Health Security

Errata
item Errata Date
1.

The followunit is now availalbe in 2019:

GOVT6313 Leadership in Theory and Practice Session: Semester 2.

18/12/2018

Health Security

Candidates for the Graduate Certificate in Health Security are required to complete 24 credit points, including a minimum of 12 credit points of core units of study and a maximum of 12 credit points of core elective units of study.
Candidates for the Graduate Diploma in Health Security a candidate must complete 48 credit points, including a minimum of 24 credit points of core units of study and a maximum of 24 credit points of core elective units of study.
Candidates for the Master of Health Security are required to complete 96 credit points, including a minimum of 24 credit points of core units of study, a minimum of 36 credit points of core elective units of study, including a specialisation, a maximum of 30 credit points of elective units of study and a minimum of 6 credit points of capstone units of study.

Agrosecurity Specialisation

Core units of study

CISS6004 Health and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Issue brief (35%), 1x3000wd Research essay (50%), 1x500wd Self-evaluation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assesses the political and security significance of disease-related events and developments. Whether one contemplates historical experiences with smallpox, the contemporary challenges posed by diseases such as HIV/AIDS and SARS, or the risks arising from new scientific developments such as synthetic biology, it is clear that diseases exercise a powerful influence over civilised humankind. The unit concentrates on areas in which human health and security concerns intersect most closely, including: biological weapons; fast-moving disease outbreaks of natural origin; safety and security in microbiology laboratories; and the relationships between infectious disease patterns, public health capacity, state functioning and violent conflict. The overall aim of the unit is to provide students with a stronger understanding of the scientific and political nature of these problems, why and how they might threaten security, and the conceptual and empirical connections between them.
GOVT6316 Policy Making, Power and Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Short Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Long Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the nature of public policy and the processes by which it is produced. Relevant issues are common to all nation states, although they take specific forms in each individual country. First, the unit takes an overview of public policy - dealing with basic themes such as 'What is policy?' through to different approaches to understanding the policy process. These include policy cycles, rationality, interest groups, institutions, and socio-economic interests. Second, it maps out and examines the main components of public policy making: actors, institutions and policy instruments. Third, it focuses on aspects of policy-making processes which often attract a high level of attention from analysts. These include problem definition, agenda setting, decision-taking, policy implementation, policy evaluation and crisis policy-making. Fourth, it examines wider issues in terms of the state and who ultimately holds power over the making and shaping of public policy. Finally, it examines the 'bigger pictures' of long term policy trends, and the extent to which national policy making capacities and processes have been affected by globalisation. Assessments offer a large element of flexibility, allowing students to concentrate on areas of particular interest.
MECO6909 Crisis Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1000wd short-answer essay (30%), 1x3000wd research report (50%), 1x500wd group project presentation (10%), 1x500wd weekly comments (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit will examine how organisations use public relations (PR) to deal with crisis situations. Throughout the unit we will use case studies to explore frameworks, risk prioritisation, issues management, planning, response and evaluation strategies for diverse organisations and topics from environmental and corporate to health and social.
GOVT6313 Leadership in Theory and Practice

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd leadership research paper (25%), 1x1000wd Leader in Action group proposal (15%), 1x20min Leader in Action group presentation (20%), 1x3500wd reflective journal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'The leader points the way.' Eleanor Roosevelt. Leadership is a story that resolves these questions: What is a leader? What kinds of leaders are there? Is democratic leadership different from other kinds? Is leadership in a local community similar to that in national politics or international politics? Are leaders made or born? Is leadership generic? Is it the same in Europe and Asia? What is the difference between a leader and a manager? This unit reviews and evaluates theories of leadership. Participants' experiences and perceptions of leadership are an important part of the unit.

Capstone unit of study

CISS6009 Research Essay 1

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8, or equivalent hours arranged by supervisor and student Assessment: 6000wd Research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit consists of a 6000 word Research essay under the guidance of a supervisor from CISS. Normally it involves deeper study of a subject which the student has already covered in her/his degree. Entry into this unit is by permission only, and depends upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic and student's existing knowledge in the area. MCom, MBus, and MIntSec students can take this unit as a stand-alone elective unit. MIntSec students may also take this unit in conjunction with CISS6010 Research essay 2, writing a supervised dissertation of 10000 - 12000 words.
CISS6010 Research Essay 2

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8, or equivalent hours as arranged by supervisor and student. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75% Corequisites: CISS6009 Assessment: 10,000-12,000wd Research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is the second of a two-part, supervised dissertation of 10000 -12000 words to be taken in conjunction with CISS6009 Research essay 1. Entry into this unit is by permission only and requires the completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75%, and upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic.
PUBH5600 Biosecurity Seminar Series

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Walsh; Dr Gabriella Scandurra Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 2-hr lectures plus 8 x 1-hr seminar/tutorial plus 18-hrs online curated content requiring student responses Prerequisites: CISS6004 or GOVT6316 or MECO6909 or WORK6130 or unit of study coordinator permission. Assessment: 1 x 2500wd detailed assignment plus 3 x 1000wd written policy briefs plus seminar participation and online responses Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the capstone unit for the Master of Health Security. The unit is designed to bring together the knowledge achieved throughout the degree for students to use critical thinking and leadership skills to solve global health security issues presented to them. The unit will consist of a series of eight lectures and seminars that will present students with complex health security issues. Students will then critically evaluate the human and animal, biosafety and biodefense, and agrosecurity perspectives to understand how they are interconnected and appreciate the difficulty in realistically and appropriately solving these issues.

Core Elective units of study

AFNR5110 Crop Improvement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard Trethowan Session: Semester 2 Classes: The equivalent of three lectures and 3 hours practical work per week Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of plant genetics and breeding, similar to that covered by GENE4012 and GENE4013. Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), essay/assignment (20%), practical reports (20%), presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Lectures, practical work and field trip(s) covering advanced aspects of the theory, philosophy and practice of plant breeding. Included are extended discussions of screening techniques (in the field, glasshouse and laboratory), conservation and exploitation of diversity, disease resistance, tissue culture, plant cytogenetics of relevance to pre-breeding and breeding. Also considered are the role of biotechnology processes and products in plant breeding; genetic engineering and the use of molecular marker technologies. This course will use examples from the full range of crops; broad-acre cereals and legumes, pastures, turf and horticultural crops, both perennial and annual. The main base of the course may vary between the ATP and Camden campuses. Field trips (mainly to the IA Watson Grains Research Centre, Narrabri) will be used especially to examine trial procedures and field-based operations, and to interact with commercial plant breeding.
AFNR5512 Water Management and Variable Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hour workshop per week, practical work, project work during workshops Assumed knowledge: UG Maths or Physics or Hydrology. Assessment: 3 assignments (50%), 2-hour exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on knowledge gained in undergraduate science units to develop an understanding of how climate variability affects water resources. Particular focus will be on the effect of climate variability and drought and how this affects plant production and water storage. At the completion of this unit student would be able to: Quantify drought and understand the different dimensions of drought; understand how climate variability impacts plant production and what stages; understand the memory of drought and the impact on resilience; understand how climate change can impact water availability in the future. Open source software packages such as R will be used for most analysis.
AFNR5701 Plants and the Environment

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Margaret Barbour Session: Semester 1 Classes: 24 hrs lectures and in-class discussion, 36 hours practical Assessment: One 2hr exam (40%), in-class discussion (10%), research manuscript (25%), either research proposal or research manuscript (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The focus of this unit is the response of plants to the environment, drawing examples from both managed and natural ecosystems. Students will develop advanced-level understanding of plant-environment interaction at scales from leaves to whole ecosystems through presentation and discussion of current research papers. Practical sessions will provide students with hands-on experience of state-of-the-art measurement techniques. Understanding of basic biophysical processes will be applied to inform discussion about the effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystem services, including crop productivity.
Textbooks
Copies of research papers for each lecture/discussion will be provided, as will review papers where appropriate.
AFNR5801 Climate Change: Process, History, Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Franks (Coordinator), Dr Dan Penny, Dr Malcolm Possell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 18 hours lectures/tutorials, 12 hours practicals/field classes, 9 hours field trip preparation Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of climate change processes and issues. Assessment: 2-hour exam (40%), tutorials (20%), practical report from field exercise (manuscript format) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an overview of current debates and approaches to understanding and quantifying interactions between the biosphere, oceans and atmosphere, as used around the world, and the consequences of those interactions for climate. The unit considers climate change on a variety of timescales. This unit will include a weekend field trip to Snowy Mountains field sites where students will be introduced to climate change research.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided consisting of selected book chapters, journal articles and other publications
GOVT6314 Terrorism and International Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent in intensive session Assessment: 1x3000wd research essay (50%), 1x1hr final exam (20%), 1x2000wd analytical brief (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a comprehensive theoretical and empirical introduction to the problem of terrorism worldwide and its impact on global security. It will cover the origins of terrorism, the structure and behavior of terrorist organisations, social, political, economic, and technological trends that impact terrorism and the threat it poses, and the complexities of counterterrorism policy. The knowledge and analytical skills acquired by students in this unit will be instrumental in understanding the challenge of terrorism.
LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Alexandra Fowler Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive March,Intensive September Classes: Intensive March S1CIMR (Group A): Feb 25, 26, 28 and Mar 1 (9-5); Intensive April S1CIAP (Group B): Mar 18, 19 and 25, 26 (9-5); Intensive August S2CIAU (Group C): Aug 5, 6 and 8, 9 (9-5); Intensive September S2CISE (Group D): Aug 26, 27 and Sep 2, 3 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6881 Assessment: Assessment: in-class test (30%) and assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students are recommended to enrol well in advance of classes in order to complete pre-class readings (normally available to enrolled students 3 weeks prior to the first class). Law graduates from a non-common law jurisdiction are also recommended to complete classes for this unit during the first week of their commencing semester. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This is a compulsory unit for all postgraduate students who do not hold a law degree or equivalent from a common law jurisdiction entering the: Master of Administrative Law and Policy; Master of Business Law; Master of Environmental Law; Master of Environmental Science and Law; Master of Health Law; Master of Labour Law and Relations as well as Graduate Diplomas offered in these programs. The unit has been designed to equip students with the necessary legal skills and legal knowledge to competently apply themselves in their chosen area of law. Instruction will cover the legislative process; the judiciary and specialist tribunals; precedent; court hierarchies; legal reasoning; constitutional law; administrative law; contracts; and torts. Some elements of the unit will be tailored in accordance with the requirements of the particular specialist programs.
PUBH5600 Biosecurity Seminar Series

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Walsh; Dr Gabriella Scandurra Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 2-hr lectures plus 8 x 1-hr seminar/tutorial plus 18-hrs online curated content requiring student responses Prerequisites: CISS6004 or GOVT6316 or MECO6909 or WORK6130 or unit of study coordinator permission. Assessment: 1 x 2500wd detailed assignment plus 3 x 1000wd written policy briefs plus seminar participation and online responses Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the capstone unit for the Master of Health Security. The unit is designed to bring together the knowledge achieved throughout the degree for students to use critical thinking and leadership skills to solve global health security issues presented to them. The unit will consist of a series of eight lectures and seminars that will present students with complex health security issues. Students will then critically evaluate the human and animal, biosafety and biodefense, and agrosecurity perspectives to understand how they are interconnected and appreciate the difficulty in realistically and appropriately solving these issues.

Elective units of study

CISS6006 Statebuilding and 'Fragile States'

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd intelligence briefing paper (40%), Seminar participation (10%), 1x500wd actor profile (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically examines the notion of state fragility within the global system. It investigates the characteristics of so-called 'fragile' and 'failed' states, and the nature of international engagement with (and discourses about) these states. It explores various perspectives on state formation in both Western and post-colonial contexts, and emphasises the ways in which knowledge is produced about non-Western states. The unit expands upon the theoretical literature with evidence from case studies in Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia.
CISS6024 MHlthSec Practice Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: There are no lectures; however it is estimated that each practice placement will entail a minimum of 14 contact hours for consultation and supervision. The standard arrangement is expected to be: - 2 hour initial consultation meeting to discuss possible placement options and how the practice placement arrangements function; - minimum of 12 hours supervision of students per practice placement (i.e. 2 hours per week per student) Assessment: 1x1000wd placement proposal (20%), 1xreflective journal (20%), 1x4000wd project report (60%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit gives students who have completed their first 24 credit points of the Master of Health Security with a 75% or more grade point average the opportunity to undertake a work placement in a relevant institution to gain valuable work experience. During placements students will undertake a project that will make a useful contribution to the workplace.
GOVT6164 The Dual Use Dilemma and Research Policy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x1500wd issue brief (40%), 1x4000wd research essay (50%), 1x500wd self-evaluation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Some science and technology can be used for both benefit and harm. This interdisciplinary unit critically examines the security and policy implications of dual use research and related technologies across several important fields, ranging from nuclear and information technology to the life sciences. Students will consider the costs and benefits of specific developments in science and technology, as well as the various mechanisms that governments and civil society can use to mitigate the risks that new knowledge or tools will be used for nefarious purposes.
GOVT6319 Governance and Public Policy Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6x3hr lectures-tutorials/weeks 1-6, 1x7hr weekend class, 1x4hr weekend class Assessment: 1x3000wd Case study (40%), 1x1500wd equivalent Group presentation (25%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (25%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is focused on two major concepts which are mobilised in the explanation of the way we are governed: 'public policy' and 'governance'. It aims to clarify what is meant by these constructs, and how they can be used in the analysis of governing. It examines the argument that 'governance' denotes a change in the way we are governed, and works through a combination of analytic development and detailed empirical cases to establish the significance of these concepts in both the analysis and the practice of governing.
HPOL5007 Global Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider, Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode 2 x 2 day workshops plus 4 tutorials (tutorials offered face-to-face or online). Online mode: pre-recorded lectures plus 4 online tutorials and week-by-week online activities and discussion. Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (35%), Tutorial discussion papers or online discussion (15%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
The aim of this unit is to equip students with the knowledge and skills to identify and articulate political and policy processes at the global level, become familiar with institutions and actors involved in global health policy, and utilize strategies for influencing policy making at the global level. We analyse the influence and power of institutions and actors in the development and implementation of global health policy, and investigate the governance of global health policy responses. Teaching makes extensive use of current case studies from recognised experts in the field. By the end of this unit students will be able to: Explain the effects of globalization on health of populations; Demonstrate how events and trends in health and non-health areas affect global health policy; Identify and classify the different types of actors/institutions that influence health policy; Undertake a policy stakeholder analysis with reference to power, influence and interests; Develop strategies to influence global health policy development and implementation; Define global health governance and its role in structuring and regulating global health policy.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London.
LAWS6320 Climate Justice and Disaster Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 16, 17 and 23, 24 (9-5) Assessment: class participation (10%) and 8000wd essay (90%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit replaced LAWS6320 Climate Disaster Law. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
Climate change impacts are already being felt around the world and governments are called upon to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, engage in climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction, and respond to the loss and damage caused by climate disasters. Climate disasters demand an integration of multilateral negotiations on emissions reduction and adaptation, disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, Human Rights and human security. Via detailed examination of recent law and policy initiatives from developed and developing countries, this unit offers students a unique approach to human and non-human Climate Justice and its application to all stages of a disaster: prevention; response, recovery and rebuilding; and compensation and risk transfer. The role of insurance plays an important part in compensation and risk transfer. The unit of study comprehensively analyses the complexities of climate science, economics and their interfaces with the climate law-and policy-making processes, and also provides an in-depth analysis of multilateral climate change negotiations dating from the establishment of the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to the 2015 Paris Agreement.
PACS6923 The Human Right to Food

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 2 for Semester 1, 3hrs online equivalent/week commencing week 6 of Semester 2 (Session 10) Assessment: Continuous assessment equivalent to 2500wds (70%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Online
The human right to adequate food is considered in light of recent developments in economic and social rights to complement civil and political rights: historical foundations; the influence of the World Food Summit 1996; the application of the human right to adequate food in various contexts - specific countries, in relation to refugees, infants etc; analysing concrete situations to identify violations of the human right to adequate food; and formulating proposals for policy and legislation to realise the human right to adequate food in specific contexts.

Biodefence and Biosafety Specialisation

Core units of study

CISS6004 Health and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Issue brief (35%), 1x3000wd Research essay (50%), 1x500wd Self-evaluation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assesses the political and security significance of disease-related events and developments. Whether one contemplates historical experiences with smallpox, the contemporary challenges posed by diseases such as HIV/AIDS and SARS, or the risks arising from new scientific developments such as synthetic biology, it is clear that diseases exercise a powerful influence over civilised humankind. The unit concentrates on areas in which human health and security concerns intersect most closely, including: biological weapons; fast-moving disease outbreaks of natural origin; safety and security in microbiology laboratories; and the relationships between infectious disease patterns, public health capacity, state functioning and violent conflict. The overall aim of the unit is to provide students with a stronger understanding of the scientific and political nature of these problems, why and how they might threaten security, and the conceptual and empirical connections between them.
GOVT6313 Leadership in Theory and Practice

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd leadership research paper (25%), 1x1000wd Leader in Action group proposal (15%), 1x20min Leader in Action group presentation (20%), 1x3500wd reflective journal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'The leader points the way.' Eleanor Roosevelt. Leadership is a story that resolves these questions: What is a leader? What kinds of leaders are there? Is democratic leadership different from other kinds? Is leadership in a local community similar to that in national politics or international politics? Are leaders made or born? Is leadership generic? Is it the same in Europe and Asia? What is the difference between a leader and a manager? This unit reviews and evaluates theories of leadership. Participants' experiences and perceptions of leadership are an important part of the unit.
GOVT6316 Policy Making, Power and Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Short Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Long Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the nature of public policy and the processes by which it is produced. Relevant issues are common to all nation states, although they take specific forms in each individual country. First, the unit takes an overview of public policy - dealing with basic themes such as 'What is policy?' through to different approaches to understanding the policy process. These include policy cycles, rationality, interest groups, institutions, and socio-economic interests. Second, it maps out and examines the main components of public policy making: actors, institutions and policy instruments. Third, it focuses on aspects of policy-making processes which often attract a high level of attention from analysts. These include problem definition, agenda setting, decision-taking, policy implementation, policy evaluation and crisis policy-making. Fourth, it examines wider issues in terms of the state and who ultimately holds power over the making and shaping of public policy. Finally, it examines the 'bigger pictures' of long term policy trends, and the extent to which national policy making capacities and processes have been affected by globalisation. Assessments offer a large element of flexibility, allowing students to concentrate on areas of particular interest.
MECO6909 Crisis Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1000wd short-answer essay (30%), 1x3000wd research report (50%), 1x500wd group project presentation (10%), 1x500wd weekly comments (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit will examine how organisations use public relations (PR) to deal with crisis situations. Throughout the unit we will use case studies to explore frameworks, risk prioritisation, issues management, planning, response and evaluation strategies for diverse organisations and topics from environmental and corporate to health and social.

Capstone unit of study

CISS6009 Research Essay 1

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8, or equivalent hours arranged by supervisor and student Assessment: 6000wd Research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit consists of a 6000 word Research essay under the guidance of a supervisor from CISS. Normally it involves deeper study of a subject which the student has already covered in her/his degree. Entry into this unit is by permission only, and depends upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic and student's existing knowledge in the area. MCom, MBus, and MIntSec students can take this unit as a stand-alone elective unit. MIntSec students may also take this unit in conjunction with CISS6010 Research essay 2, writing a supervised dissertation of 10000 - 12000 words.
CISS6010 Research Essay 2

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8, or equivalent hours as arranged by supervisor and student. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75% Corequisites: CISS6009 Assessment: 10,000-12,000wd Research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is the second of a two-part, supervised dissertation of 10000 -12000 words to be taken in conjunction with CISS6009 Research essay 1. Entry into this unit is by permission only and requires the completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75%, and upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic.
PUBH5600 Biosecurity Seminar Series

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Walsh; Dr Gabriella Scandurra Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 2-hr lectures plus 8 x 1-hr seminar/tutorial plus 18-hrs online curated content requiring student responses Prerequisites: CISS6004 or GOVT6316 or MECO6909 or WORK6130 or unit of study coordinator permission. Assessment: 1 x 2500wd detailed assignment plus 3 x 1000wd written policy briefs plus seminar participation and online responses Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the capstone unit for the Master of Health Security. The unit is designed to bring together the knowledge achieved throughout the degree for students to use critical thinking and leadership skills to solve global health security issues presented to them. The unit will consist of a series of eight lectures and seminars that will present students with complex health security issues. Students will then critically evaluate the human and animal, biosafety and biodefense, and agrosecurity perspectives to understand how they are interconnected and appreciate the difficulty in realistically and appropriately solving these issues.

Core Elective units of study

BETH5000 Critical Concepts in Bioethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Angus Dawson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13x2hr seminars or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode Assessment: 1x 750wd review (15%) and 1x 1500wd essay (30%) and 1x 2000-2500wd essay (45%) and 1x online work/class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Note: This is a capstone Unit for the Master of Bioethics. If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only. Students will be contacted if this occurs.
This unit of study offers a critical review of the field and methods of bioethics. The course explores the meaning of 'bioethics' as a concept and practice, both historically and in contemporary discussions. The seminars explore a diverse range of different perspectives and methods that people have used in bioethics from a critical perspective. Topics include the exploration of 'bioethics' as a topic and concept, the focus on the ethical dimensions of advances in biomedical science and biotechnology, using different theoretical positions such as risk and precaution, virtue, narrative, political philosophy, cross-cultural bioethics, especially indigenous thinking, feminist bioethics, bioethics and non-human animals, public health and, climate change and ecological and environmental bioethics. Learning activities will include seminars and small group discussion.
Textbooks
All readings can be accessed through the library or online
BETH5101 Introduction to Ethical Reasoning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Ian Kerridge and Dr Lisa Dive Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online plus 2x7 hour intensives (optional) Assessment: 1x 2000wd essay (35%); 1x 4000wd essay (55%); participation in seminars or online (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Note: If a sufficient number of students express interest, two days of face-to-face lectures will be held to supplement online learning.
In this unit of study students gain the background in ethical philosophy necessary to engage in advanced analyses of issues in bioethics. Introduction to Ethical Reasoning familiarises students with classical theoretical frameworks such as virtue ethics, Kantian deontology, and utilitarianism that have been influential in the history of Western philosophy. The unit also examines more contemporary approaches to ethics, such as the capabilities approach, feminist ethics, human rights doctrines, and poststructuralist approaches. Across these different theoretical frameworks, discussions will focus on topics such as cultural relativism, universalism in ethics, difference and power.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
Students are provided with links to online readings (via the eResearve system). Supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
GOVT6164 The Dual Use Dilemma and Research Policy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x1500wd issue brief (40%), 1x4000wd research essay (50%), 1x500wd self-evaluation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Some science and technology can be used for both benefit and harm. This interdisciplinary unit critically examines the security and policy implications of dual use research and related technologies across several important fields, ranging from nuclear and information technology to the life sciences. Students will consider the costs and benefits of specific developments in science and technology, as well as the various mechanisms that governments and civil society can use to mitigate the risks that new knowledge or tools will be used for nefarious purposes.
GOVT6314 Terrorism and International Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent in intensive session Assessment: 1x3000wd research essay (50%), 1x1hr final exam (20%), 1x2000wd analytical brief (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a comprehensive theoretical and empirical introduction to the problem of terrorism worldwide and its impact on global security. It will cover the origins of terrorism, the structure and behavior of terrorist organisations, social, political, economic, and technological trends that impact terrorism and the threat it poses, and the complexities of counterterrorism policy. The knowledge and analytical skills acquired by students in this unit will be instrumental in understanding the challenge of terrorism.
ITLS6007 Disaster Relief Operations

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr workshops. Prohibitions: TPTM6390 Assessment: Individual essay (25%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Large scale, sudden onset disasters strike with little or no warning. In their wake they leave shattered infrastructure, collapsed services and traumatised populations, while the number of dead, injured and homeless often reaches staggering proportions. Humanitarian aid organisations, such as the Red Cross, Doctors without Borders or Oxfam, to name just a few, are usually amongst the first responders, but depend on extremely agile supply chains to support their worldwide operations. Successful disaster relief missions are characterised by the ability of professionals to cope with time pressure, high uncertainty and unusual restrictions. This unit is designed as an introduction to the coordination and management of humanitarian aid and emergency response logistics. Case studies of real events, such as the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake provide the framework for analysis and research, while discussion of operational factors, simulations, workshops and group exercises offer students an interactive learning environment.
ITLS6301 City Logistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit conveys the fundamentals of city logistics, which is the pickup, storage, transport and delivery of freight in urban areas. All aspects of city logistics from planning, management and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact are covered for cities of all types. The relationships between land use, transport and city logistics are described. Traffic engineering concepts like 'link' and 'place' are explored and the implications for location and design of loading zones and docks as well as underground service networks are considered. Forms of urban freight consolidation centre are looked at along with the role of alternative transport modes, like public transport, cycles, electric vehicles and drones. Ecommerce and fulfilment models are also studied. The implications for city logistics of new technologies, apps and the 'sharing economy' are considered. International case studies are covered. Seminars by city logistics professionals complement the lectures. Students have an opportunity to develop city logistics solutions for themselves through a group design project.
LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Alexandra Fowler Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive March,Intensive September Classes: Intensive March S1CIMR (Group A): Feb 25, 26, 28 and Mar 1 (9-5); Intensive April S1CIAP (Group B): Mar 18, 19 and 25, 26 (9-5); Intensive August S2CIAU (Group C): Aug 5, 6 and 8, 9 (9-5); Intensive September S2CISE (Group D): Aug 26, 27 and Sep 2, 3 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6881 Assessment: Assessment: in-class test (30%) and assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students are recommended to enrol well in advance of classes in order to complete pre-class readings (normally available to enrolled students 3 weeks prior to the first class). Law graduates from a non-common law jurisdiction are also recommended to complete classes for this unit during the first week of their commencing semester. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This is a compulsory unit for all postgraduate students who do not hold a law degree or equivalent from a common law jurisdiction entering the: Master of Administrative Law and Policy; Master of Business Law; Master of Environmental Law; Master of Environmental Science and Law; Master of Health Law; Master of Labour Law and Relations as well as Graduate Diplomas offered in these programs. The unit has been designed to equip students with the necessary legal skills and legal knowledge to competently apply themselves in their chosen area of law. Instruction will cover the legislative process; the judiciary and specialist tribunals; precedent; court hierarchies; legal reasoning; constitutional law; administrative law; contracts; and torts. Some elements of the unit will be tailored in accordance with the requirements of the particular specialist programs.
LAWS6856 Anti-Terrorism Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ben Saul Session: Intensive May Classes: May 3, 4 and 10, 11 (9-5) Prohibitions: CISS6011 or LAWS3483 Assessment: 6000wd essay (70%) and take-home exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This unit aims to introduce you to the diverse range of anti-terrorism laws and policies which have developed at the international, regional and domestic levels, and which proliferated after the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001. Laws will be evaluated in the light of their profound and complex political, ideological and ethical implications for political order, legal systems, human rights, and international relations. In essence, the study of terrorism (and the law's response to it) is the study of the timeless philosophical question of when political violence is justified, against whom, and for what purposes - whether it is 'freedom fighters', or 'State terrorism', that is at issue.
PUBH5600 Biosecurity Seminar Series

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Walsh; Dr Gabriella Scandurra Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 2-hr lectures plus 8 x 1-hr seminar/tutorial plus 18-hrs online curated content requiring student responses Prerequisites: CISS6004 or GOVT6316 or MECO6909 or WORK6130 or unit of study coordinator permission. Assessment: 1 x 2500wd detailed assignment plus 3 x 1000wd written policy briefs plus seminar participation and online responses Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the capstone unit for the Master of Health Security. The unit is designed to bring together the knowledge achieved throughout the degree for students to use critical thinking and leadership skills to solve global health security issues presented to them. The unit will consist of a series of eight lectures and seminars that will present students with complex health security issues. Students will then critically evaluate the human and animal, biosafety and biodefense, and agrosecurity perspectives to understand how they are interconnected and appreciate the difficulty in realistically and appropriately solving these issues.

Elective units of study

BETH5201 Ethics and Biotechnology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance Education (online). Assessment: 2x400wd tasks (2x10%); 1x1500wd essay (30%); 1x2500wd essay (40%); participation in seminars or online (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study introduces students to the ethical, social and legal issues that underlie a wide range of biotechnologies, including: genetics, genomics, human reproduction, stem cell research, nanotechnology and emerging biotechnologies. Key concepts influencing debates in this area are covered, such as 'procreative beneficence', personhood, risk, consent, public engagement, and property in the body (including gene patenting). Topical case studies are included to keep up with recent developments in the field. Students will explore the ethical limits to research and knowledge in biotechnology.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x7hour intensives; or Distance Education (online). Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assessment: 5xOnline Quiz (50%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit provides students with an overview of the ethical and political issues that underlie public health and public health research. The unit begins with some fundamentals: the nature of ethics, of public health (and how it might be different to clinical medicine) and of public health ethics. It introduces key concepts in public health ethics including liberty, utility, justice, solidarity and reciprocity, and introduces students to different ways of reasoning about the ethics of public health. A range of practical public health problems and issues will be considered, including ethical dimensions of communicable and non-communicable diseases in populations, and the ethical challenges of public health research. Throughout, the emphasis is on learning to make sound arguments about the ethical aspects of public health policy, practice and research. Most learning occurs in the context of five teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format).
CISS6006 Statebuilding and 'Fragile States'

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd intelligence briefing paper (40%), Seminar participation (10%), 1x500wd actor profile (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically examines the notion of state fragility within the global system. It investigates the characteristics of so-called 'fragile' and 'failed' states, and the nature of international engagement with (and discourses about) these states. It explores various perspectives on state formation in both Western and post-colonial contexts, and emphasises the ways in which knowledge is produced about non-Western states. The unit expands upon the theoretical literature with evidence from case studies in Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia.
CISS6012 Civil-Military Relations

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and 1000wd equivalent seminar presentation (30%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students must not undertake this unit if they took CISS6011 (Special Topic in International Security) when the special topic was Civil-Military Relations
This unit assesses the nature and effectiveness of civil-military cooperation and coordination in preparing for, responding to, and averting the impact of natural disasters (such as the 2004 tsunami) and conflict, particularly in Australia's nearer region. The new realities of intra-state conflict and support to fragile states have seen Australia commit increased resources to enhance prospects for stability and reduce population displacement, while promoting economic development and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals to reduce poverty. Students in this unit will examine the nexus between state-centric and human security, as well as the difficulties for military forces and humanitarian actors in navigating the 'space' in which they are co-located. Policies, principles and practices of the Australian Government, the United Nations, and other key international actors and non-government organisations are considered. Attention is also given to disaster risk reduction and peace-building strategies to help minimise the severity of natural disasters and the reversion of fragile states into conflict. Focus is given to the problems and severity of population displacement, and to the civil-military requirements to implement population protection, particularly under the Responsibility to Protect framework. The overall aim of the unit is for students to gain a better understanding of the boundaries and complexities of civil-military relations in disaster and conflict situations, and to consider initiatives relevant to Australia.
CISS6024 MHlthSec Practice Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: There are no lectures; however it is estimated that each practice placement will entail a minimum of 14 contact hours for consultation and supervision. The standard arrangement is expected to be: - 2 hour initial consultation meeting to discuss possible placement options and how the practice placement arrangements function; - minimum of 12 hours supervision of students per practice placement (i.e. 2 hours per week per student) Assessment: 1x1000wd placement proposal (20%), 1xreflective journal (20%), 1x4000wd project report (60%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit gives students who have completed their first 24 credit points of the Master of Health Security with a 75% or more grade point average the opportunity to undertake a work placement in a relevant institution to gain valuable work experience. During placements students will undertake a project that will make a useful contribution to the workplace.
GOVT6319 Governance and Public Policy Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6x3hr lectures-tutorials/weeks 1-6, 1x7hr weekend class, 1x4hr weekend class Assessment: 1x3000wd Case study (40%), 1x1500wd equivalent Group presentation (25%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (25%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is focused on two major concepts which are mobilised in the explanation of the way we are governed: 'public policy' and 'governance'. It aims to clarify what is meant by these constructs, and how they can be used in the analysis of governing. It examines the argument that 'governance' denotes a change in the way we are governed, and works through a combination of analytic development and detailed empirical cases to establish the significance of these concepts in both the analysis and the practice of governing.
LAWS6920 Global Health Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lawrence Gostin Session: Intensive July Classes: Jul 9-12 (10-5.30) Assessment: Option 1: 7000wd essay (80%) and simulation participation and contribution (20%) or Option 2: 4000wd essay (50%), simulation participation and contribution (20%) and assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
Today, domestic health and global health are recognized as intertwined and inseparable. The determinants of health (e.g. pathogens, air, water, goods, and lifestyle choices) are increasingly international in origin, expanding the need for health governance structures that transcend traditional and increasingly inadequate national approaches. In this unit, students will gain an in-depth understanding of global health law through careful examination of the major contemporary problems in global health, the principal international legal instruments governing global health, the principal international organizations, and innovative solutions for global health governance in the 21st Century. Class sessions will consist of a combination of lecture and interactive discussion, culminating in a global health law simulation. The class will cover naturally occurring infectious diseases (e.g. extensively drug resistant tuberculosis, malaria, Zika virus, and HIV/AIDS), past (e.g., SARS, influenza A H1N1 and Ebola) and future (e.g., Influenza pandemics), bioterrorism events (e.g., anthrax or smallpox), and/or major chronic diseases caused by modern lifestyles (e.g., obesity or tobacco use).
Textbooks
Lawrence O. Gostin, Global Health Law (March 2014) available from Harvard University Press or Amazon.com
LAWS6839 Critical Issues in Public Health Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roger Magnusson Session: Intensive May Classes: Intro Class: Mar 11 (6-8) then Mar 21, 22 and Apr 29, 30 (9-5) Assessment: Option 1: short response question or short presentation (20%) and 6000wd essay (80%), Option 2: short response question or short presentation (20%), 3000-3500wd essay (40%) and take-home exam question (40%) or Option 3: short response question or short presentation (20%) and 2 x 3000-3500wd essays (40% each) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: MHL students may select this unit as one of the three core units required in addition to LAWS6252 or LAWS6881. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
This unit provides an introduction to public health law. It begins by asking the question 'What is public health law?' It explores the historical concerns and conceptual focus of public health law, and how they have evolved over time. Next, the unit reviews a series of case studies that illustrate the sources of public health law, including the impact of international law on access to essential medicines in low-income countries, and the impact of constitutional rights on governments' capacity to protect public health. The case studies illustrate the wide variety of legal issues that arise in public health, as well as debates about the appropriate limits for law in protecting health in a liberal democracy, and the irreducibly political nature of public health law. The unit then considers three foundational topics in public health law. These are: Australia's legal framework for responding to public health emergencies (with a focus on pandemic influenza, and other contagious diseases with pandemic potential); law's role in regulating sexual health and transmission of STIs; and tobacco and nicotine control. Key topics include: The definition and role of public health law; Case studies illustrating the sources of public health law; The legal framework for managing pandemic influenza and other acute public health threats; An introduction to tobacco control law; and law's role in promoting sexual health Throughout the unit, students will be trained to identify legal issues and to critically evaluate the impact of law on efforts to protect the public's health, with due regard to civil liberties and other competing public and private interests. A flexible assessment regime will allow students to focus on issues of interest within the unit.
GLOH5124 Humanitarian Crises and Refugee Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Lyndal Trevena, Mrs Priyanthi Abeyratne Session: Intensive October Classes: 15 hours of online lectures and interactive tasks as preparation followed by 4 consecutive days of workshops from October 28th 2019 to 1st November 2019 including a tabletop simulation exercise which is part of the assessment. Prohibitions: MIPH5124 Assessment: reflective writing task - 750 words (10%), simulation performance score (40%), assessable discussion (10%) and assignment - 2500 word- (40%) Mode of delivery: Online, Block mode
This unit gives students an overview of global health aspects of forced migration and humanitarian emergencies. This includes considering problems faced by government and non-government organisations in humanitarian emergency relief efforts as well as the increasing pressures of forced migration resulting from these. Topics covered in the unit include international and human rights law, the role of donor agencies, refugee health, nutritional emergencies, site planning for refugee camps, water and sanitation, sexual violence, protection of vulnerable groups, and communicable disease surveillance and control.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
PUBH5010 Epidemiology Methods and Uses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Mathieu, Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week for 13 weeks - face to face or their equivalent online Prohibitions: BSTA5011 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 1x 6 page assignment (25%), 10 weekly quizzes (5% in total) and 1x 2.5hr supervised open-book exam (70%). For distance students, it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit provides students with core skills in epidemiology, particularly the ability to critically appraise public health and clinical epidemiological research literature regarding public health and clinical issue. This unit covers: study types; measures of frequency and association; measurement bias; confounding/effect modification; randomized trials; systematic reviews; screening and test evaluation; infectious disease outbreaks; measuring public health impact and use and interpretation of population health data. In addition to formal classes or their on-line equivalent,it is expected that students spend an additional 2-3 hours at least each week preparing for their tutorials.
Textbooks
Webb, PW. Bain, CJ. and Pirozzo, SL. Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals Second Edition: Cambridge University Press 2017.
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker, Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block/intensive 2 blocks of 2 x 9-5 full days; please check with the coordinator for scheduling Assessment: Assignment 1: 1 x 2500 word (35%), Assignment 2: 1 x 2500 words or equivalent (35%), online activities (30%). Attendance at intensives is compulsory and 80% attendance is required to pass the unit of study. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit, students learn how to communicate effectively with respect to health risks, both to individuals with health concerns, and with respect to risks to the public. The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis; and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health, including: how to effectively manage outbreak or other crisis situations; how to communicate about issues where the risk is low but ublic concern is high (such as with respect to the fluoridation of water); and how to best manage controversies. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement, traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.

Human and Animal Health Specialisation [[ italic || (not available in 2019) ]]

Core units of study

CISS6004 Health and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Issue brief (35%), 1x3000wd Research essay (50%), 1x500wd Self-evaluation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assesses the political and security significance of disease-related events and developments. Whether one contemplates historical experiences with smallpox, the contemporary challenges posed by diseases such as HIV/AIDS and SARS, or the risks arising from new scientific developments such as synthetic biology, it is clear that diseases exercise a powerful influence over civilised humankind. The unit concentrates on areas in which human health and security concerns intersect most closely, including: biological weapons; fast-moving disease outbreaks of natural origin; safety and security in microbiology laboratories; and the relationships between infectious disease patterns, public health capacity, state functioning and violent conflict. The overall aim of the unit is to provide students with a stronger understanding of the scientific and political nature of these problems, why and how they might threaten security, and the conceptual and empirical connections between them.
GOVT6313 Leadership in Theory and Practice

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd leadership research paper (25%), 1x1000wd Leader in Action group proposal (15%), 1x20min Leader in Action group presentation (20%), 1x3500wd reflective journal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
'The leader points the way.' Eleanor Roosevelt. Leadership is a story that resolves these questions: What is a leader? What kinds of leaders are there? Is democratic leadership different from other kinds? Is leadership in a local community similar to that in national politics or international politics? Are leaders made or born? Is leadership generic? Is it the same in Europe and Asia? What is the difference between a leader and a manager? This unit reviews and evaluates theories of leadership. Participants' experiences and perceptions of leadership are an important part of the unit.
GOVT6316 Policy Making, Power and Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Short Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Long Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the nature of public policy and the processes by which it is produced. Relevant issues are common to all nation states, although they take specific forms in each individual country. First, the unit takes an overview of public policy - dealing with basic themes such as 'What is policy?' through to different approaches to understanding the policy process. These include policy cycles, rationality, interest groups, institutions, and socio-economic interests. Second, it maps out and examines the main components of public policy making: actors, institutions and policy instruments. Third, it focuses on aspects of policy-making processes which often attract a high level of attention from analysts. These include problem definition, agenda setting, decision-taking, policy implementation, policy evaluation and crisis policy-making. Fourth, it examines wider issues in terms of the state and who ultimately holds power over the making and shaping of public policy. Finally, it examines the 'bigger pictures' of long term policy trends, and the extent to which national policy making capacities and processes have been affected by globalisation. Assessments offer a large element of flexibility, allowing students to concentrate on areas of particular interest.
MECO6909 Crisis Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1000wd short-answer essay (30%), 1x3000wd research report (50%), 1x500wd group project presentation (10%), 1x500wd weekly comments (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit will examine how organisations use public relations (PR) to deal with crisis situations. Throughout the unit we will use case studies to explore frameworks, risk prioritisation, issues management, planning, response and evaluation strategies for diverse organisations and topics from environmental and corporate to health and social.

Captsone unit of study

CISS6009 Research Essay 1

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8, or equivalent hours arranged by supervisor and student Assessment: 6000wd Research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit consists of a 6000 word Research essay under the guidance of a supervisor from CISS. Normally it involves deeper study of a subject which the student has already covered in her/his degree. Entry into this unit is by permission only, and depends upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic and student's existing knowledge in the area. MCom, MBus, and MIntSec students can take this unit as a stand-alone elective unit. MIntSec students may also take this unit in conjunction with CISS6010 Research essay 2, writing a supervised dissertation of 10000 - 12000 words.
CISS6010 Research Essay 2

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8, or equivalent hours as arranged by supervisor and student. Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75% Corequisites: CISS6009 Assessment: 10,000-12,000wd Research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is the second of a two-part, supervised dissertation of 10000 -12000 words to be taken in conjunction with CISS6009 Research essay 1. Entry into this unit is by permission only and requires the completion of a minimum of 4 units with an average of 75%, and upon the availability of a CISS supervisor for the proposed topic.
PUBH5600 Biosecurity Seminar Series

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Walsh; Dr Gabriella Scandurra Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 2-hr lectures plus 8 x 1-hr seminar/tutorial plus 18-hrs online curated content requiring student responses Prerequisites: CISS6004 or GOVT6316 or MECO6909 or WORK6130 or unit of study coordinator permission. Assessment: 1 x 2500wd detailed assignment plus 3 x 1000wd written policy briefs plus seminar participation and online responses Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the capstone unit for the Master of Health Security. The unit is designed to bring together the knowledge achieved throughout the degree for students to use critical thinking and leadership skills to solve global health security issues presented to them. The unit will consist of a series of eight lectures and seminars that will present students with complex health security issues. Students will then critically evaluate the human and animal, biosafety and biodefense, and agrosecurity perspectives to understand how they are interconnected and appreciate the difficulty in realistically and appropriately solving these issues.

Core Elective units of study

HPOL5007 Global Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider, Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode 2 x 2 day workshops plus 4 tutorials (tutorials offered face-to-face or online). Online mode: pre-recorded lectures plus 4 online tutorials and week-by-week online activities and discussion. Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (35%), Tutorial discussion papers or online discussion (15%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
The aim of this unit is to equip students with the knowledge and skills to identify and articulate political and policy processes at the global level, become familiar with institutions and actors involved in global health policy, and utilize strategies for influencing policy making at the global level. We analyse the influence and power of institutions and actors in the development and implementation of global health policy, and investigate the governance of global health policy responses. Teaching makes extensive use of current case studies from recognised experts in the field. By the end of this unit students will be able to: Explain the effects of globalization on health of populations; Demonstrate how events and trends in health and non-health areas affect global health policy; Identify and classify the different types of actors/institutions that influence health policy; Undertake a policy stakeholder analysis with reference to power, influence and interests; Develop strategies to influence global health policy development and implementation; Define global health governance and its role in structuring and regulating global health policy.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London.
GLOH5112 Global Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne, Ms Kerri Anton Session: Semester 2 Classes: face to face students: 13x1.5hr lecture and 11x1.5hr tutorial, 1x4hr workshop and 1x8hr presentation online students: 13x1.5hr online lecture and 11 weeks of tutorial discussion, 4hr online workshop content and 8hr online presentation content Assessment: 1x3000 word written essay (50%) tutorial facilitation and participation (20%) -face-to-face students will each facilitate a 1.5hr tutorial session -online students will each facilitate a 1-week online discussion board 1 x student group presentation (25%) -face-to-face student groups will give a 30-min oral presentation (accompanied by a powerpoint) -online student groups will upload a 30-min powerpoint presentation peer evaluation of student presentation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gives candidates essential knowledge of prevention and control of communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries using country-specific examples. After successfully completing this unit of study, candidates will understand the key issues in communicable diseases and their control in developing countries, as well as gain the knowledge and insight on how prevention and control mechanisms and programs are developed for these diseases in resource-poor settings. The unit covers disease emergence, respiratory tract infections (including TB), vector-borne infections, food- and water-borne infections, neurological infections, neglected tropical diseases, bloodborne and sexually transmitted infections (including HIV) and drug-resistant infections.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
GLOH5101 Foundations of Global Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Seye Abimbol, Dr Giselle Manalo Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar per week for 12 weeks, 1x1day group presentations Prohibitions: MIPH5131 or MIPH5132 Assessment: 1x1500 word assignment (25%), 1x asynchronized group presentation for online and f2f students (25%), 1x2500 word assignment (40%), assessable tutorial discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit for the Master of Global Health will give students insight into historical and contemporary contexts of global health and global health interventions, as well as looking at global health as a system. Students will engage critically with the essential issues of global health, including cultural relativism and ethics, equity, human rights, measuring global health, global responsibility and securitisation of health, the role of non-health entities impact on global health, and foreign aid.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
PUBH5010 Epidemiology Methods and Uses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Mathieu, Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week for 13 weeks - face to face or their equivalent online Prohibitions: BSTA5011 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 1x 6 page assignment (25%), 10 weekly quizzes (5% in total) and 1x 2.5hr supervised open-book exam (70%). For distance students, it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit provides students with core skills in epidemiology, particularly the ability to critically appraise public health and clinical epidemiological research literature regarding public health and clinical issue. This unit covers: study types; measures of frequency and association; measurement bias; confounding/effect modification; randomized trials; systematic reviews; screening and test evaluation; infectious disease outbreaks; measuring public health impact and use and interpretation of population health data. In addition to formal classes or their on-line equivalent,it is expected that students spend an additional 2-3 hours at least each week preparing for their tutorials.
Textbooks
Webb, PW. Bain, CJ. and Pirozzo, SL. Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals Second Edition: Cambridge University Press 2017.
PUBH5117 Communicable Disease Control

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr online lecture and 2hrs online group discussion per week for 12 weeks Assessment: online discussion and other online activities (20%), online quizzes (10%), and 2 x 2000 word written assignments (70%) Mode of delivery: Online
This fully online unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the burden of communicable diseases of public health significance in Australia, as well as the biology, epidemiology and surveillance for and control of those communicable diseases. By the end of this unit, the student will have the theoretical background to take up a position as a member of a Communicable Diseases section of a Commonwealth or State Health Department or Public Health Unit. It is expected that the students undertake an extra hour per week of reading, research and preparation for discussion.
Textbooks
Recommended: Heymann. David L. (2014): Control of communicable diseases manual. American Public Health Association. Other readings provided on the course eLearning site.
PUBH5600 Biosecurity Seminar Series

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Walsh; Dr Gabriella Scandurra Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 2-hr lectures plus 8 x 1-hr seminar/tutorial plus 18-hrs online curated content requiring student responses Prerequisites: CISS6004 or GOVT6316 or MECO6909 or WORK6130 or unit of study coordinator permission. Assessment: 1 x 2500wd detailed assignment plus 3 x 1000wd written policy briefs plus seminar participation and online responses Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the capstone unit for the Master of Health Security. The unit is designed to bring together the knowledge achieved throughout the degree for students to use critical thinking and leadership skills to solve global health security issues presented to them. The unit will consist of a series of eight lectures and seminars that will present students with complex health security issues. Students will then critically evaluate the human and animal, biosafety and biodefense, and agrosecurity perspectives to understand how they are interconnected and appreciate the difficulty in realistically and appropriately solving these issues.

Elective units of study

BETH5209 Medicines Policy, Economics and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Wendy Lipworth, Dr Narcyz Ghinea Session: Semester 2 Classes: Fully online. Assumed knowledge: A degree in science, medicine, pharmacy, nursing, allied health, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, history, law, communications, public policy, business, economics, commerce, organisation studies, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: Online work (15%) 1x minor essay (35%) 1x major essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Medicines save lives but they can be costly and can have serious adverse effects. Value-laden decisions are continuously being made at individual, institutional, national and international levels regarding the medicines we need, want and can afford. In this unit of study, we will explore and critique global and national policies and processes related to medicines, examining how research and development agendas are set; how medicines are assessed and evaluated; and how new technologies are translated into practice. We will also explore broader trends such as globalisation, commercialisation and changing consumer expectations. By the end of the course, students will understand the forces shaping the development, regulation, funding and uptake of medicines both nationally and internationally, and the political, ethical, legal and economic issues that are at stake. This course is designed to appeal to a wide range of students from ethics, law, public health, health care, policy, communications, economics, business, politics, administration, and biomedical science.
Textbooks
Readings will be provided
CISS6024 MHlthSec Practice Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: There are no lectures; however it is estimated that each practice placement will entail a minimum of 14 contact hours for consultation and supervision. The standard arrangement is expected to be: - 2 hour initial consultation meeting to discuss possible placement options and how the practice placement arrangements function; - minimum of 12 hours supervision of students per practice placement (i.e. 2 hours per week per student) Assessment: 1x1000wd placement proposal (20%), 1xreflective journal (20%), 1x4000wd project report (60%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit gives students who have completed their first 24 credit points of the Master of Health Security with a 75% or more grade point average the opportunity to undertake a work placement in a relevant institution to gain valuable work experience. During placements students will undertake a project that will make a useful contribution to the workplace.
GOVT6164 The Dual Use Dilemma and Research Policy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x1500wd issue brief (40%), 1x4000wd research essay (50%), 1x500wd self-evaluation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Some science and technology can be used for both benefit and harm. This interdisciplinary unit critically examines the security and policy implications of dual use research and related technologies across several important fields, ranging from nuclear and information technology to the life sciences. Students will consider the costs and benefits of specific developments in science and technology, as well as the various mechanisms that governments and civil society can use to mitigate the risks that new knowledge or tools will be used for nefarious purposes.
HIMT5067 Evidence Based Health Care

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hanafi Ali Session: Semester 1 Classes: 7 online self-directed learning modules, 1 day compulsory workshop (Wk 4), 3x compulsory tutorials (Wk 1, 7 and 10) Assessment: 3x quizzes (15%), written report (25%) and written exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: The three quizzes will be conducted during the workshop and complusory tutorials weeks 7 and 10.
This unit of study will teach students how to critically appraise clinical research pertinent to health professionals and to practice evidence-based decision-making. Self-directed modules address qualitative and quantitative study designs, experiences of therapies, effects of interventions, accuracy of diagnostic tests, prognoses, clinical decision analysis and systematic reviews.
Textbooks
Recommended - Hoffmann, T Bennett, S., and Del Mar C (Eds) (2013) Evidence-Based Practice. Across the Health Professions 2nd Edition, Sydney: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier
HPOL5003 Analysing Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Samantha Rowbotham Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode: 2 x 2 day workshops plus online activities. Online mode: pre-recorded lectures and week-by-week online discussion and activities. Assessment: 1x2500 word assignment (35%), participation grade (5 x short online or face-to-face learning activities) (15%), 1x3000 word policy analysis project proposal (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to develop skills for undertaking policy research and analysis from a systems thinking perspective. A multidisciplinary approach familiarises students with fundamental frameworks and methodologies that can be applied to analyse policy by drawing on multiple disciplines including public health, social and political sciences, behavioural sciences, public policy and history. By the end of the unit students will be able to: Define policy and formulate research questions that can be used to analyse policy and policy processes; Take a systems thinking approach to policy analsys and research; Understand and explain the different methodological approaches and research paradigms that can be applied in policy analysis and research; Apply a critical analysis to a case study of policy success or failure; Identify appropriate study designs, research methodologies, data collection methods and analysis frameworks for specific policy research questions; Design a systems thinking-informed analysis of a current policy issue.
Textbooks
Required and recommended readings and reference lists will be available through eLearning.
MIPH5132 Global Disease Burden and Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ying Zhang, Professor Michael Dibley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 13 weeks;1x1hr tutorial per week for 10 weeks (face to face students only); 10xonline tutorials that each run for one week (online students only); plus 1x1 day seminar on qualitative methods (face to face students only) and 1x1 day seminar on quantitativemethods (face to face students only); week long online qualitative and quantitative methods seminars (online students only) Assessment: qualitative and quantitative methods exercise (10%); 1x 1500 word case scenario based research methods written assessment (10%); 1x 3000 word individual essay (60%); and tutorial facilitation discussion (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Note: Departmental permission required for non-MIPH students
This unit introduces candidates to the global burden of disease in low and middle income countries and to field research methods (quantitative and qualitative methods) used to assess disease burden. Through the lectures, readings and tutorial discussions, students will learn about conditions, diseases, risk factors, causative determinants and the influence of socio-cultutral-economic-political and environmental factors that contribute most to the burden of disease in low- and middle-income countries. This unit provides candidates with an understanding of the major conditions responsible for illness, disability and premature mortality. The design and implementation of disease control and health promotion programs for developing country populations will be discussed based on an understanding of the biological, environmental, behavioral, social and cultural aspects of major health problems. Topics covered in the unit include the global burden of disease; methods for conducting both quantitative and qualitative applied field research; and the epidemiology, control and prevention strategies for communicable diseases- malaria, tuberculosis, neglected tropical illnesses, HIV; zoonoses; perinatal conditions; non-communicable siseases- cardiovascular diseases, mental helath; injury; disease priorities for child health and nutrition; planetary and environmental health i.e. air pollution.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearnng site.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan, Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%), 1 x 1hr online test (20%) and 1x1.5hr open-book exam (50%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5033 Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Philayrath Phongsavan, James Kite Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 half-day workshops, 9 face-to-face tutorials or online discussion; fully online version available Assessment: 1x1500 word assignment (25%); 1 presentation (15%); 1 x 2500 word assignment (50%); tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This core unit of study introduces students to evidence-based health promotion as a fundamental approach to promoting and improving health and well being, preventing disease and reducing health inequalities in populations. The unit is divided into three modules: (i) the building blocks of disease prevention and health promotion, (ii) using evidence to develop disease prevention and health promotion interventions, and (iii) evaluating disease prevention and health promotion programs to inform policy and practice. This unit will give students an understanding of disease prevention and health promotion and their relationship to public health, introduce design, implementation, and evaluation of disease prevention and health promotion interventions, and develop and refine students' research, critical appraisal, and communication skills.
Textbooks
Course Readings Provided
PUBH5421 Infection Prevention in Healthcare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Patricia Ferguson Session: Semester 2 Classes: block mode (2 x 3days) Assumed knowledge: basic knowledge of medical microbiology, antimicrobial agents and communicable disease epidemiology and clinical features Assessment: 2x2000 word essays/assignments (2x30%); 2x short answer question exams -150 word answers for each of 5 questions (2x20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Attendance, in person, at workshops is strongly recommended, to enable participation in discussions. However, lectures will be recorded and available online after the workshops. Students who are unable to attend some or all of workshop sessions can view them, but generally not the associated discussions, online. Assessments are online.
This unit will provide students with an understanding of the individual and societal risks of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) and the rationale for, and barriers to, their prevention and control (PC). A basic understanding of medical microbiology and communicable disease epidemiology will be assumed. The unit will cover such important concepts as: ethical and economic implications; psychological, behavioural, cultural and professional influences; the varying roles, responsibilities and perspectives of clinicians, health support staff, administrators, patients and the community; potential uses and implications of new technology (such as information and decision support systems, electronic medical records and highly discriminatory microbial strain typing, including whole genome sequencing) in HAI surveillance. The course will also address the rationales and strategies for implementation of HAI-related policies, such as hand hygiene, aseptic technique and antimicrobial stewardship, and some reasons for and consequences of failure to implement them, for individual patients, the health system and the community.
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker, Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block/intensive 2 blocks of 2 x 9-5 full days; please check with the coordinator for scheduling Assessment: Assignment 1: 1 x 2500 word (35%), Assignment 2: 1 x 2500 words or equivalent (35%), online activities (30%). Attendance at intensives is compulsory and 80% attendance is required to pass the unit of study. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit, students learn how to communicate effectively with respect to health risks, both to individuals with health concerns, and with respect to risks to the public. The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis; and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health, including: how to effectively manage outbreak or other crisis situations; how to communicate about issues where the risk is low but ublic concern is high (such as with respect to the fluoridation of water); and how to best manage controversies. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement, traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.