Unit descriptions P - R

NURS5095 Primary Health Care in the Community

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: distance education/intensive on campus, up to 4 study days Assessment: reflection and essay and presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit of study will focus on determinants of health, community needs assessment, community participation, health promotion models, health education and health literacy, and the ways in which these inform and underpin primary health care in the community. Students will examine evidence-based health promotion strategies and how these may impact on disease prevention. Students will develop community-based health assessment skills and knowledge, and explore management and prevention of infectious and chronic conditions. The unit will differentiate between health education needs of communities and broader socio-cultural, economic and political dynamics and initiatives designed to empower individuals and communities to improve and develop control of their health and health care.
NURS5099 Promoting Health and Care in the Community

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: four intensive, on-campus study days Assessment: 1500 word evaluation (15%), presentation (35%) and 3000 word report (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study will focus on community needs assessment, community participation, health promotion, health literacy and the ways in which these inform and underpin promoting health and care in the community. Students will examine evidence-based health promotion strategies, develop community-based health assessment skills, and enhance their communication skills to work with people at home, including motivational and counselling skills and develop knowledge and skills in cultural competence person centred care.
PACS6901 United Nations, Peace and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive or online Assessment: (500wd equivalent seminar participation (10%), 1x800wd model UN exercise and assignment (15%), 1x1000wd model UN reflection report (20%), 1x3500wd final essay (55%)) OR ((500wd equivalent online discussion contribution (10%), 3x500wd online reading reflections (30%), 1x800wd Online essay plan (10%), 1x3000wd Online final essay (50%)) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
In this unit students critically examine the role of the United Nations in promoting international peace and security. Contemporary and historical case studies are used to analyse the UN's performance in relation to such activities as peacemaking, peacekeeping, peacebuilding and peace enforcement. We assess the challenges facing the UN in achieving its mandate and implementing reform with a view to attaining peace with justice.
PACS6902 Reconciliation and Conflict Transformation

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive May Classes: 6 day intensive or equivalent weekly seminars (36 hrs total) Assessment: 1x500wd participation and role play (15%), 1x1000wd reflection exercise (25%), 1x3000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit we explore the concept of reconciliation and its relationship to conflict transformation and peacebuilding at personal, community, national and international levels. We will use case studies to highlight the psychological, spiritual, cultural, structural and political dimensions of reconciliation in different contexts such as indigenous/settler relations, restorative justice processes and transitional justice after mass violence.
PACS6904 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5x2hr seminars or equivalent supervision meetings Assessment: Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000-15000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing toward a dissertation of 12000-15000 words on an approved topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
PACS6905 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: supervision meetings as required Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000-15000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Completion of research and writing, and submission of a dissertation of 12000-15000 words on an approved topic, written under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
PACS6909 Cultures of Violence

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: Seminar participation (15%) and 2x750wd seminar papers (15%, 20%) and 3500wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will study the cultural contexts, origins, meaning and leading varieties of 'violence' in the modern world. How violence has been defined historically, its character and prevalence in different times and places, and changes in public perceptions, media presentation, tolerance, prevention and prosecution will be examined. Topics such as violence in the home, sport, public protest, sexual and racial relations, terrorism, genocide, warfare, youth culture and the criminal justice system will be considered.
PACS6911 Key Issues in Peace and Conflict Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent online or intensive Prohibitions: SCWK6930 Assessment: Seminar participation (10%) and 2500wd personal learning journal (30%) and 3500wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Peace and Conflict Studies and the history, philosophy and politics of peace. Students will gain an understanding of the nature and causes of violence, the potential of nonviolence and the means of achieving peace with justice in different conflict settings.
PACS6912 Nonviolence: Philosophy and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Prohibitions: SCWK6933 Assessment: 1x2500wd reflective journal (50%), 1x3500wd case study analysis (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically and experientially explores the philosophical basis and theoretical underpinnings of nonviolent civil resistance in local and global struggles against injustice. We will analyse the nature of power, the meaning of nonviolent action and how it can bring about social change. Extensive use is made of case studies of nonviolent social movements from across time and around the world as well as practical exercises to unpack assumptions about the use of violence and nonviolence.
PACS6913 Conflict in Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Late Classes: Intensive delivery over 6 days Assessment: Seminar participation (10%), 1xClass presentation equivalent to 500wds (15%), 1x1200wd paper (25%), 1x3000wd final paper (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
People spend a large part of their lives dealing with organisations. Organisations require close proximity and communication between people, often under pressure. This unit analyses organisations and diagnoses dysfunctional practices. It explores conflict/consensus theories and organisational politics. Culture and the relevance of peace with justice in the workplace are explored, and theory and skills that lead toward satisfying outcomes are examined and practiced. Students will learn to apply tools to resolve conflict in the workplace and achieve peace with justice.
PACS6914 Conflict-Resolving Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August Classes: Intensive delivery over 5 days (total 30hrs) Prohibitions: SCWK6935 Assessment: 2x2500wd Commentaries (80%), Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit examines media representations of conflict and their influence on the behaviour of those involved. It introduces creative ways for journalists, media development workers and media activists to apply principles of conflict resolution. Students diagnose 'war journalism' and 'peace journalism', and analyse conflict in a journalism context. Theories of news and concepts of objectivity and responsibility are critically explored. Students gain practical skills in peace journalism and media activism as well as devising peace journalism interventions in conflict-affected areas.
PACS6914 Conflict-Resolving Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August Classes: Intensive delivery over 5 days (total 30hrs) Prohibitions: SCWK6935 Assessment: 2x2500wd Commentaries (80%), Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit examines media representations of conflict and their influence on the behaviour of those involved. It introduces creative ways for journalists, media development workers and media activists to apply principles of conflict resolution. Students diagnose 'war journalism' and 'peace journalism', and analyse conflict in a journalism context. Theories of news and concepts of objectivity and responsibility are critically explored. Students gain practical skills in peace journalism and media activism as well as devising peace journalism interventions in conflict-affected areas.
PACS6915 Human Rights, Peace and Justice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or online equivalent Prohibitions: SCWK6941 Assessment: (1x800wd participation and presentation (15%), 1x1500wd short assignment (25%), 1x600wd essay plan (10%), 1x3000wd major essay (50%)) OR (1x500wd online discussion contribution (10%), 3x500wd online reading reflections (30%), 1x800wd online essay plan (10%), 1x3000wd online final essay (50%)) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit explores the interrelationship between human rights, peace and justice in theory and in practice. We examine the philosophical underpinnings, legal instruments, political strategies and ethical challenges involved in understanding and attaining human rights locally and globally. Students will engage in debates about global responsibilities for the prevention and prosecution of mass human rights violations as well as specific rights such as those of women, refugees and indigenous peoples and how they contribute to peace with justice.
PACS6917 Religion, War and Peace

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent group presentation (15%), 1x1500wd short Essay (20%), 1x 3000wd final Essay (50%), 1x500wd equivalent questionnaire (5%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Religion is frequently blamed as the cause of war, and yet peace and nonviolence are considered central to most, if not all, religions. In this unit, students gain an appreciation of the war and peace traditions of the world's major religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam. We look at sacred texts for sources of attitudes towards war and peace, and examine historical and contemporary case studies to deepen our understanding of both religion-based violence and the peacemaking potential of religion.
PACS6921 Peace of Mind: The Psychology of Peace

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: 6-day intensive seminar or equivalent (35hrs total) Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent Oral Presentation (20%), 1x1000wd Reflective journal (15%)m 1x3000wd Essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit explores the psychological dimensions of building peace in the world through cultivating inner peace or 'peace of mind'. We examine how it is that ordinary human beings can commit genocide and other mass atrocities, and how an understanding of underlying psychological processes can help with creating more peaceful communities. These inner processes include the effects of fear and trauma, and the development of empathy, resilience, healing and reconciliation.
PACS6922 Peaceful Conflict Transformation

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3hrs online intensive/week Assessment: Continuous assessment equivalent to 2000wds (60%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), Mode of delivery: Online
A critical introduction to the TRANSCEND method of analysing conflicts and identifying means for peaceful transformation, also known as Diagnosis-Prognosis Therapy. The application of these principles is considered: to micro-conflicts, within and between individuals; meso-conflicts, within societies; macro-conflicts, among states and nations; and mega-conflicts, among regions and civilizations. There will be an examination of 'deep culture' and 'deep structure' the underlying dynamics which predispose societies, states, nations and regions to particular forms of response to conflict issues.
PACS6923 The Human Right to Food

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 2 for Semester 1, 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 6 of Semester 2 (Session 10) Assessment: Continuous assessment equivalent to 2500wds (70%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Online
The human right to adequate food is considered in light of recent developments in economic and social rights to complement civil and political rights: historical foundations; the influence of the World Food Summit 1996; the application of the human right to adequate food in various contexts - specific countries, in relation to refugees, infants etc; analysing concrete situations to identify violations of the human right to adequate food; and formulating proposals for policy and legislation to realise the human right to adequate food in specific contexts.
PACS6924 Democracy in the Developing World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3hrs online equivalent/week Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (30%), 1x3000wd final essay (60%), Online Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit offers a comparative consideration of different concepts of democratisation and development including the criteria for compiling country development indices and typologies of democracy. Experiences of implanting and/or imposing democracy are examined in Japan, Iraq and other nations. The pan-Pacific model of development, and the pros and cons of using authoritarian means to achieve it, is also considered, with examples including Indonesia under Suharto and Singapore under Lee Kuan Yew. Relationships between development, conflict and poverty are examined - do elections lead to more democracy? More development? Or do they allow authoritarian winners to institutionalise power? What about the coup in Thailand?
PACS6925 Peace and the Global Compact

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 7 Assessment: Continuous assessment equivalent to 2000wds (60%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), Mode of delivery: Online
An in depth critical exploration of the context, concept and development of the Global Compact, with an examination of the theoretical underpinnings of the notion of corporate social responsibility and the role business can play and should play in pursuit of peace and justice. Human rights principles, labour rights principles and environmental principles: where do they come from and how can they be applied in different situations? The role of business in zones of conflict and enabling economies of peace is considered in light of current case studies and experience.
PACS6927 Transitional Justice and Peacebuilding

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive September Classes: 6-day intensive seminar or equivalent Assessment: 1xRole play exercise equivalent to 400wds (10%), 1x1200wd short assignment (30%), 1x3000wd final Essay (60%), Mode of delivery: Block mode
Transitional justice is a rapidly emerging interdisciplinary field of study focussing on processes dealing with past human rights violations and the transition to a more peaceful and democratic state. This unit examines the evolution of transitional justice theory and practice, including truth commissions, trials and traditional practices, in such contexts as post-apartheid South Africa and post-genocide Cambodia and Rwanda. Issues discussed include the various types of justice, accountability, truth, reconciliation and reparations, and the challenges of balancing justice and peace.
PACS6928 Community Mediation: Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Late Classes: 5-day intensive seminar Assessment: Seminar participation/role equivalent to 500wd (25%), 1x1250wd Reflective journal (25%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the theory and practical application of facilitation, communication and conflict resolution skills in a community mediation context. Students will learn about various models of community mediation and will become skilled in the stages of community mediation through role-plays and simulation exercises. Successful completion of this unit of study will equip students for possible accreditation as a community mediator in Australia, as well as providing students with transferable skills and knowledge about mediation.
PACS6930 Ethics for a Sustainable Peace

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hrs online/week Assessment: 5x 600wd reflective responses (50%), 5x 400wd mini case study analyses (30%), 1x1000wd end of semester evaluative task (20%), Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study will focus on developing a set of value-based ethical principles for responding to the forms of violence that obstruct the achievement of a culture of sustainable peace, namely organized physical violence, structural and ecological violence. Case studies and literature in the area of social justice, nonviolence, ecological sustainability and participatory decision-making will be used for acquiring an understanding of the ethical challenges presented by these forms of violence and developing ethical principles for responding to them.
PACS6931 Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive September Classes: 6-day intensive seminar or equivalent (36hrs total) Assessment: 1000wd equivalent participation and role plays (25%), 1x1000wd short assignment (25%), 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study introduces students to the theory and practice of conflict analysis and resolution. Students will gain an understanding of the various methods of conflict management, resolution and transformation, and will learn skills that can be applied across the spectrum of conflict types from interpersonal, family and community, to inter-ethnic and international.
PACS6934 Conflict-Sensitive Development Practice

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Winter Main Classes: Summer intensive (total 39 hours) Prerequisites: PACS6911 or DVST6901 Assessment: 1x1000wd collaborative group work project (20%), 1x1100wd reflective note (20%), 1x2400wd final essay (45%), seminar and practice participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
International aid efforts are often delivered in contexts affected by conflict, and risk feeding the conflict rather than alleviating it. Conflict sensitivity is about minimising the negative impact of aid (do no harm), and maximising its positive potential. Nowadays a core operating principle for international development and humanitarian organisations, being conflict-sensitive is essential in making aid more effective and accountable. This unit is designed as a practical, skills-based workshop suitable for professionals or advanced PG students wishing to engage in field-based work.
PMGT5871 Project Process Planning and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online, Block mode
"Project Management processes are what moves the project from initiation through all its phases to a successful conclusion. This course takes the project manager from a detailed understanding of process modelling through to the development and implementation of management processes applicable to various project types and industries and covers approaches to reviewing, monitoring and improving these processes.
Specifically, the UoS aims to: Develop understanding of the nature and purpose of project management in the context of economic enterprise; Develop knowledge of various models and frameworks for the practical application of project management; Explore core elements of effective project management with particular focus on technological development and innovation"
PMGT5872 People and Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block mode
This is a core program unit with a focus on enhancing leadership and people management capability. It covers diverse traditional and innovative theories, models and tools. It complements traditional views based on PMBoK, applying diverse approaches to contemporary project environments. Many of the unit tasks are framed in uncertain and potentially ambiguous terms as is common in many project environments.
Topic areas covered: Project context; Personal Competence; Interpersonal Competence; Team Competence.
The unit references a range of Australian and global Project Management, Management and Consulting Standards. It integrates theory and practice to optimise results.
PMGT5873 Project Economics and Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This course equips members of project management teams with information and tools to do financial appraisal and optimise decision making. It imparts basic knowledge and competencies required in project appraisal and financial management applicable to all sectors of industry and business. These include services, business investment, R&D, capital projects, local, state and national government departments and agencies.
Topics include: Review of the Fundamentals of Project Economics and Financial Techniques; Implementation of Fundamental Principles including EUAC, NPV, IRR, B/C, Valuation, Depreciation, Replacement Studies and Life Cycle Costing; Development of Project Alternatives and Application of the Analysis Techniques; Sensitivity Analysis, Risk Analysis and Management; Project Funding and Selection; Project Appraisal Report.
PMGT5875 Project Innovation Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Innovation is widely-recognised as a major driver of economic growth. Yet innovation projects can be difficult to manage: they typically involve a high level of uncertainty, and many organisations are unsatisfied with the level of innovation they achieve. In this unit of study, we focus on issues in the management of innovation projects at the individual project level, organisational level and across networks of organisations. Since a systematic approach can and does improve our effectiveness in managing innovation, we begin by exploring several different process models of the stages through which innovation projects are managed. We discuss context and challenges which impact such projects, as well as the concepts of creativity and intellectual property management. Using focused case studies, we analyse best practice in the structures and processes that organisations can provide to enable innovation, as well as to support the search, selection, implementation, dissemination, feedback and evaluation stages of their innovative projects. We also examine the impact of networks on innovation (e.g. collaboration networks), national innovation policies and systems, and trends towards open innovation.
PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Seminars Prohibitions: WORK6026 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Welcome to PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change. This course is designed to foster and promote critical thinking and the application of good theory to inform good practice in the strategic delivery of organisational change. The philosophy underpinning this course is design thinking. You will learn quite a bit about this idea over the duration of the course, and why it is increasingly important to change management. The course develops capabilities that will differentiate you from the average project manager and change agent, and which are in high demand in forward thinking organisations.
PMGT5877 Management of Project Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Readings, Online discussions, Group Assignment Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This course examines the challenges and approaches of managing project-oriented organisations. These could be independent business units or divisions within a larger corporation. Examples are construction contractors, ICT services, R&D units and many internal business units that concurrently undertake multiple projects. Today, more organisations are adopting project management as a management strategy to provide effective and timely solutions to clients. They are adapting organisational architectures to support both 'business as usual' and the multiple projects that are increasingly important to the organisation. Focus is on the relationship between project management and the following: organisational culture, structure, processes, cross-functional teams, project governance, performance management, organisational learning, change and knowledge management. The assessment comprises of a case study team assignment, quizzes and online discussions.
PMGT5879 Strategic Portfolio and Program Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit specifically addresses the selection and prioritisation of multiple programmes and projects which have been grouped to support an organisation's strategic portfolio. The allocation of programmes of work within a multi-project environment, governing, controlling and supporting the organisation's strategy, are considered. The aim is to formulate and manage the delivery of the portfolio of strategies using programme management. Students will learn and practice the issues to be considered in selecting an effective organisation portfolio and how to implement a Portfolio Management Framework. Also they will encounter the many conflicting issues facing Program Managers as they seek to implement organisation strategy through programs and learn how to balance these to obtain desired outcomes.
PMGT5888 Global Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This course has been designed to suggest the development of best practices in communication, collaboration and management across international borders. The objectives are to: Understand the challenges faced by a global program and project teams; and, Improve the overall skills and practices of global project managers that will lead international companies to achieve maturity in global project management. Topics include: Introduction to traditional, distributed, and virtual project work; Global projects and requirements; Organisational change and organisational theory; Cross-cultural collaboration; Global project leadership; Trust building and conflict resolution; Coaching over distance; Global communication and channels; Leading a global organisation; Implementing collaborative tools; and, Implementing a Global Project Management Framework.
PMGT5889 Integrated Cost and Scheduling Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit of study focuses on the integrated management of project scope, time and cost for effective control and delivery of projects. The scope of the subject matter includes delivering comprehensive theoretical knowledge and application skills in integrated management and control of cost and schedule in complex projects. By successful completion of this unit of study, students should achieve a clear understanding of the time and cost management and appropriate control measures in project development environments.
Students should be able to: Discuss the project management trade-offs on balancing the triple-constraint; Explain the integrated cost and schedule control processes; Construct work breakdown structure (WBS) using given project information; Discuss scope monitoring and change control system; Produce networks diagrams for project scheduling; Apply critical path analysis (CPA) in network scheduling; Apply critical chain method in project scheduling; Estimate the project cost and duration; Apply resource scheduling techniques; Construct a timephased budget plan; Discuss cost monitoring and control processes; Undertake earned value analysis (EVA); and Undertake integrated cost and schedule control processes using project management software (Microsoft Project or Primavera)By the end of this unit of study, students should be able to: Undertake WBS exercises, CPA, EVA and tradeoff analysis using the given project information; Explain how the components of time and cost management interrelate; Explain in depth why integrated cost and schedule management are important to project management; and Analyse a project situation that involves time and cost management issues and apply a solution(s)
PMGT5891 Project Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is delivered in multiple modes (online and weekly). Please ensure that the correct mode is selected before checking the detailed content. The aims of this course are to develop students; understanding and ability in applying project risk management skills in project environments. The course enables the students to apply best practice techniques and methods commonly used by industry in project risk management. The competencies developed through this unit cover and go beyond the competencies in Risk areas as outlined in the competency standards by the Australian Institute of Project Management and Project Management Institute in the USA, respectively. The unit of study aims to develop students ability to understand and conceptualise risk management issues, and analyse and apply risk management techniques using concepts and frameworks from the underpinning literature.
- Ability to establish risk management plans, policies and integrate them with other project plans, organisation and align them to the business case
- Ability to understand the sources of potential risks (including but not limited to political, organisational, psychological and technical risks) and to use risk management tools and techniques to identify, assess, evaluate, and prioritise risks
- Ability to simulate the potential effects of risks on schedule, cost and other performance dimensions using sensitivity analysis, decision tree analysis and simulation techniques.
- Ability to track, monitor and control risks and actions to achieve project objectives and the business case
- Ability to close risks for an optimal outcome
PMGT5898 Complex Project Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: WORK6130 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will offer students an innovative way of looking at projects and treating them as complex adaptive systems. Applying the principles of systems thinking will assist project managers and leadership teams in formulating approaches to management and leadership of challenging and large-scale initiatives. The expected outcomes of this unit include: Exploring how systems thinking and complexity theories can be used to find new, creative ways to think about and manage projects; Diagnose complexity on a wide range of projects; Understand and manage the complexity of the business problem and use a range of systems thinking approaches and management modelling techniques to determine the most effective approach to managing all aspects of a project based on the level of complexity involved.
PMGT6869 Advanced Knowledge in Project Management

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Session 1: Weekly classes Session 2: Block mode Assessment: Through Semester Assessment (60%), Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit builds upon and challenges traditional views of project management. It concentrates on creating environments for the success of multiple, large and complex projects. Particular attention is paid to the potential causes of project failure. Projects and problems are viewed ’as systems‘ composed of interacting, interrelated, and interdependent components.
Topics:
- Project Failure
- Systems Thinking
- Business Case Development
- Large and Multiple Projects
- International Project Teams
- Organisational Learning
- Corporate Law
- Organisational Design
- Performance and Benefit Measurement
- Project Management Methodologies
- Systems and Data Integration
Unit outcomes include an ability to:
* identify complex problems and situations
* analyse situations and apply research findings to cases / projects
* integrate diverse considerations
* examine multiple views
* prioritise information
* differentiate between process and content
* synthesise findings
Recommended reading: A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide)
PMGT6872 Project Leadership and Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: PMGT5872 Assumed knowledge: Students must have at least 3 years of relevant industry experience to be eligible to enrol in PMGT6872. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: PMGT6872 is available only to students with appropriate level of previous industry experience. This must be confirmed by department before enrolment in the unit.
Effective leadership skills rate among the greatest contributors of project success. In all but the simplest of projects, project managers must demonstrate leadership effectiveness across each phase of the project life cycle. This course considers various leadership theories and styles, and how they apply to real world projects across industries. In addition, assignments and participative activities will help current and future project managers enhance their own leadership and communication skills, by leading themselves, their teams and their organisations more effectively.
These concepts are underpinned by thought leadership in diverse topics including motivational psychology, social networks and influence, systems thinking, emotional intelligence, ethics, conflict resolution, negotiation, stress management, performance coaching and leading innovation.
PRFM5900 Contemporary Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Glen McGillivray Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd workshop report (25%) based on practical workshops undertaken with performing artists in residence, 1x3500wd essay focusing on key aesthetic and political concerns of postmodern performance and the explication of these issues via some performance analysis (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the history, development and theoretical influences on contemporary performance genres, with a specific focus on what is happening in Sydney at venues such as Performance Space and Artspace. We will take advantage of the department's artists-in-residence program to develop analyses, and a practical understanding of how new work is developed.
PRFM5901 Critical Theory and Performance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay draft including bibliography and plan for Essay (25%), 1x3500-4000wd final Essay (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
As an emerging discipline, performance studies has drawn upon a wide range of theoretical positions and resources, from semiotics to New Historicism, cultural studies, feminism, psychoanalysis, discourse theory, deconstruction, phenomenology and hermeneutics. In this unit, we will read some key theoretical texts and look at how they have been applied to the analysis of performance.
PRFM5902 Rehearsal Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd reading task/journal (30%), 1x3000wd Research essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit prepares students for the task of observing and analysing rehearsal practices (or training, creative development etc) in theatre and other genres of aesthetic performance. We will canvass some of the key theoretical and methodological issues of ethnographic research, not only through readings but also through practical tasks involving video recordings of rehearsal, prompt books and other materials held in the department's unique archive. This unit is a pre-requisite for those students undertaking PRFM5903 Rehearsal to Performance.
PRFM5903 Rehearsal to Performance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: PRFM5902 Assessment: 1x1000wd formative assessment and casebook plan (25%), 1x4000wd casebook (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students are required to attend 2 weeks of rehearsals during July prior to commencement of semester 2 classes. This rehearsal observation provides essential preparatory work to undertake the unit of study.
This unit is structured around a rehearsal process occurring in the mid-year break (July) and involving performing artists in residence at the Department's Rex Cramphorn Studio. Students attend rehearsals full time for two weeks, documenting the process and writing up their observations as ethnographic fieldnotes. Seminars during semester provide an opportunity for students to 'unpack' this experience and to develop strategies for turning fieldnotes into a more detailed, coherent and analytical casebook.
PRFM6900 Theatre and Community Development

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar in weeks 2, 4, 6 and 11, Intensive workshops 10am-5pm (Mon-Thurs in Mid-semester break) Assessment: 1x1000wd report based on analysis of CCD Project Evaluation involving Oral Presentation (30%), 1x3000wd Research essay and/or 'action/research' assignment (60%), reading tasks and online discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit offers 'hands-on' training in a range of theatre techniques (e.g. Boal's "Theatre of the Oppressed") tailored to the needs of teachers and community workers involved in peace-building, human rights campaigns, health promotion, youth work and other 'community cultural development' activities. Along with practical theatre facilitation skills, the unit provides a rigorous critique of the political/educational philosophies underpinning the practice and an overview of key debates regarding the funding and evaluation of arts-based community development projects.
PSYC5010 Applying Psychology to Health

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 one hour lecture, two hours of tutorials per week Assessment: Tutorial attendance (10%) and presentation (40%), major assignment - 2500 word essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The work of health psychologists relies on a broad range of professional skills and attributes. The aim of this unit of study is to conceptually define health within a biopsychosocial framework and to present some of the psychological reactions to hospitalisation, illness and pain. This unit of study provides students with an introduction to key areas of health psychology, and demonstrates how they relate to other disciplines. It also considers the context within which treatment takes place. This unit of study will explore mental and physical diseases. This unit of study examines the application of psychology in clinical settings. The unit of study considers the application of psychological theory to illness and preparation for hospitalisation; the management of adverse psychological sequelae arising from hospitalisation; and rehabilitation.
PSYC5011 Applying Models of Health Behaviour

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 one hour lecture and two hours of tutorials per week Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), presentation of intervention (40%), write up of intervention (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The student will be given the opportunity to develop an intervention based on social cognitions models. The process can be followed from start to finish allowing the individual to utilise knowledge and skills gained in other units of study. It is an intended outcome for students enrolled in the MApplSc (HealthPsych) that students can demonstrate an understanding of the key models and theories in Health Psychology which are seen by many to be the foundations of the subject area. The aim of this unit of study is to allow students to identify an area of Health Psychology where an intervention would be appropriate, review existing literature on the topic, formulate the intervention, and evaluate the intervention on a pilot level.
PUBH5010 Epidemiology Methods and Uses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Driscoll, Dr Erin Mathieu Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week for 13 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Prohibitions: BSTA5011,CEPI5100 Assessment: 1x 6 page assignment (25%), 10 weekly quizzes (5% in total) and 1x 2.5hr supervised open-book exam (70%). For distance students, it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit provides students with core skills in epidemiology, particularly the ability to critically appraise public health and clinical epidemiological research literature. This unit covers: study types; measures of frequency and association; measurement bias; confounding/effect modification; randomized trials; systematic reviews; screening and test evaluation; infectious disease outbreaks; measuring public health impact and use and interpretation of population health data. It is expected that students spend an additional 2-3 hours at least each week preparing for their tutorials.
Textbooks
Webb, PW. Bain, CJ. and Pirozzo, SL. Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals Second Edition: Cambridge University Press 2011.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan and A/Professor Patrick Kelly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%) and 1x2.5hr open-book exam (70%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5024 Obesity and Health Promotion

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Louise Hardy Session: Intensive August Classes: compulsory attendance at 2.5 one-day workshops including participation in small group work during the workshop. Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100), PUBH5033 and PUBH5020 Assessment: Workshop participation and small group work presentation (30%) and 1x written assignment (2000 words) (70%). Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will build on introductory public health core units of study, and apply them to consideration of global obesity as a public health problem. The unit will develop students' skills in approaches to obesity monitoring, prevention programs and policies, extending research methods, critical appraisal skills, introductory health promotion and disease prevention in MPH. Students will develop an understanding of surveillance systems to monitor obesity, and develop skills in evidence based obesity prevention interventions in diverse social, cultural and community contexts. The course will include discussions of policies and international approaches to obesity prevention, as part of non-communicable disease prevention and control.
Textbooks
Pre-readings will be provided
PUBH5026 Mass Media Campaigns and Social Marketing

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Philayrath Phongsavan, Professor Adrian Bauman (coordinators), Adjunct Professor Tom Carroll Session: Intensive August Classes: Face-to-face/ on-campus 2-day residential workshop (lectures, on-line discussions, and student participation and student presentations) Prerequisites: PUBH5033 Assumed knowledge: Training in research methods epidemiology is advised but not essential. Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (60%); on-line participation/discussion (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit focuses on mass-reach public health campaigns used to promote health and prevent disease. Building on introductory Masters of Public Health units of study in health promotion/disease prevention [or equivalent], this unit describes the rationale for mass-media led campaigns, social marketing interventions, and how they fit into a comprehensive approach to population health promotion and chronic disease prevention. The major themes covered are the principles of mass-reach communications in public health; designing campaigns [formative evaluation]; developing public health campaigns as part of comprehensive health promotion; understanding the messages, branding and marketing of campaigns; process and impact evaluation of campaigns; the differences between campaigns and social marketing initiatives; and the role of ancillary and supportive health promotion strategies, including media placement and advocacy. In addition, the role of, and evaluating social media campaigns will be included. The unit will equip students with skills to plan, design, implement and evaluate public health campaigns.
Textbooks
Course readings will be provided before the workshop. These are required readings, and there is some individual student preparation required for presentation at the first workshop and after the workshop to prepare for the on-line two weeks discussions.
PUBH5027 Public Health Program Evaluation Methods

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Adrian Bauman, A/Professor Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 day residential workshop in semester 2 Assessment: In-class participation (20%) and one 1500 word assignments at the end of the unit (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study is taught over two days of residential workshop and is an introduction to public health program evaluation principles. It builds on core MPH methods subjects, but extends learning objectives to develop skills in practical and applied public health and health promotion program planning, evaluation and research methods. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be used in program evaluation discussions, but the major focus will be on measuring the implementation of programs, and assessing public health program impact. There is an emphasis on evaluating 'real world' programs that address chronic disease prevention and health promotion, but other broad public health content areas will also be used as examples. The unit comprises four areas of discussion, including the [i] principles of evaluation; [ii] research designs and methodological issues for community and applied public health settings; [iii] methods for measuring program impact and outcomes; and [iv] the principles of research translation and dissemination. Attendance at the two days of residential teaching is compulsory for participants.
Textbooks
Recommended: Bauman A, Nutbeam D. Evaluation in a Nutshell. McGraw Hill Sydney (2nd Edition, 2013)
PUBH5030 Public Health: Achievements and Challenges

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hudson Birden Session: Semester 1 Classes: Available in block mode (2 day workshop) or online. Assumed knowledge: Basic science Assessment: 1500 word assignment (70%), online discussions (30%) Practical field work: participation in online discussions Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit provides a critical overview of foundational aspects of public health, introducing fundamental concepts and conceptual and historical contexts through which to view contemporary issues in public health. The unit begins with a review of human health status through history and the changing roles and major challenges that drove development of modern public health theory and practice. It then provides an overview of contemporary challenges in public health policy and program development through exposure to leading commentators, activists and theoreticians on public health. It culminates with an anticipation of major problems that public health practitioners will be challenged with over the near future (5-10 years).The particular problems of societal inequities as drivers of health status, and the importance of multi-disciplinary approaches to contemporary health problems are emphasised.
Textbooks
a set of readings will be provided online
PUBH5032 Making Decisions in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie, A/Prof Alison Hayes Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-day workshop; fully online version available Assessment: Multiple choice assessment (50%); Written assignment of 2000 words (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit introduces students to the methods by which evidence is translated, used and abused when governments make decisions affecting public health. Students will become familiar with the main tools used by health economists and policy analysts. The unit will emphasize the role of different forms of evidence and values for priority-setting and policy-making. Unit technical content is unified by common themes and case studies. Students will apply methods and principles of health economics e.g. resource scarcity, opportunity cost, efficiency and equity to practical real-life examples (including specific indigenous health issues) to critically consider the role of economic evidence in health decision-making in Australia.
Students will then use policy analysis methods to critically examine the Australian health care system and decision-making in public health. The unit will pay particular attention to questions of power and equity, including the position of indigenous peoples. Finally, it will look at how evidence is framed and used in decision-making. Teaching will make use of contemporary case studies so students learn how technical analytical tools are used in practical examples of policy development, decision-making and public debate. The unit gives public health students an essential basic knowledge of both disciplines (health economics and health policy) and lays the groundwork for more advanced studies.
PUBH5033 Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 half-day workshops, face-to-face tutorials and online discussion; fully online version available Prohibitions: MIPH5014 Assessment: 1 quiz (10 multiple choice questions) (10%); 1x1500 word assignment (20%); 1 presentation (10%); 1x3000 word assignment (50%); tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This core unit of study introduces students to evidence-based health promotion as a fundamental approach to preventing disease and reducing health inequalities in populations. The unit is divided into three modules: (i) building blocks of disease prevention and health promotion, (ii) using evidence and evaluating disease prevention and health promotion programs, and (iii) using research to inform policy and practice. This unit will give students an understanding of disease prevention and health promotion and their relationship to public health, introduce design, implementation, and evaluation of disease prevention and health promotion interventions, and develop and refine students' research, critical appraisal, and communication skills. The role of translation of research into policy and practice to enhance public health impact will also be explored. The unit will also illustrate how the principles of prevention and health promotion are applied in Aboriginal settings.
Textbooks
Course Readings Provided
PUBH5111 Environmental Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Geoff Morgan Session: Semester 2 Classes: The unit is delivered via face to face mode or via online mode. Both modes cover the same course content. Face to face students: Thirteen lectures (13 sessions of approximately 1.5 hours each) offered online, with the first (introductory) lecture delivered face to face as well as online; Six face to face tutorials (6 sessions of 2 hours each); One online group assignment plan discussion; Three online group tutorial assessments. Online students students: Thirteen lectures (13 sessions of approximately 1.5 hours each) offered online; Six online tutorials (6 sessions of 2 hours equivelent each); One assignment plan online group discussion; Three online group tutorial assessments. Assessment: 1 x written assignment plan and group discussion (5%); 1 x written assignment 2000 words (70%); 10 x lecture multiple choice quiz (10 x 0.5 = 5%); 5 x tutorial multiple choice quiz (5 x 0.5 = 2.5%); 5 x tutorial participation (5 x 0.5 = 2.5%); 3 x tutorial briefing note (3 x 5 = 15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This course aims to describe the interrelation between our environment and human populations, local communities and individuals and the potential impact on health of environmental agents/contaminants. The unit will explore the major categories of environmental health hazards including air quality, water quality, chemical hazards (eg soils and contaminated sites), physical hazards (eg noise and radiation), microbiological hazards (eg Legionnaires' disease) and food safety. Regional and global issues of sustainability, climate change and land use planning will also be covered. The disciplines of epidemiology, toxicology and ecology will be applied within a risk assessment framework to characterise health risks associated with environmental hazards and determine risk management options and risk communication strategies. Students completing this unit will appreciate the multi-disciplinary nature of environmental health, the application of a risk assessment to characterise environmental health risks and inform risk management and risk communication, and the need to work closely with a broad range of stakeholders including commonwealth and state health, environment and planning agencies, local government, industry and the community.
Textbooks
Environmental Health (Fourth Edition). Moeller DW. Harvard University Press, 2011; Basic Environmental Health. Yassi, A et al. Oxford University Press, 2001; Environmental Health in Australia and New Zealand. Edited by Nancy Cromar, Scott Cameron and Howard Fallowfield, Oxford University Press, 2004.
PUBH5114 Alcohol, Drug Use and Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Day Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13 weeks of 2hr teaching sessions and/or associated readings and online activities. The teaching sessions are a combination of a one day face-to-face workshop and online seminars. Students unable to attend face-to-face sessions can do the entire course online. Prohibitions: PUBH5115 Assessment: 2 x 1500 word assignments (60%), compulsory discussion related activities (30%); online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to assist students in developing an evidence-based understanding of the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use and its impact on health, and the effectiveness of methods for prevention and management of related problems. This fuller drug and alcohol elective covers all the content of PUBH5115 and goes on to assist the student to develop more advanced skills in research and in management of clinical services in relation to alcohol and drug use disorders, and to examine the needs of special populations.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5116 Genetics and Public Health

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Cust, Dr Gabrielle Williams Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1x 2.5 day workshop Assessment: 3x 30min online quiz (20%), small group assignment (30%) and take home exam of 6 questions (250 words each) (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Pre-readings and some lectures will be posted on the unit's eLearning site 2-3 weeks before the course starts, and it is expected that you will look at this content before coming to the first day of the course. This will enable more time for class discussion.
This unit caters for practitioners, policy and decision-makers, students and researchers in public health, public policy, journalism, law, epidemiology, medicine, science, industry, ethics, philosophy, communication and advocacy. It gives a basic introduction to genetics and genetic epidemiology and covers issues like genetic determinants of disease, genetic testing and screening, psychosocial, legal and ethical aspects of genetics and genetic testing, genetic education and genetics and public policy.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5117 Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr online lecture and 2hrs online group discussion per week for 12 weeks Assessment: online discussion and other online activities (20%), online quizzes (10%), and 2 x 2000 word written assignments (70%) Mode of delivery: Online
This fully online unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the burden of communicable diseases of public health significance in Australia, as well as the biology, epidemiology and surveillance for and control of those communicable diseases. By the end of this unit, the student will have the theoretical background to take up a position as a member of a Communicable Diseases section of a Commonwealth or State Health Department or Public Health Unit. It is expected that the students undertake an extra hour per week of reading, research and preparation for discussion.
Textbooks
Recommended: Heymann. David L. (2014): Control of communicable diseases manual. American Public Health Association. Other readings provided on the course eLearning site.
PUBH5118 Indigenous Health Promotion

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Suzanne Plater Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2-day compulsory workshop and preparatory online activities. Assessment: 1 x reflective essay (10%), 1 x analytic essay (10%), online quizzes and other activities (30%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Health promotion in urban, regional and remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities requires working collaboratively with each community to develop human capital and capabilities within a paradigm of hope and respect for alternate worldviews. In this unit, you will acquire an understanding of health promotion in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander contexts, and examine the distal, medial and proximal determinants of health and subsequent risk factors that have resulted in high rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander morbidity and mortality. You will learn how to ethically engage and work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and invest in relationships that enable genuine partnerships to develop. You will also identify and challenge neo-colonial policies and practices, and learn how to navigate around other barriers that hinder Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander self-determination. And you may end up questioning some of your own assumptions and behaviours as part of this process.
Later in the unit you will choose and explore a particular community and health issue, then work with an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health promotion professional and/or leader from that community to apply your skills and understanding in a compulsory workshop. The outcome will be a draft health promotion plan that addresses a specific priority health issue in a specific urban, regional or remote Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander community. The conceptual and technical tools learned may then be built upon and applied to any health issue in any Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander setting.
Textbooks
Course materials will be provided.
PUBH5205 Decision Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Martin and Professor John Simes Session: Semester 2b Classes: Six 2-hour sessions comprising five lectures (sessions 1-4 and 6), one quiz (session 5), and three computer practicals (sessions 4-6) Prerequisites: PUBH5018 and (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Assumed knowledge: PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation Assessment: 1 x quiz (20%) and 1 written assignment (80%) Practical field work: Three 1 hour computer practicals (sessions 4-6) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines quantitative approaches to public health and clinical decision-making. Topics of study include: decision trees and health-related utility assessment; incorporating diagnostic information in decision making; sensitivity and threshold analysis; and application of decision analysis to economic evaluation. Students gain practical skills using decision analysis software via computer practicals undertaken within sessions 4-6. The assessment quiz (20%) is conducted in the first part of session 5. Exercises are set at the end of most sessions and are reviewed at the start of the following session. Readings are also set after most sessions. Preparation time for each session is 1-2 hours.
PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Alison Hayes Session: Intensive September Classes: 2x 2day compulsory workshops Prerequisites: ((PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018) or (HPOL5001 as a prerequisite and HPOL5003 as a co-requisite) Assessment: assignment 1 (40%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to develop students' knowledge and skills of economic evaluation as an aid to priority setting in health care. This unit covers: principles of economic evaluation; critical appraisal guidelines; measuring and valuing benefits; methods of costing; modeling in economic evaluation. The workshops consist of interactive lectures and class exercises.
Textbooks
A course manual will be provided to each student.
PUBH5308 Health Workforce Policy Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Deborah Schofield, Dr Michelle Cunich Session: Intensive October Classes: On-line materials plus compulsory attendance at a two day workshop. Assessment: Assignment on a health workforce policy analysis topic of the student's choice (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will examine the major mechanisms of health workforce planning in Australia. The nature of the Australian health workforce will be considered, and the processes by which planning is influenced through government policy and research translated and integrated with policy. Current health workforce issues such as adequacy of education and training programs, ageing, and the distribution of the workforce will be addressed. Current approaches to planning for an adequate health workforce, and evaluations of the quality of evidence on current health workforce models of care will be examined using practical examples.
Textbooks
Australia's Health Workforce, Productivity Commission Research Report, 2005 Available at: http://www.pc.gov.au/study/healthworkforce/finalreport/index.html
PUBH5309 Translational Health

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Emeritus Professor Jack Dowie, Professor Glenn Salkeld Session: Semester 2a,Semester 2b Classes: Weekly on-line plus one compulsory day workshop. Assessment: Multiple Choice Questions [MCQ] and creation of an original Annalisa Decision Aid construct (30%), 1500-2000 word Report (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Translational Health introduces the main existing translational methods and models in healthcare, most of which focus on 'knowledge translation' and 'bringing evidence into practice', i.e. on moving results from the basic sciences through clinical and public health science and guidelines into clinical and public health decision and policy making. Most of these models diagnose the problem of 'loss in translation' in terms of institutional and professional barriers and blocks along the translation pathways. While acknowledging these, Translational Health focuses on the modelling method - the 'language' and 'vocabulary' - most likely to perform the translation task effectively in relation to patient-centered practice. The technique underlying the method is Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (in contrast to conventional Decision Analysis) and the template for its practical implementation is the Annalisa 2.0+ software. It is shown how high quality clinical and public health decision making needs to be based on 'values translation' as well as 'knowledge translation'. And how the approach can facilitate the desirable 'backwards translation' to ensure research is practice-relevant in both content and format. Students choose from a set of topics within which to pursue the principles, follow empirical examples and develop their own analyses in a practicum.
PUBH5415 Injury Prevention

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rebecca Ivers Session: Intensive October Classes: 1 x 2day workshop Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (90%) and participation in small group work during the workshop (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Injury is the leading cause of death and disability in children, adolescents and people of working age in Australia and globally. This unit aims to provide students with a clear understanding of the magnitude of the injury burden, both in higher and lower income countries, and the strategies that are required to address this burden. During the 2 day workshop, guest speakers will outline issues relevant to the general injury prevention field and students will participate in interactive small group work which will focus on issues relevant to cause-specific injuries, in collaboration with guest contributors. Topics covered include road injury, occupational injury, fall injury, drowning, suicide, injury in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, burns, and injury in resource poor settings.
Textbooks
Students will be provided with a course manual. Recommended text: McClure R, Stevenson M, McEvoy S. The Scientific Basis of Injury Prevention and Control. Melbourne: IP Communications, 2004; Li, G, Baker, SP. Injury Research: Theories, Methods, and Approaches. Boston: Springer, 2012.
PUBH5416 Vaccines in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Aditi Dey, Dr Frank Beard, Professor Peter McIntyre Session: Semester 2 Classes: Preparatory online lectures and 1x 2day workshop at the Children's Hospital Westmead Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 or PUBH5018 Assessment: 2x short online quizzes (10%) plus 1x 2000 word assignment (90%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students who have not done the core units of study in epidemiology (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) or biostatistics (PUBH5018) but have previous demonstrable experience in these study areas will be required to request permission from the unit of study coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Permission is required to ensure that students have a basic grounding in epidemiology and biostatistics. The coordinator emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit to advise whether or not the student has permission to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of immunisation principles, the impact of vaccination on the epidemiology of vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs), how to assess the need for new vaccines and how to implement and monitor a new vaccination program. This unit covers the history and impact of vaccination; basic immunological principles of immunisation; surveillance of diseases, vaccination coverage, vaccine effectiveness and adverse events; vaccine scares; risk communication; immunisation in the developing country context; assessing disease burden and new vaccines. Learning activities include short online preparatory lectures and a workshop with interactive lectures and small group case studies.
PUBH5418 Tobacco Control in the 21st Century

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Becky Freeman Session: Intensive August Classes: 1x3 day workshop of lectures and problem-focused discussions, followed by 4 weeks of problem-based online discussions Assessment: 2x 2000 word essays (60%), 1x 100 item online quiz (10%) and online discussion and participation (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Distance education/intensive on campus
The unit consists of learning topics, each of which is supported by extensive Web based resources, and 4 moderated online discussion forums, each focusing on a problem related to tobacco use and control. Lecture topics include: history of tobacco use and control; the burden of illness from tobacco use; secondhand smoke: the research evidence; measuring tobacco use, uptake and cessation in communities; international trends in tobacco consumption; the tobacco industry; the WHO's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and new forms of tobacco advertising and promotion. Problem focused discussion forums include: Harm reduction and tobacco control, regulation of tobacco, improving and implementing pack warnings; promoting smoking cessation, prevention of uptake (youth programs); denormalisation of the tobacco industry; controlling advertising; and controlling exposure to tobacco smoke, making news on tobacco and influencing political policy on tobacco.
Textbooks
(recommended only) Chapman S. Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking History. Oxford: Blackwell, 2007.
PUBH5420 Public Health Advocacy Strategies

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Becky Freeman Session: Semester 2b Classes: 2 full days followed by 3 weeks of online Assessment: 2500 word essay (70%), online participation (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Students will have the opportunity to critique and analyse case studies from a variety of both successful and unsuccessful public health advocacy examples. There will be an emphasis on how online environments and social media tools are contributing to public health advocacy debates and campaigns. Recent examples of how online media have influenced health policy and programming will be presented. Students will examine and prepare writing for online media such as news, blogs, and social media. The lectures will include guest speakers from non-government organisations, government and other experienced stakeholders from across the public heath sector.
Textbooks
Recommended: Chapman S. (2007) Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking History. Oxford: Blackwell.
PUBH5421 Infection Prevention in Healthcare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Lyn Gilbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: block mode (2 x 3days) Assumed knowledge: basic knowledge of medical microbiology, antimicrobial agents and communicable disease epidemiology and clinical features Assessment: 2x2000 word essays/assignments (2x30%); 2x short answer question exams -150 word answers for each of 5 questions (2x20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Attendance, in person, at workshops is strongly recommended, to enable participation in discussions. However, lectures will be recorded and available online after the workshops. Students who are unable to attend some or all of workshop sessions can view them, but generally not the associated discussions, online. Assessments are online.
This unit will provide students with an understanding of the individual and societal risks of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) and the rationale for, and barriers to, their prevention and control (PC). A basic understanding of medical microbiology and communicable disease epidemiology will be assumed. The unit will cover such important concepts as: ethical and economic implications; psychological, behavioural, cultural and professional influences; the varying roles, responsibilities and perspectives of clinicians, health support staff, administrators, patients and the community; potential uses and implications of new technology (such as information and decision support systems, electronic medical records and highly discriminatory microbial strain typing, including whole genome sequencing) in HAI surveillance. The course will also address the rationales and strategies for implementation of HAI-related policies, such as hand hygiene, aseptic technique and antimicrobial stewardship, and some reasons for and consequences of failure to implement them, for individual patients, the health system and the community.
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker, Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block/intensive 2 x 9-5 full days + 3 x 9-5 full days; please check with the coordinator for scheduling Assessment: Assignment 1 x 3000 word (50%), Assignment 1 x 2000 words (35%), online activities (15%). Attendance at intensives is compulsory and 80% attendance is required to pass the unit of study. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit, students will develop a critical awareness of the determinants of effective communication, particularly in relation to health risks to the individual and to society. The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health, ranging from managing outbreak situations to low risk / high concern issues such as immunisation. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement, traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
PUBH5500 Advanced Qualitative Health Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x3 full day workshop in March/April Prohibitions: QUAL5005 Assessment: interviewing activity with reflection (35%); 2500wd essay (35%); multiple choice quizzes (2x10%); in-class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides a comprehensive introduction to qualitative inquiry in health. It is designed for beginners and people who want an advanced-level introduction. Over the course of the unit we will address: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What is its history? What research problems can it address? How do I design a qualitative study? What are the different (and best) ways to generate data? How do you analyse qualitative data? Is methodology different to method? What are ontology and epistemology? What is reflexivity (and aren't qualitative researchers biased)? What are the ethical issues? What is good quality qualitative research? Can I generalise qualitative findings? You will get practical experience and skills through carrying out an observation, participating in a focus group, conducting an interview, analysing data, arguing for qualitative research in health, and appraising the quality of published literature. In both workshops you will meet working qualitative researchers and hear about their projects. This advanced unit will show you a new way of thinking critically about research and researching, and give you the skills and confidence to begin evaluating and doing qualitative research for yourself.
PUBH5600 Biosecurity Seminar Series

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne; Ms Kerri Anton Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 2-hr lectures plus 8 x 1-hr seminar/tutorial plus 18-hrs online curated content requiring student responses Prerequisites: CISS6004 or GOVT6316 or MECO6909 or WORK6130 or unit of study coordinator permission. Assessment: 1 x 2500wd detailed assignment plus 3 x 1000wd written policy briefs plus seminar participation and online responses Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is a collaborative offering between the School of Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Science, the Marie Bashir Institute, and the Masters of Health Security to be offered by the Centre for Security Studies.
This is the capstone unit for the Master of Health Security. The unit is designed to bring together the knowledge achieved throughout the degree for students to use critical thinking and leadership skills to solve global health security issues presented to them. The unit will consist of a series of eight lectures and seminars that will present students with complex health security issues. Students will then critically evaluate the human and animal, biosafety and biodefense, and agrosecurity perspectives to understand how they are interconnected and appreciate the difficulty in realistically and appropriately solving these issues.