US Studies

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The following unit is not available in 2019:

CISS6018 Nuclear Arms Control and Non-proliferation

13/2/2019
2.

The following unit of study is no longer available in 2019:

ECOP6130 Human Rights and International Development

12/3/2019
3.

The description has changed for the following unit:

GOVT6229 Campaigning: Data, Politics, Strategy Description: Students will gain an understanding of survey design, big data, data analysis and interpretation, and the use of data in political campaigns. Students will combine the tools of data science with an understanding of public opinion to study citizen behaviour and craft political strategies. Greater insight into how data can be used in politics is provided with guest lectures by speakers from politics, media and strategic consulting.

13/3/2019

US Studies

Candidates for the Graduate Certificate in US Studies are required to complete 24 credit points, including a minimum of 6 credit points of core units of study, a minimum of 12 credit points of core elective units of study and a maximum of 6 credit points of elective units of study.
Candidates for the Graduate Diploma in US Studies are required to complete 48 credit points, including a minimum of 24 credit points of core units of study, a minimum of 18 credit points of core elective units of study and a maximum of 6 credit points of elective units of study.
Candidates for the Master of US Studies are required to complete 96 credit points, including a minimum of 24 credit points of core units of study, a minimum of 36 credit points of core elective units of study, a maximum of 30 credit points of elective units of study, a minimum of 6 credit points of capstone units of study, and an optional specialisation as listed in the unit of study table.

Core units of study

USSC6901 Fundamentals of US Studies

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x5-hr intensive classes weeks 1 and 2, 1x6-hr intensive week 3 Assessment: class participation including journal (20%), learning portfolio (equivalent to 3000wds) (40%) and 1x3000wd research essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit introduces students to the foundations of American politics, economics, society and culture, examining the interplay of major actors and ideas from these spheres. It will familiarise students with the variegated landscape of America through analysing contemporary issues using interactive approaches to learning. Students will survey how America's political framework either engages with or impedes social and economic actors and how these dynamics are reflected in and supported or undermined by the media and artistic expression.
USSC6902 US Politics: Presidency and Congress

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: 1x2000-2500wd major paper (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine US domestic politics through analysing the federal structure and separation of powers within the American political system. This understanding will provide an appreciation of the porous nature of US political institutions, offering social actors a variety of venues and opportunities to influence political decision-making. It will examine the factors that make some arenas more open than others and strategies that groups and political actors take to secure or prise open those avenues for change.
USSC6903 US Foreign and National Security Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: class participation 10%; reading response paper 30%; Essay proposal 20%; Research Essay 40%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide a sophisticated understanding of the making of American foreign and national security policy from "inside the beltway." As a democratic country, the process of its foreign policy making has more domestic influences and pressures than many other countries. This unit provides students with a detailed understanding of the domestic, societal and international sources of American foreign policy, including the roles of: individuals, the bureaucracy, the NSC and interagency process, lobby groups, Congress, public opinion, the media, parties and partisanship, think tanks, presidential doctrines, US political culture and discourse, and more.
USSC6906 US Constitution

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: class participation (10%), oral presentation (10%), 1x1000wd short paper (10%), 1x3000wd long paper (20%), 1x2hr final open book written exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the US Constitution, a document which animates nearly all facets of contemporary American life. It shapes the contours of speech and media and is constantly tested and reinterpreted by social actors, the judiciary, and political institutions. Many issues faced by foreign businesses or organisations operating in the US have a constitutional dimension. Students will participate in lively debate about the Constitution, consistent with its importance in the American landscape.

Core elective units of study

USSC6905 US Economic Policy and Regulation

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours per week Assessment: Class participation (10%), 1x3000wd essay (40%), 5x500wd reading briefs (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit studies the ways in which economic and regulatory policies and institutions drive the business and social environment in the United States. Macro-economic policy, micro-economic reforms and changes to the legal framework and legal institutions have a fundamental effect on the impetus for research and development, the qualities of domestic and imported goods and services, the incentives for business and societal innovations, the extent and fairness of competition, the advancement of employment equity, the quality of education, the improvement of productivity, the attainment of social benefits and social equity, the mechanisms for rapid and equitable information transfer, the minimisation of surveillance and enforcement costs, and the equitable sharing of income and risks within US society.
USSC6907 American Exceptionalism

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 1x3000wd essay (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the motivation and meaning behind the claim that the United States of America is an exception nation. What exactly is an exceptional nation? Is the US exceptional or just different? How has the idea of exceptionalism evolved throughout American history? What are the implications or consequences of exceptionalism? To what extent and in what ways has the idea of exceptionalism shaped US history and influences America's relationship with the rest of the world?
USSC6920 US Media: Politics, Culture, Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x2hr class/week Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 2x Critical reviews (800 words, worth 20% each), 1x3000wd research paper (40%), Presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit will focus on media coverage of political campaigns and politics in America. It will look at the role of the media in American society in shaping debates and also the power of the American media globally. The impact of the internet on American journalism will be discussed as will the future of the media.
USSC6914 Key Issues in American Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Rodney Taveria Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture a week Assessment: weekly reflective journal (4000 words) (60%), 1x2000wd research paper (30%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit proposes a week-by-week engagement with some of the defining moments in US cultural history. Working from the premise that ideas in the US are cultural and political acts, the unit constructs a chart of the nation's salient (and often critical) intellectual projections. Blending written texts with works of visual art, high with 'low' culture, the course offers a close encounter with a misunderstood intellectual tradition and shows its relevance to the present.
USSC6922 US Strategy in the Asia-Pacific

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x700wd group presentation (10%), 1x1800wd policy memo (30%), 1x3500wd research paper (50%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The United States' has long pursued a grand strategy in Asia premised on preventing regional threats and maintaining access to Asian markets, societies, and strategic waterways. Under President Trump, however, America's regional role may be changing. This unit will explore the history and making of US strategy in Asia, including key turning points, strategic actors, and policy debates. Students will also examine contemporary challenges and flashpoints for America's Asia policy, and how these may affect stability and relations with the region.
DATA5207 Data Analysis in the Social Sciences

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Assumed knowledge: COMP5310 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Data science is a new, rapidly expanding field. There is an unprecedented demand from technology companies, financial services, government and not-for-profits for graduates who can effectively analyse data. This subject will help students gain a critical understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of quantitative research, and acquire practical skills using different methods and tools to answer relevant social science questions.
This subject will offer a nuanced combination of real-world applications to data science methodology, bringing an awareness of how to solve actual social problems to the Master of Data Science. We cover topics including elections, criminology, economics and the media. You will clean, process, model and make meaningful visualisations using data from these fields, and test hypotheses to draw inferences about the social world.
Techniques covered range from descriptive statistics and linear and logistic regression, the analysis of data from randomised experiments, model selection for prediction and classification tasks, to the analysis of unstructured text as data, multilevel and geospatial modelling, all using the open source program R. In doing this, not only will we build on the skills you have already mastered through this degree, but explore different ways to use them once you graduate.
USSC6919 American Film and Hollywood

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x4-hr class/week Assessment: 1x1500wd critical analysis/evaluation (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the relationship between 'American cinema' and Hollywood cinema. 'American cinema' draws inspiration from and attempts to contribute to cultural movements and contexts that include Hollywood but extend to literature and the visual arts more generally. Hollywood's power as a cultural sign will be examined in relation to alternative and independent film cultures. This will include not only analysis of feature films but also of writings by filmmakers and theorists. Questions of cinematic subjectivity and authorship will be a focus of the unit.
USSC6923 The US Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2 hour lecture per week, 1x1 hour tutorial per week Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (50%), Multiple Choice Problem Set (500wd equiv) (25%), 1x1000wd Book Review (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The United States economy is the world's largest and has a major influence on the Australian and global economies. This unit examines the main institutional features of the US economy and their role in determining US economic growth, the business cycle and other contemporary economic policy issues. The US economy's interactions with the rest of the world are also considered, with a particular focus on Australia's trade and investment relationship with the United States.

Elective

USSC6910 Special Topics in US Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: At least one meeting per month between student and project supervisor Assessment: 1x1500wd reflective essay (25%), participation (15%), 1x3500wd project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students accepted in this unit will be able to undertake a special independent or group project in US Studies. Independent projects will be completed under the supervision of the postgraduate coordinator and a USSC faculty member or a special visiting fellow where appropriate. Group projects will facilitate local and international learning experiences organized by the US Studies Centre and will be coordinated by the postgraduate coordinator of US Studies.
USSC6916 Research Essay in US Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervisory meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: 1x6000wd research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Available to Master of US Studies candidates only.
Students will undertake research essay of 6,000 words on an approved topic under the guidance of a supervisor from the Centre for US Studies. Normally, the essay involves deeper study of a subject which the student has already covered in the first semester of his or her program. Entry to this unit is subject to the permission of the Director and depends upon the availability of a supervisor from the Centre, the student's existing knowledge in the area, and her or his academic performance in the preceding semester.
USSC6205 Internship Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: Research project on behalf of the workplace partner, 4000wds Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of two units of study in an internship sequence that may be undertaken in partial fulfilment of requirements for the award of Master of Letters in US Studies. The project (Part 2) requires the completion of a research project on behalf of the workplace partner. In order to be considered, a minimum weighted average mark (WAM) of 70% across all units undertaken toward the Master of US Studies degree is required. Admission is subject to the Director's approval.
GOVT6229 Campaigning: Data, Politics, Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT6359 US-China Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x15-20min Presentation (equiv 750wd) (25%), 1x750wd Policy Memo (15%), 1x4500wd Research Paper (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This seminar introduces students to the dynamics of US-China relations, regarded by many as the most significant bilateral relationship in the world. The seminar aims to give an overview of the history of US-China relations, to deepen the students' understanding of the strategic thinking and policy-making of both China and the US, and to discuss a number of key contemporary issues in the relationship in some detail. This bilateral relationship has arguably become the most complex and challenging for both Washington and Beijing.
FASS7001 Academic English for Postgraduates

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x500wd Annotated Bibliography (15%), 1x2500wd Reflection Journal (25%), 1xSeminar Presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective is designed for International postgraduates who are new to study in an English language university. It supports the development of study, research, and critical thinking abilities, spoken English and academic language. Knowledge acquired in this unit will strengthen written and spoken English to help meet the standards necessary for successful completion of FASS Masters by coursework degrees. It is recommended that this elective be taken during the first semester.
FASS7002 Critical Thinking and Persuasive Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Weeks 1-3: 2x1hr lecture/week, 2x2hr tutorial/week; Weeks 4-9:1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd critical review (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), seminar presentation (20%),1x2500wd reflection journal (20%), tutorial participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective supports development of skills in critical analysis, writing in different genres, research, presentation, and developing individual scholarly 'voice'. While valuable for all commencing postgraduates, it is of particular benefit to those returning to academia after an extended break, or for International students wishing to orient themselves to local standards of practice for academic communication. This unit is structured to have additional seminars and lectures early in the semester and fewer later in the semester so students have the opportunity to apply new skills to all their coursework. The unit is ideally taken in the first semester of study.
CAEL5043 Screen Writing and Directing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project proposal (25%) and seminar presentation (15%) and project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective provides you with the skills and knowledge to conceptualise and develop a script, and to learn effective directorial techniques associated with the production of a short video work. During this elective you will be exposed to a range of film screenings, practical in-class exercises and moving image-based artworks. These viewings are intended to expose you to a range of creative writing skills and directorial techniques and encourage discussion, debate and creative development. Through lectures, tutorial, seminars, screenings and class exercises you are provided with a historical and conceptual framework in which to conceive of and develop your own creative projects. Projects are to be supported by a set of professional standard production documents and the presentation of seminars related to the development and production of the work.
CAEL5045 Web Environment for Cultural Producers

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project documentation (10%) and seminar presenation (20%) and major project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective unit of study provides you with the skills and knowledge to conceptualise and develop interactive websites for delivery across a range of platforms including desktop, tablet and mobile. Over the course of the unit of study you will learn a range of approaches to interactive authoring for the web, including principles of user-interface design and navigational architecture for web-based work. You will learn current web authoring tools such as Adobe Dreamweaver and Muse, and be introduced to the possibilities of scripting for design and interactivity using HTML5, CSS and JavaScript libraries. The major outcome of this unit of study is the development of an interactive website that demonstrates the technical and conceptual knowledge you have gained during the unit. It is expected that this project be creatively focused and critically engaged with the possibilities presented by the online environment for media implementation and interactivity. This project is to be supported by a series of seminars and a set of professional standard production documents that reflect the development and implementation of your major project.
ARIN6904 Mobile Media and Games

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Review and presentation (25%), 1x3000wd Critical Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Game/app concept (25%), Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Networked mobile devices and computer games are increasingly prominent in today's mediascapes, supporting practices of individualised mobility and play. This unit of study critically examines the aesthetics, politics and everyday uses of these emerging cultural technologies. It draws on new media studies, game studies and platform studies to explore themes such as the complication of leisure and work spaces, new media industries, gamification, playbour and mobile social media.
MECO6913 Public Opinion, Policy and Public Sphere

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Report (20%), 1x1500wd Stakeholder position paper (20%), 1x500wd Presentation (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (45%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit analyses the relationship between professional communication and public opinion. It focuses on theories of influence and persuasion in the context of the development of policy, and how these are reflected in the public sphere. It develops the notion of the public sphere as represented by Habermas, Fraser, Schudson and others, focusing in particular on the transformation of the public sphere in terms of postmodern public relations.
MECO6915 Writing Features: Narrative Journalism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x700wd pitching assignment (15%), 1x1500wd draft first feature (20%), 1x1500wd final first feature (20%), 1x2000wd second feature (40%), 1x300wd market report (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit teaches students the basic principles of short-form narrative journalism or feature writing suitable for publication in magazines, websites and newspapers. Genres covered include the profile, the Essay, travel, memoir, investigative journalism, cultural commentary and behind-the-news stories. Skills in pitching story ideas, interviewing, research, structure and style will be covered in workshop-based classes, providing opportunities to critique work and become familiar with editing processes prior to submission of assignments.
EDPK5003 Developing a Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachel Wilson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x4 hr Saturday workshops, plus online lectures and activities Assessment: online exercises (40%) and class presentation (20%) and research proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit is seen as the foundation unit in research methods and it provides an overview of the research process, with a focus on developing skills for critical evaluation of research reports and the design of research projects. Research strategies, sampling and design issues and various methods of data collection and analysis are examined. Students explore both quantitative and qualitative research approaches. The assessment in this unit is developed around students' own research interests and by the end of the unit students will have developed their own research proposal document.
WMST6903 Gender, Media and Consumer Societies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd group discussion/presentation (15%), 1x1000wd advertising analysis (25%), 1x500wd research essay proposal (10%), 1x2500wd research essay (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines theories of consumption in regards to cultural and media products and practices, with a specific focus on gender. Drawing upon a wide range of feminist media and cultural theories, we will critically analyse different forms of belonging and identity that are created through these practices. We will also pay close attention to the critiques of globalisation and consumption, theories of the 'citizen consumer' and the realities of geo-political and economic inequalities that underpin many forms of consumption.
MKTG6013 International and Global Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive November,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: midterm quiz (15%), participation (13%), group written report (25%), oral presentation (10%), research component (2%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit aims to give students an understanding of international marketing concepts by using the framework of marketing mix elements of product, price, distribution and promotions, and highlights their importance in a rapidly changing global economy. Topics include the 'scope and environmental factors (PEST)' including 'culture'; 'globalisation verses internationalisation and multinational corporations'; 'international and global products, services and brands', 'market size assessment'; 'foreign market selection'; 'foreign market entry mode'; 'pricing for international markets'; 'international distribution channels'; and 'international promotions (global vs. multinational approaches) and strategies'. Understanding these concepts help students develop skills in designing and implementing marketing strategies in diverse international country contexts.
MKTG6020 Business Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Intensive mode Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: B2B simulation (25%), written reflection on simulation (30%), presentation (15%), written report (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Business marketing is concerned with the marketing of products and services to other businesses and institutions. It involves selecting, developing and managing customer relationships in line with the skills, resources, strategy and objectives of both the supplier and customer companies. Traditionally, business marketing was approached using the '4P's' framework. This unit exposes students not only to the traditional view but contrasts that approach with the interactions, relationships and networks approach to business marketing. The unit aims to develop students into more complete marketers, capable of operating within the dynamic business marketing environment.
FINC6013 International Business Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In our highly globalised and integrated world economy, understanding international dimensions of financial management is essential for businesses. This unit provides a greater understanding of the fundamental concepts and the tools necessary for effective financial decision making by business enterprises, within a global setting.
CISS6001 New Security Challenges

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (30%), 1x3500wd Essay (60%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit considers the evolving nature of security in the context of global politics. It focuses on non-military challenges to security while acknowledging the relationships between these and traditional security concerns. Among the topics considered are: international law and security; the privatisation of security; economics and security; energy resources; environmental degradation; the burden of infectious diseases; population dynamics; gender and age perspectives on security; the dilemmas of fragile and failing states; transnational organised crime; and new modes of warfare. The overall objective of the unit is to engage with issues and arguments that challenge how security is traditionally understood. Teaching and learning take place via a combination of lectures, student-led seminars, independent research, debates and case studies.
CISS6012 Civil-Military Relations

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 5000wd essay (60%) and 1000wd equivalent seminar presentation (30%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students must not undertake this unit if they took CISS6011 (Special Topic in International Security) when the special topic was Civil-Military Relations
This unit assesses the nature and effectiveness of civil-military cooperation and coordination in preparing for, responding to, and averting the impact of natural disasters (such as the 2004 tsunami) and conflict, particularly in Australia's nearer region. The new realities of intra-state conflict and support to fragile states have seen Australia commit increased resources to enhance prospects for stability and reduce population displacement, while promoting economic development and achievement of the Millennium Development Goals to reduce poverty. Students in this unit will examine the nexus between state-centric and human security, as well as the difficulties for military forces and humanitarian actors in navigating the 'space' in which they are co-located. Policies, principles and practices of the Australian Government, the United Nations, and other key international actors and non-government organisations are considered. Attention is also given to disaster risk reduction and peace-building strategies to help minimise the severity of natural disasters and the reversion of fragile states into conflict. Focus is given to the problems and severity of population displacement, and to the civil-military requirements to implement population protection, particularly under the Responsibility to Protect framework. The overall aim of the unit is for students to gain a better understanding of the boundaries and complexities of civil-military relations in disaster and conflict situations, and to consider initiatives relevant to Australia.
CISS6022 Cybersecurity

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2hr exam (40%), 1x3000wd analytical Essay (40%), 1x1000wd equivalent lab exercise (10%), 1xSeminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The digital revolution has created new frontiers of information that influence almost every aspect of our lives. But does cyberspace also threaten our security? What are the methods and motives for attack? And how can state and non-state actors respond? Drawing on a unique combination of expertise from the Centre for International Security Studies and the School of Information Technologies, this unit introduces students to the technical and political concepts that are necessary to answer these important questions.
CISS6018 Nuclear Arms Control and Non-proliferation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Take-home exercise (20%), 1x4500wd Research essay (60%)1, 1x500wd Group presentation (10%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the basic knowledge of the issues, challenges, and policies related to nuclear arms control and non-proliferation. The principal objective is to give students a better understanding of the politics of arms control and non-proliferation and help them develop the analytical skills for undertaking policy-relevant research and the ability to develop policy recommendations. The unit is also designed to examine proliferation problems and the ways that arms control can contribute to national and regional security.
ENGL6984 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Creative non-fiction story (40%), 1x2000wd Exegesis/critical reflection (40%), 4x500wd Participation and in-class writing (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the principles and practices of creative non-fiction, also known as literary journalism. This diverse genre includes travel, memoir, biography, essays, historical, medical or investigative narratives. The unit provides a scholarly framework to creative non-fiction and the work of writers such as essayists and literary journalists. In addition to the content provided by the coordinators, three major contemporary non-fiction writers take participants through the process of composition of their recent works.
IBUS5003 Global Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: in class participation (10%), mid-semester exam (20%), group presentation (10%), group project (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the application of strategic thinking in key business contexts with a particular focus on the global nature of business. Students gain knowledge about: (i) identifying and managing challenges and risks presented by operating in a global business environment; (ii) international business trade and foreign direct investment theories; (iii) country level factors that impact global strategy.
IBUS6001 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x 2 hr lecture and 1x 1hr seminar per week Corequisites: IBUS5003 Prohibitions: ECHS6008 Assessment: Individual assignments (70%) and group assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit analyses how multinational firms leverage their capabilities and competencies to create competitive advantages in international and global markets. Topics include assessing foreign market attractiveness; understanding the impact of differences in legal, cultural, political and economic regimes; evaluating international political and economic risk; building and operating global networks, including entry mode choice; understanding how managers design organisational architecture and implement internal control and incentive mechanisms; and assessing the challenges of global citizenship, ethical behaviour and social responsibility for international business. Problem-based learning, with case study workshops, is an integral part of the unit.
IBUS6002 Cross-Cultural Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: tutorial participation (10%); case study (30%); mid-semester test (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
An understanding of cultural differences and how to manage such differences is critical to effective management in international and multi-cultural business environments. The aim of this unit is to provide conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that will develop an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact on management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management, the meaning and dimensions of culture, comparative international management and leadership styles, managing communication across cultures, ethics and social responsibility in global management, cross-cultural negotiation and decision-making, forming and managing global teams, and developing the international and global manager.
FINC6013 International Business Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In our highly globalised and integrated world economy, understanding international dimensions of financial management is essential for businesses. This unit provides a greater understanding of the fundamental concepts and the tools necessary for effective financial decision making by business enterprises, within a global setting.
MECO6900 News Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr introductory lecture/semester, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd news reporting portfolio (40%), 1x3000wd news story reporting package (50%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit hones writing skills as a foundation for all forms of media production. Students are introduced to the elements of journalistic style, the processes of news, and the skills of interviewing and research. While the unit focuses on news and writing, it will be useful for any field that deals with the media, such as PR and communication management.
MECO6912 Political Public Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x Seminar participation (10%), 1x2000wd Campaign proposal (30%), 1x2000wd Campaign presentation (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study analyses and examines the convergence of public relations, advertising and political consulting in the history of political campaigning. The unit's objectives are to demonstrate an understanding of the relationships that exist in the political process between politicians, the media and public relations. It develops student skills specific to the delivery of political public relations and political campaigns. Its focus is the process of professionalisation and internationalisation of electioneering and campaign practices in media-centred democracies.
MECO6913 Public Opinion, Policy and Public Sphere

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Report (20%), 1x1500wd Stakeholder position paper (20%), 1x500wd Presentation (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (45%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit analyses the relationship between professional communication and public opinion. It focuses on theories of influence and persuasion in the context of the development of policy, and how these are reflected in the public sphere. It develops the notion of the public sphere as represented by Habermas, Fraser, Schudson and others, focusing in particular on the transformation of the public sphere in terms of postmodern public relations.
MECO6915 Writing Features: Narrative Journalism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x700wd pitching assignment (15%), 1x1500wd draft first feature (20%), 1x1500wd final first feature (20%), 1x2000wd second feature (40%), 1x300wd market report (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit teaches students the basic principles of short-form narrative journalism or feature writing suitable for publication in magazines, websites and newspapers. Genres covered include the profile, the Essay, travel, memoir, investigative journalism, cultural commentary and behind-the-news stories. Skills in pitching story ideas, interviewing, research, structure and style will be covered in workshop-based classes, providing opportunities to critique work and become familiar with editing processes prior to submission of assignments.
MECO6926 International Media Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 10x120wd reflection on reading (20%), 1x2400wd investigation of media systems (40%), 1x2400wd research essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
International media practices teaches students to map, compare and debate the power of digital media systems around the world. Within this framework, it explores concepts of hybridity and practical examples of intercultural media practice. Students will access diverse online media and examine future professional employment options.
ECOP6011 USA-Europe-Japan: From Growth to Crisis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 3500wd Essay (60%) and 1500wd report (25%) and 1000wd equivalent Seminar presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the dynamics of capitalist growth and crisis from the end of the Second World War until the present. It will analyse the formation of a triad formed by the USA, Europe, and Japan, as well as the contradictions that beset this constellation from the 1980s. The unit will pay particular attention to the rise of new economic powers like China over the past decades, and it will explore the dynamics of the financial crisis of 2008 and its impact on the European Union.
GOVT6304 Development and World Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Book review (20%), 1x3500wd Essay (50%), 1x1500wd equivalent Class presentation (20%), 1x Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine critical perspectives on international development. It will explore key questions concerning development, including: Have efforts to 'reduce poverty' been effective? What are the various meanings associated with development concepts like 'building capacity' and 'empowerment'? Is there any consensus about what development is and how to 'do' it? The unit will include an analysis of how much has been learned about development over the last fifty years. Finally, the unit will consider what role might individuals take.
GOVT6119 International Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week Assessment: 2x 2700wd Essay (90%), 1x600wd In-class quizzes (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit reviews developments in international security since before World War l, to recent events like September 11 and its aftermath. The principal focus is on developments since the end of the Cold War and the collapse of Communism. The unit takes account of traditional notions about the causes of war and the conditions of peace, as well as changes in the structure and process of contemporary international relations.
GOVT6111 Chinese Politics

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Corequisites: Recommended Co-requisites: CHSC6901 for Master of China Public Administration and Master of China Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd Book review (15%), 1x1500wd Literature review (25%), 1x3500wd Essay (50%), 1x Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine the internal governance of the People's Republic of China and aspects of its external relations. It begins by tracing the emergence of the PRC's political system after 1949, focussing on key features of Maoism and the rationale of Post-Mao reforms. It then considers the remarkable economic, demographic and social changes that have occurred in recent years and how China's government has responded to a range of crucial challenges. In particular the unit will provide critical insights into how concepts like democracy, human rights, civil society and 'rule of law' have developed within the Chinese context. Finally the unit will analyse the impact of 'globalization' on China's political system.

Optional specialisation

Politics specialisation
12 credit points from the following
USSC6902 US Politics: Presidency and Congress

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Winter Main Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: 1x2000-2500wd major paper (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) and class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will examine US domestic politics through analysing the federal structure and separation of powers within the American political system. This understanding will provide an appreciation of the porous nature of US political institutions, offering social actors a variety of venues and opportunities to influence political decision-making. It will examine the factors that make some arenas more open than others and strategies that groups and political actors take to secure or prise open those avenues for change.
USSC6903 US Foreign and National Security Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr class/week Assessment: class participation 10%; reading response paper 30%; Essay proposal 20%; Research Essay 40%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide a sophisticated understanding of the making of American foreign and national security policy from "inside the beltway." As a democratic country, the process of its foreign policy making has more domestic influences and pressures than many other countries. This unit provides students with a detailed understanding of the domestic, societal and international sources of American foreign policy, including the roles of: individuals, the bureaucracy, the NSC and interagency process, lobby groups, Congress, public opinion, the media, parties and partisanship, think tanks, presidential doctrines, US political culture and discourse, and more.
6 credit points from the following
USSC6907 American Exceptionalism

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 1x3000wd essay (45%), 1x2hr exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the motivation and meaning behind the claim that the United States of America is an exception nation. What exactly is an exceptional nation? Is the US exceptional or just different? How has the idea of exceptionalism evolved throughout American history? What are the implications or consequences of exceptionalism? To what extent and in what ways has the idea of exceptionalism shaped US history and influences America's relationship with the rest of the world?
USSC6922 US Strategy in the Asia-Pacific

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x700wd group presentation (10%), 1x1800wd policy memo (30%), 1x3500wd research paper (50%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The United States' has long pursued a grand strategy in Asia premised on preventing regional threats and maintaining access to Asian markets, societies, and strategic waterways. Under President Trump, however, America's regional role may be changing. This unit will explore the history and making of US strategy in Asia, including key turning points, strategic actors, and policy debates. Students will also examine contemporary challenges and flashpoints for America's Asia policy, and how these may affect stability and relations with the region.
GOVT6229 Campaigning: Data, Politics, Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GOVT6359 US-China Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x15-20min Presentation (equiv 750wd) (25%), 1x750wd Policy Memo (15%), 1x4500wd Research Paper (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This seminar introduces students to the dynamics of US-China relations, regarded by many as the most significant bilateral relationship in the world. The seminar aims to give an overview of the history of US-China relations, to deepen the students' understanding of the strategic thinking and policy-making of both China and the US, and to discuss a number of key contemporary issues in the relationship in some detail. This bilateral relationship has arguably become the most complex and challenging for both Washington and Beijing.
Business specialisation
12 credit points from the following
USSC6905 US Economic Policy and Regulation

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hours per week Assessment: Class participation (10%), 1x3000wd essay (40%), 5x500wd reading briefs (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit studies the ways in which economic and regulatory policies and institutions drive the business and social environment in the United States. Macro-economic policy, micro-economic reforms and changes to the legal framework and legal institutions have a fundamental effect on the impetus for research and development, the qualities of domestic and imported goods and services, the incentives for business and societal innovations, the extent and fairness of competition, the advancement of employment equity, the quality of education, the improvement of productivity, the attainment of social benefits and social equity, the mechanisms for rapid and equitable information transfer, the minimisation of surveillance and enforcement costs, and the equitable sharing of income and risks within US society.
USSC6923 The US Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2 hour lecture per week, 1x1 hour tutorial per week Assessment: 1x3000wd Essay (50%), Multiple Choice Problem Set (500wd equiv) (25%), 1x1000wd Book Review (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The United States economy is the world's largest and has a major influence on the Australian and global economies. This unit examines the main institutional features of the US economy and their role in determining US economic growth, the business cycle and other contemporary economic policy issues. The US economy's interactions with the rest of the world are also considered, with a particular focus on Australia's trade and investment relationship with the United States.
6 credit points from the following
IBUS5003 Global Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: in class participation (10%), mid-semester exam (20%), group presentation (10%), group project (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on the application of strategic thinking in key business contexts with a particular focus on the global nature of business. Students gain knowledge about: (i) identifying and managing challenges and risks presented by operating in a global business environment; (ii) international business trade and foreign direct investment theories; (iii) country level factors that impact global strategy.
FINC6013 International Business Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In our highly globalised and integrated world economy, understanding international dimensions of financial management is essential for businesses. This unit provides a greater understanding of the fundamental concepts and the tools necessary for effective financial decision making by business enterprises, within a global setting.
IBUS6001 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x 2 hr lecture and 1x 1hr seminar per week Corequisites: IBUS5003 Prohibitions: ECHS6008 Assessment: Individual assignments (70%) and group assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit analyses how multinational firms leverage their capabilities and competencies to create competitive advantages in international and global markets. Topics include assessing foreign market attractiveness; understanding the impact of differences in legal, cultural, political and economic regimes; evaluating international political and economic risk; building and operating global networks, including entry mode choice; understanding how managers design organisational architecture and implement internal control and incentive mechanisms; and assessing the challenges of global citizenship, ethical behaviour and social responsibility for international business. Problem-based learning, with case study workshops, is an integral part of the unit.
IBUS6002 Cross-Cultural Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: tutorial participation (10%); case study (30%); mid-semester test (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
An understanding of cultural differences and how to manage such differences is critical to effective management in international and multi-cultural business environments. The aim of this unit is to provide conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that will develop an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact on management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management, the meaning and dimensions of culture, comparative international management and leadership styles, managing communication across cultures, ethics and social responsibility in global management, cross-cultural negotiation and decision-making, forming and managing global teams, and developing the international and global manager.
MKTG6013 International and Global Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive November,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: midterm quiz (15%), participation (13%), group written report (25%), oral presentation (10%), research component (2%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit aims to give students an understanding of international marketing concepts by using the framework of marketing mix elements of product, price, distribution and promotions, and highlights their importance in a rapidly changing global economy. Topics include the 'scope and environmental factors (PEST)' including 'culture'; 'globalisation verses internationalisation and multinational corporations'; 'international and global products, services and brands', 'market size assessment'; 'foreign market selection'; 'foreign market entry mode'; 'pricing for international markets'; 'international distribution channels'; and 'international promotions (global vs. multinational approaches) and strategies'. Understanding these concepts help students develop skills in designing and implementing marketing strategies in diverse international country contexts.
Media specialisation
12 credit points from the following
USSC6919 American Film and Hollywood

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x4-hr class/week Assessment: 1x1500wd critical analysis/evaluation (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), seminar participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the relationship between 'American cinema' and Hollywood cinema. 'American cinema' draws inspiration from and attempts to contribute to cultural movements and contexts that include Hollywood but extend to literature and the visual arts more generally. Hollywood's power as a cultural sign will be examined in relation to alternative and independent film cultures. This will include not only analysis of feature films but also of writings by filmmakers and theorists. Questions of cinematic subjectivity and authorship will be a focus of the unit.
USSC6920 US Media: Politics, Culture, Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x2hr class/week Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 2x Critical reviews (800 words, worth 20% each), 1x3000wd research paper (40%), Presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit will focus on media coverage of political campaigns and politics in America. It will look at the role of the media in American society in shaping debates and also the power of the American media globally. The impact of the internet on American journalism will be discussed as will the future of the media.
6 credit points from the following
USSC6914 Key Issues in American Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Rodney Taveria Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture a week Assessment: weekly reflective journal (4000 words) (60%), 1x2000wd research paper (30%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit proposes a week-by-week engagement with some of the defining moments in US cultural history. Working from the premise that ideas in the US are cultural and political acts, the unit constructs a chart of the nation's salient (and often critical) intellectual projections. Blending written texts with works of visual art, high with 'low' culture, the course offers a close encounter with a misunderstood intellectual tradition and shows its relevance to the present.
MECO6913 Public Opinion, Policy and Public Sphere

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Report (20%), 1x1500wd Stakeholder position paper (20%), 1x500wd Presentation (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (45%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit analyses the relationship between professional communication and public opinion. It focuses on theories of influence and persuasion in the context of the development of policy, and how these are reflected in the public sphere. It develops the notion of the public sphere as represented by Habermas, Fraser, Schudson and others, focusing in particular on the transformation of the public sphere in terms of postmodern public relations.
WMST6903 Gender, Media and Consumer Societies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd group discussion/presentation (15%), 1x1000wd advertising analysis (25%), 1x500wd research essay proposal (10%), 1x2500wd research essay (40%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines theories of consumption in regards to cultural and media products and practices, with a specific focus on gender. Drawing upon a wide range of feminist media and cultural theories, we will critically analyse different forms of belonging and identity that are created through these practices. We will also pay close attention to the critiques of globalisation and consumption, theories of the 'citizen consumer' and the realities of geo-political and economic inequalities that underpin many forms of consumption.
ENGL6984 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Creative non-fiction story (40%), 1x2000wd Exegesis/critical reflection (40%), 4x500wd Participation and in-class writing (20%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to the principles and practices of creative non-fiction, also known as literary journalism. This diverse genre includes travel, memoir, biography, essays, historical, medical or investigative narratives. The unit provides a scholarly framework to creative non-fiction and the work of writers such as essayists and literary journalists. In addition to the content provided by the coordinators, three major contemporary non-fiction writers take participants through the process of composition of their recent works.
MECO6912 Political Public Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x Seminar participation (10%), 1x2000wd Campaign proposal (30%), 1x2000wd Campaign presentation (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study analyses and examines the convergence of public relations, advertising and political consulting in the history of political campaigning. The unit's objectives are to demonstrate an understanding of the relationships that exist in the political process between politicians, the media and public relations. It develops student skills specific to the delivery of political public relations and political campaigns. Its focus is the process of professionalisation and internationalisation of electioneering and campaign practices in media-centred democracies.
MECO6915 Writing Features: Narrative Journalism

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x700wd pitching assignment (15%), 1x1500wd draft first feature (20%), 1x1500wd final first feature (20%), 1x2000wd second feature (40%), 1x300wd market report (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit teaches students the basic principles of short-form narrative journalism or feature writing suitable for publication in magazines, websites and newspapers. Genres covered include the profile, the Essay, travel, memoir, investigative journalism, cultural commentary and behind-the-news stories. Skills in pitching story ideas, interviewing, research, structure and style will be covered in workshop-based classes, providing opportunities to critique work and become familiar with editing processes prior to submission of assignments.
CAEL5043 Screen Writing and Directing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project proposal (25%) and seminar presentation (15%) and project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective provides you with the skills and knowledge to conceptualise and develop a script, and to learn effective directorial techniques associated with the production of a short video work. During this elective you will be exposed to a range of film screenings, practical in-class exercises and moving image-based artworks. These viewings are intended to expose you to a range of creative writing skills and directorial techniques and encourage discussion, debate and creative development. Through lectures, tutorial, seminars, screenings and class exercises you are provided with a historical and conceptual framework in which to conceive of and develop your own creative projects. Projects are to be supported by a set of professional standard production documents and the presentation of seminars related to the development and production of the work.
CAEL5045 Web Environment for Cultural Producers

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Assessment: project documentation (10%) and seminar presenation (20%) and major project (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective unit of study provides you with the skills and knowledge to conceptualise and develop interactive websites for delivery across a range of platforms including desktop, tablet and mobile. Over the course of the unit of study you will learn a range of approaches to interactive authoring for the web, including principles of user-interface design and navigational architecture for web-based work. You will learn current web authoring tools such as Adobe Dreamweaver and Muse, and be introduced to the possibilities of scripting for design and interactivity using HTML5, CSS and JavaScript libraries. The major outcome of this unit of study is the development of an interactive website that demonstrates the technical and conceptual knowledge you have gained during the unit. It is expected that this project be creatively focused and critically engaged with the possibilities presented by the online environment for media implementation and interactivity. This project is to be supported by a series of seminars and a set of professional standard production documents that reflect the development and implementation of your major project.
ARIN6904 Mobile Media and Games

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd Review and presentation (25%), 1x3000wd Critical Essay (40%), 1x1500wd Game/app concept (25%), Seminar participation (10%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Networked mobile devices and computer games are increasingly prominent in today's mediascapes, supporting practices of individualised mobility and play. This unit of study critically examines the aesthetics, politics and everyday uses of these emerging cultural technologies. It draws on new media studies, game studies and platform studies to explore themes such as the complication of leisure and work spaces, new media industries, gamification, playbour and mobile social media.
MECO6900 News Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr introductory lecture/semester, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x3000wd news reporting portfolio (40%), 1x3000wd news story reporting package (50%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This core unit hones writing skills as a foundation for all forms of media production. Students are introduced to the elements of journalistic style, the processes of news, and the skills of interviewing and research. While the unit focuses on news and writing, it will be useful for any field that deals with the media, such as PR and communication management.
MECO6926 International Media Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 10x120wd reflection on reading (20%), 1x2400wd investigation of media systems (40%), 1x2400wd research essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
International media practices teaches students to map, compare and debate the power of digital media systems around the world. Within this framework, it explores concepts of hybridity and practical examples of intercultural media practice. Students will access diverse online media and examine future professional employment options.

Capstone units of study

USSC6204 Internship Capstone

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: Preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice 2000wds, learning contract 1000wds, satisfactory completion of placement, equiv to 30 days in the field under the supervision of a workplace supervisor, in collaboration with the program Director Practical field work: An internship of 30 days equivalent Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of two units of study in an internship sequence that may be undertaken in partial fulfilment of requirements for the award of Master of Letters in US Studies. Part 1 is dedicated to the satisfactory completion of the internship and the development of skills necessary for an internship experience: project planning and management, developing a learning contract and critical self-reflection. In order to be considered, a minimum weighted average mark (WAM) of 70% across all units undertaken toward the Master of US Studies degree is required. Admission is subject to the Director's approval.
USSC6205 Internship Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: Research project on behalf of the workplace partner, 4000wds Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of two units of study in an internship sequence that may be undertaken in partial fulfilment of requirements for the award of Master of Letters in US Studies. The project (Part 2) requires the completion of a research project on behalf of the workplace partner. In order to be considered, a minimum weighted average mark (WAM) of 70% across all units undertaken toward the Master of US Studies degree is required. Admission is subject to the Director's approval.
USSC6211 Treatise 1

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5 x 1 hour supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. Students will be expect to submit written work to their supervisor prior to each meeting. Prerequisites: 24 credit points Assessment: 1x24000wd Research Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is the first of a two part sequence comprising the supervised writing of a treatise of 24,000 words to be submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of US Studies.
USSC6212 Treatise 2

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 5x1hr supervision meetings weeks 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10. Students will be expect to submit written work to their supervisor prior to each meeting. Assessment: 1x24000wd Research Essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is one of two units that students will complete as part of the capstone. It is a treatise that will total 24,000 words.
USSC6214 Internship Project 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: At least one meeting per month between student and project supervisor. Prerequisites: 24 credit points Corequisites: USSC6204 and USSC6205 Assessment: 1x4000wd Reflective Essay (90%), Particpation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of four internship units of study that may be undertaken in partial fulfilment of requirements for the award of Master of US Studies. The unit is dedicated to the satisfactory completion of the internship and the development of skills necessary for an internship experience: project planning and management, developing a learning contract and critical self-reflection.
USSC6910 Special Topics in US Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: At least one meeting per month between student and project supervisor Assessment: 1x1500wd reflective essay (25%), participation (15%), 1x3500wd project (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students accepted in this unit will be able to undertake a special independent or group project in US Studies. Independent projects will be completed under the supervision of the postgraduate coordinator and a USSC faculty member or a special visiting fellow where appropriate. Group projects will facilitate local and international learning experiences organized by the US Studies Centre and will be coordinated by the postgraduate coordinator of US Studies.
USSC6916 Research Essay in US Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-2hr supervisory meetings weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 Assessment: 1x6000wd research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Available to Master of US Studies candidates only.
Students will undertake research essay of 6,000 words on an approved topic under the guidance of a supervisor from the Centre for US Studies. Normally, the essay involves deeper study of a subject which the student has already covered in the first semester of his or her program. Entry to this unit is subject to the permission of the Director and depends upon the availability of a supervisor from the Centre, the student's existing knowledge in the area, and her or his academic performance in the preceding semester.