the broader context of contemporary art and media discourses.
MMDE6101 Animation for Media and Video

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hour lecture and 1x2-hour tutorial/week Assessment: 1x15min oral examination of presentation of major studio project (60%) and pre-production documentation (20%) and participation in class exercises (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Special permission is required for cross-faculty enrolments. Please contact unit of study co-oridinator.
The aim of this unit of study is to give you a comprehensive understanding of techniques and approaches to enable you to create animated sequences for use in interactive media and video. Through a combination of film/video screenings, tutorials, practical studio seminars and class critiques you will be provided with an understanding of the creative potential of animation. A range of digital techniques will be explored, including the use of software programs such as Adobe Flash. You will learn techniques such as rotoscoping, and frame-by-frame animation while being introduced to fundamental approaches for producing 2D animated sequences in the digital environment. In addition, a range of other techniques such as stop-motion animation will be examined in the context of contemporary production. During the semester you will complete a short animation project that will be developed, along with supporting paper-based designs, in consultation with an academic advisor.
MUSM7030 Exhibition Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a,Semester 2a Classes: Intensive mode in weeks 2-6 in Semester 1 Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent online discussions (15%), 1x2000wd exhibition proposal (35%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Understanding display practices in museums is central to the functions of these cultural institutions. This unit of study examines the way in which exhibitions may function by exploring current issues and debates associated with the practice of exhibiting. We will consider how different spaces inform the interpretation of the cultural material and information displayed. In particular, we will examine the issue of representation as it relates to the museum context. This unit of study will provide students with an overview of the intellectual discourses and practical knowledge used to analyse, conceptualise, propose and develop exhibitions.
MUSM7032 Museum and Gallery Administration

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd project plan (35%), 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd equivalent online discussions (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Good management is critical to the long term survival of museums as vibrant cultural institutions. This unit of study explores the characteristics of a well managed facility and provides students with the skills necessary to evaluate the operation of their own museum, both in terms of budget, human resource management and general cultural stewardship. Students will also acquire a specific set of key management skills utilised by middle and senior management. They include strategic planning, project management, budget development and program evaluation. Professional competence in these areas is normally a prerequisite for career progression. Field studies and role play techniques are utilised as part of the teaching program.
MUSM7035 Ethics of Cultural Property

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd case study (35%), 1x3000wd Essay (45%), 1x500wd Seminar presentation (10%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit tracks the ethical and political disputes surrounding the ownership, control and care of cultural property. While giving historical background on religious iconoclasm, the focus will be on notable modern cases, from the Elgin Marbles or the Benin Bronzes in the colonial era to recent acts like the destruction of the Bamiyan Buddhas or the ransack of the Iraq Museum. Australian museum practice in relation to Indigenous cultural property and issues of repatriation will be considered, as will the art market, in both legal and philosophical dimensions.
MUSM7036 Museums and the Digital

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Intensive mode in weeks 8-12 in Semester 1 Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent online discussions (20%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), 1x2000wd concept proposal (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit investigates the current use and adoption of digital technologies and new media across the museum and gallery sectors internationally. It considers how museums use digital technologies and new media, its relationship to audiences through Web 2.0 and Museum3 environments, and the growing use of the web as an important tool for cultural institutions. This course is an opportunity to research and develop critical knowledge about the use of new media and its application in the museum.