Public Administration

Public Administration

Master of Public Administration

Students must complete 48 credit points, including:
(a) 24 credit points of core units of study
(b) a 6 credit point work based or internship project, and
(c) 18 credit points of elective units of study.

Graduate Diploma in Public Administration

Students must complete 36 credit points, including:
(a) 24 credit points of core units of study; and
(b) a 6 credit point work based or internship project; and
(c) 6 credit points of elective unit of study.

Graduate Certificate in Public Administration

Students must complete 24 credit points, including:
(a) 12-24 credit points of core units of study; and
(b) up to 12 credit points of elective units of study.

Executive Master of Public Administration

Students must complete 72 credit points, comprising:
(a) 42 credit points of core units of study; and
(b) 12 credit points of capstone units of study, and
(c) maximum 18 credit points of elective units of study selected from a list of recommended elective units of study.

Core units of study

GSOG6004 Managing Public Expenditure

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August Classes: 1x8hr seminar/week, 8.30am-4.30pm Thursday, weeks 1 to 4 and weeks 8 to 10 Assessment: 4500wd workbook and journal (50%), 3000wd budget briefing paper (30%), 2500wd Essay (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who are not undertaking the award courses GCPA, GDPA, MPAdmin or EMPA must have the permission of the Director, Graduate School of Government, to take this unit of study.
This unit examines contemporary budgeting and financial management practices in Australia and selected comparative jurisdictions (for example, Canada and the United Kingdom) as a continuing site of political, bureaucratic, and parliamentary conflict. In particular, it is framed around the continuing quest to increase the 'rationality' of resource allocation. The unit traces the shift from traditional cash-based financial management to the rise of accrual-based performance budgeting, and examines issues such as the nature of 'budgeting control', the place of non-financial performance information in resource allocation, the consequences of accounting reforms for public accountability and the contested orthodoxy of applying 'market discipline' in budget-dependent government services. Students will review the changing role of central budget agencies, in particular, the influence of the accounting profession, corporate interests and international organisations on the reform agenda. At a practical level the unit provides insight into techniques for budget management and preparation, including the strategies and issues involved in risk management, procuring capital works and managing assets and facilities. The role and application of pricing policy and strategies are addressed in case studies.
Textbooks
GSOG6004 unit reader.

Core work based or internship units of study

GSOG6005 Work Based Project

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x8hr workshop, 1x4hr workshop, 1x4hr workshop Prerequisites: GSOG6001 and GSOG6002 and GSOG6003 and GSOG6004 Assessment: project application and contract (0%), 1500wd literature review and research methods paper (20%), 5000wd individual) or 10,000wd (group) written report (60%), 250wd learning impact statement (0%), 10min Oral Presentation (20%) Practical field work: Interviews, research, data collection and analysis as required; the main component of this unit is conducted within the workplace Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who are not enrolled in GCPA, GDPA or MPAdmin must have the permission of the Director, Graduate School of Government to undertake this unit of study.
A project, undertaken individually or with a group, that results in a written report with appropriate supporting material and documentation to aid implementation or progression to approval (for example, a draft Cabinet Minute, ministerial briefing note, internal or external discussion paper). The report should demonstrate primary research, the development of proposals based on independent research and an in-depth examination of the project theme. For students undertaking individual projects the expected length would be 5000 words or less, while group projects would be 10,000 words or less (including supporting and implementation documentation). The project report must include a Learning Objectives Impact Analysis (about 250 words) that demonstrates the manner and extent to which the completed project achieves the general learning objectives identified below for the Work Based Project unit of study. The project must also demonstrate the application of theory and practice with respect to policy development and the assessment of resource impacts of recommendations or proposed actions. The project report must also demonstrate the use of processes and techniques that engage others in consultation and feedback during the evolution of the report and the project. Each project will be assigned both an academic and work-based supervisor, underpinned by a formal commitment to complete the defined scope of the project. Milestones will be identified with feedback provided as the project develops.

Specialisation or elective units of study

Masters degree candidates may choose up to three and Graduate Diploma candidates may choose up to one of the following elective units:
ACCT5001 Accounting Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: assignment (20%), mid-semester test (30%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the generally accepted accounting principles and practices underlying financial accounting and reporting. The unit introduces students to the concepts and skills required to prepare, analyse, and interpret financial statements.
CISS6001 New Security Challenges

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1x3500wd Essay (60%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit considers the evolving nature of security in the context of global politics. It focuses on non-military challenges to security while acknowledging the relationships between these and traditional security concerns. Among the topics considered are: international law and security; the privatisation of security; economics and security; energy resources; environmental degradation; the burden of infectious diseases; population dynamics; gender and age perspectives on security; the dilemmas of fragile and failing states; transnational organised crime; and new modes of warfare. The overall objective of the unit is to engage with issues and arguments that challenge how security is traditionally understood. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, independent research, debates and case studies.
CISS6002 Strategy and Security in the Asia-Pacific

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 2x 2000wd Essay (80%), 1x400wd equivalent Oral Presentation (10%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit focuses on the strategic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific region and the security challenges it faces. It combines a grounding in International Relations theory, and concepts of strategy and security, with a series of dedicated country profiles. Issues such as great power rivalry, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, piracy, and environmental degradation are all considered. The overall objective of the unit is to engage with issues and arguments about strategy and security that relate specifically to the Asia-Pacific region. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, and independent research.
CISS6004 Health and Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Issue brief (35%), 1x3000wd Research essay (50%), 1x500wd Self-evaluation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit assesses the political and security significance of disease-related events and developments. Whether one contemplates historical experiences with smallpox, the contemporary challenges posed by diseases such as HIV/AIDS and SARS, or the risks arising from new scientific developments such as synthetic biology, it is clear that diseases exercise a powerful influence over civilised humankind. The unit concentrates on areas in which human health and security concerns intersect most closely, including: biological weapons; fast-moving disease outbreaks of natural origin; safety and security in microbiology laboratories; and the relationships between infectious disease patterns, public health capacity, state functioning and violent conflict. The overall aim of the unit is to provide students with a stronger understanding of the scientific and political nature of these problems, why and how they might threaten security, and the conceptual and empirical connections between them.
CISS6006 Intervention and 'Fragile' States

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd intelligence briefing paper (40%), Seminar participation (10%), 1x500wd actor profile (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit critically examines the notion of state fragility within the global system. It investigates the characteristics of so-called 'fragile' and 'failed' states, and the nature of international engagement with (and discourses about) these states. It explores various perspectives on state formation in both Western and post-colonial contexts, and emphasises the ways in which knowledge is produced about non-Western states. The unit expands upon the theoretical literature with evidence from case studies in Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia.
CLAW5001 Legal Environment of Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: case analysis (20%), mid-semester exam (35%), final examination (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All business conduct is regulated by the law. Every transaction and every relationship is governed by an increasingly complex mix of statutory and judge-made laws. The ability to identify and manage legal risks, and knowledge of compliance and dispute resolution strategies, are essential business management skills. This unit examines the legal framework and regulatory regime within which all businesses operate in Australia and in a global economy. It introduces students to the legal implications of commercial conduct and provides an overview of the Australian legal system and threshold legal concepts of agreement, ownership, and civil and criminal liability. Key areas of substantive business law are examined including contracts, torts (in particular negligence and the economic torts), property and securities, and crime. The unit also provides students with an overview of areas of legal regulation with an increasingly significant impact on business operations including: privacy, intellectual property rights, competition law, consumer law (in particular advertising regulation, product liability and unfair contracts), misleading conduct and unconscionable conduct.
ECON5001 Microeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5040 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1000wd (10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (35%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level microeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Microeconomics studies how economic agents make choices in a variety of environments. The unit covers theory and applications of the principles of consumer choice, of firm behaviour, and of strategic interaction among economic agents. Equipped with these theories of decision making, students can address a range of interesting and important questions. Examples are: What market strategy should a firm adopt with its competitors? How might one create a market to deal with externalities such as pollution? What are the implications of different kinds of taxes? What compensation scheme will provide the right incentives to work?
ECON5002 Macroeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5003 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1500wd (20%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level macroeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behaviour. The unit covers theories of the engines of long-run economic growth, of unemployment, of money, inflation, the interest rate and the exchange rate, as well as consumption, saving and investment behaviour. The unit also studies a number of applications of the theory and addresses contemporary macroeconomic problems and policy.
ECON6001 Microeconomics Analysis 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5040 Prohibitions: ECON6701 Assessment: 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), 1xTake-home Mid-semester task equivalent to 1000wd (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to modern microeconomic theory and as such has three purposes: (i) to introduce students to the major ideas of modern microeconomics and to develop their understanding of these ideas; (ii) to develop students' facility with analytic economic models; and (iii) to develop students' ability to solve economic problems with the ideas, techniques, and models available to professional economists. Topics covered include (i) individual decision-making by economic agents, (ii) the determination of prices and resource allocation in competitive general equilibrium models, (iii) strategic behaviour by firms under imperfect competition, and (iv) contracting with imperfect information.
ECON6002 Macroeconomics Analysis 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON5002 Prohibitions: ECON6702 Assessment: Problem Sets equivalent to 1000wd (10%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is aimed at providing students with a sound and comprehensive knowledge of modern macroeconomic theory, an ability to formulate and solve problems analytically, and a general appreciation of how policymakers can use the analysis in practice. Topics covered include (i) micro-foundations of macroeconomics, focusing on consumption, investment, money demand, and credit rationing; (ii) equilibrium macroeconomics, focusing on the conventional prototype as well as on recent stochastic macroeconomic models; and (iii) dis-equilibrium macroeconomics, concepts, issues, and models.
ECON6016 Trade and Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5002 or ECON5040 Assessment: 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x1500wd equivalent Seminar paper and presentation (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to highlight the relation between trade and development from an institutional and structural perspective, with appropriate modifications of received general economic principles, theories and policies. It closely studies the integration process of traditional segment of a developing society into its modern counterpart in countries selected from Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific regions. It examines role of the state and international institutions (like the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, World Trade Organization), rationale for trade, planning and market mechanisms in developing economies, and also socio-cultural preconditions and economic requirements for a market economy. It focuses on a wide range of developmental problems and issues (such as foreign aid, debt, investment, technology transfer) from both national and international points of view.
ECON6018 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5040 Assessment: 1xSeminar paper and presentation equivalent to 1000wd (25%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study emphasis is exclusively concerned with market failures that impact on the natural environment. Attention is given to why these market failures occur and what role there is for regulation and government policy. Topics covered include efficiency and markets, market failure, externalities (e.g. pollution), various methods of regulating pollution, and measuring the demand for environmental quality.
ECOP6016 China in the World Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1xTeam Oral Presentation (10%), 1x1500wd report (20%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study analyses the modern economic development of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and its role in the international economic system, including the World Trade Organisation. It examines the internal political economy of the PRC; the political economy of transition; and China's transformation into a major centre of foreign direct investment and global exports. In the unit, students will learn the differential impact of China's transformation on the USA, East Asia and Japan, and the European Union. The policy of free trade agreements of China will also be studied. An understanding of these issues is important for people concerned both with investment and trade with China and the global political economic implications of China's emerging market economy under socialism.
ECOP6103 Strategic Debates on Economic Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Essay (60%), 1xGroup presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the processes of socioeconomic change, and the forces involved in bringing about such change. It introduces several theoretical perspectives and - using a number of contemporary case studies - considers the interests, the relationships and the constraints involved in socioeconomic change. Students consider a range of issues and debates, and make a detailed study in one such area.
EDPA5001 Organisational Theory, Managemnt and Admin

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd review (40%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Organisation theories provide us with different lenses through which we can understand what an organisation is and what it means to be part of one. This unit explores the development of organisation theory from its beginnings to the present day. Concepts, theories and models from the perspectives of the Historical, Modern, Symbolic Interpretive and Postmodern periods are studied through selected original works by key writers in the field. From the early writings to Taylor and Weber, through to the words of Greenfield and Morgan different approaches to management and administration are investigated.
EDPA6018 Social Policy Process

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Assessment: class attendance and participation, including discussion and mini-presentations (15%); presentation (35%) and essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The world of policy is changing, from a centralised model to a decentralised one, in which you may be involved, at least at institutional level. Whether you work in the public, private, or third sector as an educator, social worker, civil servant or in another capacity, it is important to understand the changing world of policy. Another change that we examine is the rise of neo-liberalism and its effects on the policy process. Critics charge that policy is now framed with economic rather than social good in mind, and that the success of policies is measured by the same calculus. How is policy made, and by whom? How does Australian federalism influence the making and implementation of policy? What kinds of transnational influences affect the policy process, and to what extent? Do different countries respond to difference (class, ethnic, gender, age), in a world of increasing diversity, migration and mobility?
GOVT6116 International Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 4000wd Essay (50%) and 2hr exam (30%) and Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to how states and other actors in the international arena cooperate to build institutions as a response to common problems. After completing the unit students should be able to analyse contemporary international organisations to see how they work, whose interests they serve, and to what degree they attenuate or enhance the power of sovereign states.
GOVT6119 International Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week Assessment: 2x 2700wd Essay (90%), 1x600wd In-class quizzes (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit reviews developments in international security since before World War l, to recent events like September 11 and its aftermath. The principal focus is on developments since the end of the Cold War and the collapse of Communism. The unit takes account of traditional notions about the causes of war and the conditions of peace, as well as changes in the structure and process of contemporary international relations.
GOVT6123 Globalisation and Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x3000wd Research essay (40%), 3x 500wd Tutorial papers (30%), 1x1.5hr Examination (20%), 1x Tutorial participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
It is widely believed that we are entering a new era in which the transborder flows of capital, goods, ideas, and people are rapidly transforming human society. 'Globalisation', many claim, threatens the autonomy of nation-states and erodes the power of national governments to provide social protection and promote the nation's economic prosperity. This unit examines not only the causes and mechanisms of this process, but also assesses its social, economic, and political impacts. The views of radicals, transformationalists, skeptics, and institutionalists are compared and criticised. While globalisation is often viewed as a singular process, trending towards a global society, this unit offers a distinctive approach. Globalisation has uneven and highly differentiated impacts, whether harmful or beneficial, and this unevenness is closely associated with the nature of institutions of governance, at both the domestic and international levels.
GOVT6135 Global Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Essay (50%), Seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the environment as a political and policy issue. Although relatively recent, the environment has become a full-fledged public policy issue exerting influence in local, national and international arenas. The unit will first focus on the specific features of the policy that influences the capability of contemporary societies to enhance the management of environmental resources and of public goods in general. Second, it discusses the development of environmental policy in Western countries, with a particular emphasis on the European Union. Third, a grid for the analysis of environmental policy will be presented, with a discussion of the main actors (political, institutional and socio-economic) involved in it and of the factors (interests and ideas) influencing their positions. Fourth, the unit briefly discusses environmental conflicts and consensual approaches used for tackling them.
GOVT6139 Research Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x4000wd Proposal (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students with the fundamentals for constructing and conducting effective research projects in the social sciences. An overview of social science inquiry will be presented through an examination of the diversity in theoretical and methodological approaches used in research. This will include a focus on both primary research, using interviews and questionnaires, and secondary research, using statistical databases, content analysis and textual analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative methods will be covered in the unit, as will an overview of ethical practices associated with research design. The assessment will be based around constructing practical research projects that can be utilised in both university and workplace-based research.
GOVT6156 Strategy and Civil Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Project Analysis (20%), 1x1000wd Research Proposal (15%), 1x3000wd Research Report (50%), 1x Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an overview of contemporary debates about policy making in democratic states, such as Australia. It examines how 'governance' is constituted by the interaction between the state and civil society. Governance is an emerging area of interest for both government and non-government organisations, and this unit analyses the way these social, economic and political organisations interact to both create public policy agendas and lead to social and political change. The unit covers the configurations of policy communities, political networks and social movements which shape both representative and participatory democratic practice. There is a particular emphasis on understanding the strategies that different political actors adopt.
GOVT6301 Public Sector Ethics and Corruption

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x900wd Short paper (15%), 1x3600wd Essay (60%), 1x1500wd Reflective journal (25%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Much recent attention has focused on preventing corruption and improving ethics in public sector organisations around the world. This unit equips students to identify and analyse different forms of corruption and ethical failure, and to reflect critically on the best ways of combatting corruption and enhancing ethics in the public sector. The unit takes a comparative approach to these issues.
GOVT6311 Issues in Public Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will examine a current national or international public policy process, issue or sector. It will deal with contemporary themes and issues in terms of ground level policies, as well as wider conceptual frameworks to help explain them.
GOVT6319 Governance and Public Policy Making

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6x3hr lectures-tutorials/weeks 1-6, 1x7hr weekend class, 1x4hr weekend class Assessment: 1x3000wd Case study (40%), 1x1500wd equivalent Group presentation (25%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (25%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is focused on two major concepts which are mobilised in the explanation of the way we are governed: 'public policy' and 'governance'. It aims to clarify what is meant by these constructs, and how they can be used in the analysis of governing. It examines the argument that 'governance' denotes a change in the way we are governed, and works through a combination of analytic development and detailed empirical cases to establish the significance of these concepts in both the analysis and the practice of governing.
GOVT6331 Public Management and Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr in-class group work/week Assessment: 1x3000wd case study (50%), 1x1000wd case study outline (10%), 1x2hr Examination (30%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit outlines some of the most important developments in contemporary public management and governance and how these relate to the everyday practices of those working in the public sector. It uses examples drawn from a number of OECD countries to: critically analyse the forces that have driven the move towards 'public management'; examine the theory and practice of 'public governance'; evaluate the merits of these developments; and apply this knowledge to better understand specific developments across different contexts.
HPOL5000 Health Policy and Health Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow, A/Prof Alison Pearce Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online students: week by week online activities including online lectures and/or videos, introductory tutorial, 6 interactive tutorials with online content via discussion boards, readings (total: approx 10 hours per week) Block Mode students: 2 x 1 day workshops, introductory tutorial, 6 interactive tutorials (either face-to-face or online) with online lectures and/or videos, readings (total: approx 10 hours per week) Prohibitions: PUBH5032 Assessment: assessable tutorials (30%); multiple choice online exam: 2 hr, open book (30%); 6 short reports (400-500 words each) on health policy and health economic evaluation, submitted online (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy as well as provide students with an understanding of the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics and political economy. It gives an overview of the political choices and frameworks that shape decision making in health. By the end of this unit students will be able to: Define the boundaries and key features of health policy; Identify policy instruments and how they function; Understand the main frameworks used for analysing health policy, and different approaches and perspectives regarding setting priorities in health policy; Apply methods and principles of health economics e.g. resource scarcity, opportunity cost, efficiency and equity to practical real-life examples; Critically analyse the role of economic evidence in informing policy decisions in health decision-making in Australia.
Textbooks
Recommended: Buse, K, Mays, N and Walt, G. Making Health Policy (2nd Ed). Open University Press, 2012. Copies of the text are available in the University of Sydney library. Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
HPOL5001 Health Systems and Financing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor James Gillespie, Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online students: 12 x week by week online tasks and activities (lectures, discussion boards, quizzes, short videos, interactive readings). Block Mode students: 2 x 2 full day workshops, plus 12 x week by week online tasks Prohibitions: GLOH5135 Assessment: compulsory contributions (5%), online quiz (15%), assignment 1: 2500 word individual written report on comparative health systems analysis (40%) assignment 2: 2500 word individual written report on analysis of health finance and policy objectives (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to equip students with operational knowledge of the structures and financing of health systems. The focus will be on Australia and comparable countries. However, we will also look at particular issues around lower income and aid dependent health systems. Topics covered include funding priorities and mechanisms, the debates over the public-private mix, governance and accountability. The unit addresses questions such as: Who makes decisions about funding priorities? To whom should decision makers be held accountable and for what aspects of their work? How does health financing shape universal health coverage? By the end of this unit students will be able to: Apply a critical understanding of the basic history and features of the Australian and comparable health systems; Debate the main models and principles of health system funding, including principles of insurance, risk-pooling, equity, delivery and governance; Undertake a cross-country comparative analysis of health system features and outcomes, including low and middle income countries; Critically analyse national health budgets and funding programs; Locate finance policy in the wider context of health systems and economies.
Textbooks
Recommended: Blank, RH and Burau, V. Comparative Health Policy (5th Edition) Macmillan, 2017. (Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site)
HPOL5003 Analysing Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Samantha Rowbotham Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block Mode: 2 x 2 day workshops plus online activities. Online mode: pre-recorded lectures and week-by-week online discussion and activities. Assessment: 1 x 2000 word assignment (35%), participation grade (5 x short online or face-to-face learning activities) (15%), 1 x 3000 word policy analysis project proposal (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to develop skills for undertaking policy research and analysis, and is underpinned by principles from systems thinking and complexity approaches. A mult-idisciplinary approach familiarises students with fundamental frameworks and methodologies that can be applied to research and analysis of health policy by drawing on multiple disciplines including public health, social and political sciences, behavioural sciences, public policy and history. By the end of the unit students will be able to: Define policy and formulate research questions that can be used to analyse policy and policy processes; Understand and apply systems thinking approaches to policy analysis and research; Understand and explain the different methodological approaches and research paradigms that can be applied in policy analysis and research; Apply a critical analysis to a case study of policy success or failure; Identify appropriate study designs, research methodologies, data collection methods and analysis frameworks for specific policy research questions; Design a systems thinking-informed analysis of a current policy issue.
Textbooks
Required and recommended readings and reference lists will be available through eLearning.
HPOL5007 Global Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider, Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode 2 x 2 day workshops plus 4 online tutorials. Online mode: pre-recorded lectures plus 4 online tutorials and week-by-week online activities and discussion. Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (35%), Tutorial discussion papers or online discussion (15%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
The aim of this unit is to equip students with the knowledge and skills to identify and articulate political and policy processes at the global level, become familiar with institutions and actors involved in global health policy, and utilize strategies for influencing policy making at the global level. We analyse the influence and power of institutions and actors in the development and implementation of global health policy, and investigate the governance of global health policy responses. Teaching makes extensive use of current case studies from recognised experts in the field. By the end of this unit students will be able to: Explain the effects of globalization on health of populations; Demonstrate how events and trends in health and non-health areas affect global health policy; Identify and classify the different types of actors/institutions that influence health policy; Undertake a policy stakeholder analysis with reference to power, influence and interests; Develop strategies to influence global health policy development and implementation; Define global health governance and its role in structuring and regulating global health policy.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London.
IBUS5002 Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: individual assignment (30%), group assignment (30%), participation and contribution (10%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This foundation unit provides an introduction to the essential concepts and frameworks in the domains of strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship. Each domain is presented in a block of three lectures supplemented with case-based tutorials. Topics covered include user and disruptive innovation, entrepreneurial opportunities and business models, value chain and ecosystem analysis. Theories and frameworks are further tested in the real-life business projects offered by the participating companies. The emphasis of the unit is made on understanding the complexity of the innovation process and learning how to navigate the business environment to maximise the value from innovation.
IBUS6001 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hr lecture and 1x 1hr seminar per week Corequisites: IBUS5003 Prohibitions: ECHS6008 Assessment: group project (30%); case analysis (20%); final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit analyses how multinational firms leverage their capabilities and competencies to create competitive advantages in international and global markets. Topics include assessing foreign market attractiveness; understanding the impact of differences in legal, cultural, political and economic regimes; evaluating international political and economic risk; building and operating global networks, including entry mode choice; understanding how managers design organisational architecture and implement internal control and incentive mechanisms; and assessing the challenges of global citizenship, ethical behaviour and social responsibility for international business. Problem-based learning, with case study workshops, is an integral part of the unit.
IBUS6002 Cross-Cultural Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: tutorial participation (10%); culture report presentation (10%); mid-semester test (20%); case study debate(30%); final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An understanding of cultural differences and how to manage such differences is critical to effective management in international and multi-cultural business environments. The aim of this unit is to provide conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that will develop an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact on management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management, the meaning and dimensions of culture, comparative international management and leadership styles, managing communication across cultures, ethics and social responsibility in global management, cross-cultural negotiation and decision-making, forming and managing global teams, and developing the international and global manager.
IBUS6016 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1: 1x 3h lecture/workshop per week; Intensive sessions: 2 x 3hr lecture/workshops pre-departure (Sydney), 30hrs lecture/workshops in country, 1 x 3hr seminar post-trip (Sydney) Assumed knowledge: IBUS5002, or completion of at least 24 credit points Assessment: individual report (25%), practice and final pitch (25%), final report (25%), reflective piece (15%), workshop engagement and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Social entrepreneurs are committed to furthering a social mission through enterprises that rank social, environmental or cultural impact on a par with, or even above, profit. Intersecting the business and not-for-profit worlds, social entrepreneurship addresses many complex local and global problems. This unit critically introduces the concept and develops frameworks for understanding social entrepreneurship (also referred to as social enterprise and social innovation). Teaching and learning utilises case studies and includes the opportunity to apply theory to real-world experiences. Topics include creating innovative social enterprises, sustainable business models, philanthropy and funding, impact assessment, and leadership. The unit is structured around learning from engaged practice and provides the opportunity to work with social enterprises.
IBUS6018 Business Negotiations

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive September,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3-hour seminar per week Assessment: in-class exercises (33%), assignment (33%), final exam (34%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This unit is only available in the Semester 2 session to students enrolled in the Master of Management (CEMS) / MIM (CEMS) stream.
This course is aimed at making you feel more comfortable and confident with the negotiation process. The course is taught as a 'flipped classroom', meaning that the content of the course is primarily taught outside of class, through brief written lectures, and class time is used to assimilate that knowledge through at least a dozen marked role-play negotiations, debriefs of those negotiations, problem-solving workshops and international negotiation case study analysis. You will also be taught how to develop your own negotiation strategies and tactics using a combination of multiple psychological, economic and legal concepts from the course.
IBUS6019 Strategy and Emerging Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1X 3 hour lecture/seminar per week Assessment: case analysis (20%), class leadership presentation (10%), in-class activity and quiz (10%), mid-term exam (15%), final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Do you have an Emerging Market Strategy? This is a question that an increasingly large number of company managers, especially in the developed western world, are trying to answer. This unit lays the foundations of strategy making in emerging markets, with an emphasis on four of the largest emerging markets of the world today - Brazil, Russia, India and China - often termed as the BRIC countries. Utilising frameworks from mainstream strategy and international business disciplines, the unit analyses emerging markets from the perspective of primarily two simultaneous phenomena - multinationals from developed markets trying to tap into emerging markets, and companies from emerging markets globalising their operations and consequently changing the global competitive landscape.
INFO5990 Professional Practice in IT

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Masahiro Takatsuka Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in INFO5990 are assumed to have previously completed a Bachelor's degree in some area of IT, or have completed a Graduate Diploma in some area of IT, or have many years experience as a practising IT professional. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: The main focus of the subject is to provide students with the necessary tools, basic skills, experience and adequate knowledge so they develop an awareness and an understanding of the responsibilities and issues associated with professional conduct and practice in the information technology sector. This unit is for MIT, MITM, MIT/MITM students only.
This Unit of Study introduces the students to some of the concepts, standards and techniques associated with the current professional practice in information technology in the business environment.
Students will encounter a range of concepts, techniques and professional issues including interpersonal and organisational communication, human resources and conflict resolution, globalisation, professional ethics, social impacts of IT, data security, data quality assurance, system audit, investigative research and project management practice. Practical and real world case studies will be used as part of the learning to enhance the in-class teachings to the needs of industry.
INFO5991 Services Science Management and Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Liu Na Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Seminars Assumed knowledge: INFO5990. Students are expected to have a degree in computer science, engineering, information technology, information systems or business. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The service economy plays a dominant and growing role in economic growth and employment in most parts of the world. Increasingly, the improved productivity and competitive performance of firms and nations in services relies on innovative and effective design, engineering, and management of IT-centric services.
This unit offers IT graduates and professionals an understanding of the role of IT-centric services in a social, economic and business context, as well as knowledge of the principles of their design, engineering and management in a service-oriented IT framework. Delivery of the unit is driven by a critical approach to the literature, live case studies presented by industry professionals and writing a Consultants' Report. Its learning outcomes are based on industry needs. Three modules address the range of topics in Services Science, Management and Engineering (SSME).
1. Service fundamentals context and strategy: the service economy and the nature of service systems; the role IT-centric services in a social, economic and business context; IT-centric services optimisation and innovation.
2. Designing and Engineering IT-centric services: service design; service oriented enterprise and IT architecture.
3. Sourcing, governing, and managing IT-centric services: outsourcing IT-centric services (including services in the cloud); IT-centric services governance and management (COBIT and ITIL; service level agreements.
Critical analysis of articles and the persuasive use of evidence in writing are cornerstones of the unit. Students learn how to apply these skills in business consulting processes to a business case drawn from a recent consulting project at a large multinational organisation. The processes include:clarifying the client's situation and problems, researching evidence related to it, analysing the evidence, developing options for solving the problems, presenting recommendations persuasively to the client both orally and in a written Consultants' Report. These steps are scaffolded for the student, with formative assessment, and increasing levels of difficulty.
Students need to be able to read, critically analyse, and report on an article or case study every three weeks. If you are not confident of your skills in these areas, you can enroll in the free courses provided by the University's Learning Centre in Academic Reading and Writing and Oral Communication Skills. Some of these courses are specifically designed for students with a non-English speaking background. Familiarity with using Library reference tools and the ability to locate scholarly resources in the Library's electronic databases is also necessary. See the Library's Research and information skills page for help with this http://www.library.usyd.edu.au/skills/
INFO5992 Understanding IT Innovations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jinman Kim Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: 24 credit points of units at 5000-level or above Prohibitions: PMGT5875 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
An essential skill for an IT manager is the ability to keep up-to-date with emerging technologies, and be able to evaluate the significance of these technologies to their organisation's business activities. This unit of study is based around a study of current technologies and the influence of these technologies on business strategies.
Important trends in innovation in IT are identified and their implications for innovation management explored. Major topics include: drivers of innovation; the trend to open information ("open source") rather than protected intellectual property; and distribution of innovation over many independent but collaborating actors.
On completion of this unit, students will be able to identify and analyse an emerging technology and write a detailed evaluation of the impact of this technology on existing business practices.
INFO6007 Project Management in IT

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Hamzah Osop Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Workshops, Assignments, Exam Preparation Prohibitions: PMGT5871 Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in INFO6007 are assumed to have previously completed a Bachelor's degree in some area of IT, or have completed a Graduate Diploma in some area of IT, or have three years experience as a practising IT professional. Recent work experience, or recent postgraduate education, in software project management, software process improvement, or software quality assurance is an advantage. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study covers the key components of successfully managing a wide variety of Information Technology projects. The course covers both quantitative and qualitative aspects of project management. Topics include the management of time, scope, budget, risk, quality, and resources through each of the phases of a project.
INFS5001 Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1 and Semester 2: 1 x 3hr seminar per week; Summer School: 3 x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFS6014 Assessment: group assignment (30%); individual assignment (20%); exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) this unit introduces the end-to-end project management lifecycle. Students learn how to select appropriate projects based on their alignment with an organisation's strategy and then how to manage those projects successfully from initiation through execution to completion. The unit covers the essential components of effective project management and how to apply them in an integrated manner. The unit also explores both the technical and behavioural aspects of project management - including Microsoft Project - and students gain experience in critically analysing the application of concepts in specific project contexts. As organisations increasingly structure their activities on a project basis, the unit is of value to a range of discipline specialisations. The unit can also contribute to the achievement of internationally recognised accreditation from the Project Management Institute (PMI).
LAWS6011 Administrative Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Margaret Allars Session: Intensive April Classes: Mar 20, 21 & Apr 17, 18 (9-5) Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate law degree or LAWS6252 (core unit for MALP students) Assessment: 7500wd essay or 2 x 3750wd essays (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Core unit for MALP students. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
The aim of the unit is to develop a critical perspective upon the accountability of government decision-makers. The unit examines theoretical frameworks for analysis of a range of issues concerning accountability, with reference to relevant principles of administrative law. Part 1 of the unit examines the concept of administrative discretion, alternative theories of the rule of law, human rights, ethics and managerialism. Part 2 of the unit is concerned with the accountability of the executive branch of government. It includes analysis of separation of powers and the doctrine of ministerial responsibility, merits review tribunals, investigative tribunals and tribunal procedure. Part 3 of the unit examines theories of participatory democracy, with reference to relevant legal principles drawn from procedural fairness, rules of standing and consultation requirements in rule making. Part 4 examines theories of open government, with reference to statutory duties to give reasons for decisions and freedom of information legislation. Part 5 examines the proper scope of administrative law by discussion of the issue of its extension to government business enterprises which are corporatised, privatised or contracted out.
LAWS6856 Anti-Terrorism Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ben Saul Session: Intensive May Classes: Apr 23, 24 & Apr 30 & May 1 (9-5) Prohibitions: CISS6011 or LAWS3483 Assumed knowledge: Students should have either completed LAWS6243 International Law I or have an understanding in at least one of the following areas: public or a specialised area of international law or criminal law or criminology or human rights or security and conflict studies acquired through university studies and/or relevant professional experience. Assessment: Option 1: assignment (40%) and 5000wd essay (60%), Option 2: 8000wd essay (100%) or Option 3: assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php
This unit explores how international law has confronted terrorist violence from the mid-19th century to the present, including under transnational and international criminal law, the law on the use of military force, the law of armed conflict, human rights law, measures adopted by the United Nations Security Council and General Assembly, and the law of state responsibility. It considers controversies about the (in)adequacy of the law in areas such as `targeted killings' (or extrajudicial assassinations?), aerial drones, detention and trial of suspects, `irregular renditions' (illegal abductions?), `enhanced interrogation' (torture?), `shoot to kill' policies, foreign terrorist fighters and citizen stripping, mass surveillance and privacy, and public emergency laws. Selected regional laws (in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa) and national laws (particularly in Australia, the UK and the US) implementing international obligations are also considered. The study of terrorism, and the law's response to it, is ultimately a study of when violence is justified, against whom, and for what purposes ¿ whether it is `freedom fighters' or `state terrorism', or extreme religious challenges to secular norms, at issue.
LAWS6044 Environmental Law and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gerry Bates Session: Intensive March Classes: Mar 4-7 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS3430 or LAWS5130 Assumed knowledge: LAWS6252 or law degree from a common law jurisdiction Assessment: 2000wd essay (25%) and assignment (75%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students who do not hold a law degree from a common law jurisdiction must either have completed or be concurrently enrolled in LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System before undertaking the environmental law units. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-visitors.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
The aim of the unit is to introduce students to overarching themes in environmental law and policy as a foundation to their more detailed studies for the Environmental Law Program. This is an overview unit addressing a number of environmental issues at various levels of analysis; such as policy making, implementation of policy and dispute resolution. The concept of ecologically sustainable development and its implications for environmental law and policy is a continuing theme. The unit is designed to develop multi-dimensional thinking about environmental issues and the strategies needed to address them. The unit provides a broad background of the political and economic issues in so far as they are related to the legal issues involved.
LAWS6112 Law of Tax Administration

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Celeste Black Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 28-30 and Sep 16, 17 (9-3.30) Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students undertaking this unit have an understanding of Australian income taxation law commensurate with that which would be obtained from completing undergraduate study in Australian taxation law or five years working with Australian tax law in a law or accounting practice in an industry role or in the Australian Taxation Office. For students who do not have such knowledge or work experience they first should undertake LAWS6825 Introduction to Australian Business Tax before enrolling in this unit. Assessment: class assignment (30%) and take-home exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
Tax Administration is a study of the theoretical and practical issues that arise in the administration of the Australian tax system, concentrating primarily on the income tax. The unit of study is structured around the key design features of any system of tax administration, namely ascertainment of liability (particularly self assessment), dispute resolution, and collection and recovery of tax. Particular emphasis will be given to the reforms implemented as a result of the Government's Review of Self Assessment. Wherever relevant, the interaction of administration issues with the substantive provisions of the tax law will be considered. Students should gain an understanding of the foundational rules underlying the administration of the income tax laws and a detailed knowledge of the application of those laws to a variety of common dealings between taxpayers and the tax administration.
LAWS6161 International Human Rights

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Irene Baghoomians Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prohibitions: GOVT6117 Assessment: 2000wd assignment (30%) and 5000wd essay (70%) or 7000wd (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Available to MLLR students who commenced after Jan 2015. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit introduces students to the principles and practice of international human rights law - a field of public international law and policy of ever-expanding dimensions. It will introduce students to some key concepts, debates, documents and institutions in this field, while encouraging critical examination of these from a variety of angles. In summary, this unit considers the question: what happens when we regard a situation or predicament as one involving a breach of international human rights law - what possibilities and problems does this entail? Addressing this question, students in this unit will examine: (a) forums where international human rights law is being produced (international tribunals, domestic courts, multilateral bodies - including United Nations organs - regional agencies, non-governmental organisations, academic institutions, and the media); (b) settings where international human rights law is being deployed (in Australia and elsewhere); and (c) particular identities/subjects that international human rights law aspires to shape, regulate or secure. By the end of this unit, students should be able to formulate written and oral arguments by reference to key international human rights law instruments and principles; give strategic advice as to available avenues of recourse in international human rights law; and advance an informed critique of particular dimensions of international human rights law scholarship and practice, by reference to contemporary literature in this field.
LAWS6167 International Law II

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alison Pert Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 14, 15 & 21, 22 (9-5) Assumed knowledge: LAWS6243 Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Compulsory core unit for MIL and GradDipIntLaw students who commenced prior to 1 January 2019. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit of study consolidates and builds upon knowledge gained in LAWS6243 International Law I. The relationship between international law and domestic law is explored in depth, both in a comparative perspective and with reference to the impact of international law on Australian law and legal institutions. The unit also addresses specialist topics not covered, or only briefly covered, in LAWS6243 International Law I, which may include a more detailed examination of the limits of state jurisdiction, the role of the individual in international law, international human rights, and the right of states to respond to international wrongs. Other topics of current interest in public international law will also be examined, with students given an appreciation of the role and relevance of international law in major events in contemporary international affairs.
LAWS6243 International Law I

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alison Pert Session: Intensive March,Semester 2 Classes: S1CIMR (Group A): Mar 6, 7 & 13, 14 (9-5) and S2C (Group B): 1x2-hr lecture/week Prohibitions: LAWS1023 or LAWS5005 Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit is compulsory for MIL and GradDipIntLaw students who have not completed any previous study in international law and must be taken during the first semester of candidature. This unit is not available to MLawIntDev students who have been granted a reduced volume of learning. This unit is available as one of the core units for GradDipIntBusLaw students. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit provides an introduction to public international law. Its purpose is to ensure that students have a thorough understanding of the core principles and problems of, and contemporary issues in, international law. The unit covers the following topics: nature and scope of public international law, sources of public international law, international legal personality, the law of treaties, how title to territory is acquired, state jurisdiction in international law, immunity from jurisdiction, state responsibility for international wrongs, dispute settlement, and the legality of the use of force.
LAWS6032 Crime Research and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Judith Cashmore Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 2000wd research problem (30%) and 4000wd research proposal (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for MCrim and GradDipCrim students. Elective unit for GradDipCrim students who commenced on or after 1 Jan 2019. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit provides an examination of research methods in the context of criminology. The relationship between theory and methodology is explored. The production of knowledge about crime is critically assessed. Sources and forms of crime data are discussed and their significance is assessed. Research design, evaluation and analysis are also studied.
LAWS6034 Gender, Violence and the Criminal Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Graeme Coss Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: 3000wd essay (50%) and 2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: The unit replaced LAWS6034 Criminal Liability. Core unit for MCrim students who commenced before 1 January 2019. This unit is an introduction to aspects of criminal law for non-lawyers, and for law students from non-common law jurisdictions. It is therefore not available to students who have completed a law degree in a common law jurisdiction. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-visitors.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
In this unit, students will examine the ways in which criminal liability is established, analysing the ingredients of particular personal violence offences (assault, sexual assault, the homicides) and related defences (provocation and self-defence, 'insanity' and substantial impairment, automatism, infanticide, intoxication, necessity and duress) from historical, theoretical and practical context perspectives. In the process, students will gain an appreciation of how gender impacts the ways that the criminal law and justice system contend with accused persons and their victims. The Law's claims to equality and neutrality will be scrutinised, as will perceptions of discrimination based on gender.
LAWS6066 Discretion in Criminal Justice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Nicholas Cowdery Session: Intensive November Classes: Oct 9, 10 & 23, 24 (9-5) Assessment: take-home exam (60%) and essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit looks at the ways in which the exercise of discretionary judgment arises for consideration in the course of the criminal justice process and the ways in which that judgment should be exercised at each step. It deals with each stage from the reporting or observation of crime, through investigation, arrest, charging, bail, plea, hearing, appeal, retrial and publicity. It describes how actors at each step (citizens, police, prosecutors and judges) confront decision making, the laws (legislation, common law) and rules (prosecution guidelines, memoranda and procedures) that apply and provides examples of the exercise of such discretions. It also looks at the place of public commentary (personal, the media and political) in the process. The unit explores nuances in the conduct of any criminal prosecution aside from the application of the letter of the law.
LAWS6893 Environmental Criminology: Space and Place

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Murray Lee, Assoc Prof Garner Clancey Session: Intensive August Classes: Aug 9, 10 and 16, 17 (9-5) Assessment: 4000wd essay (50%) and research project (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/cpd/
The unit examines traditions of criminological theorising, research and public intervention that focus on the socio-spatial context(s) and determinants of crime and its governance. It explores the principal sources of data collection, the methodologies and theoretical underpinnings concerned with the spatial and social ecological dispersion of crime and deviance and its techniques of management and control. It also explores the relationship of public safety and crime prevention to public policy/interventions in areas such as urban and regional planning, housing, local government and community services.
LAWS6048 Explaining Crime

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jennifer Bargen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: take-home exam (30%), class presentation (10%) and 3500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for MCrim and GradDipCrim students and co-requisite for other criminology elective units. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-visitors.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit examines the relevance of theory to the process of explaining crime as a social phenomenon. It will selectively analyse the history of criminological thought. Special attention will be given to the cross-disciplinary nature of efforts to understand crime, criminality and their causes. A significant section of the unit will deal with contemporary approaches to criminological explanation including the influence of feminism and postmodernism. Contemporary theorists such as Foucault, Garland and Braithwaite will also be considered. The unit will endeavour to make explicit the links between criminological theory and the development of public policy.
LAWS6970 Forensic Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr H Paterson, Dr Celine Van Golde Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prohibitions: PSYC1001 or PSYC3020 Assessment: class participation (10%), 3500-4000wd essay (40%) and 2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-visitors.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
Forensic psychology is the application of psychological knowledge and theories to all aspects of the criminal and civil justice systems. It is currently one of the fastest developing and most popular aspects of psychology. In this unit we will draw upon psychological evidence to explain and understand some of the people and processes involved in the legal system. Through a series of interactive seminars we will discuss topics such as lie detection, profiling, interviewing, jury deliberation, eyewitness memory, criminal offenders, victims of crime, and police officers.
LAWS6877 Mental Illness: Law and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: To be advised Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 17, 18 & Sep 7, 8 (9-5) Assessment: 3000wd assignment (40%) and 4500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit deals with the law relating to mental health issues in Australia including human rights principles. Background material on the nature and incidence of mental illness, psychiatric and medical issues, as well criminological and public policy literature will be considered where relevant. The unit covers substantive issues from civil treatment, welfare law, and criminal law. Topics covered will include: the social context of mental illness and the current and historical approaches to treatment of the mentally ill; contemporary State, Territorial and Federal involvement in mental health policy and legislation; the present framework of NSW mental health law and related welfare law including the Mental Health Act, Guardianship Act, Protected Estates Act and Mental Health (Criminal Procedure) Act; the process of scheduling persons with a mental illness; review mechanisms including the roles of the medical superintendent, magistrates, the mental health review tribunal and the Supreme Court; longer term detention of the mentally ill; community treatment and community counselling orders; protected estates and guardianship orders; electroconvulsive therapy; consent to surgery and special medical treatment; the defence of not guilty on the grounds of mental illness, the review of forensic patients and the exercise of the executive discretion; the issue of unfitness to be tried; the involuntary treatment of prisoners in the correctional system; and proposals and options for reform.
LAWS6197 Policing: Crime, Control and Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Murray Lee Session: Intensive March Classes: Mar 6, 7 & 20, 21 (9-5) Assessment: class discussion leadership (20%), essay (50%) and group scenario exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit critically examines the power relations that are policing (public and private). It recognizes and builds upon the essential and often problematic role of policing in crime control and security. Major aspects of police work and the discretion on which it depends, are analysed in order to understand the dynamics of social control in an age of risk and security.
MECO6901 Media Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd communication plan (30%), 1x2000wd media relations tactics (30%), 1x500wd client pitch (15%), 1x1500wd final essay (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Media Relations provides students with practical experience in seeking media coverage for a specific issue on behalf of a non-profit organisation. It requires students to research, design, present, implement and evaluate a communication plan, and to develop key tactical elements including media releases for distribution across multi-media platforms.
MECO6912 Political Public Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x Seminar participation (10%), 1x2000wd Campaign proposal (30%), 1x2000wd Campaign presentation (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study analyses and examines the convergence of public relations, advertising and political consulting in the history of political campaigning. The unit's objectives are to demonstrate an understanding of the relationships that exist in the political process between politicians, the media and public relations. It develops student skills specific to the delivery of political public relations and political campaigns. Its focus is the process of professionalisation and internationalisation of electioneering and campaign practices in media-centred democracies.
MECO6913 Public Opinion, Policy and Public Sphere

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Report (20%), 1x1500wd Stakeholder position paper (20%), 1x500wd Presentation (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (45%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit analyses the relationship between professional communication and public opinion. It focuses on theories of influence and persuasion in the context of the development of policy, and how these are reflected in the public sphere. It develops the notion of the public sphere as represented by Habermas, Fraser, Schudson and others, focusing in particular on the transformation of the public sphere in terms of postmodern public relations.
MKTG5001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: in-semester test (25%), final exam (35%), team project (30%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to basic principles and language of marketing theory and practice. Marketing principles are examined in relation to a wide variety of products and services, in both commercial and non-commercial domains. An emphasis is placed on strategy planning and the marketing decision process. It is an introduction to the issues and terminology of marketing that can serve as a standalone understanding of the basics of marketing or as a foundation unit for further study in marketing. The unit focuses on the practical analysis marketing and the marketing management process and the development of the marketing mix the components that make up a marketing plan.
MKTG6003 Marketing Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: final exam (40%), team project (20%), presentation (10%), class and blackboard participation (20%), reflection (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a survey of marketing strategy and planning. It critically evaluates key marketing strategy concepts such as SWOT analysis; alternative identification and evaluation; marketing research to inform strategic decision making; selection of alternatives and implementation of strategy and the role of the marketing mix elements in marketing strategy. It also critically evaluates sustainable and non-sustainable advantages.
MKTG6005 Marketing Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: Intensive - 6 days, 9:30am-5pm Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: in-class participation (10%), assignment (20%), assignment (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit provides a theoretical and practical perspective on the role of integrated marketing communications in the marketing process, planning and implementation. The unit focuses on the role of different media (e.g. television, radio, print, outdoor, cinema, Internet, mobile and social media) and covers various aspects of advertising and promotions management including: mass media advertising, online, mobile, social media, in-store advertising, sales promotion, public relations, sponsorships, and personal selling.
MKTG6206 Regulatory Environment and Ethics

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Individual assessment (20%), group assignment (30%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit is only available to students enrolled in the Master of Marketing, Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate of Marketing.
In today's highly competitive and uncertain business environment, it is critical for marketing professionals to have a clear understanding of marketing issues and the impact of possible regulatory and ethical factors. Marketing programmes and strategies have greater chances of success if they are developed with an awareness of regulatory and ethical guidance.
PACS6913 Conflict in Organisations

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: Intensive delivery over 6 days Assessment: Seminar participation (10%), 1xClass presentation equivalent to 500wds (15%), 1x1200wd paper (25%), 1x3000wd final paper (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
People spend a large part of their lives dealing with organisations. Organisations require close proximity and communication between people, often under pressure. This unit analyses organisations and diagnoses dysfunctional practices. It explores conflict/consensus theories and organisational politics. Culture and the relevance of peace with justice in the workplace are explored, and theory and skills that lead toward satisfying outcomes are examined and practiced. Students will learn to apply tools to resolve conflict in the workplace and achieve peace with justice.
PACS6928 Community Mediation: Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive April Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week or equivalent intensive Assessment: 1x1500wd equiv seminar participation/role plays (25%), 1x1500wd reflective journal (25%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study will focus on the theory and practical application of facilitation, communication and conflict resolution skills in a community mediation context. Students will learn about various models of community mediation and will become skilled in the stages of community mediation through role-plays and simulation exercises. In addition to specific training in community mediation, the unit provides students with transferable skills and knowledge about mediation.
PMGT5871 Project Process Planning and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fatima Afzal Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prohibitions: PMGT6871 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Project Management processes are what moves the project from initiation through all its phases to a successful conclusion. This course takes the project manager from a detailed understanding of process modelling through to the development and implementation of management processes applicable to various project types and industries and covers approaches to reviewing, monitoring and improving these processes. Specifically, the UoS aims to develop understanding of the nature and purpose of project management in the context of economic enterprise; develop knowledge of various models and frameworks for the practical application of project management; and explore core elements of effective project management with particular focus on technological development and innovation
PMGT5873 Project Economics and Finance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: PMGT6873 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This course equips members of project management teams with information and tools to do financial appraisal and optimise decision making. It imparts basic knowledge and competencies required in project appraisal and financial management applicable to all sectors of industry and business. These include services, business investment, RandD, capital projects, local, state and national government departments and agencies.
Topics include: Review of the Fundamentals of Project Economics and Financial Techniques; Implementation of Fundamental Principles including EUAC, NPV, IRR, B/C, Valuation, Depreciation, Replacement Studies and Life Cycle Costing; Development of Project Alternatives and Application of the Analysis Techniques; Sensitivity Analysis, Risk Analysis and Management; Project Funding and Selection; Project Appraisal Report.
PMGT5875 Project Innovation Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Innovation is widely-recognised as a major driver of economic growth. Yet innovation projects can be difficult to manage: they typically involve a high level of uncertainty, and many organisations are unsatisfied with the level of innovation they achieve. In this unit of study, we focus on issues in the management of innovation projects at the individual project level, organisational level and across networks of organisations. Since a systematic approach can and does improve our effectiveness in managing innovation, we begin by exploring several different process models of the stages through which innovation projects are managed. We discuss context and challenges which impact such projects, as well as the concepts of creativity and intellectual property management. Using focused case studies, we analyse best practice in the structures and processes that organisations can provide to enable innovation, as well as to support the search, selection, implementation, dissemination, feedback and evaluation stages of their innovative projects. We also examine the impact of networks on innovation (e.g. collaboration networks), national innovation policies and systems, and trends towards open innovation.
PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack; Julien Pollack Session: Semester 2 Classes: Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: WORK6026 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Welcome to PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change. This course is designed to foster and promote critical thinking and the application of good theory to inform good practice in the strategic delivery of organisational change. The philosophy underpinning this course is design thinking and storytelling. You will learn quite a bit about these ideas over the duration of the course, and why it is increasingly important to change management. The course develops capabilities that will differentiate you from the average project manager and change agent, and which are in high demand in forward thinking organisations: be they in private, public or third sector.
PMGT5877 Management of Project Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Readings, Online discussions, Group Assignment Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This course examines the challenges and approaches of managing project-oriented organisations. These could be independent business units or divisions within a larger corporation. Examples are construction contractors, ICT services, RandD units and many internal business units that concurrently undertake multiple projects. Today, more organisations are adopting project management as a management strategy to provide effective and timely solutions to clients. They are adapting organisational architectures to support both 'business as usual' and the multiple projects that are increasingly important to the organisation. Focus is on the relationship between project management and the following: organisational culture, structure, processes, cross-functional teams, project governance, performance management, organisational learning, change and knowledge management. The assessment comprises of a case study team assignment, quizzes and online discussions.
PMGT5879 Strategic Portfolio and Program Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petr Matous Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit specifically addresses the selection and prioritisation of multiple programmes and projects which have been grouped to support an organisation's strategic portfolio. The allocation of programmes of work within a multi-project environment, governing, controlling and supporting the organisation's strategy, are considered. The aim is to formulate and manage the delivery of the portfolio of strategies using programme management. Students will learn and practice the issues to be considered in selecting an effective organisation portfolio and how to implement a Portfolio Management Framework. Also they will encounter the many conflicting issues facing Program Managers as they seek to implement organisation strategy through programs and learn how to balance these to obtain desired outcomes.
PMGT5888 Global Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petr Matous Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This course has been designed to suggest the development of best practices in communication, collaboration and management across international borders. The objectives are to: Understand the challenges faced by a global program and project teams; and, Improve the overall skills and practices of global project managers that will lead international companies to achieve maturity in global project management. Topics include: Introduction to traditional, distributed, and virtual project work; Global projects and requirements; Organisational change and organisational theory; Cross-cultural collaboration; Global project leadership; Trust building and conflict resolution; Coaching over distance; Global communication and channels; Leading a global organisation; Implementing collaborative tools; and, Implementing a Global Project Management Framework.
PMGT5889 Integrated Cost and Scheduling Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit of study focuses on the integrated management of project scope, time and cost for effective control and delivery of projects. The scope of the subject matter includes delivering comprehensive theoretical knowledge and application skills in integrated management and control of cost and schedule in complex projects. By successful completion of this unit of study, students should achieve a clear understanding of the time and cost management and appropriate control measures in project development environments.
Students should be able to: Discuss the project management trade-offs on balancing the triple-constraint; Explain the integrated cost and schedule control processes; Construct work breakdown structure (WBS) using given project information; Discuss scope monitoring and change control system; Produce networks diagrams for project scheduling; Apply critical path analysis (CPA) in network scheduling; Apply critical chain method in project scheduling; Estimate the project cost and duration; Apply resource scheduling techniques; Construct a timephased budget plan; Discuss cost monitoring and control processes; Undertake earned value analysis (EVA); and Undertake integrated cost and schedule control processes using project management software (Microsoft Project or Primavera)By the end of this unit of study, students should be able to: Undertake WBS exercises, CPA, EVA and tradeoff analysis using the given project information; Explain how the components of time and cost management interrelate; Explain in depth why integrated cost and schedule management are important to project management; and Analyse a project situation that involves time and cost management issues and apply a solution(s)
PMGT5891 Project Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Gerard Mcgarry; Gerard Mcgarry Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: PMGT6891 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit is delivered in multiple modes (online and weekly). Please ensure that the correct mode is selected before checking the detailed content. The aims of this course are to develop students' understanding and ability in applying project risk management skills in project environments. The course enables the students to apply best practice techniques and methods commonly used by industry in project risk management. The competencies developed through this unit cover and go beyond the competencies in Risk areas as outlined in the competency standards by the Australian Institute of Project Management and Project Management Institute in the USA, respectively. The unit aims to develop students ability to understand and conceptualise risk management issues, and analyse and apply risk management techniques using concepts and frameworks from the underpinning literature. - Ability to establish risk management plans, policies and integrate them with other project plans, organisation and align them to the business case - Ability to understand the sources of potential risks (including but not limited to political, organisational, psychological and technical risks) and to use risk management tools and techniques to identify, assess, evaluate, and prioritise risks - Ability to simulate the potential effects of risks on schedule, cost and other performance dimensions using sensitivity analysis, decision tree analysis and simulation techniques. - Ability to track, monitor and control risks and actions to achieve project objectives and the business case - Ability to close risks for an optimal outcome
PUBH5114 Alcohol, Drug Use and Health

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Day Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13 weeks of 2hr teaching sessions and/or associated readings and online activities. Students can complete the unit either online or in blended mode. The teaching sessions are a combination of online seminars and discussion activities for online students. Those enrolled in the blended mode, take part in online seminars and two compulsory one day face-to-face workshops. Prohibitions: PUBH5115 Assessment: 2 x 1500 word assignments (55%), compulsory discussion related activities (30%); online quizzes (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to assist students in developing an evidence-based understanding of the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use and its impact on health, and the effectiveness of methods for prevention and management of related problems. This fuller drug and alcohol elective covers all the content of PUBH5115 and goes on to assist the student to develop more advanced understanding of research, policy and treatment services for alcohol and drug use disorders, and to examine the needs of special populations.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Alison Hayes Session: Intensive September Classes: 2x 2day compulsory workshops Prerequisites: ((PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018) or (HPOL5001 as a prerequisite and HPOL5003 as a co-requisite) Assessment: assignment 1 (40%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to develop students' knowledge and skills of economic evaluation as an aid to priority setting in health care. This unit covers: principles of economic evaluation; critical appraisal guidelines; measuring and valuing benefits; methods of costing; modeling in economic evaluation. The workshops consist of interactive lectures and class exercises.
Textbooks
A course manual will be provided to each student.
PUBH5416 Vaccines in Public Health

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Aditi Dey, Dr Frank Beard Session: Semester 2 Classes: Preparatory online lectures and 1x 2day workshop at the Children's Hospital Westmead Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 or PUBH5018 Assessment: 2x short online quizzes (10%) plus 1x 1500 word assignment (90%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students who have not done the core units of study in epidemiology (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) or biostatistics (PUBH5018) but have previous demonstrable experience in these study areas will be required to request permission from the unit of study coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Permission is required to ensure that students have a basic grounding in epidemiology and biostatistics. The coordinator emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit to advise whether or not the student has permission to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of immunisation principles, the impact of vaccination on the epidemiology of vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs), how to assess the need for new vaccines and how to implement and monitor a new vaccination program. This unit covers the history and impact of vaccination; basic immunological principles of immunisation; surveillance of diseases, vaccination coverage, vaccine effectiveness and adverse events; vaccine scares; risk communication; immunisation in the developing country context; assessing disease burden and new vaccines. Learning activities include short online preparatory lectures and a workshop with interactive lectures and small group case studies.
SCWK6902 Social Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Offered either in block (1x4 hr seminar/week x 6 weeks) or normal semester 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd qualitative task (20%), 1x1500wd quantitative task (20%), 1x1000wd equivalent participation tasks (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study introduces students to a range of research methods and focus on quantitative and qualitative methods. Many other research issues in developing a research proposal will be addressed through the semester. It is intended that, at the conclusion of this unit, students will have developed a research project able to implement through either further study or in workplaces.
SUST5001 Introduction to Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Philip McManus Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Assessment: Essays, oral presentations, short written assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit of study will introduce students to the concepts and multidisciplinary nature of sustainability, starting with the physical basis of climate change and its impact on the environment and human development. This will be followed by several case studies covering Energy, Health, Development and Environment. The case studies will be presented by industry professionals and will illustrate sustainability issues currently before Australia- their origins, impacts and industry responses. The unit of study will provide students with a holistic systems lens through which to view their learning throughout the Masters program. This will underpin understanding of the integrated nature of sustainability and facilitate the challenging of silo-based assumptions- their own and those of others. The intention is to ground understanding of complex systems in the real world through the use of case studies that will demonstrate organisational change and problem solving in a world with competing values and conflicting views of what it means to live sustainably. Students completing the unit of study will have a "sustainability tool kit" to apply to sustainability issues in their professional and community activities.
SUST5002 Food and Water Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Field Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments and group presentation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study involves essay and blog writing and group work. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
Potentially the greatest challenge facing humanity is how to feed 10 billion people in a hot world. How do we reverse trends which suggest that essential resources are becoming scarce, consumers sicker and traditional systems of food production are breaking down? This is the situation that faces us in the 21 Century. This unit explores the imperatives and challenges of ensuring an adequate supply of safe water and nutritious food in the face of changes in the environment, human population and global markets. Factors influencing trends in supply and demand include environmental degradation, climate change, energy scarcity, technology, changes in population and the patterns of global prosperity, growing urbanisation, and increased consumption. The unit will consider the underlying policy, economic and market-driven forces that play an important role in affecting both supply and demand. The needs of low-, middle- and high-income nations will be compared and the role of international, national and regional mechanisms will be discussed. Placing emphasis on the relevance to Australia, the unit will explore available interdisciplinary and multi-sectoral actions across a range of organisational levels such as communities, governments, NGOs and international agencies.
SUST5003 Energy and Resources

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Elizabeth Tomc Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 to 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week presented in an intensive format with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, classroom presentations, short written assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit will examine the critical roles that energy and resource usage play in global, national and local sustainability. The need for developed economies to decarbonise their energy supply and for developing countries to have access to clean energy and sustainable resources will require major changes in technology, policy and business systems. This unit of study will cover the fundamentals of energy and resource supply; sustainable supply and use of energy for industry, business and consumers; life cycle analysis; energy security and alternative energy systems. Students will gain an understanding of: different sources of energy and their uses; the economic, environmental and societal contexts of energy and resource use; the need and scope for a transition from conventional energy sources; sound principles for analysing different resource and energy supply options; the role of international agreements and federal policy in influencing resource and energy use.
SUST5004 Sustainable Development and Population Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Gill Session: Semester 2 Classes: Alternate full-day workshops and online tutorials on Thursdays in August, September and October. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, group project and short written assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit introduces students to the extremely close nexus between human health, demographic change and environmental sustainability issues. This relationship is examined within the context of the three pillars of sustainable development with a focus on achieving equitable outcomes. This unit explores the extent to which environmental changes influence population demographics and health, and the extent to which demographic and secular changes impact on the physical environment. The influence of migration, conflict, food insecurity, droughts, flooding, heat stress, emerging and re-emerging infections and chronic health problems on poverty, ageing and dependency, physical, mental and social health and economic sustainability will be analysed alongside the elements needed to preserve the diversity and functioning of the ecosystem for future human survival. International models and policies for mitigating and/or adapting to the negative consequences of globalisation, urbanisation, overconsumption, and resource depletion will be analysed for their potential benefits and harms to sustainable population growth, optimal health and equitable distribution of essential resources.
SUST5005 Law, Policy and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rosemary Lyster Session: Intensive October Classes: Intensive classes for 4 full days in October Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Class presentation and short essay (1,500-2,000 w, 20%) and long essay (6,000 w, 80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit examines how policy-makers engage with and implement policies and legal requirements for regulating ecologically sustainable development. Meeting the needs of a growing global population while at the same time maintaining the health of the environment, which provides the life support system for humanity, is the central policy challenge of the 21st century. Key sustainability challenges include: avoiding dangerous climate change, safeguarding biological diversity, providing food security, coping with resource scarcity, and promoting green technology including low-carbon energy generation. These issues provide acute challenges for governments given that they cut across a range of policy areas, and require long-term planning rather than short-term decision-making. The unit examines how policy-makers at international, national and sub-national scales consider and respond to sustainability issues. Students will be introduced to: the role of analysis (economic, legal, political, scientific and social etc) in providing an evidence base for decisions; the variety of instruments and institutions available for policy delivery; how the lobbying process influences policy determination; and effectiveness of policy design and implementation. The unit also examines how decision-making is influenced by stakeholders, including industry, nongovernmental organisations and citizens. It will be seen that sustainability policy design and implementation in the real world involves reconciling competing agendas and interests, and that trade-offs are often made that may strengthen or weaken the effectiveness of sustainability policies. Offered through the Sydney Law School, this unit introduces students to the legal imperatives (both international and national) which inform and mandate policy choices.
SUST5006 Sustainability: Business and Leadership

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Christopher Wright Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2.5 hour interactive lecture per week with up to four hours per week spent on a combination of additional (e.g. on-line) learning tasks, small group sessions and consultation with lecturers. Corequisites: SUST5001 Assessment: Essays, short written assignments, group project (100%) Practical field work: Experiential learning with sustainable enterprise Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study involves essay-writing. Academic writing skills equivalent to HSC Advanced English or significant consultation via the Writing Hub is assumed.
This unit of study will help build your understanding of the knowledge, skills and activities required to lead sustainability and change in, and with, businesses and organisations. The unit presents the relevance and importance of business mission and strategy, and will introduce the roles of corporate social responsibility, sustainability and change management. It will also explore stakeholders associated with business (including shareholders, consumers and government) and how they can both motivate and impede change in the context of sustainability. Learning will be facilitated through seminars, readings, as well as individual group projects.
WORK5002 Foundations of HRM and IR

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: tutorial facilitation and reflections (20%); final exam (40%); research essay (30%); tutorial attendance (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This is the foundational unit for the graduate Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations program and should be taken in a student's first semester of study.
The unit provides an integrated overview of the social, legal, psychological, ethical and strategic dimensions of human resource management (HRM) and industrial relations (IR). The learning content develops broad and deep knowledge in a select number of topical HR and IR issues and links these to a real-world context. As such the unit provides students with the essential preparatory knowledge and skills to build an intellectual foundation for the suite of subsequent core and elective units in HRM and IR available in the program.
WORK5003 Management and Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: quiz (10%), assignment (20%), essay (35%), participation (10%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to introduce students to the nature and context of management. It explores the functions and processes of management and encourages students to critically reflect on management theory and practice. It can be taken as a standalone unit for students enrolled in various specialist masters programs and also prepares students for further study in strategic management, organisational analysis and strategy and human resource management.
WORK6001 Organisational Analysis and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: presentation (20%), essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces students to the behaviour of people when acting as members of an organisation. The aim of the unit is to provide an understanding of the processes and structures that influence organisational behaviour, by drawing on ideas from psychology, sociology, management and anthropology. Topics covered include: personality and the self; learning and socialisation; motivation and commitment; group behaviour and dynamics; organisational design and boundaries; organisational culture, change and leadership.
WORK6002 Strategic Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1a: Intensive - TBA; Semester 2: 1 x 3hr seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: seminar-based assessment (20%), case study assessment (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The aim of this unit is to introduce the concept of strategy and explain its role in the management of organisations. The unit thus traces the development of strategic management as a field and examines different approaches to strategic management. WORK6002 introduces students to the classical strategy process of strategic analysis, strategy formulation and strategy implementation. This involves learning about and working with a range of strategy models and tools that can be used in the strategic management of organisations. In particular, a range of case studies is used to explore the practical application of these tools. The unit also critically examines traditional views of strategy by introducing a range of current debates in the strategy field.
WORK6017 Human Resource Strategies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture, 1 x 1 hour seminar/tutorial Prerequisites: WORK5002 or WORK5003 Assessment: presentation (20%); group report (20%); essay (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This is a core unit for the Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations courses.
This unit examines the theoretical foundations of strategic human resource management and then critically analyses the empirical evidence related to a range of HR strategies deployed in contemporary workplaces, both in Australia and internationally. In doing so, the unit explores the issues underpinning emerging HR strategies, their implementation and the outcomes experienced within the organisation and the wider environment. The HR strategies studied involve those that focus on managing a contemporary workforce and may include human resources strategies associated with: the management of front line workers, teams, non-standard forms of employment, job quality and work-life balance, and gender and diversity at work, for example.
WORK6026 Organisational Change and Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: assignment 1 (35%), assignment 2 (15%), presentation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit seeks to develop diagnostic and prescriptive skills in relation to the management of organisational change while also encouraging the adoption of a critical perspective of the field. Part 1 (Organisational Change and the Nature of Organisations) introduces the fields of organisational change, explains its relevance to organisation performance and strategy and examines key change management models. Part 2 (Diagnosis and Intervention) examines the utility of key organisational change models and techniques and identifies factors that may impact on the effectiveness of the change management process. Part 3 (Key Areas of Intervention) analyses the application of organisational change practices and initiatives to a number of specific organisational issues.
WORK6030 Performance and Rewards

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: Intensive Assessment: participation (10%), tests (20%), assignment (40%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit examines the processes and practices associated with contemporary performance and reward management. Results-based, behaviourally-based and competency-based methods of performance management are examined, along with processes of performance review, planning and developing. Coverage of reward management issues includes: job- and person-based approaches to building base pay structures; methods for rewarding individual performance; work group incentives such as gainsharing, goal-sharing and team pay; methods of rewarding employees for organisational performance, including employee share ownership; and performance-related rewards for executives. The unit also examines approaches to developing strategically integrated performance and reward management systems.
WORK6111 Management Consulting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2a Classes: Intensive Assumed knowledge: Knowledge is assumed in the areas of basic business strategy and organisational change. It is recommended that students enrolling in this Unit will have completed either or both of the following or similar Units: WORK6026 Organisational Change and Development, WORK6002 Foundations of Strategic Management. Assessment: seminar introduction (10%), seminar paper (30%), seminar participation (inc in-class exercise) (20%), and exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit explores the role, influence and activities of management consultants in Australia and overseas. It examines management consultants as developers and disseminators of knowledge and practice and their role as change agents. The main management themes covered in the subject include: the consulting industry in Australia and overseas; consultant roles and the consultant-client relationship; consultants and organisational change; knowledge intensive firms and the management of expertise; the diffusion of management knowledge and fashion in a global economy; consulting as an occupation and career; managing a consultancy.
USSC6902 US Politics: Presidency and Congress

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive October,Intensive September,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: 1x2000-2500wd major paper (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit will examine US domestic politics through analysing the federal structure and separation of powers within the American political system. This understanding will provide an appreciation of the porous nature of US political institutions, offering social actors a variety of venues and opportunities to influence political decision-making. It will examine the factors that make some arenas more open than others and strategies that groups and political actors take to secure or prise open those avenues for change.
USSC6906 US Constitution

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: class participation (10%), oral presentation (10%), 1x1000wd short paper (10%), 1x3000wd long paper (20%), 1x2hr final open book written exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the US Constitution, a document which animates nearly all facets of contemporary American life. It shapes the contours of speech and media and is constantly tested and reinterpreted by social actors, the judiciary, and political institutions. Many issues faced by foreign businesses or organisations operating in the US have a constitutional dimension. Students will participate in lively debate about the Constitution, consistent with its importance in the American landscape.
FASS7001 Academic English for Postgraduates

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x500wd Annotated Bibliography (15%), 1x2500wd Reflection Journal (25%), 1xSeminar Presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective is designed for International postgraduates who are new to study in an English language university. It supports the development of study, research, and critical thinking abilities, spoken English and academic language. Knowledge acquired in this unit will strengthen written and spoken English to help meet the standards necessary for successful completion of FASS Masters by coursework degrees. It is recommended that this elective be taken during the first semester.
FASS7002 Critical Thinking and Persuasive Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weeks 1-3: 2x1hr lecture/week, 2x2hr tutorial/week; Weeks 4-9:1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd critical review (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), seminar presentation (20%),1x2500wd reflection journal (20%), tutorial participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective supports development of skills in critical analysis, writing in different genres, research, presentation, and developing individual scholarly 'voice'. While valuable for all commencing postgraduates, it is of particular benefit to those returning to academia after an extended break, or for International students wishing to orient themselves to local standards of practice for academic communication. This unit is structured to have additional seminars and lectures early in the semester and fewer later in the semester so students have the opportunity to apply new skills to all their coursework. The unit is ideally taken in the first semester of study.