Human and Community Services

Human and Community Services

Graduate Certificate in Human and Community Services

Students complete 24 credit points, comprising:
(a) 6 credit points of core units of study; and
(b) 18 credit points of elective units of study, including:
(i) 12 credit points of elective units; and
(ii) 6 credit points of elective units chosen from any postgraduate units offered by the Sydney School of Education and Social Work.
Specialisation:
(b) completion of a specialisation is optional
(a) a specialisation in Domestic and Family Violence is available, this requires:
(i) a minimum of 12 credit of the required specialisation core and elective units listed below

Core units

SCWK6943 Practice Theory Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x6-hr seminars (week 2, week 5, week 8, week 11) Assessment: presentation (50%); 1x2000wd assignment (40%) and 1x500wd participation statement (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of a range of theoretical perspectives underpinning social work research and practice in a range of settings. This unit will offer students the opportunity to reflect upon the relative contributions of these perspectives towards achieving social justice, particularly with marginalised individuals and communities. Developing requisite knowledge, skills and values to engage in critically reflective social work research and practice is a core component of this unit. Students are encouraged to reflect upon and analyse research and practice through multiple lenses.

Elective units

SCWK6048 Environmental Change for Social Justice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x5hr seminar/wk for 5 weeks Assessment: 3x500wd blog posts (30%), 1x3000wd reflective essay (40%), 1x individual presentation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Global warming is recognised as an outstanding threat for human societies (World Bank, 2012). The links between the environment, human rights and social justice are widely recognised. The International Federation of Social Work's 'Policy Statement on Globalisation and the Environment' and the AASW's Code of Ethics identify social work as a key player in efforts to address climate change. This unit recognises the importance of preparing students to: have an understanding of the impact of climate change; to develop skills to prevent further environmental degradation; and to respond to individuals and communities most impacted by climate change.
SCWK6902 Social Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Offered either in block (1x4 hr seminar/week x 6 weeks) or normal semester 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd qualitative task (20%), 1x1500wd quantitative task (20%), 1x1000wd equivalent participation tasks (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study introduces students to a range of research methods and focus on quantitative and qualitative methods. Many other research issues in developing a research proposal will be addressed through the semester. It is intended that, at the conclusion of this unit, students will have developed a research project able to implement through either further study or in workplaces.
SCWK6910 Working with Communities

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Amanda Howard Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x500wd on-line quiz (35%); 1x4000wd practice essay (45%); and participation (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Working with communities is a key policy and practice priority for government and non-government agencies in Australia. This unit will critically examine the current policy frameworks informing work with communities as well as current practice models of community development and community engagement. The unit seeks to explore the why and how of work with communities. It will draw on an emerging Australian body of research about working with communities based in the community of Glebe. This unit is suitable for practitioners seeking to work more effectively with communities.
SCWK6917 Practice Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Independent study with appointed supervisor Assessment: 1x1000wd proposal (20%); 1x1500wd reflective blog (25%); 1x4000wd research essay (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study is designed to provide students with the opportunity to undertake in-depth guided study. This unit provides students with flexibility, enabling them to tailor study around practice issues of interest such as working with women experiencing violence, person centred planning or the impact of a specific social policy on individuals and/or communities. Students will have the opportunity to discuss their progress, share their learning, receive feedback and guidance. Field based learning can be arranged for international students enrolled in this unit.
SCWK6918 Critical Leadership and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd class presentation (35%); 1x4000wd essay (65%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit targets social workers and other human service professionals interested in critically assessing the contemporary organizational context of human service delivery. The course will aim to encourage reflection and critical understandings of individual and collective leadership styles and abilities and how they may be used effectively within contemporary organisational contexts. The content will be based on in-depth understandings of professional practice, critically-informed practice and theory, and social justice.
SCWK6948 Social Policy Frameworks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Sue Goodwin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 1x2000wd essay proposal and presentation (40%); 1x4000wd major essay (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to provide students with a sound understanding of the key institutional components of the Australian welfare system and the key issues and debates associated with the theory and practice of contemporary social policy. The target audience for this unit includes participants from a diverse range of organisations involved in human service provision. All human service work takes place in the context of social policy: social policy provides the mandate and the resources for human service work, and the activities of workers are extensively defined and shaped by social policy. In turn, human service workers are increasingly involved in the shaping of policy, or policy action. The rationale for this unit is to provide an opportunity for students to develop an advanced understanding of social policy frameworks in order to inform policy action.
SCWK6949 Global Social Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: tutorial presentation and paper (40%); global social policy research exercise (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
There is a well-established scholarship and governmental interest in both the impact of globalisation on social policy and the emergence of what is increasingly termed 'global social policy' which is a direct response to global social problems. It is a field that is growing in the areas of social policy and social work research and practice and can be clearly linked to increased employment opportunities for social workers and social policy graduates in the international/global arena. A key perspective of this unit of study is from non-government organisations' participation in the development of a global civil society and their contribution to global social policy. It also examines the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and how NGOs have contributed to both the ambitions of the goals as well as the outcomes for different countries. This unit provides opportunities for students to deepen their understanding and knowledge of core global concerns such as poverty, health, education, environment, NGO corporate engagement and gender equality and make links to the vital role of NGOs in these areas.
Domestic and Family Violence specialisation
SCWK5008 Re-Imagining Child and Family Social Work

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week for 6 weeks Assessment: 1x750wd discussion board contribution (15%), 1x1500wd annotated bibliography (25%), 1x3000wd group project (45%), 1x750wd self reflection (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Departmental permission only
This unit addresses the range of factors from poverty to positive parenting that contribute to the safety, welfare and wellbeing of children, young people and their families. A range of theories, from psychological to sociological, are critically examined from a social work perspective. This unit examines multiple contested and socially constructed concepts such as 'child abuse and/or neglect,' 'child wellbeing and protection,' 'risk and resilience.' Research regarding the potential impact of child abuse and/or neglect on children's and young people's development is examined through human rights and trauma informed lenses. Promoting ethical, collaborative and socially just practices when working with individuals, families and communities is emphasised in order to develop environments that value children and young people. This UOS also addresses international issues of child protection and well-being including child trafficking, the treatment of refugee children and their families, poverty and war.
SCWK5011 Violence Against Women

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive May Classes: 1 hr lecture for 12 weeks and 2-hr seminar/week for 12 weeks Assessment: media analysis essay (20%); group presentation (30%); major essay (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Taking the example of violence against women, this unit of study builds upon previous studies of social inequality to explore the role of gender inequality as both a cause and consequence of violence against women. The intersection of gender inequality with other forms of inequality, such as that based on race, class and ability is also explored. Because of its short and long term impacts on women's health, well being and life chances, social workers in all settings are involved in responding to violence against women. Students will engage critically with a range of theories, research approaches, and policy and practice reponses to violence against women at local, national and global levels.
SCWK6917 Practice Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Independent study with appointed supervisor Assessment: 1x1000wd proposal (20%); 1x1500wd reflective blog (25%); 1x4000wd research essay (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study is designed to provide students with the opportunity to undertake in-depth guided study. This unit provides students with flexibility, enabling them to tailor study around practice issues of interest such as working with women experiencing violence, person centred planning or the impact of a specific social policy on individuals and/or communities. Students will have the opportunity to discuss their progress, share their learning, receive feedback and guidance. Field based learning can be arranged for international students enrolled in this unit.
SCWK6950 Sexual Assault in the Australian Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mareese Terare Session: Semester 1b Classes: 24 hrs in block mode over 1 week Assessment: case conference simulation and refection (40%); essay (30%); and on-line reflection (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit is offered in Block Mode to ECAV pathway students only
Sexual assault is one of the most common forms of violence against women and children There is a growing understanding of sexual violence against boys and men. Sexual victimisation can have devastating effects on a person's development and family relationships and without effective responses, results in long term emotional and social difficulties. Effective intervention requires knowledge of complex inter organisational, health, community and legal contexts. Students will review the contexts in which sexual violence take splace and the emerging evidence base for effective interventions as well as critically analysing a range of preventive, systemic and therapeutic frameworks.
SCWK6951 Trauma-informed Responses to Violence

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mareese Terare Session: Semester 2b Classes: 24 hours in block mode over 1 week Assessment: Pair presentation (25%); essay (45%) and 3 on-line reflections (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit is offered in Block Mode to ECAV pathway students only
The trauma model is increasingly recognized as a useful approach to understanding the mental health impacts of interpersonal violence. The trauma model provides a potential bridge that enables mental health and social justice perspectives to be combined in responses to interpersonal trauma. The trauma model can also move beyond the harm suffered by individuals to considerations of community and trans-generational trauma, for example, as suffered by Indigenous Australians through experiences of murder, dispossession and child removal. This UOS provides students with a framework for responding to individual and community trauma.
LAWS6105 Child Sexual Abuse: Diverse Perspectives

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rita Shackel, Prof Judith Cashmore Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: 4500wd essay (60%) and critical review comprising oral presentation (20%) and written paper (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit of study examines the socio-legal complexities of responding to child sexual abuse in society. The unit presents students with a theoretical and multidisciplinary framework for understanding and evaluating contemporary issues relevant to child sexual abuse. More specifically the unit of study will analyse the nature of child sexual abuse and the underlying dynamics of such victimisation. Students will critically evaluate different strategies and models directed at identification and prevention of child sexual abuse and critically analyse legal responses to child sexual victimisation.
SCWK6023 Practice with Indigenous Australians

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1b Classes: 4x6hr sessions Assessment: 1x1500wd Critical Reflective Practice (30%), 1xGroup Work Presentation + Report 1000wd Cultural Safety Strategy (30%), 1x3500wd Integrated Literature Review (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an insight into and understanding of the application of social work practice within an Indigenous context. It will explore the multidimensional social and societal issues impacting on the lives of First Nations Australians and it will assist students in developing the mechanisms and skills necessary to work effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Individuals, Families and Communities. It will bring to the forefront Indigenous- specific Knowledge systems and social work practice