Unit descriptions P

PACS6901 United Nations, Peace and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive or online Assessment: Seminar participation (10%), 1x1500wd equivalent Model UN exercise (20%), 1x1000wd Model UN reflection report (20%), 1x3500wd Research essay (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit students critically examine the role of the United Nations in promoting international peace and security. Contemporary and historical case studies such as Rwanda, Iraq and East Timor are used to analyse the UN's performance in relation to such activities as peacemaking, peacekeeping, peacebuilding and peace enforcement. We assess the challenges facing the UN in achieving its mandate and implementing reform with a view to attaining peace with justice.
PACS6902 Reconciliation & Conflict Transformation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Lambourne Session: Intensive May Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week or the equivalent intensive Assessment: class participation and role play (20%) and 1200wd reflection exercise (20%) and 3500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit we explore the concept of reconciliation and its relationship to conflict transformation and peacebuilding at personal, community, national and international levels. We will use case studies to highlight the psychological, spiritual, performative, structural and political dimensions of reconciliation in different contexts such as indigenous/settler relations, restorative justice processes in the domestic criminal justice system, trauma healing and transitional justice after mass violence. Country case studies include Australia, South Africa, Bougainville, Rwanda and East Timor.
PACS6904 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5x2hr seminars or equivalent supervision meetings Assessment: Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000-15000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing toward a dissertation of 12000-15000 words on an approved topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
PACS6905 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: supervision meetings as required Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000-15000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Completion of research and writing, and submission of a dissertation of 12000-15000 words on an approved topic, written under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
PACS6907 Gender, Peace and Justice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lucy Fiske Session: Semester 2,Semester 2b Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week or equivalent Assessment: 1300wd short essay (30%) and 200wd abstract (10%) and 1000wd equivalent oral presentation (20%) and 3500wd essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores theories of how 'gender' is understood as a concept and the implications for peace and justice, with particular reference to conflict and post-conflict situations. The unit addresses factors intersecting with gender (such as race, caste, class, sexuality) and encourages students to develop a multidimensional analytical framework. The unit looks at 'real world' case studies of how different approaches to gender manifest in violence against women, international law, peace-building, human rights, transitional justice, development and structural inequality.
PACS6909 Cultures of Violence

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: Seminar participation (15%) and 2x750wd seminar papers (15%, 20%) and 3500wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will study the cultural contexts, origins, meaning and leading varieties of 'violence' in the modern world. How violence has been defined historically, its character and prevalence in different times and places, and changes in public perceptions, media presentation, tolerance, prevention and prosecution will be examined. Topics such as violence in the home, sport, public protest, sexual and racial relations, terrorism, genocide, warfare, youth culture and the criminal justice system will be considered.
PACS6911 Key Issues in Peace and Conflict Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Semester 2b Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent online Prohibitions: SCWK6930 Assessment: Seminar participation (10%) and 2500wd personal learning journal (30%) and 3500wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit introduces students to theories of peace, conflict and violence and the interdisciplinary character of peace and conflict studies. Students will gain an understanding of the nature of social conflict, causes of violence and the meanings of peace, as well as the means of achieving peace with justice in different conflict settings.
PACS6912 Nonviolence: Philosophy and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Winter Main Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive during Summer School Corequisites: SCWK6930 Prohibitions: SCWK6933 Assessment: 1x2500wd reflective journal (50%), 1x3500wd case study analysis (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the role of nonviolence as a philosophy and practice in promoting social change. Specific topics include: approaches advocated by Gandhi, Martin Luther King and Aung San Suu Kyi; manifestations of nonviolence in the language of peace negotiations; analysis of how commitments to nonviolence advance understanding of democracy and civil society and thus influence principles of citizenship and human rights; and appraisal of the relevance of nonviolence to questions about national identity and policy priorities in the 21st century.
PACS6913 Conflict in Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Late Classes: Intensive delivery over 6 days Prohibitions: SCWK6934 Assessment: Seminar participation (10%), 1xClass presentation equivalent to 500wds (15%), 1x1200wd paper (25%), 1x3000wd final paper (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
People spend a large part of their lives dealing with organisations. Organisations require close proximity and communication between people, often under pressure. This unit analyses organisations and diagnoses dysfunctional practices. It explores conflict/consensus theories and organisational politics. Culture and the relevance of peace with justice in the workplace are explored, and theory and skills that lead toward satisfying outcomes are examined and practiced. Students will learn to apply tools to resolve conflict in the workplace and achieve peace with justice.
PACS6914 Conflict-Resolving Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: Intensive delivery over 5 days (total 30hrs) Prohibitions: SCWK6935 Assessment: 2x2500wd Commentaries (80%), Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit examines media representations of conflict and their influence on the behaviour of those involved. It introduces creative ways for journalists, media development workers and media activists to apply principles of conflict resolution. Students diagnose 'war journalism' and 'peace journalism', and analyse conflict in a journalism context. Theories of news and concepts of objectivity and responsibility are critically explored. Students gain practical skills in peace journalism and media activism as well as devising peace journalism interventions in conflict-affected areas.
PACS6915 Human Rights, Peace and Justice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or online equivalent Prohibitions: SCWK6941 Assessment: on campus: 2000wd short Essay (40%) and 4000wd major Essay (60%); online: 500wd equivalent online discussion (10%) and 4x500wd readings responses (30%) and 500wd Essay plan (10%) and 3000wd final Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit explores the philosophical development of the idea of human rights and the international human rights regime as a means of promoting peace with justice. We examine legal instruments, political strategies, humanitarian challenges and moral imperatives that pertain to implementing human rights locally and internationally. We consider debates surrounding universality of human rights, humanitarian intervention, the role of civil society and global responsibilities, as well as specific rights such as those of women, refugees and indigenous peoples.
PACS6917 Religion, War and Peace

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent group presentation (15%), 1x1500wd short Essay (20%), 1x 3000wd final Essay (50%), 1x500wd equivalent questionnaire (5%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Religion is frequently blamed as the cause of war, and yet peace and nonviolence are considered central to most, if not all, religions. In this unit, students gain an appreciation of the war and peace traditions of the world's major religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We look at sacred texts for sources of attitudes towards war and peace, and examine historical and contemporary case studies to deepen our understanding of both religion-based violence and the peacemaking potential of religion.
PACS6919 Treatise Part 1

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: supervision meetings Corequisites: PACS6911 Assessment: Research and writing towards a treatise of 25000-30000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Under supervision of a member of staff, students devise a research proposal, conduct research and complete a treatise of 25000-30000 words. In Treatise Part 1, students define the research topic and complete the bulk of research.
PACS6920 Treatise Part 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: supervision meetings as required Corequisites: PACS6911 and PACS6919 Assessment: Completion and submission of a treatise of 25000-30000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Under the supervision of a member of staff, students devise a research proposal, conduct research and complete a treatise of 25000-30000 words. In Treatise Part 2, students will complete their research and writing of the treatise.
PACS6921 Peace of Mind: The Psychology of Peace

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive October Classes: 6-day intensive seminar or equivalent (35hrs total) Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent Oral Presentation (20%), 1x1000wd Reflective journal (15%)m 1x3000wd Essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit explores the psychological dimensions of cultivating peace, by assisting individuals and communities to evolve emotional resilience and empathic capacities to minimise aggression, violence and war. For those already trapped in cycles of violence, we examine the psychological mechanisms of trauma, addiction and violence and how they can be transformed into healing and well-being.
PACS6922 Peaceful Conflict Transformation

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3hrs online intensive/week Assessment: Continuous assessment equivalent to 2000wds (60%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), Mode of delivery: Online
A critical introduction to the TRANSCEND method of analysing conflicts and identifying means for peaceful transformation, also known as Diagnosis-Prognosis Therapy. The application of these principles is considered: to micro-conflicts, within and between individuals; meso-conflicts, within societies; macro-conflicts, among states and nations; and mega-conflicts, among regions and civilizations. There will be an examination of 'deep culture' and 'deep structure' the underlying dynamics which predispose societies, states, nations and regions to particular forms of response to conflict issues.
PACS6923 The Human Right to Food

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2b Classes: 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 2 for Semester 1, 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 6 of Semester 2 (Session 10) Assessment: Continuous assessment equivalent to 2500wds (70%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Online
The human right to adequate food is considered in light of recent developments in economic and social rights to complement civil and political rights: historical foundations; the influence of the World Food Summit 1996; the application of the human right to adequate food in various contexts - specific countries, in relation to refugees, infants etc; analysing concrete situations to identify violations of the human right to adequate food; and formulating proposals for policy and legislation to realise the human right to adequate food in specific contexts.
PACS6924 Democracy in the Developing World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2b Classes: 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 2 for Semester 1, 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 6 of Semester 2 (Session 10) Assessment: Continuous assessment equivalent to 2000wds (60%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), Mode of delivery: Online
This unit offers a comparative consideration of different concepts of democratisation and development including the criteria for compiling country development indices and typologies of democracy. Experiences of implanting and/or imposing democracy are examined in Japan, Iraq and other nations. The pan-Pacific model of development, and the pros and cons of using authoritarian means to achieve it, is also considered, with examples including Indonesia under Suharto and Singapore under Lee Kuan Yew. Relationships between development, conflict and poverty are examined - do elections lead to more democracy? More development? Or do they allow authoritarian winners to institutionalise power? What about the coup in Thailand?
PACS6925 Peace and the Global Compact

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 7 Assessment: Continuous assessment equivalent to 2000wds (60%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), Mode of delivery: Online
An in depth critical exploration of the context, concept and development of the Global Compact, with an examination of the theoretical underpinnings of the notion of corporate social responsibility and the role business can play and should play in pursuit of peace and justice. Human rights principles, labour rights principles and environmental principles: where do they come from and how can they be applied in different situations? The role of business in zones of conflict and enabling economies of peace is considered in light of current case studies and experience.
PACS6926 Peace and Conflict in South-East Asia

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erik Paul Session: Winter Main Classes: 26 hours Assessment: class participation (15%) and 2500wd case study presentation (35%) and 3500wd research paper (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit focuses on the themes of development, conflict, and democratisation in Southeast Asia. An introductory theoretical framework (tools of analysis) on development, conflict, and democratisation is followed by a country-based case studies of Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Laos, Philippines, Singapore Thailand, Timor Leste (East Timor), and Vietnam. A regional analysis focuses on ASEAN and the region's interaction with the rest of the world completes the unit.
PACS6927 Transitional Justice and Peacebuilding

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive September Classes: 6-day intensive seminar or equivalent Assessment: 1xRole play exercise equivalent to 400wds (10%), 1x1200wd short assignment (30%), 1x3000wd final Essay (60%), Mode of delivery: Block mode
Transitional justice is a rapidly emerging interdisciplinary field of study focussing on processes dealing with past human rights violations and the transition to a more peaceful and democratic state. This unit examines the evolution of transitional justice theory and practice, including truth commissions, trials and traditional practices, in such contexts as post-apartheid South Africa and post-genocide Cambodia and Rwanda. Issues discussed include the various types of justice, accountability, truth, reconciliation and reparations, and the challenges of balancing justice and peace.
PACS6928 Community Mediation: Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Late Classes: 5-day intensive seminar Assessment: Seminar participation/role equivalent to 500wd (25%), 1x1250wd Reflective journal (25%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the theory and practical application of facilitation, communication and conflict resolution skills in a community mediation context. Students will learn about various models of community mediation and will become skilled in the stages of community mediation through role-plays and simulation exercises. Successful completion of this unit of study will equip students for possible accreditation as a community mediator in Australia, as well as providing students with transferable skills and knowledge about mediation.
PACS6930 Ethics for a Sustainable Peace

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hrs online/week Assessment: 5x 600wd reflective responses (50%), 5x 400wd mini case study analyses (30%), 1x1000wd end of semester evaluative task (20%), Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study will focus on developing a set of value-based ethical principles for responding to the forms of violence that obstruct the achievement of a culture of sustainable peace, namely organized physical violence, structural and ecological violence. Case studies and literature in the area of social justice, nonviolence, ecological sustainability and participatory decision-making will be used for acquiring an understanding of the ethical challenges presented by these forms of violence and developing ethical principles for responding to them.
PACS6931 Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: Seminar participation (25%), 1x1500wd Short Assignment (25%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the theory and practice of conflict analysis and resolution. Students will gain an understanding of the various methods of conflict management, resolution and transformation, and will learn skills that can be applied across the spectrum of conflict types from interpersonal, family and community, to inter-ethnic and international.
PACS6932 Internship Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5x2-hr seminars or equivalent supervision meetings Prerequisites: PACS6911 Prohibitions: PACS6904, PACS6905, PACS6935, PACS6936 Assessment: Result for Internship Part 2 (100%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Work intensively in a peace-focused domestic or international organisation, to gain a working knowledge of practical applications of peace with justice. Supervised by the organisation, students will undertake a specific focused task and work with faculty to draw links with theoretical issues of peace with justice. MPACS only. Department permission required."=
PACS6933 Internship Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Successful completion of 140-hour Internship (in one secondment or as part-time blocks) as confirmed by receiving organisation. Prerequisites: PACS6911 Prohibitions: PACS6904, PACS6905, PACS6935, PACS6936 Assessment: 1x1200wd Internship Proposal (15%), 140hrs Internship (25%), 1x5000wd Internship Final Report (60%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Work intensively in a peace-focused domestic or international organisation, to gain a working knowledge of practical applications of peace with justice. Supervised by the organisation, students will undertake a specific focused task and work with faculty to draw links with theoretical issues of peace with justice. MPACS only. Department permission required.
PACS6934 Conflict-Sensitive Development Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Early,Winter Main Classes: Summer intensive comprising 6 days of seminars and practical sessions: 9:00 am-5:00 pm (total 39 hours) Prerequisites: (PACS6911) or (DVST6901) or (Bachelor degree plus relevant experience) Prohibitions: SCWK6930 Assessment: Seminar participation (10%), 1xCollaborative group work equivalent to 1000wd (20%), 1x1000wd Reflective note (20%), 1x2500wd Written assignment (50%), Mode of delivery: Block mode
International aid efforts are often delivered in contexts affected by conflict, and risk feeding the conflict rather than alleviating it. Conflict sensitivity is about minimising the negative impact of aid (do no harm), and maximising its positive potential. Nowadays a core operating principle for international development and humanitarian organisations, being conflict-sensitive is essential in making aid more effective and accountable. This unit is designed as a practical, skills-based workshop suitable for professionals or advanced PG students wishing to engage in field-based work.
PACS6935 Advocacy and Activism Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x2-hr seminars or equivalent supervision meetings Prerequisites: PACS6911 Prohibitions: PACS6904, PACS6905, PACS6932, PACS6933 Assessment: Results for Advocacy Part 2 (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Work intensively in Australia on a peace-focused project of advocacy or activism. Supervised by faculty, students will organise and publicise a discrete action or series of actions, then write a reflective article drawing links with theoretical issues of peace with justice. MPACS only. Department permission required.
PHIL7811 Supervised Reading Course 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: 1x4000-5000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Selected reading program supervised by an academic member of staff. Students write a Research essay based on a question arising from the program of reading.
PHIL7822 Treatise Part 1

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: Research and writing toward a Treatise of 20-25000 words Mode of delivery: Supervision
Research and writing toward a Treatise of 20-25000 words on an approved topic, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Department permission required prior to enrolment.
PHIL7823 Treatise Part 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: PHIL7822 Assessment: Completion and submission of a Treatise of 20-25000 words Mode of delivery: Supervision
Completion and submission of a Treatise of 20-25000 words on an approved topic, written under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Department permission required prior to enrolment.
PHIL7826 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2,4,6 and 8 Assessment: research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Research and writing toward a Dissertation on an approved topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
PHIL7827 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2,4,6 and 8 Prerequisites: PHIL7826 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Completion and submission of a Dissertation on an approved topic, written under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
PRFM5901 Critical Theory and Performance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay draft including bibliography and plan for Essay (25%), 1x3500-4000wd final Essay (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
As an emerging discipline, performance studies has drawn upon a wide range of theoretical positions and resources, from semiotics to New Historicism, cultural studies, feminism, psychoanalysis, discourse theory, deconstruction, phenomenology and hermeneutics. In this unit, we will read some key theoretical texts and look at how they have been applied to the analysis of performance.
PRFM5902 Rehearsal Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd reading task/journal (30%), 1x3000wd Research essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit prepares students for the task of observing and analysing rehearsal practices (or training, creative development etc) in theatre and other genres of aesthetic performance. We will canvass some of the key theoretical and methodological issues of ethnographic research, not only through readings but also through practical tasks involving video recordings of rehearsal, prompt books and other materials held in the department's unique archive. This unit is a pre-requisite for those students undertaking PRFM5903 Rehearsal to Performance.
PRFM5903 Rehearsal to Performance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: PRFM5902 Assessment: 1x1000wd formative assessment and casebook plan (25%), 1x4000wd casebook (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are required to attend 2 weeks of rehearsals during July prior to commencement of semester 2 classes. This rehearsal observation provides essential preparatory work to undertake the unit of study.
This unit is structured around a rehearsal process occurring in the mid-year break (July) and involving performing artists in residence at the Department's Rex Cramphorn Studio. Students attend rehearsals full time for two weeks, documenting the process and writing up their observations as ethnographic fieldnotes. Seminars during semester provide an opportunity for students to 'unpack' this experience and to develop strategies for turning fieldnotes into a more detailed, coherent and analytical casebook.
PRFM6900 Theatre and Community Development

This unit of study is not available in 2015

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar in weeks 2, 4, 6 and 11, Intensive workshops 10am-5pm (Mon-Thurs in Mid-semester break) Assessment: 1x1000wd report based on analysis of CCD Project Evaluation involving Oral Presentation (30%), 1x3000wd Research essay and/or 'action/research' assignment (60%), reading tasks and online discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit offers 'hands-on' training in a range of theatre techniques (e.g. Boal's "Theatre of the Oppressed") tailored to the needs of teachers and community workers involved in peace-building, human rights campaigns, health promotion, youth work and other 'community cultural development' activities. Along with practical theatre facilitation skills, the unit provides a rigorous critique of the political/educational philosophies underpinning the practice and an overview of key debates regarding the funding and evaluation of arts-based community development projects.