Unit descriptions S - Z

SANS5901 Sanskrit for Postgraduates 1

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: SANS1001 Assessment: 3x1000wd assignments (60%), 3hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Sanskrit is an important canonical language of Buddhism and was the most widely used language in India for philosophy and religion up until modern times. This unit provides an introduction to the language. Emphasis will be given to understanding the basic grammatical structures and Devanagari script and to understanding the place of Sanskrit within Indian culture and Buddhist tradition. There will be exercises in translation from Sanskrit to English and English to Sanskrit.
SANS5902 Sanskrit for Postgraduates 2

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: SANS5901 Prohibitions: SANS1002 Assessment: 3x1000wd assignments (60%), 1x3hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an extension to work completed in SANS5901. By the end of the unit, students will have an understanding of the grammar required for reading simple Sanskrit texts.
SCLG6901 Citizenship Rights and Social Movements

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCWK6901 Assessment: 1500wd reading journal (30%) and 2500wd research essay (50%) and 1000wd equivalent oral presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
This unit will provide an analysis of theories and practices of citizenship rights in Australia, other Anglophone countries and European countries in the 20th and 21st centuries. It will examine the relationships between different modes of citizenship, claims for rights and the formation of social movements with regard to the women's movement, Indigenous movements (where applicable) and movements concerned with migration, ethnic diversity and multiculturalism. Analyses will focus on the processes, content and outcomes of social movement advocacy.
SCLG6902 Doing Social Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prohibitions: SCLG3003 Assessment: 1x1500wd paper (25%), 1x1500wd Oral Presentation (25%), 1x3000wd Research proposal (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a comprehensive lecture program that covers the research process, from the selection of a topic through to data analysis and the interpretation of results. Students will engage in debates about the philosophical basis of social research, and will undertake exercises designed to enhance their skills in conducting research. For the primary assessment, students will select a topic and develop a research proposal, suitable for submission to a funding agency, or for a Masters or PhD thesis.
SCLG6903 New Debates in Social Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2400wd Research essay (40%), 1x2400wd Research essay (40%), 1x1200wd equivalent online presentations and discussion (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores a series of issues of controversy and debate in social theory. These include debates over: the information age; new information and communication technologies; the new capitalism and changing work practices; the cultural sphere; new forms of power and surveillance; shifting claims to insight in knowledge societies; the role of education in social inequality; the bases of making knowledge claims; and globalisation. The unit involves both face-to-face seminars and online discussions.
SCLG6905 Independent Study and Report

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meeting weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: 5000-7000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing of a long Essay, on an approved topic of the candidate's own choice, under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
SCLG6906 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000-15000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing for a dissertation, on an approved topic of the candidate's own choice, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. To be completed in SCLG6907 during the following semester i.e., candidates must enrol in both units of study.
SCLG6907 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000-15000 words in length Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Completion of research and writing for a dissertation on an approved topic of the candidate's own choice, under the supervision of an academic member of staff.
SCLG6918 Introductory Quantitative Methods

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 6x 500wd activities/reports (60%), 1x2000wd Essay (20%), 1x1000wd Group work report/case study (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides students with the basic principles and procedures of quantitative research methods in the social sciences. It first introduces a range of quantitative research strategies and tools that can be deployed to collect research data, and then introduces basic statistical methods to analyse that data. By the end of the unit students should be able to interpret basic statistical data and be able to design their own quantitative research strategies to carry out social sciences research.
SCWK6910 Working with Communities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Margot Rawsthorne Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x250wd blog postings (35%); 1x4000wd practice essay (45%); and class participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Working with communities is a key policy and practice priority for government and non-government agencies in Australia. This unit will critically examine the current policy frameworks informing work with communities as well as current practice models of community development and community engagement. The unit seeks to explore the why and how of work with communities. It will draw on an emerging Australian body of research about working with communities based in the community of Glebe. This unit is suitable for practitioners seeking to work more effectively with communities.
SCWK6948 Social Policy Frameworks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Sue Goodwin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 1x2000wd essay proposal and presentation (40%); 1x4000wd major essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to provide students with a sound understanding of the key institutional components of the Australian welfare system and the key issues and debates associated with the theory and practice of contemporary social policy. The target audience for this unit includes participants from a diverse range of organisations involved in human service provision. All human service work takes place in the context of social policy: social policy provides the mandate and the resources for human service work, and the activities of workers are extensively defined and shaped by social policy. In turn, human service workers are increasingly involved in the shaping of policy, or policy action. The rationale for this unit is to provide an opportunity for students to develop an advanced understanding of social policy frameworks in order to inform policy action.
SCWK6949 Global Social Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Ruth Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: tutorial presentation and paper (40%); global social policy research exercise (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
There is a well-established scholarship and governmental interest in both the impact of globalisation on social policy and the emergence of what is increasingly termed 'global social policy' which is a direct response to global social problems. It is a field that is growing in the areas of social policy and social work research and practice and can be clearly linked to increased employment opportunities for social workers and social policy graduates in the international/global arena. A key perspective of this unit of study is from non-government organisations' participation in the development of a global civil society and their contribution to global social policy. It also examines the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and how NGOs have contributed to both the ambitions of the goals as well as the outcomes for different countries. This unit provides opportunities for students to deepen their understanding and knowledge of core global concerns such as poverty, health, education, environment, NGO corporate engagement and gender equality and make links to the vital role of NGOs in these areas.
SUST5001 Introduction to Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tony Masters Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Assessment: Essays, oral presentations, short written assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce students to the concepts and multidisciplinary nature of sustainability, starting with the physical basis of climate change and its impact on the environment and human development. This will be followed by several case studies covering Energy, Health, Development and Environment. The case studies will be presented by industry professionals and will illustrate sustainability issues currently before Australia- their origins, impacts and industry responses. The unit of study will provide students with a holistic systems lens through which to view their learning throughout the Masters program. This will underpin understanding of the integrated nature of sustainability and facilitate the challenging of silo-based assumptions- their own and those of others. The intention is to ground understanding of complex systems in the real world through the use of case studies that will demonstrate organisational change and problem solving in a world with competing values and conflicting views of what it means to live sustainably. Students completing the unit of study will have a "sustainability tool kit" to apply to sustainability issues in their professional and community activities.
SUST5002 Food and Water Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael D'Occhio Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the imperatives and challenges of ensuring an adequate supply of water and nutritious food in the face of changes in global markets, the environment and human population. These challenges will be examined in the context of access and potential trends in supply and demand. Factors influencing trends in supply include environmental degradation, climate change, energy scarcity, technology, changes in population and the patterns of global prosperity, growing urbanisation, and increased consumption. The unit will consider the underlying policy, economic and market-driven forces that play an important role in affecting both supply and demand. The needs of both developing and developed nations will be compared and the role of international, national and regional mechanisms will be discussed. Placing some emphasis on the relevance to Australia, the unit will explore available actions across a range of organisational levels such as communities, governments and NGOs.
SUST5003 Energy and Resources

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tony Vassallo Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, classroom presentations, short written assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the critical roles that energy and resource usage play in global, national and local sustainability. The need for developed economies to decarbonise their energy supply and for developing countries to have access to clean energy and sustainable resources will require major changes in technology, policy and business systems. This unit of study will cover the fundamentals of energy and resource supply; sustainable supply and use of energy for industry, business and consumers; life cycle analysis; energy security and alternative energy systems. Students will gain an understanding of: different sources of energy and their uses; the economic, environmental and societal contexts of energy and resource use; the need and scope for a transition from conventional energy sources; sound principles for analysing different resource and energy supply options; the role of international agreements and federal policy in influencing resource and energy use.
SUST5004 Populations and Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Tim Gill Session: Semester 2 Classes: Alternate full-day workshops and online tutorials on Thursdays in August, September and October. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the extent to which environmental changes influence population demographics and health, and the extent to which demographic and secular changes impact on the physical environment. The influence of migration, conflict, food insecurity, scarce resources, droughts, flooding, heat stress, emerging and re-emerging infections and chronic health problems on poverty, ageing and dependency, physical, mental and social health and economic sustainability will be analysed alongside the elements needed to preserve the diversity and functioning of the ecosystem for future human survival. International models and policies for mitigating and/or adapting to the negative consequences of globalisation, urbanisation, overconsumption, and resource depletion will be analysed for their potential benefits and harms to sustainable population growth, optimal health and equitable distribution of essential resources.
SUST5005 Policy and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ed Couzens Session: Intensive October Classes: Intensive classes for 4 full days in September 2015 Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Opinion article (1500w; 20%) and Research essay (4000 w; 80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines how policy-makers engage with and implement policies of ecologically sustainable development. Meeting the needs of a growing global population while at the same time maintaining the health of the environment, which provides the life support system for humanity, is the central policy challenge of the 21st century. Key sustainability challenges include: avoiding dangerous climate change, safeguarding biological diversity, providing food security, coping with resource scarcity, and promoting green technology including low-carbon energy generation. These issues provide acute challenges for governments given that they cut across a range of policy areas, and require long-term planning rather than short-term decision-making. The unit examines how policy-makers at international, national and sub-national scales consider and respond to sustainability issues. Students will be introduced to: the role of analysis (scientific, economic, social and political etc) in providing an evidence base for decisions; the variety of instruments and institutions available for policy delivery; how the lobbying process influences policy determination; and effectiveness of policy design and implementation. The unit also examines how decision-making is influenced by stakeholders and 'rent-seekers', including industry, nongovernmental organisations and citizens. It will be seen that sustainability policy design and implementation in the real world involves reconciling competing agendas and interests, and that trade-offs are often made that may strengthen or weaken the effectiveness of sustainability policies.
SUST5006 Sustainability: Business and Leadership

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Seymour Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will help build your understanding of the knowledge, skills and activities required to lead sustainability and change in, and with, businesses and organisations. The unit presents the relevance and importance of business mission and strategy, and will introduce the roles of corporate social responsibility, social entrepreneurship and impact measurement. It will also explore stakeholders associated with business (including shareholders, consumers and government) and how they can both motivate and impede change in the context of sustainability. Flexible and inclusive models of leadership will be introduced as we seek an appreciation of systems theory and its crucial place in understanding the complex nature of sustainability. Building on an understanding of distributed leadership and the nature of systems, action research and action learning are introduced as ideal frameworks to affect societal and organisational change. Learning will be facilitated through seminars, readings, as well as individual group projects.
USSC6201 Treatise Part 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Brendon O'Connor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: Supervised research and writing towards a treatise on an approved topic, under the supervision of an academic staff member. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is the first of a three-part sequence comprising the supervised writing of a treatise of 15,000 - 20,000 words to be submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Letters in US Studies.
USSC6202 Treatise Part 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Brendon O'Connor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Prerequisites: USSC6201 Assessment: Research and writing towards a treatise on an approved topic, under the supervision of an academic staff member Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is the second of a three-part sequence comprising the supervised writing of a treatise of 15,000 - 20,000 words to be submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Letters in US Studies.
USSC6203 Treatise Part 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Brendon O'Connor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: Research and writing towards a treatise on an approved topic, under the supervision of an academic staff member Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is the third of a three-part sequence comprising the supervised writing of a treatise of 15,000 - 20,000 words to be submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Letters in US Studies.
USSC6204 Internship

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Brendon O'Connor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: Preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice 2000wds, learning contract 1000wds, satisfactory completion of placement, equiv to 30 days in the field under the supervision of a workplace supervisor, in collaboration with the program Director Practical field work: An internship of 30 days equivalent Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of two units of study in an internship sequence that may be undertaken in partial fulfilment of requirements for the award of Master of Letters in US Studies. Part 1 is dedicated to the satisfactory completion of the internship and the development of skills necessary for an internship experience: project planning and management, developing a learning contract and critical self-reflection. In order to be considered, a minimum weighted average mark (WAM) of 70% across all units undertaken toward the Master of US Studies degree is required. Admission is subject to the Director's approval.
USSC6205 Internship Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Brendon O'Connor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: Research project on behalf of the workplace partner, 4000wds Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of two units of study in an internship sequence that may be undertaken in partial fulfilment of requirements for the award of Master of Letters in US Studies. The project (Part 2) requires the completion of a research project on behalf of the workplace partner. In order to be considered, a minimum weighted average mark (WAM) of 70% across all units undertaken toward the Master of US Studies degree is required. Admission is subject to the Director's approval.
USSC6207 Exchange 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Brendon O'Connor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Approved exchange at an accredited university in the United States Assessment: 5000 words equiv in assignments/essays Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of a maximum four possible units of study to be undertaken at a university in the United States in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the degree of Master of Letters in US Studies.
USSC6208 Exchange 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Brendon O'Connor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Approved exchange at an accredited university in the United States Assessment: 5000 words equiv in assignments/essays Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of a maximum four possible units of study to be undertaken at a university in the United States in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the degree of Master of Letters in US Studies.
USSC6209 Exchange 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Brendon O'Connor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Approved exchange at an acredited university in the United States Assessment: 5000 words equiv in assignments/essays Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of a maximum four possible units of study to be undertaken at a university in the United States in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the degree of Master of Letters in US Studies.
USSC6210 Exchange 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Brendon O'Connor Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Approved exchange at an accredited university in the United States Assessment: 5000 words equiv in assignments/essays Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of a maximum four possible units of study to be undertaken at a university in the United States in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the degree of Master of Letters in US Studies.
USSC6211 Treatise 1

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5 x 1 hour supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. Students will be expect to submit written work to their supervisor prior to each meeting. Prerequisites: 24 credit points Assessment: 1x24000wd Research Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is the first of a two part sequence comprising the supervised writing of a treatise of 24,000 words to be submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of US Studies.
USSC6212 Treatise 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5x1hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. Students will be expect to submit written work to their supervisor prior to each meeting. Assessment: 1x24000wd Research Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is one of two units that students will complete as part of the capstone. It is a treatise that will total 24,000 words.
USSC6213 Internship 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: There will be no teaching hours for this internship. It will be assessed at a later date as the student must complete a project with this internship. Corequisites: USSC6205 Assessment: Internship of 40-50 Days (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of four internship units of study that may be undertaken in partial fulfilment of requirements for the award of Master of US Studies. The unit is dedicated to the satisfactory completion of the internship and the development of skills necessary for an internship experience: project planning and management, developing a learning contract and critical self-reflection.
USSC6214 Internship Project 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: At least one meeting per month between student and project supervisor. Prerequisites: 24 credit points Corequisites: USSC6204 and USSC6205 Assessment: 1x4000wd Reflective Essay (90%), Particpation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of four internship units of study that may be undertaken in partial fulfilment of requirements for the award of Master of US Studies. The unit is dedicated to the satisfactory completion of the internship and the development of skills necessary for an internship experience: project planning and management, developing a learning contract and critical self-reflection.
USSC6215 Exchange Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: At least one meeting a month between student and project supervisor. Prerequisites: 24 credit points Corequisites: USSC6207, USSC6209 Assessment: 1x4000wd Essay (90%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of a maximum of four possible units of study to be undertaken at a university in the United States in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the degree of Master of US Studies. The unit is part of an Exchange Stream. A project will be written on Exchange or once the student has returned from Exchange.
USSC6901 Fundamentals of US Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rebecca Sheehan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x5-hr intensive classes weeks 1 and 2, 1x6-hr intensive week 3 Assessment: class participation including journal (20%), learning portfolio (equivalent to 3000wds) (40%) and 1x3000wd research essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit introduces students to the foundations of American politics, economics, society and culture, examining the interplay of major actors and ideas from these spheres. It will familiarise students with the variegated landscape of America through analysing contemporary issues using interactive approaches to learning. Students will survey how America's political framework either engages with or impedes social and economic actors and how these dynamics are reflected in and supported or undermined by the media and artistic expression.
USSC6902 US Politics: Presidency and Congress

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Lockyer Session: Intensive May Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: 1x2000-2500wd major paper (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine US domestic politics through analysing the federal structure and separation of powers within the American political system. This understanding will provide an appreciation of the porous nature of US political institutions, offering social actors a variety of venues and opportunities to influence political decision-making. It will examine the factors that make some arenas more open than others and strategies that groups and political actors take to secure or prise open those avenues for change.
USSC6903 US Foreign and National Security Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Lockyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 1x3000wd essay (45%) and 1x2hr exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine US foreign and security policy formulation and implementation throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It will consider US military policy, foreign economic policy, foreign energy and resource policy, policy on human rights and democracy overseas, and US responses to the proliferation of WMD and trans-national terrorism. The unit will conclude by examining US foreign and defence policy in the aftermath of 9/11, the Iraq War, and other contemporary security challenges facing the US.
USSC6905 US Economic Policy and Regulation

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hours per week Assessment: Class participation (10%), 1x3000wd essay (40%), 5x500wd reading briefs (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit studies the ways in which economic and regulatory policies and institutions drive the business and social environment in the United States. Macro-economic policy, micro-economic reforms and changes to the legal framework and legal institutions have a fundamental effect on the impetus for research and development, the qualities of domestic and imported goods and services, the incentives for business and societal innovations, the extent and fairness of competition, the advancement of employment equity, the quality of education, the improvement of productivity, the attainment of social benefits and social equity, the mechanisms for rapid and equitable information transfer, the minimisation of surveillance and enforcement costs, and the equitable sharing of income and risks within US society.
USSC6906 US Constitution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Harry Melkonian Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: class participation (10%), oral presentation (10%), 1x1000wd short paper (10%), 1x3000wd long paper (20%), 1x2hr final open book written exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the US Constitution, a document which animates nearly all facets of contemporary American life. It shapes the contours of speech and media and is constantly tested and reinterpreted by social actors, the judiciary, and political institutions. Many issues faced by foreign businesses or organisations operating in the US have a constitutional dimension. Students will participate in lively debate about the Constitution, consistent with its importance in the American landscape.
USSC6907 American Exceptionalism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Lockyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 1x3000wd essay (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the motivation and meaning behind the claim that the United States of America is an exception nation. What exactly is an exceptional nation? Is the US exceptional or just different? How has the idea of exceptionalism evolved throughout American history? What are the implications or consequences of exceptionalism? To what extent and in what ways has the idea of exceptionalism shaped US history and influences America's relationship with the rest of the world?
USSC6910 Special Topics in US Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Visiting scholar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: At least one meeting per month between student and project supervisor Assessment: 1x1500wd reflective essay (25%), participation (15%), 1x3500wd project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students accepted in this unit will be able to undertake a special independent or group project in US Studies. Independent projects will be completed under the supervision of the postgraduate coordinator and a USSC faculty member or a special visiting fellow where appropriate. Group projects will facilitate local and international learning experiences organized by the US Studies Centre and will be coordinated by the postgraduate coordinator of US Studies.
USSC6915 Contemporary American Media

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jane Park Session: Intensive September Classes: 1x2-hr class/week, 1xscreening/week Assessment: online reading and media analysis (5 x 500 word entries), case study (2000 words) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit overviews current issues in American media studies, including the relationship between democracy and media production, theories of media influence, approaches to audience analysis, and trans-national media spheres. It emphasises the diversity of forms, texts and practices that make up the contemporary American media and the cultural flows between the US and the rest of the world. Examples include the press, advertising, genre television, narrative cinema, "current affairs", popular music, radio, and gaming and Internet cultures.
USSC6916 Research Essay in US Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Adam Lockyer Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervisory meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: 1x6000wd research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Available to Master of US Studies candidates only.
Students will undertake research essay of 6,000 words on an approved topic under the guidance of a supervisor from the Centre for US Studies. Normally, the essay involves deeper study of a subject which the student has already covered in the first semester of his or her program. Entry to this unit is subject to the permission of the Director and depends upon the availability of a supervisor from the Centre, the student's existing knowledge in the area, and her or his academic performance in the preceding semester.
USSC6917 The American City

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Rowena Braddock Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: seminar participation (10%), 1x1000wd multi-media scrapbook (25%), 1x oral presentation of research project (15%) and 1x4000wd final research project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the concept, ideal and experience of the city in the United States. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this course seeks to engage a variety of discourses in its exploration of the question of the city as both an imaginary and a material construct. The particularity of the American city will be examined by considering how it is lived in terms of built form, urban life and sustainability and how it is conceived in and through its representation in literature, cinema, the visual arts, critical and cultural theory, urban studies and popular culture. From a study of sources as diverse as the changing and conflicted fictional cityscapes of Edith Wharton, Dos Passos and DeLillo; the cartoons of Frank Miller; the films of Martin Scorcese; as well as, reflecting upon and rethinking the notion of the `wounded' or `traumatised' (post-crisis) cities of NYC, Detroit and New Orleans; addressing the crucial issue of sustainability and the future of the city; and exploring the significance of contemporary urban phenomena, the American city will be discovered to be a unique, dynamic, paradoxical and profoundly influential site of human interaction and engagement.
USSC6919 American Film and Hollywood

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bruce Isaacs Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x4-hr class/week Assessment: 1x1500wd critical analysis/evaluation (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the relationship between 'American cinema' and Hollywood cinema. 'American cinema' draws inspiration from and attempts to contribute to cultural movements and contexts that include Hollywood but extend to literature and the visual arts more generally. Hollywood's power as a cultural sign will be examined in relation to alternative and independent film cultures. This will include not only analysis of feature films but also of writings by filmmakers and theorists. Questions of cinematic subjectivity and authorship will be a focus of the unit.
USSC6920 US Media: Politics, Culture, Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Barron Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr class/week Assessment: Oral presentations (500 words) (15%), 3x online tasks (1500 words) (3x15%), 1x3000wd research paper (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit will focus on media coverage of political campaigns and politics in America. It will look at the role of the media in American society in shaping debates and also the power of the American media globally. The impact of the internet on American journalism will be discussed as will the future of the media.
VETS7008 Hazards to Human and Animal Health

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor(s): Siobhan Mor Session: Semester 1a Classes: Online (Sem 1, weeks 1 - 7) Assessment: Individual report (45%); Article Review (10%); Group Assignment (30%); Participation (15%). Mode of delivery: Online
After completing Hazards to Human and Animal Health, students will be able to: Describe the key elements of risk assessment and the concepts of hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP) intervention; List sources of chemical contamination of food of animal origin and describe how to detect, monitor and prevent these; Explain how the national residue survey works; Discuss the microbial hazards in food of animal origin and the means by which they affect humans, and identify critical control points; Summarise key points of the current antibiotic resistance debate concerning the implications for public health of antibiotic use in animals; Describe critical aspects of important zoonotic diseases acquired by humans by ingestion of animal products and other routes of exposure and identify possible means of prevention; Analyse the factors that influence the emergence of new diseases and discuss changes that need to be implemented in animal and human health surveillance; List the notifiable animal diseases (endemic and emergency) in Australia and discuss the rationale and process for notification and control; describe global trends in livestock disease distribution - both in time and space; Describe the disease control programs for a range of current animal diseases and discuss their health, welfare and political ramifications.
Textbooks
No specific textbook is essential for this unit of study.
VETS7009 Animal Health Economics

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Lecturer: Sarah Jane Wilson Session: Semester 2b Classes: Online Semester 2 Weeks 8-14 Assessment: Student participation in weekly online discussions and other learning activities in the online classroom (15%); online quizzes (45%); report, done in pairs (40%). Mode of delivery: Online
After completing Animal Health Economics, participants will be able to: Discuss the importance of animal diseases in efficiency of animal production, consumers' perceptions of animals and animal products, and global trade; Analyse economic problems using basic methods such as partial budgeting, cost-benefit analysis and decision analysis; Detail the critical steps in systems analysis and choose appropriate modelling types and techniques; Describe the uses of linear and dynamic programming, and Markov chain and Monte Carlo simulations; Discuss the basic principles of risk analysis; Explain the basic steps in the decision-making process and the role of risk analysis in this process; Explain the role of decision support systems in animal health management and demonstrate their profitability; Build and interpret spreadsheet models for economic analyses in MS EXCEL; Discuss the importance of Animal Health Economics in decision making, implementation and evaluation of animal health programs, and policy development and implementation processes.
Textbooks
J. Rushton The Economics of Animal Health and Production. CAB International, Oxford, 2009.
VETS7010 Animal Health Policy Development

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: TBA Session: Semester 2a Classes: Online (Semester 2 Weeks 1-7) Assessment: Semester 2, weeks 1-7) Assessment: Individual report (45%); Group report (40%); Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Online
After studying the Principles of Animal Health Policy Development unit, students will be able to: Describe the structure and role of Australia's Veterinary Service; Outline the process of law making and policy development in relation to public health and animal health in Australia; Outline current policy issues relating to veterinary public health and animal health in Australia; Discuss strategies used to resolve conflicts among stakeholders and to address the economic, political, technical and social issues that may arise; Discuss the means whereby veterinary public health and animal health policy is monitored and enforced; Discuss evaluation and improvement strategies for animal health policy.
Textbooks
Colebatch HK. Policy. 3rd Edition 2009, Open University Press (McGraw-Hill) Policy Concepts in the Social Sciences series.
VETS7012 Wildlife Epidemiology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: Colleen Duncan Session: Semester 1b Classes: Online (Semester 1 Weeks 8-14) Prerequisites: VETS7004 Assessment: Individual assignment (45%); Group assignment (40%); Participation (15%). Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Elective Units of Study offered online will not normally be run with less than 6 participants and are usually only offered every second year. All units offered are subject to class size limitations.
After studying the Wildlife Epidemiology unit, you will be able to: Apply epidemiological concepts to wildlife populations. Explain the concept of disease ecology. Discuss issues relevant to disease determination in wildlife populations and explain the associated diagnostic challenges. Discuss alternate study methodologies and design a valid observational study for a wildlife population. Discuss design and analysis issues relevant to wildlife disease studies. Identify sources of wildlife animal health data and discuss wildlife health information systems. Critically review published literature on wildlife disease studies.
This unit is offered in alternate years to VETS7014 Aquatic Animal Epidemiology.
Textbooks
Thrusfield M. Veterinary Epidemiology. 3rd Edition. Oxford: Blackwell Science 2007
VETS7013 Risk Analysis

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Academic Supervisor: Michael Ward Session: Semester 2a Classes: Online (Sem 2, weeks 1-7) Assessment: Participation in weekly online discussions (15%) on-line quiz (15%); group assignment (30%); individual assignment (40%). Mode of delivery: Online
After studying Risk Analysis you will be able to: apply the terminology and major concepts, principles, tools and techniques used in risk management in an animal health context; analyse and evaluate the main approaches to risk management in animal health (including veterinary public health) and trade; evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of some of the tools used in risk management; synthesise the tasks and issues associated with risk management with your knowledge of animal and public health; approach risk communication with an understanding of the different methods of good risk communication and the relationship between risk perception and risk communication.
Textbooks
There is no single textbook that covers all of the topics explored in this unit. The unit does, however, draw heavily on the Australian and International Standard for Risk Management, AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 and it is recommended that you are familiar with this document. The unit also draws on the OIE Handbook on Import Risk Analysis for Animals and Animal Products: Volumes 1 and 2 (2004).
VETS7015 Surveillance, Preparedness & Response

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Instructor: Mike Nunn and Sam Hamilton Session: Semester 2a Classes: Online (Semester 2 Weeks 1-7) Assessment: Participation in weekly online discussions (15%) ; online quiz (15%) ; group assignment (35%); individual assignment (35%) Mode of delivery: Online
After studying Surveillance, Preparedness & Response you will be able to: explain how surveillance contributes to the assessment and management of risks that affect public health, animal health, or trade; provide advice on the development of a surveillance strategy to meet defined objectives; describe a preferred framework for managing animal health emergencies.
Textbooks
Veterinary Epidemiology Thrusfield, M. 3E06, 2007 Blackwell Science, Oxford, UK.
VETS7017 Food Safety

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Academic Supervisor: Michael Ward Session: Semester 1a Classes: Online (Sem 1, weeks 1 - 7) Assessment: Participation in weekly online discussions and learning activities (15%); group assignment (40%); individual assignment (45%). Mode of delivery: Online
After completing Food Safety participants will be able to describe the respective roles and recent initiatives in food safety of the various government and industry organisations that make up the global, national and regional regulatory system for the safety of food of animal origin; Describe and critically analyse the key elements in food safety risk assessment and management and critically apply this to the analysis of a total quality management food safety system; Describe the critical aspects of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, management and prevention of the well-recognised bacterial food-borne pathogens; Identify emerging food-borne pathogens of animal origin and describe the critical aspects of the epidemiology that make them a particular public health concern; Describe the principles used in newer microbiological diagnostic tests and their application in food safety programs; Discuss the elements required for an effective national antimicrobial resistance management program; List the potential sources of and critically assess the potential public health threats posed by the presence of natural toxins and environmental contaminants in food of animal origin.
Textbooks
Torrence M. E. and Isaacson R.E. (eds) (2003) Microbial Food Safety in Animal Agriculture Current Topics, Iowa Stat Press, Ames, Iowa, USA.
VETS7018 Research Paper A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Research Coordinator: Jenny-Ann Toribio Instructor(s): Supervisors on arrangement Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised project. Online seminar. Corequisites: VETS7005 Assessment: Dissertation (90%); Participation in online seminar (5%); Progress Reports (5%). Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Completing the research project will enable you to execute research in a professional and ethical manner. A six credit point project should equate to at least 150 hours work.
VETS7019 Research Paper B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Program Academic Supervisor: Prof Michael Ward Research Coordinator: Jenny-Ann Toribio Instructor(s): Supervisors on arrangement Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised project. Online seminar. Corequisites: VETS7018 Assessment: Dissertation (90%); Participation in online seminar (5%); Progress Reports (5%). Mode of delivery: Supervision
Completing the research project will enable you to execute research in a professional and ethical manner. A 12 credit point project should equate to at least 300 hours work.
WILD5003 Wildlife Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof DN Phalen Session: Intensive September Classes: September intensive: 4 days on the Camden campus, one day on the Sydney Campus Assessment: The assessment of this unit occurs both in the full-time week and in individual written assignments done in the student's own time. The full-time week contributes (40%) of the total mark through a group project ending in a presentation to the class. The remaining (60%) comes from a written assignment of 5,000 due 4 weeks after the end of class. Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides an introduction to the health issues confronting wildlife in Australasia, an overview of the health status of that wildlife, and an understanding of both the investigation of health problems and the effective management of these. Issues in wildlife disease management are exemplified using a broad range of vertebrate species occupying different environments. Emphasis is placed on providing students with a coordinated and interdisciplinary approach to wildlife health, and on developing expertise in recognising and solving a broad range of health problems in field populations. The unit is taught intensively in a full-time week on the Camden campus (4 days) and the Sydney Campus (1day). The unit integrates lectures, practical work and supervised study, and offer students the opportunity to work through real-world wildlife conservation problems relevant to their individual backgrounds.
Textbooks
There are no set textbooks for this unit of study.
WILD5006 Ex Situ Wildlife Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Derek Spielman Session: Intensive May Classes: The Unit is taught in a full-time week in May at Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo, NSW. Assessment: The assessment of this unit occurs both in the full-time week and in an individual written assignment done in the students' own time. The full-time week contributes (40%) of the total mark through a group presentation on the status in the wild and in captivity of a species in the Taronga Western Plains Zoo. The remaining (60%) comes from a written assignment of 5,000 words on a successful species survival plan that involves a significant ex situ component. Mode of delivery: Block mode
Wildlife populations are under a variety of threats, most of which result from human activities. Modern conservation biology seeks practical solutions to these problems using a wide variety of options. These options may include captive breeding and re-introduction programs, provided that a range of biological, ethical and politico-economic issues are addressed. This unit of study provides students with the tools to evaluate the likely cost-effectiveness of such programs. It also develops knowledge of the technologies available to capture and translocate wildlife, and of the planning required to ensure the best possible chance of success. The unit is taught in a full-time week at Western Plains Zoo in Dubbo, NSW. The unit integrates lectures, tutorials, practical work and site visits and offers students the opportunity to examine real problems in the conservation and management of threatened wildlife populations using relevant case studies.
Textbooks
Unit of Study Handbook is the primary reference.
WMST6902 Arguing the Point

Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd outline/literature review (20%), 1x500wd in-Class presentation (10%) and 1x4000wd thesis chapter (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit of study aims to develop scholarly skills of research, writing and argumentation. Through the study of different examples of academic research, we will carefully draw out why and how certain research and argumentation strategies are privileged in different texts. We will also closely examine different genres of academic writing and different modes of research (including empirical research). The unit will encourage students to develop their own argumentation skills and research practices.
WMST6903 Gender, Media and Consumer Societies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x5000wd Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines theories of consumption in regards to cultural and media products and practices. From the basis of sociology, cultural studies and gender theories, we will critically analyse different forms of belonging and identity that are created through these practices. We will also pay close attention to the critiques of globalisation and consumption, theories of the 'citizen consumer' and the realities of geo-political and economic inequalities that underpin many forms of consumption. The unit focuses on theories of culture, media and consumption, principally through the analyses of case studies.
WMST6904 Modernist Cultural Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x Seminar presentations, written + oral (30%) and 1x5000wd final research paper, developed from a presentation (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines modernism, modernity and postmodernism through a range of 20th century concepts, practices and movements, including the avant-garde, feminism and modernism, the 'everyday', mass culture and technology, cinema and visual technologies, ethnography and the invention of 'culture' and the emergence of postcolonial thought. The unit will provide an important foundation for some of the key intellectual ideas and approaches of cultural studies.
WMST6922 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12000 words on an approved topic, to be completed in WMST6923 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Research and writing towards a dissertation of 12,000 words on an approved topic, under the supervision of an academic member of staff. Prospective candidates should consult the postgraduate coordinator prior to enrolment, in order to formulate a topic.
WMST6923 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Prerequisites: WMST6922 Assessment: Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12000 words, following satisfactory progress in WMST6922 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Completion and submission of a dissertation of 12,000 words.
WORK5002 People, Work and Employment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Semester 1: Professor Marian Baird; Semester 2: Associate Professor Diane van den Broek Session: Semester 1,Semester 2a Classes: Semester 1: 1 x 3hr seminar/tutorial per week; Semester 2a intensive: Wednesday 5pm - 7pm & Saturday 9am - 4pm in weeks 2, 3, 4 & 5 Assessment: assignment 1 (20%), assignment 2 (30%), final exam (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Foundation Unit for MHRM&IR. This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
This is the foundational unit in the Graduate Certificate/Graduate Diploma/Master of Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations and should be taken in the student's first semester of study in this program. The unit provides an integrated overview of the social, legal, psychological, ethical and strategic dimensions of work and paid employment. The learning content also combines broad knowledge of these dimensions with a depth of knowledge in a select number of topical human resource and industrial relations issues. As such the unit provides a foundation for the suite of elective units in industrial relations, human resource management, and organisational studies available in the program. In addition, the unit provides the essential preparatory knowledge and skills for studying work and employment in an academic context.
WORK5003 Management and Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Semester 1: Dr Mark Westcott; Semester 2: TBA Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: quiz (10%), assignment (20%), essay (35%), participation (10%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the nature and context of management. It explores the functions and processes of management and encourages students to critically reflect on management theory and practice. It can be taken as a standalone unit for students enrolled in various specialist masters programs and also prepares students for further study in strategic management, organisational analysis and strategy and human resource management.
WORK6001 Organisational Analysis and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Angela Knox Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: presentation (20%), essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the behaviour of people when acting as members of an organisation. The aim of the unit is to provide an understanding of the processes and structures that influence organisational behaviour, by drawing on ideas from psychology, sociology, management and anthropology. Topics covered include: personality and the self; learning and socialisation; motivation and commitment; group behaviour and dynamics; organisational design and boundaries; organisational culture, change and leadership.
WORK6002 Strategic Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jane Le Session: Semester 1,Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: seminar based assessment (20%), case study assessment (45%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to introduce the concept of strategy and explain its role in the management of organisations. The unit thus traces the development of strategic management as a field and examines different approaches to strategic management. WORK6002 introduces students to the classical strategy process of strategic analysis, strategy formulation and strategy implementation. This involves learning about and working with a range of strategy models and tools that can be used in the strategic management of organisations. In particular, a range of case studies is used to explore the practical application of these tools. The unit also critically examines traditional views of strategy by introducing a range of current debates in the strategy field.
WORK6017 Human Resource Strategies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Semester 1: Associate Professor Angela Knox; and Semester 2: Jane Le Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: presentation (20%), essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Core unit for the MHRM&IR
This unit examines the theoretical foundations of strategic human resource management and then critically analyses the empirical evidence related to a range of HR strategies deployed in contemporary workplaces, both in Australia and internationally. In doing so, the unit explores the issues underpinning emerging HR strategies, their implementation and the outcomes experienced within the organisation and the wider environment. The HR strategies studied involve those that focus on managing a contemporary workforce and may include human resources strategies associated with: the management of front line workers, teams, non standard forms of employment, job quality and work-life balance, and gender and diversity at work, for example.
WORK6026 Organisational Change and Development

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anya Johnson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: assignment (50%), and exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit seeks to develop diagnostic and prescriptive skills in relation to the management of organisational change while also encouraging the adoption of a critical perspective of the field. Part 1 (Organisational Change and the Nature of Organisations) introduces the fields of organisational change, explains its relevance to organisation performance and strategy and examines key change management models. Part 2 (Diagnosis and Intervention) examines the utility of key organisational change models and techniques and identifies factors that may impact on the effectiveness of the change management process. Part 3 (Key Areas of Intervention) analyses the application of organisational change practices and initiatives to a number of specific organisational issues.
WORK6030 Performance and Rewards

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: Intensive Assessment: participation (10%), tests (20%), assignment (40%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit examines the processes and practices associated with contemporary performance and reward management. Results-based, behaviourally-based and competency-based methods of performance management are examined, along with processes of performance review, planning and developing. Coverage of reward management issues includes: job- and person-based approaches to building base pay structures; methods for rewarding individual performance; work group incentives such as gainsharing, goal-sharing and team pay; methods of rewarding employees for organisational performance, including employee share ownership; and performance-related rewards for executives. The unit also examines approaches to developing strategically integrated performance and reward management systems.
WORK6130 Leadership in Organisations

This unit of study is not available in 2016

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eric Knight Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ECOF5807 or ECOF6090 Assessment: Group assessment (30%), case studies (30%) and exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to encourage students to consider the role and significance of leadership in various organisational contexts. The unit introduces the major streams of leadership theory and traces the development of our understanding about leadership. The unit explores how these theories allow us to understand leadership in practice and in what ways leadership is linked to different aspects of organisational effectiveness. It then examines the 'good, the bad, and the ugly' sides of leadership, e.g. positive forms (transformational, charismatic) and negative forms (narcissistic and Machiavellian). The unit explores leading for diversity and diversity in leadership (e.g. based on gender, culture and ethnicity) and the role of leaders in constituting ethical and socially responsible organisations. The critical role of leaders in effecting organisational change is explored and the leadership of top management teams, and leadership succession is examined. The unit also examines leadership development programs and instruments and students have an opportunity to reflect on factors that might influence their own leadership style.
WRIT6000 Professional Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Analysis (20%), 1x2000wd Case Study (30%), 1x1000wd Project (20%), 1x2000wd Proposal (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces theories of professional writing with a specific focus on composing in the workplace. Students will develop abilities in analysing, writing, revising, and delivering workplace texts, both print and multimedia. By examining and discussing a range of actual workplace documents, from emails to websites, students will gain a broader understanding of the rhetorical principles and ethical responsibilities inherent in professional writing practice. They will improve their ability to negotiate the relationships, tensions, and politics that influence workplace writing contexts.
WRIT6001 Professional Editing

Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Individual Analysis (30%), 1x2000wd Group Analysis (30%), 1x1000wd Oral Presentation (20%), 1x1000wd Essay (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces practical techniques for editing workplace documents for increased clarity and effectiveness. Applying theories and principles of visual rhetoric, students will learn how to improve the readability and reception of workplace texts according to audience conventions and expectations. By analysing actual workplace documents, students will develop their critical reading abilities and gain a better understanding of how to edit texts for word economy, improved design and layout, and inclusive language. Editing print texts for digital or oral presentation will also be emphasised.