Education (Taronga Conservation Education)

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Classes have changed for the following unit. They are now:

EDPT5002 Understanding Conservation Science Classes: Taronga Zoo, Sydney Site: 1x2hr seminar/week

22/1/2019

Taronga Conservation Education

Candidates for the Master of Education (Taronga Conservation Education) must complete 48 credit points, including 18 credit points of core units of study developed and delivered at Taronga, 6 credit points of core units of study developed and delivered at The University of Sydney, a maximum of 12 credit points of capstone units of study and a maximum of 12 credit points of postgraduate Education units of study which can be chosen from any Master of Education program.
Candidates for the Graduate Diploma in Educational Studies (Taronga Conservation Education) must complete 36 credit points, including a minimum of 24 credit points of core units of study and a maximum of 6 credit points of postgraduate Education units of study chosen from any Master of Education program.
Candidates for the Graduate Certificate in Educational Studies (Taronga Conservation Education) must complete 24 credit points of core units of study..

Core units

EDPT5002 Understanding Conservation Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, students will use and critique current research to understand broad concepts of conservation science, the complexities of ecosystem structure and function, and issues in conservation. This unit includes examples of current conservation scenarios and programs that are being developed and implemented, and provides an opportunity to explore conservation science and education as practiced at Taronga Conservation Society Australia. It also explores approaches to addressing conservation and evaluating conservation programs. Students will critically assess different techniques used in conservation science through examination of the literature - both peer reviewed and unpublished reports.
EDPT5003 Environmental Education Programs

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Taronga Zoo, Sydney site: 2x6 hr weekend seminars, 6x2 hr evening seminars Prerequisites: Understanding Conservation Science (new proposal) EDPC5022 Design for Learning Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Education is an essential element in addressing the persistent environmental problems society is currently facing. This unit examines issues related to the declining opportunity for students and community to engage with outdoor learning and their lack of opportunity to make a positive impact on their local environment. Connecting people with nature has profound benefits on knowledge retention, and supports students to develop investigative skills, to acquire an attitude of care for the environment and to practise the principles of ecological sustainability. In this unit, participants will gain an advanced understanding of contemporary environmental education theory, research and practice. Using Taronga Conservation Society of Australia as a case study, current environmental education programs that demonstrate positive conservation outcomes will be investigated. This elective provides participants with the knowledge and skills to be effective environmental educators. Various teaching pedagogies will be explored which will help participants gain the expertise to move beyond the classroom with their practice. The major focus of this unit is to teach current and aspiring educators how to design authentic environmental education programs, for all academic levels, that will enable their students to participate actively as citizens in protecting the environment and contribute to the development of an enduring sustainable, environmentally sound society.
EDPT5004 Conservation Leadership and Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 10 x 2 hr workshops - located at Taronga 1 x 4 hr weekend workshop - located at Taronga Prerequisites: Understanding Conservation Science (new proposal) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There has never been a more urgent and critical need to address the threats to biodiversity. Whilst humans are the main driver of these problems, they can also drive the solution. The contemporary understanding of conservation science reflects this, broadening the context from a focus on biology to people and the choices they make. To be effective, programs to conserve ecosystems must consider the human behaviour dimension. In the last decade, many zoos have begun to fully embrace social science and use behaviour change theories as a basis for their programs, experiences and exhibits. This has been a deliberate shift in order to move beyond merely awareness raising and onto facilitating the pro-wildlife and pro-environmental behaviours needed to address threats to biodiversity. Zoos also provide a unique opportunity to influence the next generation, as emotionally powerful childhood experiences of nature and wildlife have been shown to be an important factor behind environmentally responsible actions by adults. Combining many individual actions and changes in behaviour can assist in building towards a tipping point for legislative, regulatory, social and/or market changes. In this unit, students will explore Taronga Conservation Society Australia's campaigns and programs that lead the community to rethink the way we live and the impacts we have on our environment both at Taronga and in the community. The students in this course will learn how to apply models and methodologies to influence behaviour and create social impact to solve environmental problems and support healthy ecosystems for a sustainable future. They will also develop their capacity to lead and deliver education programs through a practical understanding of communication and environmental education strategies.
EDPC5022 Design for Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Lina Markauskaite Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignments (2x25%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This course provides a framework for considering many of the core problems facing those who carry out the work of educational design. It offers a model of the architecture of learning situations and focuses on three main design components that influence the character and outcomes of learning: the design of good learning tasks, the design of physical and digital resources and spaces for learning, and design intended to evoke convivial learning relationships. The course does not aim to teach specific design techniques - for example, the steps in Instructional Systems Design (ISD). Rather, it suggests ways of identifying which tools and techniques, from the many now available, are most likely to be appropriate for a specific design challenge. The course therefore offers an overview of selected, contemporary approaches, techniques and tools of relevance to designing for other people's learning. It also provides an opportunity to review empirical research on how designers design and what knowledge they draw upon in design work.

Capstone units

EDPZ6730 Special Project 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several sessions with supervisor Prerequisites: 24 credit points of units Assessment: 1x6000wd project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Special Project is a capstone unit, semester length independent investigation of a personally chosen topic in an educational context, the result of which is a 'product' of approximately 6,000 words such as a written report, review, account of the development of a resource, analysis of action research or critique of research. All 'products' should be demonstrably informed by relevant theory and research. The satisfactory completion of this unit provides an alternative to the regular face-to-face classroom unit of study for candidates enrolled in a graduate coursework award.
EDPZ6731 Special Project 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several sessions with supervisor Prerequisites: EDPZ6730 Assessment: 1x6000wd project (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Special Project is a semester length independent investigation of a personally chosen topic in an educational context, the result of which is a 'product' of approximately 6,000 words such as a written report, review, account of the development of a resource, analysis of action research or critique of research All 'products' should be demonstrably informed by relevant theory and research. The satisfactory completion of this unit provides an alternative to the regular face-to-face classroom unit of study for candidates enrolled in a graduate coursework award. This unit is only available to students enrolled in a course which requires them to complete Special Project 1 and Special Project 2.
EDPZ6724 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: meetings/discussions with supervisor Assessment: satisfactory progress during semester; students then must enrol in EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2 the following semester Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methods unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development. This unit is part one of the Dissertation which runs over two semesters; therefore, students must also enroll in EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2 in the following semester.
EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: meetings/discussions with supervisor Prerequisites: EDPZ6724 Assessment: 1x12000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methods unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development. This unit is part two of the Dissertation which runs over two semester; therefore, students must have also enrolled in EDPZ6724 Dissertation Part 1 in the previous semester.
EDPZ6720 Dissertation

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: meetings/discussions with supervisor Assessment: 1x12000wd dissertation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methodology unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development.