Units of study descriptions for Commerce coursework programs

The University of Sydney website (sydney.edu.au/business/courses/) contains the most up to date information on unit of study availability and other requirements. Timetabling information for the current year is available on the Business School website (sydney.edu.au/business/timetable). Students should note that units of study are run subject to demand.

Note: The following unit of study descriptions are listed by specialisation subject area

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

BUSS5001 Firms, Markets and Business Management assessments changed to:

Mid-semester test (25%); assignment (25%); final exam (35%); class participation (15%)

19/1/2018
2.

INFS6018 Managing Business Intelligence

Sessions changed to: Available in Semester 1 and Semester 2

6/2/2018
3.

ACCT6010 Advanced Financial Reporting

This unit will not be offered in the Intensive July session for 2018
11/4/2018

1. Core unit of study

BUSS5020 Business Insights

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: seminars/workshops: 3 hours per week x 13 weeks Assessment: In-class assessments (20%), presentation (5%), group project (20%), mid-semester exam (20%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed specifically to provide Commerce students with foundational knowledge in relation to business challenges and the major issues and trends facing business leaders today. Students are required to consider and analyse how business leaders might respond to these challenges in a changing and uncertain environment. Students are also encouraged to think creatively about ways in which business, government and the community can function better. This unit provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to successfully pursue the specialisations offered in the Master of Commerce.

2. Foundational units of study

ACCT5001 Accounting Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: assignment (20%), mid semester test (30%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides an introduction to the generally accepted accounting principles and practices underlying financial accounting and reporting. The unit introduces students to the concepts and skills required to prepare, analyse, and interpret financial statements.
Textbooks
Nobles, Mattison, Matsumura, Best, Fraser, Tan, Willet; Horngren¿s Financial Accounting, 8th Edition, Pearson, 2016
CLAW5001 Legal Environment of Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: case analysis (20%), mid-semester exam (35%), final examination (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All business conduct is regulated by the law. Every transaction and every relationship is governed by an increasingly complex mix of statutory and judge-made laws. The ability to identify and manage legal risks, and knowledge of compliance and dispute resolution strategies, are essential business management skills. This unit examines the legal framework and regulatory regime within which all businesses operate in Australia and in a global economy. It introduces students to the legal implications of commercial conduct and provides an overview of the Australian legal system and threshold legal concepts of agreement, ownership, and civil and criminal liability. Key areas of substantive business law are examined including contracts, torts (in particular negligence and the economic torts), property and securities, and crime. The unit also provides students with an overview of areas of legal regulation with an increasingly significant impact on business operations including: privacy, intellectual property rights, competition law, consumer law (in particular advertising regulation, product liability and unfair contracts), misleading conduct and unconscionable conduct.
Textbooks
Business and the Law 6th edition, Andrew Terry.
ECON5040 Microeconomics for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prohibitions: ECON5001 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester exam (35%), 5x online quizzes (1000wd equivalent)(10%), 1x2hr final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microeconomics is the study of choice under scarcity. Its importance is underlined by the fact that all businesses, consumers and even countries and their governments have limited resources. This unit provides an introduction to microeconomic analysis with a particular focus on concepts and applications relevant to business. It addresses how individual consumers and firms make decisions and how they interact in markets. We also introduce economic tools for analysing public policies a government might introduce to address market failures. It provides a rigorous platform for further study and a specialisation in business economics as well as providing valuable tools of analysis that complement a student's general business training, regardless of their area of study.
FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid semester-test (20%), major assignment (25%), and final examination (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit provides an introduction to basic concepts in corporate finance and capital markets. It is designed to equip students to undertake further studies in finance. After reviewing some very basic ideas in finance and financial mathematics, the unit provides an introduction to the valuation of equity and debt securities and companies. The unit then examines issues related to pricing in capital markets and ends with a discussion of theory and practice related to capital structure and dividend policy.
IBUS5002 Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (20%), short essay (20%), group assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This foundation unit provides an introduction to the essential concepts and frameworks relevant to the fields of strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship. Topics covered include the key elements of business strategy, including developing a business mission, understanding the external environment, reviewing internal resources and capabilities, and business and corporate strategy. The importance of entrepreneurial activity and the challenges faced by startup ventures, as well as examples of successful and unsuccessful business innovations, are highlighted. The emphasis of the unit is on understanding the strategic activity of both startup and established businesses with a focus on issues relevant to entrepreneurs as well as business managers.
IBUS5003 Global Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: in class participation (10%), mid-semester exam (20%), group presentation (10%), group project (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block mode
This unit focuses on the application of strategic thinking in key business contexts with a particular focus on the global nature of business. Students gain knowledge about: (i) identifying and managing challenges and risks presented by operating in a global business environment; (ii) international business trade and foreign direct investment theories; (iii) country level factors that impact global strategy.
INFS5001 Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1 and Semester 2: 1 x 3hr seminar per week; Summer School: 3 x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFS6014 Assessment: Semester 1 and Semester 2: group assignment (25%), individual assignment (30%), exam (45%); Summer School: individual assignment (50%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block mode
Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) this unit introduces the end-to-end project management lifecycle. Students learn how to select appropriate projects based on their alignment with an organisation's strategy and then how to manage those projects successfully from initiation through execution to completion. The unit covers the essential components of effective project management and how to apply them in an integrated manner. The unit also explores both the technical and behavioural aspects of project management - including Microsoft Project - and students gain experience in critically analysing the application of concepts in specific project contexts. As organisations increasingly structure their activities on a project basis, the unit is of value to a range of discipline specialisations. The unit can also contribute to achievement of internationally recognised accreditation from the Project Management Institute (PMI).
INFS5002 Digital Business Foundations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFS6001 Assessment: group project (40%), case study presentation (10%), individual assessment (30%), mid-term exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces students to the foundations of information systems and their emerging strategic role in transforming organisations and creating sustainable digital business models. Students develop an understanding of systems issues, information management and use, and how various digital technologies work together to create an infrastructure for digital business and how 'personal' technologies (such as social media) are disrupting 'business as usual'. The role of information systems in capturing and distributing organisational knowledge and in enhancing decision-making is explored. Students will gain an understanding of how the information systems function and the processes in organisations can be leveraged to create digital innovation and business transformation. Finally, the special challenges and opportunities created by the pervasiveness of technology and the future disruptions resulting from digital technologies is explored.
ITLS5000 Foundations of Supply Chain Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3 hr lectures, 5 x 3 hr tutorials Prohibitions: TPTM6155 or TPTM5001 Assessment: Individual report (20%), group report (30%), quiz (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Logistics and supply chain management functions can account for as much as half of the total costs of running a business. The success of a firm¿s logistic and supply chain management not only impacts on the profitability of a firm but also has a significant and growing impact on customer experience and satisfaction. Logistics and supply chain management plays a major role in implementing organisational strategy and in many industries has sole responsibility for managing customer service. An understanding of the role of this activity within an organisation and how improving logistics and supply chains can assist business managers to better respond to market opportunities is essential for business students. Students undertaking this unit are given a solid grounding in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management, and how knowledge of these concepts contributes towards a strategically effective and operationally efficient organisation or network of organisations.
ITLS5100 Transport and Infrastructure Foundations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 12 x 3hr lectures, 1 x 2hr field trip Prohibitions: TPTM6241 Assessment: report 1 (20%), report 2 (20%), presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This is the foundation unit for all transport and infrastructure management programs and should be completed in the first period of study.
Transport and infrastructure plays an important role both in terms of personal mobility as well as accessibility of businesses and their transportation needs. This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to the role of transportation and infrastructure within the economy. The key concepts and theories needed for management of transport and infrastructure are introduced along with the analysis and problem solving skills needed for confident decision making. In providing the foundational knowledge for students in transport and infrastructure, the unit also introduces students to the professional communication skills needed. Examples and case studies are drawn from all modes of transport and infrastructure.
MKTG5001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: in-semester exam(s) (25%), final exam (35%), team project (30%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces students to basic principles and language of marketing theory and practice. Marketing principles are examined in relation to a wide variety of products and services, in both commercial and non-commercial domains. An emphasis is placed on strategy planning and the marketing decision process. It is an introduction to the issues and terminology of marketing that can serve as a standalone understanding of the basics of marketing or as a foundation unit for further study in marketing. The unit focuses on the practical analysis marketing and the marketing management process and the development of the marketing mix the components that make up a marketing plan.
QBUS5001 Quantitative Methods for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ECMT5001 or QBUS5002 Assumed knowledge: Basic calculus; basic concepts of probability & statistics Assessment: weekly homework (10%), assignment (20%), mid-semester exam (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit highlights the importance of statistical methods and tools for today's managers and analysts, and demonstrates how to apply these methods to business problems using real-world data. The quantitative skills that students learn in this unit are useful in all areas of business. Through taking this unit students learn how to model and analyse the relationships within business data; how to identify the appropriate statistical technique in different business environments; how to compute statistics by hand and using special purpose software; how to interpret results in the context of the business problem; and how to forecast using business data. The unit is taught through data-driven examples, exercises and business case studies.
WORK5003 Management and Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: quiz (10%), assignment (20%), essay (35%), participation (10%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to introduce students to the nature and context of management. It explores the functions and processes of management and encourages students to critically reflect on management theory and practice. It can be taken as a standalone unit for students enrolled in various specialist masters programs and also prepares students for further study in strategic management, organisational analysis and strategy and human resource management.

3. Capstone unit of study

BUSS6000 Succeeding in Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr seminar/workshop per semester week Prerequisites: Students must complete this unit in their final semester of study (full-time students will have completed a minimum of 72 credit points from PG study and part-time students will have completed a minimum of 84 credit points from PG study) Assessment: simulation performance mark (5%), team-working assessment (10%), oral presentation (15%), group report assessment (10%), individual assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This program-wide capstone unit must be taken by students in their final semester of study within the Master of Commerce program. Students work collaboratively with peers and advisors to integrate the discipline-specific knowledge acquired within their program to address practical business challenges requiring cross-disciplinary and cross-functional insights, knowledge and skills. Assessment is designed to assure student proficiency in program learning goals. Students work in self-managing cross-functional teams to complete a semester-long project, preparing individual and group reports that are assessed by academic staff. Weekly seminars include action learning in business life cycle, data analysis, strategic decision-making, change management, business communication, and ethical awareness and reasoning in business practice. Learning activities include short case studies and business case simulation.

4. Subject Areas

Accounting

Foundational unit of study
ACCT5001 Accounting Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: assignment (20%), mid semester test (30%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides an introduction to the generally accepted accounting principles and practices underlying financial accounting and reporting. The unit introduces students to the concepts and skills required to prepare, analyse, and interpret financial statements.
Textbooks
Nobles, Mattison, Matsumura, Best, Fraser, Tan, Willet; Horngren¿s Financial Accounting, 8th Edition, Pearson, 2016
Elective units of study
ACCT5002 Managerial Accounting and Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Prerequisites: ACCT5001 Assessment: business practical (business case) (32%), mid semester assessment task (8%), capstone readiness assurance self-assessment (5%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces the context and processes of managerial accounting, with financial and non-financial information literacy to inform both understanding and application of key managerial accounting techniques. Critical business career skills of ethical behaviour in difficult situations, collaboration, problem solving, time management, persuasive communication and following instructions are fostered across the areas of cost accounting, business performance, and strategic value creation in management accounting. Through weekly 'business practicals', students get real-world like experience in addressing practical managerial accounting issues in organisational contexts. Students become familiar with the many kinds of managerial accounting decisions concerning the techniques, benefits and risks of accounting frameworks chosen. The unit is completed with a capstone case study which consolidates learning and allows students to use their new knowledge and skills gained in identifying and addressing operational and strategic issues facing organisations concerning competition, innovation and government regulation.
ACCT6001 Intermediate Financial Reporting

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Prerequisites: ACCT5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (35%), final examination (50%), and assignment (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an understanding of the contemporary Australian financial reporting environment. Particular attention is paid to accounting theory and concepts, mandatory reporting practices and reporting policies that reflect either a choice from among several mandated alternatives, or those areas where regulation has not occurred. The unit is intended for those who will be involved in the preparation or use of company financial statements. The unit provides an understanding of accounting techniques, both in terms of technical method and their relative impact on corporation's financial statements. The emphasis throughout is on both the 'techniques' and the related explanations for their use.
ACCT6002 International Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture and 1 x 2hr tutorial per week. Prerequisites: ACCT6001 Assessment: final exam (50%), test 1 (15%), test 2 (15%), assignment (10%), oral presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Many of the topics in an international accounting unit have a domestic counterpart. However, new factors and complications arise in the international arena. Some of these are (1) diversity of laws, practices, customs, cultures, and competitive circumstances; and (2) risks associated with fluctuating exchange rates, differential rates of inflation, and unstable property rights. International accounting discusses issues from the perspective of companies that have internationalised their finance and/or their operations. It has a comparative aspect, comparing accounting across countries. It deals with corporate reporting and disclosure across national boundaries. It also deals with the harmonisation of the worldwide diversity in financial reporting, in particular, convergence around International Financial Reporting Standards. It discusses consolidation issues that arise from multinational operations.
ACCT6003 Fundamental Analysis for Equity Investment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 13x 2hr lectures, 6x 1hr workshops, 8x 1hr labs. Prerequisites: ACCT5001 and FINC5001 Assumed knowledge: QBUS5001 or QBUS5002 Assessment: mid-semester exam (20%), equity investment (25%), trading (10%), final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: ACCT6003 assumes knowledge of basic statistics and econometrics that are covered in QBUS5001/5002. ACCT6003 requires the analysis of data, transformations, understanding of distributions, expectations, variance, regression analysis, data graphing.
This unit develops a framework of fundamental analysis for equity investment in publicly traded companies. The first part of the unit deals with the analysis of financial statement information, complemented with other sources of information such as business strategy, industry prospects and key macroeconomic effects. Emphasis is on the analysis of earnings quality and accounting-based valuation methods. The second part of the unit applies fundamental analysis in the appraisal of equity investment, and the effect of credit evaluation and risk analysis, as well as the valuation for takeovers. The unit also covers the impact on equity valuation from inherent behavioural patterns in informing investment decisions.
ACCT6006 Advanced Managerial Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Prerequisites: ACCT5002 Assessment: seminar assignments (35%), seminar contribution (15%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines a number of advanced topics in managerial accounting as they relate to the use of key analytic and calculative techniques for decision making and value creation. Topics are biased towards those that are relevant and even contentious to contemporary practice and include: the potential inconsistencies between management accounting and strategic decision making and control; executive compensation and reward systems; ethical issues in budget setting and performance management; the theory of the firm and outsourcing; issues in managing joint ventures and strategic alliances; performance measurement systems; decentralisation and transfer pricing, and innovation and change in management accounting practice. An overview of each topic area is provided before exploring the topics more deeply by examining current research and/or working through case studies to provide insights into contemporary business practice.
ACCT6007 Contemporary Issues in Auditing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: ACCT6001 Assessment: quiz 1 (5%), quiz 2 (5%), quiz 3 (10%), quiz 4 (5%), group case study (20%), perspective (5%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The focus of this unit is the development of knowledge and understanding of the key elements of the 'corporate financial statement' audit process with particular reference to Australian Auditing Standards. Auditor's duties and responsibilities are considered before moving to planning the audit, performing the audit and arriving at an audit opinion. Students are exposed to the techniques used by auditors in carrying out audit procedures and evaluating audit evidence. Students are expected to further develop their critical thinking skills through applying technical audit principles to real world auditing problems and corporate case studies. Students develop an appreciation for the essential role the auditor and the audit function play in enhancing the quality of financial statements and corporate governance. In this context, the unit critically examines contemporary audit issues, recent audit headlines and challenges faced by the audit profession in the Australian and global environment.
ACCT6010 Advanced Financial Reporting

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: ACCT6001 Assessment: mid-semester examination (25%), case study (20%), final examination (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit provides students with a detailed understanding of more complex financial reporting issues. Topics examined include: group accounting issues such as the practical application of the control test; multiple subsidiaries; non-controlling interest; foreign currency translation; consolidated cash flow reporting; segment reporting; accounting for joint arrangements and associates; and related party disclosures. The unit builds on the knowledge base acquired from earlier accounting units with a strong emphasis on the application of technical skills. The unit has a substantial case component, using current examples to illustrate both appropriate technical solutions in accordance with accounting standards and guidelines, as well as the forces which determine the choice of methods. The unit also provides students with an awareness of relevant research to assist in an understanding of both current debates and accounting choices. This unit helps develop students' ability to read and analyse financial reports and to understand the financial reporting implications of management decisions relating to internal reporting and organisational structure.
ACCT6014 Designing Accounting Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: ACCT5001 Assessment: in-class assessments (20%), mid-semester test (20%), design skills test (20%), final examination (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to the concepts, challenges and approaches associated with the evaluation, design, introduction, operation and improvement of accounting systems and reflect the differences in the needs of family-owned business, small and medium sized enterprise and multi-national business firms. Elements of those systems include methods of documenting transactions and events; internal control procedures designed to safeguard human physical and financial resources; manual, semi-automated or fully automated source data entry, transaction processing methods and financial and non-financial reports on operational activities. These issues are also considered with regard to the capabilities of contemporary industry-standard accounting and business application software such as spreadsheets, MYOB and SAP in a cost-effective and secure manner. Topics include the design of charts of accounts; in solutions context; internal controls and maintaining audit trails, records management; the identification of requirements and the use of selection criteria for the evaluation, introduction, configuration and operation of packaged accounting software solutions. It provides students with the hands-on skills in the design and implementation of an accounting system to a real-world medium sized organisation using an industry standard accounting software solution by integrating concepts, approaches, commercial realities and capabilities of contemporary enterprise resource planning systems. At the commencement, students are provided with a review of business frameworks including cycles, systems, source documents and recording transactions which act as a common starting point on which the unit builds.
ACCT6101 Special Topic in Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Department permission required for enrolment.
Topics will vary from semester to semester. Please check with the Discipline of Accounting for further details.

Aviation and Maritime Management and Logistics

Foundational unit of study
ITLS5100 Transport and Infrastructure Foundations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 12 x 3hr lectures, 1 x 2hr field trip Prohibitions: TPTM6241 Assessment: report 1 (20%), report 2 (20%), presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This is the foundation unit for all transport and infrastructure management programs and should be completed in the first period of study.
Transport and infrastructure plays an important role both in terms of personal mobility as well as accessibility of businesses and their transportation needs. This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to the role of transportation and infrastructure within the economy. The key concepts and theories needed for management of transport and infrastructure are introduced along with the analysis and problem solving skills needed for confident decision making. In providing the foundational knowledge for students in transport and infrastructure, the unit also introduces students to the professional communication skills needed. Examples and case studies are drawn from all modes of transport and infrastructure.
Elective units of study
IBUS6008 Export Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: individual assignment part 1 (30%), individual assignment part 2 (30%), final test (30%), class preparation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Exporting is a key international business activity, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This unit covers both the theory and practice of export management. The main areas covered in the unit are: 1) preparing to export (export stimulation, export readiness and planning), 2) forming and maintaining relationships with intermediaries (including legal considerations), 3) managing risks and export finance, 4) filling export orders. The unit therefore covers both the operational and strategic challenges associated with the exporting process.
ITLS6101 Global Freight Logistics Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 7 x 3 hr lectures, 6 x 3 hr workshops Prohibitions: TPTM6440 Assessment: Individual report (25%); quiz (30%); group presentation (30%); individual case discussion (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an understanding of the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, rail, trucking, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit covers underlying supply chain drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different freight transport modes, as well as industry structure, institutional environment (customs, etc.) and market access. Building on this background the unit highlights the implications for profitable international logistics operations. The unit focuses on corporate strategies around fleet and network planning as well as revenue and cost management. The material covered in the unit takes into account recent developments in global and regional economic activity and discusses implications for the various sectors of the air, sea and intermodal freight businesses. This unit involves case studies and industry presentations, and analysis from the perspectives of shippers, carriers, end customers, regulatory bodies and investors.
ITLS6301 City and Ports Logistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit conveys the fundamentals of city and port logistics and thus develops each student into a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods for the city and port logistics industries. The unit covers all aspects of management from planning and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact for all types of port. Technological changes and their implications for the city and port logistics, in particular intelligent transport systems and container terminal automation, are studied. The role of cities and ports in global supply chains is analysed. The relationship of cities and ports with their hinterlands as well as the concept of port-centric logistics is looked at in detail. The port-city interface as well as waterfront redevelopment is covered, with examples drawn from a number of countries. Port policy and the importance of competition and/or regulation are presented. Talks by city and port logistics professionals complements the lectures and provides students with windows on the workings of the city and port logistics industries.
ITLS6400 Airline Strategy and Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 3 x 3.5 hr seminars, 3 x 3.5 hr workshops. Corequisites: ITLS6101 Prohibitions: TPTM6160 Assessment: individual assignment (50%), quiz (10%), presentation (30%), final exam (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Aviation is an international growth industry offering extensive commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, logistic providers, banks, consultancies and other players of the aviation supply chain. This unit covers all aspects of international business and management along the aviation value chain and analysis from the perspectives of consumers (passengers and cargo), producers, distributors, brokers and investors. Students develop industry skills and an understanding of the strategic management and economics of operating airlines and other aviation entities, including financial analysis, risk management, sustainability, logistics, innovations and implications of competitive strategies for the development of hubs and alliances both in the global and regional/remote context. The growth in air traffic (i.e. in the Asia/Pacific region) creates endless opportunities and the unit thus also covers forecasting, entrepreneurship and the role of the private sector in airline/airport business development. As a result of our strategic partnership with CAPA and a number of airlines and airports, students have access to industry data bases, guest lecturers, company information and aviation contacts/networks.
ITLS6401 Airport Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 5 x 3.5 hr lectures, 2 x 3.5 hr seminars, 5 x 3.5 hr workshops. Assessment: individual report (40%), quiz (20%), group presentation (20%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Airports play an integral role in the aviation system, and contribute significantly to the economic growth of a region, or even a country. This unit covers major aspects of airport management, operation and public policy. The unit's learning objectives are two-fold. Firstly, it provides students with the core knowledge and insights concerning the key issues and decisions involved in the operation and management of airports in a rapidly changing regulatory environment. Secondly, it develops the skills for applying various applied economics and management knowledge to the airport industry. The unit assists students to understand more fully the business related problems encountered by commercial, industrial and public organisations in the airport industry. It also develops an ability to interpret results from relevant economic / management studies.

Banking

Foundational unit of study
FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid semester-test (20%), major assignment (25%), and final examination (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit provides an introduction to basic concepts in corporate finance and capital markets. It is designed to equip students to undertake further studies in finance. After reviewing some very basic ideas in finance and financial mathematics, the unit provides an introduction to the valuation of equity and debt securities and companies. The unit then examines issues related to pricing in capital markets and ends with a discussion of theory and practice related to capital structure and dividend policy.
Compulsory units of study
BANK6002 Bank Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Corequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: group assignment part 1 (15%), group assignment part 2 (10%), mid-semester exam (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unifying theme in this unit is the application of modern finance theory to financial decision making in the management of banks and non-bank financial institutions. The subject of bank and financial institution decision-making is approached from a risk perspective. The unit objectives are: (i) To provide students with an understanding of the modern model of financial institutions and the economic functions that they perform; (ii) Identify the main types of risk confronted by financial institutions; (iii) Apply relevant techniques to measure and manage those risks; (iv) To provide students with the ability to critically assess the effectiveness of the techniques used by banks to manage their risks(v) To provide students with an understanding of international bank management and financial services.
BANK6003 Global Supervision of Bank Risks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Corequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (30%), group project and presentation (25%), and final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is aimed at students who wish to obtain a greater understanding of the central issues and principles underpinning recent developments in the global regulation and supervision of banking/financial institutions.
BANK6005 International Banking

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr workshop per week Corequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (37.5%), final exam (37.5%), research project (15%), project presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The major focus of this unit is providing students with an understanding of international banking and finance in the contemporary international financial environment. Due to the dynamic nature of the international banking environment, it is necessary to develop skills to effectively identify and understand the effects of current developments. Firstly, the international banking functions are presented; followed by international trade financing, participation in the interbank foreign exchange and Euro currency markets, international investment banking services, and sovereign lending. Other important topics include international money laundering, international banking and debt crises, and offshore banking markets.
Elective units of study
ACCT6003 Fundamental Analysis for Equity Investment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 13x 2hr lectures, 6x 1hr workshops, 8x 1hr labs. Prerequisites: ACCT5001 and FINC5001 Assumed knowledge: QBUS5001 or QBUS5002 Assessment: mid-semester exam (20%), equity investment (25%), trading (10%), final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: ACCT6003 assumes knowledge of basic statistics and econometrics that are covered in QBUS5001/5002. ACCT6003 requires the analysis of data, transformations, understanding of distributions, expectations, variance, regression analysis, data graphing.
This unit develops a framework of fundamental analysis for equity investment in publicly traded companies. The first part of the unit deals with the analysis of financial statement information, complemented with other sources of information such as business strategy, industry prospects and key macroeconomic effects. Emphasis is on the analysis of earnings quality and accounting-based valuation methods. The second part of the unit applies fundamental analysis in the appraisal of equity investment, and the effect of credit evaluation and risk analysis, as well as the valuation for takeovers. The unit also covers the impact on equity valuation from inherent behavioural patterns in informing investment decisions.
CLAW6031 International Financial Crime

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: test (20%), group assignment (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
International financial crime occupies a leading place on the international governance agenda. It has a devastating impact on national economies, international security and human development. This unit examines key international financial crimes such as investment fraud, corruption, tax evasion, money laundering and terrorist financing. Students gain an understanding of how these crimes are committed, detected and prosecuted. They analyse the changing regulatory environment and the new risks facing businesses and the professions. The role of bank secrecy and tax havens in facilitating financial crime is also studied. There is a special focus on the prevention of financial crime, and the regime for tracing, freezing and recovery of illicit assets. The unit draws on case studies from Australia, United States, Europe and Asia so as to gain a better appreciation of the national and international responses to international financial crime.
FINC6001 Intermediate Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (30%), major assignment (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit extends some of the fundamental concepts introduced in FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance, and develops a rigorous framework for the analysis and understanding of key aspects of corporate financial decision making. Fundamental concepts in corporate finance are extended to more complex settings. The unit examines more advanced approaches to asset pricing and capital budgeting. New topics are covered in relation to derivative securities and real options applications in capital budgeting. The issues of the cost of capital, corporate capital structure, and corporate dividend policy, are extended to cover the interaction of corporate and personal taxation, agency problems, and information signalling.
FINC6007 Financial Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: individual assignment (20%), group assignment (30%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores value investment principles used in investment strategies. Both investment strategies and company strategies are analysed to examine how to translate a company's strategy into shareholders' profit. The unit also provides students with the skill set of analysing and interpreting financial reports, identifying good investment and avoiding financial scandals. Great investment practitioners' (Benjamin Graham, Warren E. Buffett and Charles Munger) works are studied in detail.
FINC6009 Portfolio Theory and its Applications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 or FINC5002 or FINC6000 Assessment: mid semester exam (20%), individual assignment (15%), group assignment (15%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers several aspects of modern/post modern portfolio theory.An introduction to mathematical optimisation techniques in the presence of uncertainty is covered and results from modern portfolio theory to the Capital Asset Pricing Model derived. The unit also examines other popular models such as the Arbitrage Pricing Theory and Black-Litterman Model and concludes with some topical examples from industry. There is a degree of mathematical sophistication associated with this unit and consequently students should be comfortable with a mathematical approach. However, the required mathematical tools are covered in the unit.
FINC6010 Derivative Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides an introduction to the rapidly-growing area of options, futures and swaps. These securities are derived from fundamental securities such as equities and bonds. The unit examines the nature of each of type of derivative security before a thorough treatment of the pricing and use of these securities for investment management and risk management purposes.
FINC6013 International Business Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In our highly globalised and integrated world economy, understanding international dimensions of financial management is essential for businesses. This unit provides a greater understanding of the fundamental concepts and the tools necessary for effective financial decision making by business enterprises, within a global setting.
FINC6014 Fixed Income Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), group assignment (25%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the concepts required for investment in fixed income securities, managing bond portfolios and understanding debt markets. Topics covered include duration, convexity, interest rate risk, bond volatility and the term structure of interest rates. The more complex types of debt securities studied include mortgage backed securities, corporate bonds with embedded options such as convertible bonds and interest rate derivatives.
FINC6016 Financial Instruments and Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: 2x mid-term exams (2x15%), assignment (20%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an introduction to Australian financial markets and an evaluation of the institutions, instruments and participants involved in the industry. The main markets evaluated include the equity, money, bond, futures, options, and foreign exchange markets. The relationship between the economic environment and these markets is examined.
FINC6017 Mergers and Acquisitions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Prohibitions: ACCT6011 Assessment: mid-semester exam (20%), assignment (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Mergers and acquisitions have become perhaps the most important activity of investment banks today. They provide a fundamental way for businesses to secure growth. To analyse mergers and acquisitions, most tools from modern financial economics are needed. The unit commences with a review of how existing businesses are valued, continues with an analysis of capital structure decisions, considers management incentives and examines issues in corporate control. It then examines the motives for mergers and acquisitions. Some acquisitions are motivated by value improvements created by correcting incentive problems, some acquisitions however are motivated by bad incentives that decrease value.
FINC6021 Corporate Valuation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit applies all aspects of finance theory to the general problem of valuing companies and other financial assets. This requires a synthesis of the fundamental concepts of present value, cost of capital, security valuation, asset pricing models, optimal capital structures, derivative pricing and some related accounting concepts. The unit aims to reach a level of practical application that allows students to understand both the theoretical frameworks and institutional conventions of real world corporate valuations. Basic valuation concepts from accounting are reconciled with the finance theory on which firm value ultimately stands. Students are asked to make extensive use of Excel or similar software in valuation exercises.
FINC6023 Financial Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: Lab exercises (20%), group project (20%), mid semester exam (20%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Risk is an integral part of financial decisions. Following the rapid evolution of the discipline of financial risk management, analysts must be prepared to access the level of risk in the marketplace. This unit explores the basic concepts of modelling, measuring and managing financial risks within the regulatory framework. Topics covered include market risk (value-at-risk and expected loss), credit risk (single name, portfolio, ratings and market based models, credit derivatives), liquidity risk and operational risk. To overcome the rather quantitative nature of the topics, the unit relies heavily on practical based lab exercises with emphasis on simulations, real life examples and case studies.
FINC6024 Real Estate Finance and Investment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), group project (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Real Estate Finance will provide graduates with the knowledge and skills to value and manage real estate within the context of a mixed-asset portfolio. In particular, this unit will explore the micro-economic and macro-economic foundations of real estate, real estate valuation techniques, property derivatives and securities, real estate portfolio management, capital management and listed real estate firms. Graduates can seek employment in the property management industry, funds management industry and financial analysis roles.

Big Data in Business

Foundational unit of study
QBUS5001 Quantitative Methods for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ECMT5001 or QBUS5002 Assumed knowledge: Basic calculus; basic concepts of probability & statistics Assessment: weekly homework (10%), assignment (20%), mid-semester exam (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit highlights the importance of statistical methods and tools for today's managers and analysts, and demonstrates how to apply these methods to business problems using real-world data. The quantitative skills that students learn in this unit are useful in all areas of business. Through taking this unit students learn how to model and analyse the relationships within business data; how to identify the appropriate statistical technique in different business environments; how to compute statistics by hand and using special purpose software; how to interpret results in the context of the business problem; and how to forecast using business data. The unit is taught through data-driven examples, exercises and business case studies.
Compulsory unit of study
BUSS6002 Data Science in Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: seminars: 3 hours per week x 13 weeks Assessment: Quiz 1 (10%), Quiz 2 (10%), Quiz 3 (10%), Quiz 4 (10%), Assignment A (Business Analytics) (20%), Assignment B (Customer Analytics) (30%), and Assignment C (Data Visualisation Activity) (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Growing volumes of data and, more importantly, the computation power to analyse it are now widely recognised as key business assets. No single discipline has the tools to make the most of these assets. Instead successful `big data¿ capability requires (a) the ability to understand how data can (and often cannot) be used to generate new insights into substantive problems, (b) knowledge of how data are generated and used and (c) the ability to understand connections between variables captured in data. This unit provides an overview of principles from the disciplines of Business Information Systems and Business Analytics, applied in the context of Marketing problems, relevant for using `big data¿ in business planning, decision-making and operations.
Elective units of study
INFS6018 Managing Business Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: Understanding the major functions of a business and how those business functions interact internally and externally so the company can be competitive in a changing market. How information systems can be used and managed in a business. How to critically analyse a business and determine its options for transformation. (ii) Desirable Experience as a member of a project team. Assessment: tutorial work (10%), mid-semester exam (35%), project report (30%), project presentation (10%), reflective summary (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Business Intelligence (BI), increasingly known as Business Analytics, is a major source of competitive advantage in the Information Age and is therefore a leading business priority globally. In recent times, this field has evolved from a technology topic to a management priority, creating an unprecedented demand for new management skills. Taking a business rather than technology perspective, this unit covers all aspects of the enterprise BI ecosystem in the context of strategic and operational BI, including all five stages of BI evolution. Topics include assessment and management of organisational data quality, multidimensional data modelling and integration, management of structured and unstructured data (including those created by social media), business aspects of data warehousing, innovation through advanced analytics, BI driven performance management, business process intelligence, active enterprise intelligence, and management of complex BI projects. Access is provided to the largest world-wide community of BI academics and industry practitioners called TUN (www.TeradataUniversityNetwork.com). The hands-on experience in using a commercial BI platform, combined with in-depth analytical skills, will enable students completing the unit to help any organization (regardless of its size and industry domain) to derive more intelligence from its data and compete on analytics. This unit does not require programming experience; it is suitable for both current and aspiring BI practitioners as well as general business practitioners from any functional area interested to learn how to start and lead BI-related initiatives.
INFS6023 Data Visualisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3hr workshop (once per week), weeks 1-13. Assessment: workshop participation (10%); individual project journal (15%); project report (35%); project presentation (15%); reflective summary (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Data visualisation, story-telling, and scenario development have been identified as the most prominent analytical practices of tomorrow. This unit seeks to equip students with necessary knowledge and data visualisation skills, acquired though real-life project inspired by the leading industry practices. Students will also develop a 'holistic' view of data visualisation in practice and will acquire 'thinking tools' to deal with its organisational and societal challenges. This unit focuses on business/organisational decision makers and their use of data visualisation. As such this unit does not require any prior IT, computer science or data science experience.
ITLS6107 Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 7 x 2 hr lectures, 7 x 4 hr computer labs Prohibitions: TPTM6180 Assessment: individual projects (40%); group project (20%); group presentation (10%); final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
The world is increasingly filled with systems, devices and sensors collecting large amounts of data on a continual basis. Most of these data are associated with locations that represent everything from the movement of individuals travelling between activities to the flow of goods or transactions along a supply chain and from the location of companies to those of their current and future customers. Taking this spatial context into account transforms analyses, problem solving and provides a powerful method of visualising the world. This is the essence of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and this unit. This unit starts by introducing students to the 'building blocks' of GIS systems, including data structures, relational databases, spatial queries and analysis. The focus then moves on to sources of spatial data including Global Positioning System (GPS), operational systems such as smartcard ticketing and transaction data along with web-based sources highlighting both the potential and challenges associated with integrating each data source within a GIS environment. The unit is hands-on involving learning how to use the latest GIS software to analyse several problems of interest using real 'big data' sources and to communicate the results in a powerful and effective way. These include identifying potential demand for new services or infrastructure, creating a delivery and scheduling plan for a delivery firm or examining the behaviour of travellers or consumers over time and locations. This unit is aimed at students interested in the spatial impact of decision-making and on the potential for using large spatial datasets for in-depth multi-faceted analytics.
MKTG6001 Marketing Research Concepts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: in-semester exams(s) (20%), final exam (30%), project (stage 1) (20%), project (stage 2) (20%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to marketing research and an overview of the industry. The major components of marketing research projects are discussed and students gain an insight into understanding and structuring research problems. The unit also gives an overview of primary, secondary and internal sources of data as well as advanced methods and techniques of research.
MKTG6018 Customer Analytics and Relationship Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Mid-term exam (20%), final exam (30%), team presentation (10%), CRM program report (20%), case write-up (10%), attendance and in-class discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There have been two fundamental shifts in the focus of business and marketing strategy. On the one hand, companies have become more focused on managing relationships with their customers over an extended period of time. On the other hand, more than any time in history companies' decisions become more data-driven due to the exponential increase in the volume of data on customers, competitors and markets. To obtain, retain and grow a customer base, it is crucial to know how to obtain customer information and how to make sense of it. This unit introduces students to fundamental concepts of customer relationship management and state-of-art analytics and how to apply these to real world business problems. The unit covers topics including understanding customer relationships, implementing strategic customer relationship management, handling and analysing customer-related databases, increasing customer profitability based on actionable insights gained from customer data, and giving more value to data through visualisation. Students also gain statistical skills, however, no prior knowledge of statistics is required.
QBUS6810 Statistical Learning and Data Mining

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: ECMT5001 or QBUS5001 Assessment: group project (25%), in-class quizzes (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
It is now common for businesses to have access to very rich information data sets, often generated automatically as a by-product of the main institutional activity of a firm or business unit. Data Mining deals with inferring and validating patterns, structures and relationships in data, as a tool to support decisions in the business environment. This unit offers an insight into the main statistical methodologies for the visualization and the analysis of business and market data. It provides the tools necessary to extract information required for specific tasks such as credit scoring, prediction and classification, market segmentation and product positioning. Emphasis is given to business applications of data mining using modern software tools.
QBUS6840 Predictive Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial Prerequisites: QBUS5001 or ECMT5001 Assessment: group assignment (30%), homework (15%), mid-semester exam (20%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To be effective in a competitive business environment, a business analyst needs to be able to use predictive analytics to translate information into decisions and to convert information about past performance into reliable forecasts. An effective analyst also should be able to identify the analytical tools and data structures to anticipate market trends. In this unit, students gain skills required to succeed in today's highly analytical and data-driven economy. The unit introduces the basics of data management, business forecasting, decision trees, logistic regression, and predictive modelling. The unit features corporate case studies and hands-on exercises to demonstrate the concepts presented.
QBUS6850 Machine Learning for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week (13 weeks) and 1x 1hr tutorial (lab) per week (12 weeks) Prerequisites: QBUS6810 Assessment: assignment 1 (10%); assignment 2 (10%); group project (20%); mid-semester exam (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Machine Learning is a fundamental aspect of data analytics that automates analytical model building in modern business. In the big data era, managers are able to use very large and rich data sources and to make business decision based on quantitative data analysis. Machine Learning covers a range of state-of-the-art methods/algorithms that iteratively learn from data, allowing computers to find hidden patterns and relationships in such data so as to support business decision. This unit introduces modern machine learning techniques and builds skills in using data for everyday business decision making. Topics include: Machine Learning Foundation; Modern Regression Methods; Advanced Classification Techniques; Latent Variable Models; Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Kernel Methods; Artificial Neural Networks; Deep Learning; and Machine Learning for Big Data. Emphasis is placed on applications involving the analysis of business data. Students will practise applying machine learning algorithms to real world datasets by using an appropriate computing package.
QBUS6860 Visual Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13 interactive lectures x 2 hours each, plus 13 workshops driven by student work x 1 hour each, plus 10 week x 1 hour tutorials on software training (e.g. for Tableau, Gephi, Google Charts, Google Big Query) Prerequisites: QBUS5001 or QBUS5002 Assumed knowledge: The unit assumes knowledge of statistics and confidence in working with data. Assessment: Weekly assignments (20%), group projects (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Accurate and effective analysis of data is a crucial skill in today's data-rich business environment. Visual Data Analytics (VDA) is an indispensable scientific tool for analysing all sorts of business-related data and, in particular, complex high-dimensional data. Applications include the visualisation of financial statements, capital market data, marketing data, supply chain data and many others. VDA has the ability to encode vast amounts of information into a small space that can be then intuitively interpreted for decision-making. This unit draws upon statistics, computer science, behavioural psychology and information design for visualising numerical and text data. It presents statistical and data analysis methods that are necessary for description, exploration, inference and diagnosis using data reduction, visual mining, smoothing, clustering and validation techniques. Upon completion of the unit, students should be proficient in producing high integrity visuals that enables fast and precise business decision-making. Students will also learn about the limitations of visual perception and how to design powerful visuals that can tap into our natural cognitive predisposition in favouring visual types of information.

Business Analytics

Foundational unit of study
QBUS5001 Quantitative Methods for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ECMT5001 or QBUS5002 Assumed knowledge: Basic calculus; basic concepts of probability & statistics Assessment: weekly homework (10%), assignment (20%), mid-semester exam (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit highlights the importance of statistical methods and tools for today's managers and analysts, and demonstrates how to apply these methods to business problems using real-world data. The quantitative skills that students learn in this unit are useful in all areas of business. Through taking this unit students learn how to model and analyse the relationships within business data; how to identify the appropriate statistical technique in different business environments; how to compute statistics by hand and using special purpose software; how to interpret results in the context of the business problem; and how to forecast using business data. The unit is taught through data-driven examples, exercises and business case studies.
Elective units of study
INFS6018 Managing Business Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: Understanding the major functions of a business and how those business functions interact internally and externally so the company can be competitive in a changing market. How information systems can be used and managed in a business. How to critically analyse a business and determine its options for transformation. (ii) Desirable Experience as a member of a project team. Assessment: tutorial work (10%), mid-semester exam (35%), project report (30%), project presentation (10%), reflective summary (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Business Intelligence (BI), increasingly known as Business Analytics, is a major source of competitive advantage in the Information Age and is therefore a leading business priority globally. In recent times, this field has evolved from a technology topic to a management priority, creating an unprecedented demand for new management skills. Taking a business rather than technology perspective, this unit covers all aspects of the enterprise BI ecosystem in the context of strategic and operational BI, including all five stages of BI evolution. Topics include assessment and management of organisational data quality, multidimensional data modelling and integration, management of structured and unstructured data (including those created by social media), business aspects of data warehousing, innovation through advanced analytics, BI driven performance management, business process intelligence, active enterprise intelligence, and management of complex BI projects. Access is provided to the largest world-wide community of BI academics and industry practitioners called TUN (www.TeradataUniversityNetwork.com). The hands-on experience in using a commercial BI platform, combined with in-depth analytical skills, will enable students completing the unit to help any organization (regardless of its size and industry domain) to derive more intelligence from its data and compete on analytics. This unit does not require programming experience; it is suitable for both current and aspiring BI practitioners as well as general business practitioners from any functional area interested to learn how to start and lead BI-related initiatives.
QBUS6310 Business Operations Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Prerequisites: ECMT5001 or QBUS5001 or QBUS5002 Prohibitions: ECMT6008 Assessment: group assignment (20%), individual Assignment 1 (10%), individual Assignment 2 (10%), individual Assignment 3 (10%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Business operations are the activities that businesses carry out to create value. This unit provides the models needed to analyse business operations of a company or organisation and make management decisions on operational issues. It covers business operations in both manufacturing and service industries, looking at processes, supply chains and quality issues. Topics covered may include the modelling of manufacturing operations and related group technologies, the modelling of financial service operations (e.g. brokerage operations), and the operations implications of internet technologies.
QBUS6320 Management Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hrs of classes ('lecturial' - combination lecture/tutorial) per week Prohibitions: ECOF6070 or ECOF5804 or ECMT6310 or ECMT5003 Assessment: assignment 1 (25%), assignment 2 (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces models and tools for decision analysis and their application in managerial settings. The unit focuses on the use of formal decision methods for management decisions in business. The main goal is to show how these decision models can improve the decision process by helping the decision maker to understand the structure of decisions; use subjective probabilities for measuring risk; analyse sensitivity of decisions to changing decision parameters; quantify outcomes in accordance with risk attitudes; and estimate the value of information. Special attention is paid to informal interpretations of formal decision approaches.
QBUS6810 Statistical Learning and Data Mining

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: ECMT5001 or QBUS5001 Assessment: group project (25%), in-class quizzes (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
It is now common for businesses to have access to very rich information data sets, often generated automatically as a by-product of the main institutional activity of a firm or business unit. Data Mining deals with inferring and validating patterns, structures and relationships in data, as a tool to support decisions in the business environment. This unit offers an insight into the main statistical methodologies for the visualization and the analysis of business and market data. It provides the tools necessary to extract information required for specific tasks such as credit scoring, prediction and classification, market segmentation and product positioning. Emphasis is given to business applications of data mining using modern software tools.
QBUS6820 Business Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr class per week Prerequisites: ECMT5001 or QBUS5001 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of basic probability theory and familiarity with spreadsheet modelling Assessment: Individual assignment (30%), mid-semester exam (25%), and final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides the basic knowledge and tools needed to understand and manage risk. It includes business cases to illustrate the nature of risk and risk management strategies. The main focus is on quantitative approaches to analysing risk through understanding the probability distributions involved. Topics covered include: Value at Risk calculations; Prospect theory for decisions under risk; Extreme value theory; Monte-Carlo simulation; Stochastic optimization; Credit scoring; Real options and Hedging strategies.
QBUS6830 Financial Time Series and Forecasting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial Prerequisites: ECMT5001 or QBUS5001 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of quantitative methods including statistics, basic probability theory, and introductory regression analysis. Assessment: Mid-semester exam (20%), group assignment (40%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Time series and statistical modelling is a fundamental component of the theory and practice of modern financial asset pricing as well as financial risk measurement and management. Further, forecasting is a required component of financial and investment decision making. This unit provides an introduction to the time series models used for the analysis of data arising in financial markets. It then considers methods for forecasting, testing and sensitivity analyses, in the context of these models. Topics include: the properties of financial return data; the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM); financial return factor models, with known and unknown factors, in panel data settings; modelling and forecasting conditional volatility, via ARCH and GARCH; forecasting market risk measures such as Value at Risk. Emphasis is placed on applications involving the analysis of many real market datasets. Students are encouraged to undertake hands-on analysis using an appropriate computing package.
QBUS6840 Predictive Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial Prerequisites: QBUS5001 or ECMT5001 Assessment: group assignment (30%), homework (15%), mid-semester exam (20%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To be effective in a competitive business environment, a business analyst needs to be able to use predictive analytics to translate information into decisions and to convert information about past performance into reliable forecasts. An effective analyst also should be able to identify the analytical tools and data structures to anticipate market trends. In this unit, students gain skills required to succeed in today's highly analytical and data-driven economy. The unit introduces the basics of data management, business forecasting, decision trees, logistic regression, and predictive modelling. The unit features corporate case studies and hands-on exercises to demonstrate the concepts presented.
QBUS6850 Machine Learning for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week (13 weeks) and 1x 1hr tutorial (lab) per week (12 weeks) Prerequisites: QBUS6810 Assessment: assignment 1 (10%); assignment 2 (10%); group project (20%); mid-semester exam (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Machine Learning is a fundamental aspect of data analytics that automates analytical model building in modern business. In the big data era, managers are able to use very large and rich data sources and to make business decision based on quantitative data analysis. Machine Learning covers a range of state-of-the-art methods/algorithms that iteratively learn from data, allowing computers to find hidden patterns and relationships in such data so as to support business decision. This unit introduces modern machine learning techniques and builds skills in using data for everyday business decision making. Topics include: Machine Learning Foundation; Modern Regression Methods; Advanced Classification Techniques; Latent Variable Models; Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Kernel Methods; Artificial Neural Networks; Deep Learning; and Machine Learning for Big Data. Emphasis is placed on applications involving the analysis of business data. Students will practise applying machine learning algorithms to real world datasets by using an appropriate computing package.

Business Economics

Foundational unit of study
ECON5040 Microeconomics for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prohibitions: ECON5001 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester exam (35%), 5x online quizzes (1000wd equivalent)(10%), 1x2hr final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Microeconomics is the study of choice under scarcity. Its importance is underlined by the fact that all businesses, consumers and even countries and their governments have limited resources. This unit provides an introduction to microeconomic analysis with a particular focus on concepts and applications relevant to business. It addresses how individual consumers and firms make decisions and how they interact in markets. We also introduce economic tools for analysing public policies a government might introduce to address market failures. It provides a rigorous platform for further study and a specialisation in business economics as well as providing valuable tools of analysis that complement a student's general business training, regardless of their area of study.
Compulsory unit of study
ECON5002 Macroeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON5003 Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 1500wd (20%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level macroeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behaviour. The unit covers theories of the engines of long-run economic growth, of unemployment, of money, inflation, the interest rate and the exchange rate, as well as consumption, saving and investment behaviour. The unit also studies a number of applications of the theory and addresses contemporary macroeconomic problems and policy.
Elective units of study
ECMT5001 Principles of Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Assessment: Online quizzes equivalent to 500wd (10%), 1xGroup assignment equivalent to 1000wd (15%), 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit develops the basic principles of data description and analysis, the idea of using the concept of probability to model data generation, and the statistical concepts of estimation and statistical inference, including hypothesis testing. It then develops these concepts and techniques in the context of the linear regression model to show how econometric models can be used to analyse data in a wide range of potential areas of application in economics, business and the social sciences. The unit combines theory and application. The emphasis is upon the interpretation of econometric estimation results and requires software for hands-on experience.
ECON5004 Communication in Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week, 1x1hr non-compulsory online tutorial/week Assessment: 2x1500wd assignments (35% each), 1x10min (1500wd equivalent) oral presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to enhance oral and written communication skills and improve understanding of how to engage with academic economics. A series of tasks will consider economics academic texts in context and require learners to understand, analyse and produce appropriate spoken and written texts. Concepts in critical analysis will provide the basis for improved persuasive communication, including the difference between convention, fact, opinion and preference; deductive and inductive proof; validity and truth; evidence; and the ethics of persuasion.
ECON5006 Economics of Law and Public Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: in class participation (15%), 1x10 min presentation (15%), 1x1500wd policy evaluation report (30%), 1x2hr final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study introduces tools to study the impact of laws and public policy on individual behaviours. We will critically evaluate empirical research produced by economists, sociologists, criminologists, and legal scholars. Topics will focus on criminal justice policy but will also cover other areas of law such as labour and social policy.
ECON5007 The Economics of Financial Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5040 Assessment: 1x1.5hr mid-semester exam (30%), 1x1000wd assignment (20%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Financial markets play a fundamental role in a modern economy. In this unit of study we analyse how financial markets function, with a particular focus on: the factors underlying demand and supply; risk and uncertainty; incomplete contracts and renegotiation; and asymmetric information and its implications. In doing so, we identify the key features of markets for financial assets. The unit also examines the development of financial institutions and current issues in financial markets.
ECON5026 Strategic Business Relationships

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd assignment (25%); 1x1hr mid-semester test (25%); 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A firm's success depends on both its internal and external strategic relationships. This unit of study analyses how a firm can manage these relationships. We examine agency problems within the firm, outlining ways that firms try to mitigate these issues. Strategic relationships with input suppliers examined. We discuss how firms can establish a strong bargaining position in these relationships. The optimal boundaries of the firm are also analysed. We also study how a firm's product-market strategy affects its relationship with its rivals in the output market.
ECON6008 International Money and Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5002 Assessment: 1x1hr Mid-semester test (30%), 1x1000wd Essay (15%), 1x2.5hr Final exam (55%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the following topics: overview of the International Monetary System; foreign exchange markets, spot and future markets; swaps and options; arbitrage; covered and uncovered interest parity; exchange rate determination; forecasting exchange rate movements; exchange rate intervention; and the role of central banks.
ECON6016 Trade and Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5002 or ECON5040 Assessment: 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), 1x1500wd equivalent Seminar paper and presentation (20%), 1x2hr Final exam (60%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to highlight the relation between trade and development from an institutional and structural perspective, with appropriate modifications of received general economic principles, theories and policies. It closely studies the integration process of traditional segment of a developing society into its modern counterpart in countries selected from Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific regions. It examines role of the state and international institutions (like the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, World Trade Organization), rationale for trade, planning and market mechanisms in developing economies, and also socio-cultural preconditions and economic requirements for a market economy. It focuses on a wide range of developmental problems and issues (such as foreign aid, debt, investment, technology transfer) from both national and international points of view.
ECON6018 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5040 Assessment: 1xSeminar paper and presentation equivalent to 1000wd (25%), 1x1.5hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study emphasis is exclusively concerned with market failures that impact on the natural environment. Attention is given to why these market failures occur and what role there is for regulation and government policy. Topics covered include efficiency and markets, market failure, externalities (e.g. pollution), various methods of regulating pollution, and measuring the demand for environmental quality.
ECON6024 Private Equity

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/week Prerequisites: ECON5001 or ECON5040 Assessment: 2500wd written assignments (50%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Private equity (PE) is crucial in developing new business ventures and promoting innovation. This unit investigates how PE firms operate, analysing the key strategic issues they face during the fundraising, investing and exit stages of the PE cycle. Topics covered include: the determinants and types of PE fundraising, the organisational structure of PE firms, the PE firm's investment decision, the PE firm-investee company relationship and the design of exit strategies. The role of PE in the broader economy is also discussed. Finally, we introduce some of the ethical issues PE firms face.
ECON6029 Health Economics and Policy Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (ECON5001 or ECON5040) and ECMT5001 Assessment: 1x1500wd assignment (20%); 1x1hr mid-semester test (20%); 1x2hr final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit, students will engage in discussing major health care issues and applying econometric tools to assess the (cost)-effectiveness of health care policy reforms. The following topics are likely to be covered: (1) international health care systems and finance, (2) determinants of the demand and supply of health care and behaviours, (3) inequalities in health and access to care, and (4) current policy reforms such as the introduction of provider incentives and co-payments. Each topic will be accompanied by an empirical application and replication assignment.

Business Information Systems

Foundational unit of study
INFS5002 Digital Business Foundations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: group project (40%), case study presentation (10%), individual assessment (30%), mid-term exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces students to the foundations of information systems and their emerging strategic role in transforming organisations and creating sustainable digital business models. Students develop an understanding of systems issues, information management and use, and how various digital technologies work together to create an infrastructure for digital business and how 'personal' technologies (such as social media) are disrupting 'business as usual'. The role of information systems in capturing and distributing organisational knowledge and in enhancing decision-making is explored. Students will gain an understanding of how the information systems function and the processes in organisations can be leveraged to create digital innovation and business transformation. Finally, the special challenges and opportunities created by the pervasiveness of technology and the future disruptions resulting from digital technologies is explored.
Elective units of study
INFS6002 Strategic Information Systems Sourcing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: Basic business information systems knowledge Assessment: Group assignment (25%), individual assignment (35%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Strategic Information Systems Sourcing has at its core the cost-effective sourcing and delivery of IS solutions with the aim of supporting and enabling business strategy. It covers the procurement of in-house systems, outsourcing strategies and third-party IS sourcing (for example from 'the cloud'). The focus of this unit is on managerial decisions in relation to the design, implementation and delivery of an IS sourcing strategy, and the governance of IS sourcing solutions. Students develop knowledge of the concepts, tools and methodologies used in the negotiation and development of an IS sourcing strategy.
INFS6004 Business Transformation Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: Understanding the major functions of a business and how those business functions interact internally and externally so the company can be competitive in a changing market. How Information Systems can be used and managed in a business. How to critically analyse a business and determine its options for transformation. Desirable Experience as a member of a project team. Assessment: assignment 1 (10%), assignment 2 (40%), assignment 3 - report (40%), assignment 3 - presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The forces that currently drive business transformation, such as globalisation, the IT revolution and environmental sustainability, require businesses to be in a constant state of change to stay competitive in turbulent markets. However, as companies need to maintain their current revenue streams, they need to progress through a series of integrated business transformation projects. In this unit students learn how to analyse an organisation within a local and global context and develop knowledge of techniques required for managing technology-enabled business transformation projects. Topics covered include: the drivers of business transformation, managing change as a process, analysing information and processes, and planning, leading, sustaining, diffusing and learning from transformational projects.
INFS6012 Enterprise Systems Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: individual assignment (25%), group project (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit explores the strategic managerial issues that arise from the implementation and use of Enterprise Systems as a means of integrating data and standardising processes. The unit utilises a combination of practical sessions with an Enterprise System, such as SAP, and analyses based on readings of case studies to explore the long-term effects of strategic implementation decisions, and issues with regard to Enterprise System implementation projects. The unit explores the emergence and implications of cloud-based Enterprise Systems, and the part that Enterprise Systems play in an organisation's broader information infrastructure.
INFS6015 Business Process Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: individual assignment (25%), group assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides an overview of the business process architecture and life cycle from a management perspective. It provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, strategies, tools and technologies required for modelling, analysis, design, improvement, integration, performance measurement and governance of business processes (both intra- and inter-enterprise) in any organisational and/or value chain context and relevant industry standards. The unit also develops practical skills in modelling, redesigning and improving business processes using various business process management software tools/suites.
INFS6016 Technology Enabled Business Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS6004 and; Understanding the major functions of a business and how those business functions interact internally and externally so the company can be competitive in the market is essential in order to critically analyse how and where a business can be innovative. Some knowledge of how technology can be applied in a business is also essential. Experience as a member of a project team is desirable. Assessment: individual project proposal (10%), group project report (45%), group project presentation (5%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit develops knowledge and skills in innovative, technology-enabled business models and strategies from a management perspective. The unit facilitates a better understanding and application of the concepts, strategies, tools and technologies necessary for undertaking business innovation. From basic knowledge of business models and essential business processes, this unit increases awareness and understanding of stakeholders, their capabilities and their limitations in the strategic convergence of technology and business. It provides insights into the technology and infrastructure required to support commerce in the 21st Century and supports development of student capabilities to analyse, develop and evaluate innovative technology-enabled business strategies and models.
INFS6018 Managing Business Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: Understanding the major functions of a business and how those business functions interact internally and externally so the company can be competitive in a changing market. How information systems can be used and managed in a business. How to critically analyse a business and determine its options for transformation. (ii) Desirable Experience as a member of a project team. Assessment: tutorial work (10%), mid-semester exam (35%), project report (30%), project presentation (10%), reflective summary (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Business Intelligence (BI), increasingly known as Business Analytics, is a major source of competitive advantage in the Information Age and is therefore a leading business priority globally. In recent times, this field has evolved from a technology topic to a management priority, creating an unprecedented demand for new management skills. Taking a business rather than technology perspective, this unit covers all aspects of the enterprise BI ecosystem in the context of strategic and operational BI, including all five stages of BI evolution. Topics include assessment and management of organisational data quality, multidimensional data modelling and integration, management of structured and unstructured data (including those created by social media), business aspects of data warehousing, innovation through advanced analytics, BI driven performance management, business process intelligence, active enterprise intelligence, and management of complex BI projects. Access is provided to the largest world-wide community of BI academics and industry practitioners called TUN (www.TeradataUniversityNetwork.com). The hands-on experience in using a commercial BI platform, combined with in-depth analytical skills, will enable students completing the unit to help any organization (regardless of its size and industry domain) to derive more intelligence from its data and compete on analytics. This unit does not require programming experience; it is suitable for both current and aspiring BI practitioners as well as general business practitioners from any functional area interested to learn how to start and lead BI-related initiatives.
INFS6023 Data Visualisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3hr workshop (once per week), weeks 1-13. Assessment: workshop participation (10%); individual project journal (15%); project report (35%); project presentation (15%); reflective summary (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Data visualisation, story-telling, and scenario development have been identified as the most prominent analytical practices of tomorrow. This unit seeks to equip students with necessary knowledge and data visualisation skills, acquired though real-life project inspired by the leading industry practices. Students will also develop a 'holistic' view of data visualisation in practice and will acquire 'thinking tools' to deal with its organisational and societal challenges. This unit focuses on business/organisational decision makers and their use of data visualisation. As such this unit does not require any prior IT, computer science or data science experience.
INFS6032 Agile Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: weekly learing journals (30%), in-class agile activities (15%), agile group project report (25%), essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Traditional approaches to project management and design work well under stable conditions, when intended outcomes are well understood. Yet, under conditional of market disruption, in innovation projects, new product development or for start-up businesses, traditional methods are often restrictive and inflexible. Agile Project Management and Design Thinking offer alternative approaches that value continuous change, flexibility, time-to-market, interactive learning and self-organisation over rigorous planning and design processes. In this unit you will learn the ethos, principles, and methods of agile project management and design thinking. You will experience hands-on techniques such as design thinking, learn management and Scrum as applied in practice. Learning will revolve around practical activities, insights from experienced guest speakers and case studies representing various industries.

Business Law

Foundational unit of study
CLAW5001 Legal Environment of Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: case analysis (20%), mid-semester exam (35%), final examination (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All business conduct is regulated by the law. Every transaction and every relationship is governed by an increasingly complex mix of statutory and judge-made laws. The ability to identify and manage legal risks, and knowledge of compliance and dispute resolution strategies, are essential business management skills. This unit examines the legal framework and regulatory regime within which all businesses operate in Australia and in a global economy. It introduces students to the legal implications of commercial conduct and provides an overview of the Australian legal system and threshold legal concepts of agreement, ownership, and civil and criminal liability. Key areas of substantive business law are examined including contracts, torts (in particular negligence and the economic torts), property and securities, and crime. The unit also provides students with an overview of areas of legal regulation with an increasingly significant impact on business operations including: privacy, intellectual property rights, competition law, consumer law (in particular advertising regulation, product liability and unfair contracts), misleading conduct and unconscionable conduct.
Textbooks
Business and the Law 6th edition, Andrew Terry.
Compulsory unit of study
CLAW6002 Corporate Structures in Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One three hour class per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Prerequisites: CLAW5001 Assessment: Executive report (30%), mid-semester exam (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The corporation is the dominant structure adopted for business undertakings globally. This unit aims to demystify corporate regulation and its impact in the contemporary commercial context with a view to introducing students to the types of issues they will encounter in the real world of corporations. The unit reviews business structures (joint ventures, partnerships, trusts and companies) from a business perspective with a focus on the corporate form. The unit also examines the different options available for the conduct of businesses and the different stages of the corporate life cycle, including: how corporations are brought into existence and the characteristics attained upon incorporation; how corporations undertake certain activities (including entry into contracts, fundraising, issuing shares, paying dividends); how corporations are managed and power is distributed between participants, how the law places certain duties and obligations upon those who manage corporations; the consequences which may result from any breach of those duties and obligations; and managing corporations in financial distress, liquidation and de-registration. It takes an application-based approach which gives the unit a practical as opposed to theoretical orientation. Current issues in corporate regulation in Australia and internationally are discussed to provide students with an understanding of the types of issues which confront different types of corporations, and how these issues impact upon their management and the discharge of corporate responsibility.
Elective units of study
CLAW6007 Issues in Law and International Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 3 hour class per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Prerequisites: CLAW5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (40%), case study presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Globalisation enables successful businesses to tap into the international economy to find new and bigger markets for their goods and services. Entering the global marketplace also means greater risk, as businesses deal with new customers, and are forced to operate in unfamiliar legal environments where the "normal" rules of business often don't apply. This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of how the global economy is regulated (if at all), and to provide the tools needed to use international business law to minimise the risks of doing business in the global economy. Questions addressed include: What is international business law and what do I need to know?; What institutions ensure a level playing field for my business?; How do I make an agreement to sell my goods to foreign customers?; How do I protect those goods in transit?; How do I ensure payment for goods and services I provide?; How do I build a presence in a foreign market through local agents and distributors?; What considerations apply to entering and borrowing from foreign capital markets?; How can I safely do business online in the global virtual economy?; What if things go wrong?; and How do I fight foreign disputes by my rules and in my court?
CLAW6026 Taxation Law and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One 3 hour class per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Prerequisites: CLAW5001 Assessment: mid semester exam (20%), major assignment (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Taxation is an inevitable reality for all individuals and businesses. The impact of taxation on business structures, transactions and decisions is both real and significant. An understanding of how taxation law works is not only vitally important for professional accountants but is also an essential management skill in an increasingly complex business environment. This unit introduces students to the principal forms of taxation within the Australian taxation system with a focus on concepts and principles of income tax law. Students also learn how tax law is applied in practice. This unit covers key concepts of taxation in Australia (including the concepts of income, capital gains tax, deductions, and the residence and source principles) and examines the taxation of different entities (including partnerships, trusts and companies). The taxation of international business transactions is also considered.
CLAW6030 China's Legal Environment for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-term exam (25%), presentation of proposed research area (10%), proposal of research paper (5%), research paper (50%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
China has recently become the second biggest economy in the world and is Australia's most important trading partner. Australian businesses are increasingly engaging with China. This unit addresses the frequently asked question of how to do business with China. It addresses China's unique business environment which has resulted from its unique culture, history and demography, and examines the business regulations, tax system, and the administrative and compliance issues businesses will face when carrying on business with China. The unit first outlines the business environment in terms of culture, history, economics, demography, and government administration. It then provides students with an understanding of the legal environment that businesses will face in China. Through a hypothetical case study, different aspects of business regulation such as contract, entity structure, mergers and acquisition, property and intellectual property rights, the tax system, different tax types and associated international issues, and social insurance are analysed.
CLAW6031 International Financial Crime

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: test (20%), group assignment (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
International financial crime occupies a leading place on the international governance agenda. It has a devastating impact on national economies, international security and human development. This unit examines key international financial crimes such as investment fraud, corruption, tax evasion, money laundering and terrorist financing. Students gain an understanding of how these crimes are committed, detected and prosecuted. They analyse the changing regulatory environment and the new risks facing businesses and the professions. The role of bank secrecy and tax havens in facilitating financial crime is also studied. There is a special focus on the prevention of financial crime, and the regime for tracing, freezing and recovery of illicit assets. The unit draws on case studies from Australia, United States, Europe and Asia so as to gain a better appreciation of the national and international responses to international financial crime.
CLAW6032 Regulating Innovation and Distribution

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: class participation and engagement (20%); individual assignment (30%); group assignment: presentation (20%); group assignment: research paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Business today operates in an increasingly complex and constantly changing environment in which success depends on the ability to innovate and compete. This unit examines three key legal frameworks - intellectual property, fair trading and competition law - within which innovation and contestability in markets takes place. Intellectual property regulation seeks to promote invention and creativity and to discourage imitation and free riding. Fair trading regulation provides standards of conduct for B2B and B2C transactions. Competition law promotes fair markets by prohibiting practices which damage competition. The unit focuses on franchising as a business model, to provide the context to examine how these regulatory frameworks operate and interact in a commercial environment.
CLAW6033 International Business Tax Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: class performance (10%), mid-semester test (20%), individual assignment (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Taxation strategy of an international business has significant impact on not only the overall financial performance of the enterprise, but also the quantum of tax revenue that governments can collect. The increasing globalisation and integration of operations of multinational enterprises, together with the ingenuity of the army of tax advisors, provides ample opportunities for international tax planning. This unit introduces students to international tax principles and practices. Students will learn how the international tax rules are implemented in practice, and tax strategies that international businesses can adopt to minimise their global tax liabilities. Case studies on major multinational enterprises, such as Apple and Google, will be used to analyse and evaluate the international tax rules and business tax strategies. This unit will cover the fundamental residence and source principles, the taxation of inbound and outbound investments, the taxation of international finance, and common international tax strategies of multinational enterprises, including tax arbitrage between tax rules of entity classifications, the tax treatment of debt and equity, and transfer pricing.
CLAW6034 Commercial Property Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3 hour workshop per week Assessment: mid-semester exam (20%), group assignment (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to commercial property law, including a general understanding of the fundamentals of commercial law. Students learn about the registration systems of real property and personal property. The unit assists students in understanding how businesses and investors acquire and dispose of interests in property, including various methods of holding property interests, such as through corporations, trusts, and listed vehicles. There is a critical analysis of the legal aspects of securitisation of property interests, including legal risks in facilitating securitisation. The concept of due diligence and disclosure obligations, as well as the public policy limits on domestic and foreign investment in property is examined. Students gain an understanding of how property disputes are resolved and the international dimensions of property law.

Business Sustainability

Compulsory unit of study
WORK6033 Organisational Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Intensive Prohibitions: ECOF6110 or CLAW6028 Assessment: tests (30%), assignment (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Organisational sustainability is a critical part of contemporary managerial practice, focusing on organisations' economical, social and environmental impact. This unit critically evaluates the intentions, practices and outcomes of organisational sustainability initiatives. By applying relevant theoretical frameworks, students are encouraged to enhance their understanding of the role and responsibilities of management, the impact of organisations on employees, and the wider societal and environmental implications of contemporary organisational trends. With an emphasis on the human dimensions of organisational actions, this unit builds on foundational units of study in Management, Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management.
Elective units of study
IBUS6012 Business Innovation and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3 hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: individual assignment (60%); group assignment (30%); presentations (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Businesses are increasingly challenged for their sustainability. This unit centres on addressing significant business and societal challenges by balancing sustainability and innovation. Topics include current and future challenges of innovation and sustainability for business. This unit is structured around learning from seminar and practice. Students are required to work in a way which delivers sustainability.
INFS6022 Systemic Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: assignment 1 (10%), assignment 2 (40%), assignment 3 - report (40%), assignment 3 - presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit of study students will engage comprehensively and critically with the challenges and opportunities presented to businesses by the United Nation's agenda of sustainable development. This UN agenda outlines a systemic development concept for the period 2016-2030 covering four critical dimensions: economic development, social inclusion, environmental sustainability, and good governance. The key idea of this framework is the mobilisation of key all societal actors in the public and private sectors, in order to achieve a transition from 'business-as?usual' thinking towards a sustainable development path. As the principal engine for economic growth and job creation, but also the principal consumers of natural resources, businesses have a critical role to play in this process. Critically, businesses will have to develop and deliver many of the new technologies, organizational models, and management systems that are required in this transition. Against this background, in this unit of study you will analyse how business leaders and managers can transform their companies towards systemic sustainable development. You will learn to apply relevant theoretical frameworks based on the practices of pioneering companies, and critically question the feasibility of the UN agenda in light of the competitive nature of business.
ITLS6008 Production and Operations Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3hr lectures, 4x 3hr tutorials Corequisites: ITLS5000 Assessment: individual quiz 1 (15%); individual quiz 2 (15%); case study report (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Production and operations management designs, operates, and improves the processes and systems through which products are made and delivered. Firms can improve their productivity and gain competitive advantage through effective and innovative production and operations management. This unit offers a thorough examination of various production and operations management concepts from a supply chain perspective. The key teaching topics include operations planning hierarchy, resource management, capacity planning, quality management, retail operations, sustainable/green operations, and reverse logistics. Students learn about the successful production and operations management practices that have helped organisations improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their supply chains and create competitive advantage.
ITLS6103 Sustainable Transport Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 11 x 3 hr lectures/tutorials, 1x full day field trip Assessment: individual report 1 (25%), individual report 2 (15%), group presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Transport policy decisions shape contemporary life around the world and the connections between transport and land use are instrumental in designing effective policy in this domain. The unit provides an introduction to the context for policy making, how decisions are made, relationships with short- and long-term strategic planning, and how policy has become intertwined with broader sustainability concerns. The unit will then develop the student¿s ability to assess contemporary issues in sustainable transport policy such as liveable environments, climate change, the role of the built environment in sustainable cities, social inclusion, parking policy, human health and safety, active travel, the challenges of low density transport, the regulation of public transport, fare policies for public transport and other contemporary issues. Each issue will consider the problem and assess the success of existing policy and/or the need for new policy and what this might look like. The unit is particularly suited to students with broad interest in transport, urban planning, and environmental/sustainability issues.
PHYS5031 Ecological Econ and Sustainable Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arunima Malik Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1.5-hour lecture interspersed with hands-on exercises per week, and 1 hour seminar per week. Assessment: Essay, presentation and comprehensive diary/notes from lectures (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces contemporary topics from Ecological Economics and Sutainability Analysis, such as metrics for measuring sustainability; planetary boundaries and other natural limits; comparisons between ecological and environmental economics; valuing the environment; intergenerational discounting; global enquality with a focus on the climate change debate; and links between theories of well-being, human behaviour, consumerism and environmental impact. This unit includes guest lecturers from industry and research and an excursion. Each lecture includes hands-on exercises for practical skill-building. The unit sets the scene for the more detailed and specific units PHYS5032, PHYS5033, and PHYS5034.
PHYS5032 Techniques for Sustainability Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke and Prof Manfred Lenzen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2.5-hour lecture including tutorial per week Assessment: Two assignments based on weekly homework sheets (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Minimum class size of 5 students.
This unit of study offers a practical introduction to quantitative analysis techniques including multiple regression, uncertainty analysis, integration, structural decomposition, and dynamic systems modelling, with a strong emphasis on demonstrating their usefulness for environmental problem-solving. This unit will show students how mathematics can be brought to life when utilised in powerful applications to deal with environmental and sustainability issues. Throughout the unit of study, example applications will be explained, including climate modelling, ecosystem trophic chain analysis, linking household consumption and environmental impact, identifying socio-demographic drivers of environmental change, and the uncovering the effect of land use patterns on threats to species.

Finance

Foundational unit of study
FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid semester-test (20%), major assignment (25%), and final examination (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit provides an introduction to basic concepts in corporate finance and capital markets. It is designed to equip students to undertake further studies in finance. After reviewing some very basic ideas in finance and financial mathematics, the unit provides an introduction to the valuation of equity and debt securities and companies. The unit then examines issues related to pricing in capital markets and ends with a discussion of theory and practice related to capital structure and dividend policy.
Compulsory unit of study
FINC6001 Intermediate Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (30%), major assignment (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit extends some of the fundamental concepts introduced in FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance, and develops a rigorous framework for the analysis and understanding of key aspects of corporate financial decision making. Fundamental concepts in corporate finance are extended to more complex settings. The unit examines more advanced approaches to asset pricing and capital budgeting. New topics are covered in relation to derivative securities and real options applications in capital budgeting. The issues of the cost of capital, corporate capital structure, and corporate dividend policy, are extended to cover the interaction of corporate and personal taxation, agency problems, and information signalling.
Elective units of study
CLAW6031 International Financial Crime

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: test (20%), group assignment (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
International financial crime occupies a leading place on the international governance agenda. It has a devastating impact on national economies, international security and human development. This unit examines key international financial crimes such as investment fraud, corruption, tax evasion, money laundering and terrorist financing. Students gain an understanding of how these crimes are committed, detected and prosecuted. They analyse the changing regulatory environment and the new risks facing businesses and the professions. The role of bank secrecy and tax havens in facilitating financial crime is also studied. There is a special focus on the prevention of financial crime, and the regime for tracing, freezing and recovery of illicit assets. The unit draws on case studies from Australia, United States, Europe and Asia so as to gain a better appreciation of the national and international responses to international financial crime.
FINC6000 Quantitative Finance and Derivatives

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Prohibitions: FINC5002 Assumed knowledge: This unit requires students to have some background in calculus, matrices, statistics and probability. Assessment: assignment (20%), mid-semester exam (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides students with an introduction to quantitative models and techniques in finance. Topics covered include basic stochastic calculus, probability measures and the role of numeraires, Black-Scholes and Hull-White models, and the theoretical and numerical techniques for valuing derivatives. There is a focus on both the intuitive and mathematical understanding of these topics, as well as their application to problems in quantitative finance.
FINC6005 Advanced Asset Pricing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 or FINC5002 or FINC6000 Assessment: 2 x In class test (2x15%), assignment (20%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Only students with strong quantitative/mathematical skills should attempt this course
This unit covers the fundamentals of asset pricing and valuation, under equilibrium conditions and under no-arbitrage restrictions. It reviews the main themes in modern asset pricing, and introduce ideas of importance to the evolution of the discipline, and consequently of relevance to a practitioner's long term perspective. The unit emphasises quantitative methods, so students are required to have fairly strong mathematical skills. Nevertheless, the mathematical tools needed in the unit are adequately reviewed.
FINC6007 Financial Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: individual assignment (20%), group assignment (30%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores value investment principles used in investment strategies. Both investment strategies and company strategies are analysed to examine how to translate a company's strategy into shareholders' profit. The unit also provides students with the skill set of analysing and interpreting financial reports, identifying good investment and avoiding financial scandals. Great investment practitioners' (Benjamin Graham, Warren E. Buffett and Charles Munger) works are studied in detail.
FINC6009 Portfolio Theory and its Applications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 or FINC5002 or FINC6000 Assessment: mid semester exam (20%), individual assignment (15%), group assignment (15%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers several aspects of modern/post modern portfolio theory.An introduction to mathematical optimisation techniques in the presence of uncertainty is covered and results from modern portfolio theory to the Capital Asset Pricing Model derived. The unit also examines other popular models such as the Arbitrage Pricing Theory and Black-Litterman Model and concludes with some topical examples from industry. There is a degree of mathematical sophistication associated with this unit and consequently students should be comfortable with a mathematical approach. However, the required mathematical tools are covered in the unit.
FINC6010 Derivative Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides an introduction to the rapidly-growing area of options, futures and swaps. These securities are derived from fundamental securities such as equities and bonds. The unit examines the nature of each of type of derivative security before a thorough treatment of the pricing and use of these securities for investment management and risk management purposes.
FINC6013 International Business Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In our highly globalised and integrated world economy, understanding international dimensions of financial management is essential for businesses. This unit provides a greater understanding of the fundamental concepts and the tools necessary for effective financial decision making by business enterprises, within a global setting.
FINC6014 Fixed Income Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), group assignment (25%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the concepts required for investment in fixed income securities, managing bond portfolios and understanding debt markets. Topics covered include duration, convexity, interest rate risk, bond volatility and the term structure of interest rates. The more complex types of debt securities studied include mortgage backed securities, corporate bonds with embedded options such as convertible bonds and interest rate derivatives.
FINC6015 Trading in Securities Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (30%), 2x group assignments (2x10%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to core concepts of fundamental market design and structure, focussing on the processes that turn orders into trades in securities markets, and the forces that mould and effect order flow and execution. The unit provides insights into how the study of securities market microstructure can improve our understanding of today's global financial markets in order to: (a) facilitate better financing and investment decisions; (b) understand when, where and how to transact in financial instruments; and (c) make better use of the ever increasing flow of market information. An improved understanding of today's diverse financial markets allows for successful trading strategies to be developed in different instruments and across many markets, today and in the future.
FINC6016 Financial Instruments and Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: 2x mid-term exams (2x15%), assignment (20%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an introduction to Australian financial markets and an evaluation of the institutions, instruments and participants involved in the industry. The main markets evaluated include the equity, money, bond, futures, options, and foreign exchange markets. The relationship between the economic environment and these markets is examined.
FINC6017 Mergers and Acquisitions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Prohibitions: ACCT6011 Assessment: mid-semester exam (20%), assignment (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Mergers and acquisitions have become perhaps the most important activity of investment banks today. They provide a fundamental way for businesses to secure growth. To analyse mergers and acquisitions, most tools from modern financial economics are needed. The unit commences with a review of how existing businesses are valued, continues with an analysis of capital structure decisions, considers management incentives and examines issues in corporate control. It then examines the motives for mergers and acquisitions. Some acquisitions are motivated by value improvements created by correcting incentive problems, some acquisitions however are motivated by bad incentives that decrease value.
FINC6021 Corporate Valuation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit applies all aspects of finance theory to the general problem of valuing companies and other financial assets. This requires a synthesis of the fundamental concepts of present value, cost of capital, security valuation, asset pricing models, optimal capital structures, derivative pricing and some related accounting concepts. The unit aims to reach a level of practical application that allows students to understand both the theoretical frameworks and institutional conventions of real world corporate valuations. Basic valuation concepts from accounting are reconciled with the finance theory on which firm value ultimately stands. Students are asked to make extensive use of Excel or similar software in valuation exercises.
FINC6022 Behavioural Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-term exam (30%), group assignment (20%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Behavioural finance examines how individual financial decision making and behaviour affect outcomes in financial markets. The unit begins with a review of the foundations of efficient markets, and then draws comparisons between the efficient ('economically rational') market and the less understood but possibly more realistic behavioural ('partially rational' or 'irrational') understanding of markets. The philosophy of the unit is that both viewpoints have advantages and each adds something new to our understanding of investor behaviour, both at the level of individual traders and at the level of the market interpreted as a mechanism for aggregating opinion and attitudes to risk.
FINC6023 Financial Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: Lab exercises (20%), group project (20%), mid semester exam (20%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Risk is an integral part of financial decisions. Following the rapid evolution of the discipline of financial risk management, analysts must be prepared to access the level of risk in the marketplace. This unit explores the basic concepts of modelling, measuring and managing financial risks within the regulatory framework. Topics covered include market risk (value-at-risk and expected loss), credit risk (single name, portfolio, ratings and market based models, credit derivatives), liquidity risk and operational risk. To overcome the rather quantitative nature of the topics, the unit relies heavily on practical based lab exercises with emphasis on simulations, real life examples and case studies.
FINC6024 Real Estate Finance and Investment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), group project (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Real Estate Finance will provide graduates with the knowledge and skills to value and manage real estate within the context of a mixed-asset portfolio. In particular, this unit will explore the micro-economic and macro-economic foundations of real estate, real estate valuation techniques, property derivatives and securities, real estate portfolio management, capital management and listed real estate firms. Graduates can seek employment in the property management industry, funds management industry and financial analysis roles.
FINC6025 Entrepreneurial Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3 hour lecture per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: business plan (25%), quiz (20%), final examination (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the considerations when planning the financial needs of new ventures and young companies. An overview of entrepreneurial finance reviews the concepts of valuation for entrepreneurial ventures and possible funding sources from the standpoint of the founder, management team and the funder. Fundamental valuation approaches considered in corporate finance are extended to model the opportunities and the capital structure relevant to a new venture. This unit examines the process of venture capital funding and the challenges of managing and funding growth. New topics are covered in relation to the growth and exit strategies employed by entrepreneurial ventures, as well as later stage financing, including mezzanine financing and buy-outs.
FINC6101 Special Topic in Finance 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August Classes: 2x4hr seminars per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: Depends on topic Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Study of a special topic in Finance at postgraduate level. Topics will vary from semester to semester according to staff availability and the presence of visitors.
FINC6102 Special Topic in Finance 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: 2x 4hr seminars per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: Depends on topic Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Study of a special topic in Finance at postgraduate level. Topics will vary from semester to semester according to staff availability and the presence of visitors.

Infrastructure and Transport Management

Foundational unit of study
ITLS5100 Transport and Infrastructure Foundations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 12 x 3hr lectures, 1 x 2hr field trip Prohibitions: TPTM6241 Assessment: report 1 (20%), report 2 (20%), presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This is the foundation unit for all transport and infrastructure management programs and should be completed in the first period of study.
Transport and infrastructure plays an important role both in terms of personal mobility as well as accessibility of businesses and their transportation needs. This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to the role of transportation and infrastructure within the economy. The key concepts and theories needed for management of transport and infrastructure are introduced along with the analysis and problem solving skills needed for confident decision making. In providing the foundational knowledge for students in transport and infrastructure, the unit also introduces students to the professional communication skills needed. Examples and case studies are drawn from all modes of transport and infrastructure.
Elective units of study - Table A
ITLS6500 Decision Making on Mega Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 8 x 3.5 hr lectures, 4 x 3.5 hr workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 or INFS5001 Assessment: 2x individual assignments (40%), group assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Infrastructure is crucial to economic performance; without it business cannot operate efficiently or competitively. Delivery of large infrastructure projects, however, is complex and despite many more megaprojects being undertaken than any time in history, the majority of these projects are completed significantly over?budget and longer than planned. In this unit students will be introduced to megaproject decision making. The sources of social and technical complexity are discussed, issues of risk management and governance explored, and human biases in decision making are also highlighted. Strategies to overcome weaknesses in mega?project decision making are also outlined.
ITLS6501 Infrastructure Financing

Credit points: 6 Session: Winter Main Classes: 9 x 3.5 hr lectures, 3 x 3.5 hr workshops. Assessment: 2x individual assignments (50%), group assignment (25%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Infrastructure is the backbone of every economy. Investment in infrastructure has the capacity to enhance productivity and generate growth, and has multiplier effects that are not only economic but also social and environmental. The cost of infrastructure projects, however, can be substantial and funding these projects represents a significant challenge. In this unit, students explore the distinction between infrastructure financing and funding and the challenges in raising private finance. Students are provided with an understanding of the principles of infrastructure finance and the use of special purpose vehicles and how to structure alternative financing plans. Students learn how to develop approaches to procurement and tendering and understand issues associated with the commercial and financial structuring of Public Private Partnerships.
Elective units of study - Table B
ITLS6101 Global Freight Logistics Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 7 x 3 hr lectures, 6 x 3 hr workshops Prohibitions: TPTM6440 Assessment: Individual report (25%); quiz (30%); group presentation (30%); individual case discussion (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an understanding of the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, rail, trucking, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit covers underlying supply chain drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different freight transport modes, as well as industry structure, institutional environment (customs, etc.) and market access. Building on this background the unit highlights the implications for profitable international logistics operations. The unit focuses on corporate strategies around fleet and network planning as well as revenue and cost management. The material covered in the unit takes into account recent developments in global and regional economic activity and discusses implications for the various sectors of the air, sea and intermodal freight businesses. This unit involves case studies and industry presentations, and analysis from the perspectives of shippers, carriers, end customers, regulatory bodies and investors.
ITLS6102 Strategic Transport Planning

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3 hr lectures, 6 x 3 hr computer labs Corequisites: ITLS5200 or TPTM6495 Prohibitions: TPTM6350 Assessment: quiz 1 (20%), quiz 2 (20%), travel demand modelling (30%), case study (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides a basic understanding of the main principles underlying strategic transport models for forecasting, and the knowledge to critically assess forecasts of transport strategies made by transport planners. Students acquire knowledge of strategic forecasting models used by government and consultants as well as the methods to capture travel behaviour such as mode choice and route choice. Simple mathematical models are discussed in detail, along with numerical examples and applications in the Sydney Metropolitan Area, which are used to illustrate the principles of the methods. This unit equips students to build simple transport models in the computer lab using specialised transport planning software used by governments and consultants.
ITLS6103 Sustainable Transport Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 11 x 3 hr lectures/tutorials, 1x full day field trip Assessment: individual report 1 (25%), individual report 2 (15%), group presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Transport policy decisions shape contemporary life around the world and the connections between transport and land use are instrumental in designing effective policy in this domain. The unit provides an introduction to the context for policy making, how decisions are made, relationships with short- and long-term strategic planning, and how policy has become intertwined with broader sustainability concerns. The unit will then develop the student¿s ability to assess contemporary issues in sustainable transport policy such as liveable environments, climate change, the role of the built environment in sustainable cities, social inclusion, parking policy, human health and safety, active travel, the challenges of low density transport, the regulation of public transport, fare policies for public transport and other contemporary issues. Each issue will consider the problem and assess the success of existing policy and/or the need for new policy and what this might look like. The unit is particularly suited to students with broad interest in transport, urban planning, and environmental/sustainability issues.
ITLS6107 Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 7 x 2 hr lectures, 7 x 4 hr computer labs Prohibitions: TPTM6180 Assessment: individual projects (40%); group project (20%); group presentation (10%); final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
The world is increasingly filled with systems, devices and sensors collecting large amounts of data on a continual basis. Most of these data are associated with locations that represent everything from the movement of individuals travelling between activities to the flow of goods or transactions along a supply chain and from the location of companies to those of their current and future customers. Taking this spatial context into account transforms analyses, problem solving and provides a powerful method of visualising the world. This is the essence of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and this unit. This unit starts by introducing students to the 'building blocks' of GIS systems, including data structures, relational databases, spatial queries and analysis. The focus then moves on to sources of spatial data including Global Positioning System (GPS), operational systems such as smartcard ticketing and transaction data along with web-based sources highlighting both the potential and challenges associated with integrating each data source within a GIS environment. The unit is hands-on involving learning how to use the latest GIS software to analyse several problems of interest using real 'big data' sources and to communicate the results in a powerful and effective way. These include identifying potential demand for new services or infrastructure, creating a delivery and scheduling plan for a delivery firm or examining the behaviour of travellers or consumers over time and locations. This unit is aimed at students interested in the spatial impact of decision-making and on the potential for using large spatial datasets for in-depth multi-faceted analytics.
Elective units of study - Table C
ITLS5200 Quantitative Logistics and Transport

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr computer workshop per week Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 Prohibitions: TPTM6495 Assessment: readiness assuranceness assessments (10%); computer exam (25%); individual report (25%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Supply chain management as well as logistics, transport and infrastructure management relies on the ability to make effective decisions based on the information provided by careful analysis of data. Students undertaking this unit will develop a strong understanding of the basic techniques underpinning quantitative analysis and will develop highly marketable skills in spreadsheet modelling and the communication and presentation of data to support management decision making. This unit emphasises the practical aspects of quantitative analysis with computer based workshops. Students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making but emphasis is placed on how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis. The unit covers demand forecasting, spreadsheet modelling, optimisation of production and transportation using linear programming, simulation and basic statistics and linear regression techniques.
ITLS6301 City and Ports Logistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit conveys the fundamentals of city and port logistics and thus develops each student into a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods for the city and port logistics industries. The unit covers all aspects of management from planning and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact for all types of port. Technological changes and their implications for the city and port logistics, in particular intelligent transport systems and container terminal automation, are studied. The role of cities and ports in global supply chains is analysed. The relationship of cities and ports with their hinterlands as well as the concept of port-centric logistics is looked at in detail. The port-city interface as well as waterfront redevelopment is covered, with examples drawn from a number of countries. Port policy and the importance of competition and/or regulation are presented. Talks by city and port logistics professionals complements the lectures and provides students with windows on the workings of the city and port logistics industries.

International Business

Foundational units of study
IBUS5003 Global Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: in class participation (10%), mid-semester exam (20%), group presentation (10%), group project (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block mode
This unit focuses on the application of strategic thinking in key business contexts with a particular focus on the global nature of business. Students gain knowledge about: (i) identifying and managing challenges and risks presented by operating in a global business environment; (ii) international business trade and foreign direct investment theories; (iii) country level factors that impact global strategy.
Compulsory units of study
IBUS6001 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hr lecture and 1x 1hr seminar per week Corequisites: IBUS5003 Prohibitions: ECHS6008 Assessment: Individual assignments (70%) and group assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit analyses how multinational firms leverage their capabilities and competencies to create competitive advantages in international and global markets. Topics include assessing foreign market attractiveness; understanding the impact of differences in legal, cultural, political and economic regimes; evaluating international political and economic risk; building and operating global networks, including entry mode choice; understanding how managers design organisational architecture and implement internal control and incentive mechanisms; and assessing the challenges of global citizenship, ethical behaviour and social responsibility for international business. Problem-based learning, with case study workshops, is an integral part of the unit.
IBUS6002 Cross-Cultural Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: Participation (10%), culture report (10%), case study (20%), mid-semester exam (in class) (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
An understanding of cultural differences and how to manage such differences is critical to effective management in international and multi-cultural business environments. The aim of this unit is to provide conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that will develop an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact on management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management, the meaning and dimensions of culture, comparative international management and leadership styles, managing communication across cultures, ethics and social responsibility in global management, cross-cultural negotiation and decision-making, forming and managing global teams, and developing the international and global manager.
Elective units of study
ACCT6002 International Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture and 1 x 2hr tutorial per week. Prerequisites: ACCT6001 Assessment: final exam (50%), test 1 (15%), test 2 (15%), assignment (10%), oral presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Many of the topics in an international accounting unit have a domestic counterpart. However, new factors and complications arise in the international arena. Some of these are (1) diversity of laws, practices, customs, cultures, and competitive circumstances; and (2) risks associated with fluctuating exchange rates, differential rates of inflation, and unstable property rights. International accounting discusses issues from the perspective of companies that have internationalised their finance and/or their operations. It has a comparative aspect, comparing accounting across countries. It deals with corporate reporting and disclosure across national boundaries. It also deals with the harmonisation of the worldwide diversity in financial reporting, in particular, convergence around International Financial Reporting Standards. It discusses consolidation issues that arise from multinational operations.
CLAW6007 Issues in Law and International Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 3 hour class per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Prerequisites: CLAW5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (40%), case study presentation (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Globalisation enables successful businesses to tap into the international economy to find new and bigger markets for their goods and services. Entering the global marketplace also means greater risk, as businesses deal with new customers, and are forced to operate in unfamiliar legal environments where the "normal" rules of business often don't apply. This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of how the global economy is regulated (if at all), and to provide the tools needed to use international business law to minimise the risks of doing business in the global economy. Questions addressed include: What is international business law and what do I need to know?; What institutions ensure a level playing field for my business?; How do I make an agreement to sell my goods to foreign customers?; How do I protect those goods in transit?; How do I ensure payment for goods and services I provide?; How do I build a presence in a foreign market through local agents and distributors?; What considerations apply to entering and borrowing from foreign capital markets?; How can I safely do business online in the global virtual economy?; What if things go wrong?; and How do I fight foreign disputes by my rules and in my court?
CLAW6030 China's Legal Environment for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-term exam (25%), presentation of proposed research area (10%), proposal of research paper (5%), research paper (50%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
China has recently become the second biggest economy in the world and is Australia's most important trading partner. Australian businesses are increasingly engaging with China. This unit addresses the frequently asked question of how to do business with China. It addresses China's unique business environment which has resulted from its unique culture, history and demography, and examines the business regulations, tax system, and the administrative and compliance issues businesses will face when carrying on business with China. The unit first outlines the business environment in terms of culture, history, economics, demography, and government administration. It then provides students with an understanding of the legal environment that businesses will face in China. Through a hypothetical case study, different aspects of business regulation such as contract, entity structure, mergers and acquisition, property and intellectual property rights, the tax system, different tax types and associated international issues, and social insurance are analysed.
CLAW6033 International Business Tax Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: class performance (10%), mid-semester test (20%), individual assignment (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Taxation strategy of an international business has significant impact on not only the overall financial performance of the enterprise, but also the quantum of tax revenue that governments can collect. The increasing globalisation and integration of operations of multinational enterprises, together with the ingenuity of the army of tax advisors, provides ample opportunities for international tax planning. This unit introduces students to international tax principles and practices. Students will learn how the international tax rules are implemented in practice, and tax strategies that international businesses can adopt to minimise their global tax liabilities. Case studies on major multinational enterprises, such as Apple and Google, will be used to analyse and evaluate the international tax rules and business tax strategies. This unit will cover the fundamental residence and source principles, the taxation of inbound and outbound investments, the taxation of international finance, and common international tax strategies of multinational enterprises, including tax arbitrage between tax rules of entity classifications, the tax treatment of debt and equity, and transfer pricing.
FINC6013 International Business Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (25%), assignment (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In our highly globalised and integrated world economy, understanding international dimensions of financial management is essential for businesses. This unit provides a greater understanding of the fundamental concepts and the tools necessary for effective financial decision making by business enterprises, within a global setting.
IBUS6003 Managing International Risk

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: international risk analysis 1 (20%), international risk analysis 2 (30%), risk management proposal (20%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces students to the multi-level risk environments encountered by multinational enterprise and the processes and strategies that can be employed to identify, assess, manage and mitigate risk. Topics covered include multinational enterprise and expropriation, sovereign risk and corruption, political and regulatory risk, brand and corporate reputation risk management, managing anti-globalization protests and consumer boycotts, terrorism risk, and executive risk and risk management and a short introduction to financial risk and risk management. The unit also introduces the various analytical approaches involved in designing risk identification systems, reporting and monitoring protocols, and how risk is able to be assessed, prioritized and effectively managed. The unit emphasizes a problem case based approach to learning using workshops and simulation exercises.
IBUS6004 International Business Alliances

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: group project (30%), individual project (50%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Collaboration to achieve competitive advantage is one of the most commonly recommended cross border strategies. However, international alliances can take many different forms, and they can serve many different purposes. Managing international alliances raises a series of different issues for the alliance partners to manage. This unit examines the issues raised and considers the reasons for success and failure of international alliances. It looks at the forms that partnerships can take, it examines the methods for choosing among potential partners, it examines the potential forms of collaboration and the level of resources each may require. Managing the partnership for maximum advantage, avoiding possible risks, and deciding how and when to end the partnership, all are further issues that managers must consider. The unit considers these questions in the framework of general theoretical approaches, and pays particular attention to discussion of individual cases.
IBUS6005 Ethical International Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week from week 1 to week 13 Assessment: Group assignments (40%), final exam (30%), and individual assignments (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In order to succeed in international business, both corporations and individuals need broad decision-making abilities. Business decision-making tools yield more coherent and justifiable results when used with an understanding of the ethical, social and environmental aspects of the process. This applies to various situations in the international business setting including business relations with government, customers, employees, and NGOs. This unit is designed to look at these non-financial elements in the decisions made within the international business context. Upon completion of this unit, students will have enhanced skills and knowledge relevant to the understanding of ethical issues and ethical decisions making in international business organisations.
IBUS6006 Comparative International Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr class per week Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), final exam (35%), group research project (30%), peer evaluation (5%), participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The triad regions, Japan, the United States, and the European Union, together are the homes of almost all of the world's largest 500 corporations. They account for a large majority of world exports. They provide most of the world's outward flows of foreign direct investment, and in addition, they are the recipients of most of inward FDI flows. However, they are very different, in firm structure, in regulatory environment, and in the relations between private firms and government agencies. Dealing with them as competitors, customers, suppliers, or partners requires international managers to be aware of these differences and to vary their strategies accordingly. This unit compares the structure and operations of triad firms, and the ways that government agencies frame the operating environment in each region. The unit looks at the ways firms in each region seek competitive advantage, and how governments have supported them. In addition to the specific knowledge of the habits and tendencies of Japanese, United States, and European firms, the techniques of analysis developed in this unit are applicable to a wide range of competitive situations across the global economy.
IBUS6007 International Business Special Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 3 hr seminars day pre-departure seminar (Sydney), 30 hrs lectures in country action-research, 1x 3hr seminar post trip (Sydney) Assessment: Individual Assessments (75%), and Group Assessments (25%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The special project in International Business provides students with an opportunity to undertake a supervised research project on an approved topic.
IBUS6008 Export Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: individual assignment part 1 (30%), individual assignment part 2 (30%), final test (30%), class preparation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Exporting is a key international business activity, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This unit covers both the theory and practice of export management. The main areas covered in the unit are: 1) preparing to export (export stimulation, export readiness and planning), 2) forming and maintaining relationships with intermediaries (including legal considerations), 3) managing risks and export finance, 4) filling export orders. The unit therefore covers both the operational and strategic challenges associated with the exporting process.
IBUS6018 Business Negotiations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Assessment: in-class exercises (33%), assignment (33%), final exam (34%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Note: this unit requires participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of the grade, will require time-pressured reading of material in class.
This course is aimed at making you feel more comfortable and confident with the negotiation process. The course is taught as a 'flipped classroom', meaning that the content of the course is primarily taught outside of class, through brief written lectures, and class time is used to assimilate that knowledge through at least a dozen marked role-play negotiations, debriefs of those negotiations, problem-solving workshops and international negotiation case study analysis. You will also be taught how to develop your own negotiation strategies and tactics using a combination of multiple psychological, economic and legal concepts from the course.
IBUS6019 Strategy and Emerging Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1X 3 hour lecture/seminar per week Assessment: case analysis (20%), class leadership presentation (10%), in-class activity and quiz (10%), mid-term exam (15%), final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Do you have an Emerging Market Strategy? This is a question that an increasingly large number of company managers, especially in the developed western world, are trying to answer. This unit lays the foundations of strategy making in emerging markets, with an emphasis on four of the largest emerging markets of the world today - Brazil, Russia, India and China - often termed as the BRIC countries. Utilising frameworks from mainstream strategy and international business disciplines, the unit analyses emerging markets from the perspective of primarily two simultaneous phenomena - multinationals from developed markets trying to tap into emerging markets, and companies from emerging markets globalising their operations and consequently changing the global competitive landscape.
IBUS6020 Enterprise Management in China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Prohibitions: CHSC6902 Assessment: class participation (10%), group presentation (10%), in-class exam (10%), group case project (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit focuses on China's globalising business environment from an enterprise perspective by analysing the way in which enterprises are embedded in a dynamic economic, legal and political environment and the consequences that arise for enterprise management and entrepreneurship. The unit combines theoretical analysis of the interrelationship of markets, firms and institutions with detailed, practical case studies of domestic and transnational business activities. Students are able to familiarise themselves with different types of enterprises including the local private sector, state-owned enterprises and foreign owned enterprises operating in China as well as Chinese enterprises expanding into global markets through joint ventures, strategic alliances and mergers and acquisitions.
IBUS6022 Business and Management in India

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: take home case analysis (30%), critical summary (20%), final report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
India has gained prominence in last two decades and largely viewed as second to China in the development race. While India has significantly liberalised its economy, it remains a difficult market to successfully penetrate and offers unique challenges and opportunities. This unit focuses on achieving a comprehensive understanding of India as a significant global actor and unravel the complexities of the market it represents. Particular emphasis is given to India's institutional environment that epitomises the market conditions for local and international business to succeed in India as well as enhance their global competitiveness. Furthermore, this unit focuses on individual and firm level attributes that are necessary to survive and prosper in the Indian marketplace. How Indian businesses are globalising their operations on the basis of unique competencies is also discussed.
MKTG6013 International and Global Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: midterm (15%), participation (15%), written report and reflection (23%), oral presentation (10%), research component (2%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to give students an understanding of international marketing concepts by using the framework of marketing mix elements of product, price, distribution and promotions, and highlights their importance in a rapidly changing global economy. Topics include the 'scope and environmental factors (PEST)' including 'culture'; 'globalisation verses internationalisation and multinational corporations'; 'international and global products, services and brands', 'market size assessment'; 'foreign market selection'; 'foreign market entry mode'; 'pricing for international markets'; 'international distribution channels'; and 'international promotions (global vs. multinational approaches) and strategies'. Understanding these concepts help students develop skills in designing and implementing marketing strategies in diverse international country contexts.

Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Foundational unit of study
ITLS5000 Foundations of Supply Chain Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3 hr lectures, 5 x 3 hr tutorials Prohibitions: TPTM6155 or TPTM5001 Assessment: Individual report (20%), group report (30%), quiz (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Logistics and supply chain management functions can account for as much as half of the total costs of running a business. The success of a firm¿s logistic and supply chain management not only impacts on the profitability of a firm but also has a significant and growing impact on customer experience and satisfaction. Logistics and supply chain management plays a major role in implementing organisational strategy and in many industries has sole responsibility for managing customer service. An understanding of the role of this activity within an organisation and how improving logistics and supply chains can assist business managers to better respond to market opportunities is essential for business students. Students undertaking this unit are given a solid grounding in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management, and how knowledge of these concepts contributes towards a strategically effective and operationally efficient organisation or network of organisations.
Elective units of study
ITLS5200 Quantitative Logistics and Transport

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr computer workshop per week Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 Prohibitions: TPTM6495 Assessment: readiness assuranceness assessments (10%); computer exam (25%); individual report (25%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Supply chain management as well as logistics, transport and infrastructure management relies on the ability to make effective decisions based on the information provided by careful analysis of data. Students undertaking this unit will develop a strong understanding of the basic techniques underpinning quantitative analysis and will develop highly marketable skills in spreadsheet modelling and the communication and presentation of data to support management decision making. This unit emphasises the practical aspects of quantitative analysis with computer based workshops. Students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making but emphasis is placed on how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis. The unit covers demand forecasting, spreadsheet modelling, optimisation of production and transportation using linear programming, simulation and basic statistics and linear regression techniques.
ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr computer labs. Prerequisites: ITLS5200 or TPTM6495 or STAT5002 Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM6495 Prohibitions: TPTM6190 Assessment: 2x computer exams (40%), assignments (40%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Successful supply chain management relies upon informed decision making. This unit explores a range of important decisions, and equips students with a toolkit of models and analytical methods that can assist in making informed decisions. The first set of decisions concern supply chain design and strategy, and includes network design and facility location. These decisions provide structure to the supply chain, set the boundaries within which planning decisions will be made, and impact on supply chain performance over the long term. In contrast, planning decisions provide value over the medium and short term. Here, this unit will cover aggregate planning, sales and operations planning, and inventory control. Special attention will be placed on how to handle uncertainty and risk within the supply chain.
ITLS6003 Contemporary Procurement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 x 3 hr lectures, 8 hr workshop, 1 x 3 hr industry forum Corequisites: ITLS5200 or QBUS5001 Prohibitions: TPTM6400 Assumed knowledge: Basic ability to work with Excel is assumed. Assessment: quiz (30%), group presentation (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Procurement practitioners have to be able to generate insights from large volumes of transactional, aggregate, structured and unstructured data resulting from growing stakeholder needs, the globalisation of supply markets, evolving regulatory environments and relevant technological changes. This unit explores challenges in procurement practice using real procurement spend data from organisations with different strategic priorities. Students gain an appreciation of spend analysis techniques involving large datasets and an understanding of how the insights are applied in the context of category strategies, sourcing risk management, negotiations and ethical sourcing. The usefulness of large volumes of both structured and unstructured data for input to procurement strategy is explored. The unit includes an industry-led workshop and certificate component and is suitable for both early career procurement professionals as well as students interested in the application of data analytics in procurement.
ITLS6007 Disaster Relief Operations

Credit points: 6 Session: Winter Main Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr workshops. Prohibitions: TPTM6390 Assessment: Individual essay (25%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Large scale, sudden onset disasters strike with little or no warning. In their wake they leave shattered infrastructure, collapsed services and traumatised populations, while the number of dead, injured and homeless often reaches staggering proportions. Humanitarian aid organisations, such as the Red Cross, Doctors without Borders or Oxfam, to name just a few, are usually amongst the first responders, but depend on extremely agile supply chains to support their worldwide operations. Successful disaster relief missions are characterised by the ability of professionals to cope with time pressure, high uncertainty and unusual restrictions. This unit is designed as an introduction to the coordination and management of humanitarian aid and emergency response logistics. Case studies of real events, such as the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake provide the framework for analysis and research, while discussion of operational factors, simulations, workshops and group exercises offer students an interactive learning environment.
ITLS6008 Production and Operations Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3hr lectures, 4x 3hr tutorials Corequisites: ITLS5000 Assessment: individual quiz 1 (15%); individual quiz 2 (15%); case study report (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Production and operations management designs, operates, and improves the processes and systems through which products are made and delivered. Firms can improve their productivity and gain competitive advantage through effective and innovative production and operations management. This unit offers a thorough examination of various production and operations management concepts from a supply chain perspective. The key teaching topics include operations planning hierarchy, resource management, capacity planning, quality management, retail operations, sustainable/green operations, and reverse logistics. Students learn about the successful production and operations management practices that have helped organisations improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their supply chains and create competitive advantage.
ITLS6101 Global Freight Logistics Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 7 x 3 hr lectures, 6 x 3 hr workshops Prohibitions: TPTM6440 Assessment: Individual report (25%); quiz (30%); group presentation (30%); individual case discussion (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an understanding of the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, rail, trucking, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit covers underlying supply chain drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different freight transport modes, as well as industry structure, institutional environment (customs, etc.) and market access. Building on this background the unit highlights the implications for profitable international logistics operations. The unit focuses on corporate strategies around fleet and network planning as well as revenue and cost management. The material covered in the unit takes into account recent developments in global and regional economic activity and discusses implications for the various sectors of the air, sea and intermodal freight businesses. This unit involves case studies and industry presentations, and analysis from the perspectives of shippers, carriers, end customers, regulatory bodies and investors.
ITLS6107 Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 7 x 2 hr lectures, 7 x 4 hr computer labs Prohibitions: TPTM6180 Assessment: individual projects (40%); group project (20%); group presentation (10%); final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
The world is increasingly filled with systems, devices and sensors collecting large amounts of data on a continual basis. Most of these data are associated with locations that represent everything from the movement of individuals travelling between activities to the flow of goods or transactions along a supply chain and from the location of companies to those of their current and future customers. Taking this spatial context into account transforms analyses, problem solving and provides a powerful method of visualising the world. This is the essence of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and this unit. This unit starts by introducing students to the 'building blocks' of GIS systems, including data structures, relational databases, spatial queries and analysis. The focus then moves on to sources of spatial data including Global Positioning System (GPS), operational systems such as smartcard ticketing and transaction data along with web-based sources highlighting both the potential and challenges associated with integrating each data source within a GIS environment. The unit is hands-on involving learning how to use the latest GIS software to analyse several problems of interest using real 'big data' sources and to communicate the results in a powerful and effective way. These include identifying potential demand for new services or infrastructure, creating a delivery and scheduling plan for a delivery firm or examining the behaviour of travellers or consumers over time and locations. This unit is aimed at students interested in the spatial impact of decision-making and on the potential for using large spatial datasets for in-depth multi-faceted analytics.

Marketing

Foundational unit of study
MKTG5001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: in-semester exam(s) (25%), final exam (35%), team project (30%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces students to basic principles and language of marketing theory and practice. Marketing principles are examined in relation to a wide variety of products and services, in both commercial and non-commercial domains. An emphasis is placed on strategy planning and the marketing decision process. It is an introduction to the issues and terminology of marketing that can serve as a standalone understanding of the basics of marketing or as a foundation unit for further study in marketing. The unit focuses on the practical analysis marketing and the marketing management process and the development of the marketing mix the components that make up a marketing plan.
Compulsory unit of study
MKTG6007 Consumer Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: class participation (15%), oral presentation (15%), written assignment (25%), mid semester exam (15%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit focuses on the concepts, processes and theories that assist marketing managers in enacting a consumer-centric approach to marketing. Students learn to apply the concepts, principles, and theories from various social sciences to the study of factors that influence the acquisition, consumption and disposition of goods, services and experiences. Specifically, principles from economics, psychology, sociology, social psychology, cultural anthropology etc. are used to describe and explain consumer behaviour.
Elective units of study
CLAW6032 Regulating Innovation and Distribution

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: class participation and engagement (20%); individual assignment (30%); group assignment: presentation (20%); group assignment: research paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Business today operates in an increasingly complex and constantly changing environment in which success depends on the ability to innovate and compete. This unit examines three key legal frameworks - intellectual property, fair trading and competition law - within which innovation and contestability in markets takes place. Intellectual property regulation seeks to promote invention and creativity and to discourage imitation and free riding. Fair trading regulation provides standards of conduct for B2B and B2C transactions. Competition law promotes fair markets by prohibiting practices which damage competition. The unit focuses on franchising as a business model, to provide the context to examine how these regulatory frameworks operate and interact in a commercial environment.
MKTG6001 Marketing Research Concepts

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: in-semester exams(s) (20%), final exam (30%), project (stage 1) (20%), project (stage 2) (20%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to marketing research and an overview of the industry. The major components of marketing research projects are discussed and students gain an insight into understanding and structuring research problems. The unit also gives an overview of primary, secondary and internal sources of data as well as advanced methods and techniques of research.
MKTG6003 Marketing Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: final exam (40%), team project (20%), presentation (10%), class and blackboard particiapation (20%), reflection (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a survey of marketing strategy and planning. It critically evaluates key marketing strategy concepts such as SWOT analysis; alternative identification and evaluation; marketing research to inform strategic decision making; selection of alternatives and implementation of strategy and the role of the marketing mix elements in marketing strategy. It also critically evaluates sustainable and non-sustainable advantages.
MKTG6004 New Product Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: in-semester exam(s) (20%), final exam (30%), project (28%), presentation (10%) class participation (12%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. Students are introduced to the development and marketing of new products and services in both the private and public sectors. A product development assignment is carried out to reinforce the material covered and to provide realistic examples of how new products are designed, tested and launched.
MKTG6005 Marketing Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: Intensive - 6 days, 9:30am-5pm Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: in-class participation (10%), assignment (25%), assignment (30%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit provides a theoretical and practical perspective on the role of integrated marketing communications in the marketing process, planning and implementation. The unit focuses on the role of different media (e.g. television, radio, print, outdoor, cinema, Internet, mobile and social media) and covers various aspects of advertising and promotions management including: mass media advertising, online, mobile, social media, in-store advertising, sales promotion, public relations, sponsorships, and personal selling.
MKTG6006 Creative Communications in Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block intensive - 6 days, 9am - 4:30pm Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: class participation (15%), assignment (25%), assignment (25%), exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There has been a steady shift in the focus of creative communication decisions away from traditional advertising agencies to specialist creative services providers. Alternative ways to produce, implement and monitor creative communications have been developed. This unit explores changes that have taken place and focuses on new principles of developing and evaluating creative communications. Topics include: developments in media and modes of delivery; implications of the shift from ownership towards access; the role of the visual in cross cultural marketing; attitudinal monitoring; identifying creative issues and developing creative marketing material; the client relationship; examining areas of contention in creative communications and working with creative strategies.
MKTG6013 International and Global Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: midterm (15%), participation (15%), written report and reflection (23%), oral presentation (10%), research component (2%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to give students an understanding of international marketing concepts by using the framework of marketing mix elements of product, price, distribution and promotions, and highlights their importance in a rapidly changing global economy. Topics include the 'scope and environmental factors (PEST)' including 'culture'; 'globalisation verses internationalisation and multinational corporations'; 'international and global products, services and brands', 'market size assessment'; 'foreign market selection'; 'foreign market entry mode'; 'pricing for international markets'; 'international distribution channels'; and 'international promotions (global vs. multinational approaches) and strategies'. Understanding these concepts help students develop skills in designing and implementing marketing strategies in diverse international country contexts.
MKTG6015 Digital and Social Media Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: presentation (30%), assignment (30%), exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to emerging interactive technologies, most notably social media tools, and discusses ways in which these technologies can be exploited by businesses to more effectively serve markets. The unit examines how marketing-related functions are changed by the potential of these technologies, and how these new technologies can become key components of the organisation's strategic marketing efforts. This unitstarts from the premise that savvy consumers are increasingly participating in brands rather than merely receiving their messages, and explores how marketers can stoke conversations, co-create experiences and stories, and build engaging relationships with consumers.
MKTG6016 Brand Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: mid semester exam (20%), class participation (10%), assignment (35%), exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The most important intangible asset of any business is its brand. The company's name, symbols and slogans along with their underlying associations, perceived quality, name awareness, customer base and related proprietary resources form the basis for brand equity. Most new brands that are introduced, fail because of the lack of proper market research and analysis about positioning. The core of successfully establishing a brand lies in accurate positioning strategies. This unit helps students understand the concept of brand equity and the management of brand assets by learning to strategically create, position, develop and protect brand equity.
MKTG6018 Customer Analytics and Relationship Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Mid-term exam (20%), final exam (30%), team presentation (10%), CRM program report (20%), case write-up (10%), attendance and in-class discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There have been two fundamental shifts in the focus of business and marketing strategy. On the one hand, companies have become more focused on managing relationships with their customers over an extended period of time. On the other hand, more than any time in history companies' decisions become more data-driven due to the exponential increase in the volume of data on customers, competitors and markets. To obtain, retain and grow a customer base, it is crucial to know how to obtain customer information and how to make sense of it. This unit introduces students to fundamental concepts of customer relationship management and state-of-art analytics and how to apply these to real world business problems. The unit covers topics including understanding customer relationships, implementing strategic customer relationship management, handling and analysing customer-related databases, increasing customer profitability based on actionable insights gained from customer data, and giving more value to data through visualisation. Students also gain statistical skills, however, no prior knowledge of statistics is required.
MKTG6020 Business Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Intensive mode Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: B2B simulation (25%), written reflection on simulation (30%), presentation (15%), written report (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Business marketing is concerned with the marketing of products and services to other businesses and institutions. It involves selecting, developing and managing customer relationships in line with the skills, resources, strategy and objectives of both the supplier and customer companies. Traditionally, business marketing was approached using the '4P's' framework. This unit exposes students not only to the traditional view but contrasts that approach with the interactions, relationships and networks approach to business marketing. The unit aims to develop students into more complete marketers, capable of operating within the dynamic business marketing environment.
MKTG6104 The Psychology of Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Prohibitions: MKTG5002 Assessment: class participation (10%), minor assignment (20%), presetation (10%), project (25%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Given limitations in their ability to process information, humans adopt a variety of heuristics or "rules of thumb" when making judgements or decisions regarding business problems, product choice and consumption options, and in their personal lives. The evolution of these heuristics over time has ensured that they produce generally good outcomes across a variety of contexts. However, they also lead to systematic, and sometimes substantial, errors in certain cases. This unit of study helps students understand biases in human decision making, and how they influence business and consumer decisions in everyday life. For each decision domain, the psychological heuristic is contrasted with the logical rule for producing an optimal outcome.

People, Management and Organisations

Foundational unit of study
WORK5003 Management and Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: quiz (10%), assignment (20%), essay (35%), participation (10%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to introduce students to the nature and context of management. It explores the functions and processes of management and encourages students to critically reflect on management theory and practice. It can be taken as a standalone unit for students enrolled in various specialist masters programs and also prepares students for further study in strategic management, organisational analysis and strategy and human resource management.
Elective units of study
WORK6001 Organisational Analysis and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: presentation (20%), essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit introduces students to the behaviour of people when acting as members of an organisation. The aim of the unit is to provide an understanding of the processes and structures that influence organisational behaviour, by drawing on ideas from psychology, sociology, management and anthropology. Topics covered include: personality and the self; learning and socialisation; motivation and commitment; group behaviour and dynamics; organisational design and boundaries; organisational culture, change and leadership.
WORK6002 Strategic Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2b Classes: Semester 1b: Intensive - TBA; Semester 2: 1 x 3hr seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: seminar-based assessment (20%), case study assessment (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block mode
The aim of this unit is to introduce the concept of strategy and explain its role in the management of organisations. The unit thus traces the development of strategic management as a field and examines different approaches to strategic management. WORK6002 introduces students to the classical strategy process of strategic analysis, strategy formulation and strategy implementation. This involves learning about and working with a range of strategy models and tools that can be used in the strategic management of organisations. In particular, a range of case studies is used to explore the practical application of these tools. The unit also critically examines traditional views of strategy by introducing a range of current debates in the strategy field.
WORK6012 Industrial Relations Policy

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive October Classes: Intensive - TBA Assessment: presentation (30%), end of unit quiz (20%), policy essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The aim of this unit is to provide an understanding of the policy debates in employment relations with an emphasis on laws, institutions and social processes. It combines theoretical and historical understandings of employment relations in Australia with a detailed examination of the current policies and strategies of the key employment relations players and the role of the state. Topics covered include: the regulatory framework, state and federal governments policies, union policy, employer policy, the practices of Australia's industrial tribunals and responses to current challenges, such as the quest for improved productivity and greater flexibility. Overarching themes include individualisation and decentralisation of employment relations policy in Australia and whether there are more suitable alternatives.
WORK6017 Human Resource Strategies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: group presentation (10%), group report (10%), essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for the MHRM and IR
This unit examines the theoretical foundations of strategic human resource management and then critically analyses the empirical evidence related to a range of HR strategies deployed in contemporary workplaces, both in Australia and internationally. In doing so, the unit explores the issues underpinning emerging HR strategies, their implementation and the outcomes experienced within the organisation and the wider environment. The HR strategies studied involve those that focus on managing a contemporary workforce and may include human resources strategies associated with: the management of front line workers, teams, non standard forms of employment, job quality and work-life balance, and gender and diversity at work, for example.
WORK6018 International Industrial Relations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Intensive Assessment: minor essay (10%), major essay (30%), seminar presentation (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides students with insights into the debate about the effect of globalisation on employment relations by using comparative analysis to identify the range of factors that account for similarities and difference in national patterns of industrial relations. The unit focuses on providing an understanding of the nature of industrial relations patterns in developed and developing market economies and invites students to compare a range of developments across these countries.
WORK6026 Organisational Change and Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: assignment 1 (35%), assignment 2 (15%), presentation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit seeks to develop diagnostic and prescriptive skills in relation to the management of organisational change while also encouraging the adoption of a critical perspective of the field. Part 1 (Organisational Change and the Nature of Organisations) introduces the fields of organisational change, explains its relevance to organisation performance and strategy and examines key change management models. Part 2 (Diagnosis and Intervention) examines the utility of key organisational change models and techniques and identifies factors that may impact on the effectiveness of the change management process. Part 3 (Key Areas of Intervention) analyses the application of organisational change practices and initiatives to a number of specific organisational issues.
WORK6030 Performance and Rewards

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2b Classes: Intensive Assessment: participation (10%), tests (20%), assignment (40%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit examines the processes and practices associated with contemporary performance and reward management. Results-based, behaviourally-based and competency-based methods of performance management are examined, along with processes of performance review, planning and developing. Coverage of reward management issues includes: job- and person-based approaches to building base pay structures; methods for rewarding individual performance; work group incentives such as gainsharing, goal-sharing and team pay; methods of rewarding employees for organisational performance, including employee share ownership; and performance-related rewards for executives. The unit also examines approaches to developing strategically integrated performance and reward management systems.
WORK6033 Organisational Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Intensive Prohibitions: ECOF6110 or CLAW6028 Assessment: tests (30%), assignment (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Organisational sustainability is a critical part of contemporary managerial practice, focusing on organisations' economical, social and environmental impact. This unit critically evaluates the intentions, practices and outcomes of organisational sustainability initiatives. By applying relevant theoretical frameworks, students are encouraged to enhance their understanding of the role and responsibilities of management, the impact of organisations on employees, and the wider societal and environmental implications of contemporary organisational trends. With an emphasis on the human dimensions of organisational actions, this unit builds on foundational units of study in Management, Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management.
WORK6108 International Dimensions of HRM

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Intensive Assessment: assignment 1 (40%), assignment 2 (25%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit considers the opportunities and challenges associated with managing people in international and cross-cultural contexts, with specific emphasis on international recruitment, selection, preparation, placement, management development, performance management, reward and remuneration. The unit considers the implications of internationalisation and globalisation for human resource management (HRM), the different levels of international business activity, the difference between domestic and international HRM, the challenges of cross-cultural management, models of cross-cultural management, and specific international HR processes, including selection, development, performance management, remuneration and repatriation. The unit provides students with a practical understanding of the issues and challenges associated with managing employees in international, global and cross-cultural contexts.
WORK6115 Managing Diversity at Work

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2a Classes: intensive: 6 days, 9am - 5pm Assessment: facilitation (15%), assignment 1 (10%), assignment 2 (30%), participation (5%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit examines the ways in which organisations manage a heterogeneous workforce and the legal and ethical issues associated with the management of workforce diversity. While drawing on international literature in the field, the primary focus is on the Australian experience, including the so-called 'program' approach and the complaint mechanism found in the anti-discrimination statutes. As well as encouraging the development of diagnostic and prescriptive skills in diversity management, students also have the opportunity to develop a critical perspective on the growing literature in this field.
WORK6116 Employment and the Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: presentation (20%), essay (30%), final exam (40%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This unit is not available for students enrolled in the Master of Labour Law Relations
This unit of study examines the legal framework with respect to labour relations in Australia. In particular it examines the scope of industrial law, the employment relationship, the Federal-State division of legislative power in industrial relations and the industrial arbitration systems, courts, tribunals, agreements and awards. Current developments in the law and politics of the systems will be referred to throughout the course.
WORK6118 Managing Communication in Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture and 1 x 2hr seminar per week Prohibitions: ECOF6030 or ECOF6040 Assessment: assignment 1 (35%), assignment 2 (15%), presentation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit students learn theories of communication and how they apply within organisations, at an organisational, team and individual level. In the unit we review the concept of communication through different theoretical and philosophical lenses, so that students gain an understanding of how different perspectives provide different insights into communication within organisations. The unit also examines communication processes and how communication occurs between individuals and within groups. There is also a focus on communication challenges such as technology, diversity and globalisation. The unit incorporates practical exercises and case studies to enable students to evaluate their own communication practices and to apply the knowledge and understanding they gain from the unit to their own organisations and careers.
WORK6120 Research Essay

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervision Assessment: research essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Available only to students who have achieved 75% or better in at least four WORK (or equivalent) units studied; and have the Discipline's permission to take the unit.
This unit provides high-performing students with the opportunity to undertake supervised reading and research for a major essay of 5,000 words on an approved topic of special interest in work and organisational studies. The unit centres on supervised individual reading and research rather than on class-based teaching and learning. Enrolment is limited to students who (a) have achieved 75% or better in at least four WORK (or equivalent) units studied; and (b) have the Discipline's permission to do so. Approval is subject to supervisor availability. Students contemplating enrolment in this unit must first seek approval from the Work and Organisational Studies Postgraduate Coursework Coordinator. Approval will depend on the nature of the proposed essay topic and the availability of appropriate supervisory expertise.
WORK6130 Leadership in Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ECOF5807 or ECOF6090 Assessment: presentation (30%), assignment (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is designed to encourage students to consider the role and significance of leadership in various organisational contexts. The unit introduces the major streams of leadership theory and traces the development of our understanding about leadership. The unit explores how these theories allow us to understand leadership in practice and in what ways leadership is linked to different aspects of organisational effectiveness. It then examines the 'good, the bad, and the ugly' sides of leadership, e.g. positive forms (transformational, charismatic) and negative forms (narcissistic and Machiavellian). The unit explores leading for diversity and diversity in leadership (e.g. based on gender, culture and ethnicity) and the role of leaders in constituting ethical and socially responsible organisations. The critical role of leaders in effecting organisational change is explored and the leadership of top management teams, and leadership succession is examined. The unit also examines leadership development programs and instruments and students have an opportunity to reflect on factors that might influence their own leadership style.

Project Management

Foundational unit of study
INFS5001 Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1 and Semester 2: 1 x 3hr seminar per week; Summer School: 3 x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFS6014 Assessment: Semester 1 and Semester 2: group assignment (25%), individual assignment (30%), exam (45%); Summer School: individual assignment (50%), exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block mode
Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) this unit introduces the end-to-end project management lifecycle. Students learn how to select appropriate projects based on their alignment with an organisation's strategy and then how to manage those projects successfully from initiation through execution to completion. The unit covers the essential components of effective project management and how to apply them in an integrated manner. The unit also explores both the technical and behavioural aspects of project management - including Microsoft Project - and students gain experience in critically analysing the application of concepts in specific project contexts. As organisations increasingly structure their activities on a project basis, the unit is of value to a range of discipline specialisations. The unit can also contribute to achievement of internationally recognised accreditation from the Project Management Institute (PMI).
Compulsory unit of study
INFS6030 Project Management in Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: INFS5001 Assessment: critical analysis of a project (10%), critical analysis of a project management article (30%), development of project documentation (A) (20%), development of project documentation (B) (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This is a compulsory unit for the Project Management Specialisation in the Master of Commerce program.
Drawing upon the knowledge and skills developed from other units in the project management specialisation, this unit examines project management in practice. Students' understanding and experience of real work projects is enhanced by undertaking structured assessments of historical projects in a variety of contexts and partaking in various team-based learning activities. Contemporary alternative methodological approaches are also examined. Students learn how these methodological approaches are currently applied in industry to include a presentation from a project management expert practitioner.
Elective units of study
IBUS6002 Cross-Cultural Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: Participation (10%), culture report (10%), case study (20%), mid-semester exam (in class) (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
An understanding of cultural differences and how to manage such differences is critical to effective management in international and multi-cultural business environments. The aim of this unit is to provide conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that will develop an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact on management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management, the meaning and dimensions of culture, comparative international management and leadership styles, managing communication across cultures, ethics and social responsibility in global management, cross-cultural negotiation and decision-making, forming and managing global teams, and developing the international and global manager.
INFS6004 Business Transformation Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: Understanding the major functions of a business and how those business functions interact internally and externally so the company can be competitive in a changing market. How Information Systems can be used and managed in a business. How to critically analyse a business and determine its options for transformation. Desirable Experience as a member of a project team. Assessment: assignment 1 (10%), assignment 2 (40%), assignment 3 - report (40%), assignment 3 - presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The forces that currently drive business transformation, such as globalisation, the IT revolution and environmental sustainability, require businesses to be in a constant state of change to stay competitive in turbulent markets. However, as companies need to maintain their current revenue streams, they need to progress through a series of integrated business transformation projects. In this unit students learn how to analyse an organisation within a local and global context and develop knowledge of techniques required for managing technology-enabled business transformation projects. Topics covered include: the drivers of business transformation, managing change as a process, analysing information and processes, and planning, leading, sustaining, diffusing and learning from transformational projects.
INFS6032 Agile Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: weekly learing journals (30%), in-class agile activities (15%), agile group project report (25%), essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Traditional approaches to project management and design work well under stable conditions, when intended outcomes are well understood. Yet, under conditional of market disruption, in innovation projects, new product development or for start-up businesses, traditional methods are often restrictive and inflexible. Agile Project Management and Design Thinking offer alternative approaches that value continuous change, flexibility, time-to-market, interactive learning and self-organisation over rigorous planning and design processes. In this unit you will learn the ethos, principles, and methods of agile project management and design thinking. You will experience hands-on techniques such as design thinking, learn management and Scrum as applied in practice. Learning will revolve around practical activities, insights from experienced guest speakers and case studies representing various industries.
ITLS6500 Decision Making on Mega Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 8 x 3.5 hr lectures, 4 x 3.5 hr workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 or INFS5001 Assessment: 2x individual assignments (40%), group assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Infrastructure is crucial to economic performance; without it business cannot operate efficiently or competitively. Delivery of large infrastructure projects, however, is complex and despite many more megaprojects being undertaken than any time in history, the majority of these projects are completed significantly over?budget and longer than planned. In this unit students will be introduced to megaproject decision making. The sources of social and technical complexity are discussed, issues of risk management and governance explored, and human biases in decision making are also highlighted. Strategies to overcome weaknesses in mega?project decision making are also outlined.
MKTG6004 New Product Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: MKTG5001 Assessment: in-semester exam(s) (20%), final exam (30%), project (28%), presentation (10%) class participation (12%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. Students are introduced to the development and marketing of new products and services in both the private and public sectors. A product development assignment is carried out to reinforce the material covered and to provide realistic examples of how new products are designed, tested and launched.
QBUS6320 Management Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hrs of classes ('lecturial' - combination lecture/tutorial) per week Prohibitions: ECOF6070 or ECOF5804 or ECMT6310 or ECMT5003 Assessment: assignment 1 (25%), assignment 2 (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces models and tools for decision analysis and their application in managerial settings. The unit focuses on the use of formal decision methods for management decisions in business. The main goal is to show how these decision models can improve the decision process by helping the decision maker to understand the structure of decisions; use subjective probabilities for measuring risk; analyse sensitivity of decisions to changing decision parameters; quantify outcomes in accordance with risk attitudes; and estimate the value of information. Special attention is paid to informal interpretations of formal decision approaches.
WORK6118 Managing Communication in Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture and 1 x 2hr seminar per week Prohibitions: ECOF6030 or ECOF6040 Assessment: assignment 1 (35%), assignment 2 (15%), presentation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit students learn theories of communication and how they apply within organisations, at an organisational, team and individual level. In the unit we review the concept of communication through different theoretical and philosophical lenses, so that students gain an understanding of how different perspectives provide different insights into communication within organisations. The unit also examines communication processes and how communication occurs between individuals and within groups. There is also a focus on communication challenges such as technology, diversity and globalisation. The unit incorporates practical exercises and case studies to enable students to evaluate their own communication practices and to apply the knowledge and understanding they gain from the unit to their own organisations and careers.

Quantitative Finance

Foundational units of study
FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid semester-test (20%), major assignment (25%), and final examination (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block
This unit provides an introduction to basic concepts in corporate finance and capital markets. It is designed to equip students to undertake further studies in finance. After reviewing some very basic ideas in finance and financial mathematics, the unit provides an introduction to the valuation of equity and debt securities and companies. The unit then examines issues related to pricing in capital markets and ends with a discussion of theory and practice related to capital structure and dividend policy.
QBUS5001 Quantitative Methods for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ECMT5001 or QBUS5002 Assumed knowledge: Basic calculus; basic concepts of probability & statistics Assessment: weekly homework (10%), assignment (20%), mid-semester exam (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit highlights the importance of statistical methods and tools for today's managers and analysts, and demonstrates how to apply these methods to business problems using real-world data. The quantitative skills that students learn in this unit are useful in all areas of business. Through taking this unit students learn how to model and analyse the relationships within business data; how to identify the appropriate statistical technique in different business environments; how to compute statistics by hand and using special purpose software; how to interpret results in the context of the business problem; and how to forecast using business data. The unit is taught through data-driven examples, exercises and business case studies.
Compulsory units of study
FINC6000 Quantitative Finance and Derivatives

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Prohibitions: FINC5002 Assumed knowledge: This unit requires students to have some background in calculus, matrices, statistics and probability. Assessment: assignment (20%), mid-semester exam (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides students with an introduction to quantitative models and techniques in finance. Topics covered include basic stochastic calculus, probability measures and the role of numeraires, Black-Scholes and Hull-White models, and the theoretical and numerical techniques for valuing derivatives. There is a focus on both the intuitive and mathematical understanding of these topics, as well as their application to problems in quantitative finance.
QBUS6830 Financial Time Series and Forecasting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial Prerequisites: ECMT5001 or QBUS5001 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of quantitative methods including statistics, basic probability theory, and introductory regression analysis. Assessment: Mid-semester exam (20%), group assignment (40%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Time series and statistical modelling is a fundamental component of the theory and practice of modern financial asset pricing as well as financial risk measurement and management. Further, forecasting is a required component of financial and investment decision making. This unit provides an introduction to the time series models used for the analysis of data arising in financial markets. It then considers methods for forecasting, testing and sensitivity analyses, in the context of these models. Topics include: the properties of financial return data; the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM); financial return factor models, with known and unknown factors, in panel data settings; modelling and forecasting conditional volatility, via ARCH and GARCH; forecasting market risk measures such as Value at Risk. Emphasis is placed on applications involving the analysis of many real market datasets. Students are encouraged to undertake hands-on analysis using an appropriate computing package.
Elective units of study
FINC6005 Advanced Asset Pricing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 or FINC5002 or FINC6000 Assessment: 2 x In class test (2x15%), assignment (20%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Only students with strong quantitative/mathematical skills should attempt this course
This unit covers the fundamentals of asset pricing and valuation, under equilibrium conditions and under no-arbitrage restrictions. It reviews the main themes in modern asset pricing, and introduce ideas of importance to the evolution of the discipline, and consequently of relevance to a practitioner's long term perspective. The unit emphasises quantitative methods, so students are required to have fairly strong mathematical skills. Nevertheless, the mathematical tools needed in the unit are adequately reviewed.
FINC6009 Portfolio Theory and its Applications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 or FINC5002 or FINC6000 Assessment: mid semester exam (20%), individual assignment (15%), group assignment (15%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers several aspects of modern/post modern portfolio theory.An introduction to mathematical optimisation techniques in the presence of uncertainty is covered and results from modern portfolio theory to the Capital Asset Pricing Model derived. The unit also examines other popular models such as the Arbitrage Pricing Theory and Black-Litterman Model and concludes with some topical examples from industry. There is a degree of mathematical sophistication associated with this unit and consequently students should be comfortable with a mathematical approach. However, the required mathematical tools are covered in the unit.
FINC6014 Fixed Income Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), group assignment (25%), and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the concepts required for investment in fixed income securities, managing bond portfolios and understanding debt markets. Topics covered include duration, convexity, interest rate risk, bond volatility and the term structure of interest rates. The more complex types of debt securities studied include mortgage backed securities, corporate bonds with embedded options such as convertible bonds and interest rate derivatives.
FINC6023 Financial Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: FINC5001 Assessment: Lab exercises (20%), group project (20%), mid semester exam (20%), and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Risk is an integral part of financial decisions. Following the rapid evolution of the discipline of financial risk management, analysts must be prepared to access the level of risk in the marketplace. This unit explores the basic concepts of modelling, measuring and managing financial risks within the regulatory framework. Topics covered include market risk (value-at-risk and expected loss), credit risk (single name, portfolio, ratings and market based models, credit derivatives), liquidity risk and operational risk. To overcome the rather quantitative nature of the topics, the unit relies heavily on practical based lab exercises with emphasis on simulations, real life examples and case studies.

Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Foundational unit of study
IBUS5002 Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: IBUS5001 Assessment: mid-semester test (20%), short essay (20%), group assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This foundation unit provides an introduction to the essential concepts and frameworks relevant to the fields of strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship. Topics covered include the key elements of business strategy, including developing a business mission, understanding the external environment, reviewing internal resources and capabilities, and business and corporate strategy. The importance of entrepreneurial activity and the challenges faced by startup ventures, as well as examples of successful and unsuccessful business innovations, are highlighted. The emphasis of the unit is on understanding the strategic activity of both startup and established businesses with a focus on issues relevant to entrepreneurs as well as business managers.
Compulsory unit of study
WORK6002 Strategic Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2b Classes: Semester 1b: Intensive - TBA; Semester 2: 1 x 3hr seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: seminar-based assessment (20%), case study assessment (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block mode
The aim of this unit is to introduce the concept of strategy and explain its role in the management of organisations. The unit thus traces the development of strategic management as a field and examines different approaches to strategic management. WORK6002 introduces students to the classical strategy process of strategic analysis, strategy formulation and strategy implementation. This involves learning about and working with a range of strategy models and tools that can be used in the strategic management of organisations. In particular, a range of case studies is used to explore the practical application of these tools. The unit also critically examines traditional views of strategy by introducing a range of current debates in the strategy field.
Elective units of study
BUSS6505 NEXT Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1.5hr introductory seminar, 2x 4hr workshops, 2-hour teleconference, anticipated 13 hours contact with an industry mentor, 3.5 hours semi-final and networking event and 11 hours of structured online activity. Prerequisites: Completion of 48 credit points with a WAM of 65% Prohibitions: BUSS6509 or BUSS6510 Assessment: Initial active concept / value proposition (10%), research / prototype report (15%), innovation pitch (3-5min video) + business plan appendix 6-slide PowerPoint (20%), in-person semi finals (10%), participation (20%), and reflection exercise (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The NEXT Innovation program (previously Deloitte FASTRACK) is a globally recognised award-winning innovation program designed to give outstanding business and management students practical experience in business innovation. It has been built up and tested around a structured process specifically for developing a portfolio of market-tested 'business of tomorrow' concepts in a constrained timeframe. The program has been designed as an interactive, work integrated program featuring a mix of instructor presentation, applied reading content, practical application, market testing, assignment and presentation learning methods, supported by a purpose built innovation management system with collaborative social media features. The program allows students to work with Deloitte mentors and aims to replicate a corporate 'innovation community' among the students, corporate mentors, NEXT coordinators and additional participants. Further information and application process is outlined at http://sydney.edu.au/business/study/opportunities/next_innovation_program.
CLAW6032 Regulating Innovation and Distribution

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: class participation and engagement (20%); individual assignment (30%); group assignment: presentation (20%); group assignment: research paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Business today operates in an increasingly complex and constantly changing environment in which success depends on the ability to innovate and compete. This unit examines three key legal frameworks - intellectual property, fair trading and competition law - within which innovation and contestability in markets takes place. Intellectual property regulation seeks to promote invention and creativity and to discourage imitation and free riding. Fair trading regulation provides standards of conduct for B2B and B2C transactions. Competition law promotes fair markets by prohibiting practices which damage competition. The unit focuses on franchising as a business model, to provide the context to examine how these regulatory frameworks operate and interact in a commercial environment.
IBUS6007 International Business Special Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 3 hr seminars day pre-departure seminar (Sydney), 30 hrs lectures in country action-research, 1x 3hr seminar post trip (Sydney) Assessment: Individual Assessments (75%), and Group Assessments (25%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The special project in International Business provides students with an opportunity to undertake a supervised research project on an approved topic.
IBUS6011 New Business Opportunities and Startups

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hr lecture/seminar per week for classes Prohibitions: IBUS5011 or WORK6112 Assumed knowledge: IBUS5002, or completion of at least 24 credit points Assessment: business opportunity and strategy design assignment (35%), start up financials (15%), business plan assignment and presentation (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Being able to identify and exploit new business opportunities is critical to all sizes of businesses. Identifying new markets, developing new products and implementing new business models are highly-regarded and valuable skills for entrepreneurs and business managers alike. This unit is structured around learning from engaged practice in order to explore the special problems and opportunities associated with entrepreneurial start-ups. Students engage with start up and early stage businesses to deliver a plan to help them become profitable. Topics include opportunity recognition, strategy development, business model design, customer acquisition and retention, financial model development, as well as entrepreneurial and creative leadership.
IBUS6012 Business Innovation and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3 hr lecture/seminar per week Assumed knowledge: IBUS5002, or completion of at least 24 credit points Assessment: individual assignment (60%); group assignment (30%); presentations (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Businesses are increasingly challenged for their sustainability. This unit centres on addressing significant business and societal challenges by balancing sustainability and innovation. Topics include current and future challenges of innovation and sustainability for business. This unit is structured around learning from seminar and practice. Students are required to work in a way which delivers sustainability.
IBUS6013 Business Restructuring and Renewal

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assumed knowledge: IBUS5002, or completion of at least 24 credit points Assessment: presentation (15%), mid-semester test (35%), group presentation (15%), major group project (25%: written report - 20%, individual component group report - 5%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Entrepreneurial business opportunities do not always relate to early-stage or start-up businesses. Later-stage business investments, whether buying existing businesses or turning around failing enterprises, are a significant and growing focus of entrepreneurial activity. This unit explores the process of acquiring and reinvigorating established businesses and how to secure private equity funds (leveraged buy-outs) or corporate funding. The focus is on opportunity evaluation, business model innovation, management and revitalisation rather than financial structuring. Students have the opportunity to apply the functional skills learned in core strategy, finance, marketing, and management units to real opportunities. As well as being of interest to those wishing to acquire and manage their own business, the unit is appropriate for those working in 'big' business and the financial markets.
IBUS6015 Entrepreneurship and Innovation Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive March,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar/wk Corequisites: IBUS5002 Assessment: instriuctor update 1 (10%), project proposal (20%), instructor update 2 (10%), report presentation (20%), report documentation (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: All students need to apply for permission to enroll in this unit. Students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate of Innovation and Enterprise, where this unit is core, should note that they are enrolled in this course as their reason for applying for permission to enroll in this unit.
This unit is designed to assist students to develop specialised knowledge and communicative skills in the context of entrepreneurship, innovation and sustainability. Students complete a research project that explores the phenomena of strategy, sustainability and/or entrepreneurship in a context of their choice or as proposed by an academic. This research addresses a specific entrepreneurial problem or opportunity confronting business. For example, these research projects could relate to action research in a remote or rural enterprise, students' own enterprise, or future career. The unit is offered to students undertaking the Graduate Certificate in Innovation and Enterprise, as well as those in the Master of Commerce who successfully apply for special permission.
IBUS6016 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Semester 1: 1x 3h lecture/workshop per week; Intensive sessions: 2 x 3hr lecture/workshops pre- departure (Sydney), 30hrs lecture/workshops in country, 1 x 3hr seminar post trip (Sydney) Assumed knowledge: IBUS5002, or completion of at least 24 credit points Assessment: individual report (25%), practice and final pitch (25%), final report (25%), reflective piece (15%), workshop engagement and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Social entrepreneurs are committed to furthering a social mission through enterprises that rank social, environmental or cultural impact on a par with, or even above, profit. Intersecting the business and not-for profit worlds, social entrepreneurship addresses many complex local and global problems. This unit critically introduces the concept and develops frameworks for understanding social entrepreneurship (also referred to as social enterprise and social innovation). Teaching and learning utilises case studies, and includes the opportunity to apply theory to real-world experiences. Topics include creating innovative social enterprises, sustainable business models, philanthropy and funding, impact assessment, and leadership. The unit is structured around learning from engaged practice, and provides the opportunity to work with social enterprises.
IBUS6018 Business Negotiations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Assessment: in-class exercises (33%), assignment (33%), final exam (34%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Note: this unit requires participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of the grade, will require time-pressured reading of material in class.
This course is aimed at making you feel more comfortable and confident with the negotiation process. The course is taught as a 'flipped classroom', meaning that the content of the course is primarily taught outside of class, through brief written lectures, and class time is used to assimilate that knowledge through at least a dozen marked role-play negotiations, debriefs of those negotiations, problem-solving workshops and international negotiation case study analysis. You will also be taught how to develop your own negotiation strategies and tactics using a combination of multiple psychological, economic and legal concepts from the course.
IBUS6023 Engaged Entrepreneurship Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: classes will include 39 hours contact with heavy emphasis on a mix of seminars, workshops and other sessions. With intensive block mode, students will typically be in-country for a period of 2 weeks, with seminars prior and after departure Prerequisites: IBUS5002 Assessment: Respond to the brief (0%), interim pitch (15%), final pitch (15%), final report (30%), reflective piece (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study will be intensively taught off campus, enabling you to engage deeply with entrepreneurial contexts and opportunities. The unit will be offered in a variety of contexts but could include businesses in cities, towns or remote locations in Australia and Asia. You will work intensively with a business or community to resolve a particular problem, and apply entrepreneurial insights and actions to grow an existing or new enterprise. These problems could be addressed through commercial or social entrepreneurship, and will typically require that you engage with other fields such as architecture or engineering. The focus of the unit is learning with action, and acting with learning - you will cover topics that will ensure you appropriately understand the situation, as well as organisational resources, capabilities and vision. With this understanding you will be challenged to develop an entrepreneurial strategy and funding proposal that can be implemented by the enterprise.
WORK6026 Organisational Change and Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: assignment 1 (35%), assignment 2 (15%), presentation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit seeks to develop diagnostic and prescriptive skills in relation to the management of organisational change while also encouraging the adoption of a critical perspective of the field. Part 1 (Organisational Change and the Nature of Organisations) introduces the fields of organisational change, explains its relevance to organisation performance and strategy and examines key change management models. Part 2 (Diagnosis and Intervention) examines the utility of key organisational change models and techniques and identifies factors that may impact on the effectiveness of the change management process. Part 3 (Key Areas of Intervention) analyses the application of organisational change practices and initiatives to a number of specific organisational issues.

5. Other Business School elective units of study

Business School elective units of study
BUSS5001 Firms, Markets and Business Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr seminar per week Prohibitions: ECON5001 or ECON5002 or ECON5003 or ECOF5010 Assessment: case analyses (50%), class participation (15%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with the tools to understand the impact of economic, socio-cultural, institutional, and technological factors on businesses' operations. Such considerations are crucial for understanding how businesses make decisions and interact in the marketplace. The first part of the unit provides an introduction to macroeconomic and microeconomic analysis and applications. In macroeconomics, we consider determination of the aggregate level of economic activity (GDP and inflation), the economic effects of government policies, and the link between interest rates and exchange rates and the level of economic activity. In microeconomics, we look at economic decision-making by individuals and firms and the determination of prices in different kinds of markets. The next part of the unit investigates wages, as well as the social, cultural, political, and technological environments in which firms operate. It examines theories, models and conceptual tools that help us understand and make decisions in relation to these factors. The unit is complemented by developing an understanding of the complexity of professional behaviour and ethical decision making.
BUSS6505 NEXT Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1.5hr introductory seminar, 2x 4hr workshops, 2-hour teleconference, anticipated 13 hours contact with an industry mentor, 3.5 hours semi-final and networking event and 11 hours of structured online activity. Prerequisites: Completion of 48 credit points with a WAM of 65% Prohibitions: BUSS6509 or BUSS6510 Assessment: Initial active concept / value proposition (10%), research / prototype report (15%), innovation pitch (3-5min video) + business plan appendix 6-slide PowerPoint (20%), in-person semi finals (10%), participation (20%), and reflection exercise (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The NEXT Innovation program (previously Deloitte FASTRACK) is a globally recognised award-winning innovation program designed to give outstanding business and management students practical experience in business innovation. It has been built up and tested around a structured process specifically for developing a portfolio of market-tested 'business of tomorrow' concepts in a constrained timeframe. The program has been designed as an interactive, work integrated program featuring a mix of instructor presentation, applied reading content, practical application, market testing, assignment and presentation learning methods, supported by a purpose built innovation management system with collaborative social media features. The program allows students to work with Deloitte mentors and aims to replicate a corporate 'innovation community' among the students, corporate mentors, NEXT coordinators and additional participants. Further information and application process is outlined at http://sydney.edu.au/business/study/opportunities/next_innovation_program.
Work Integrated Learning (WIL) units of study
(i) Industry Placement Program (IPP) units of study
BUSS6500 Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August,Intensive March,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 hours of pre-placement workshops; 210 hours internship; 2 hour debrief workshop. Prerequisites: 48 credit points with a minimum credit average (65%) Prohibitions: ECOF6500 Assessment: Performance objectives (0%), report (70%), presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employability Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au.
This unit is available to outstanding students completing the Master of Commerce, Master of Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations, and Master of Professional Accounting program. It involves a professional placement with a business, government, or non-government organisation. It includes preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and report writing. Assessment includes a reflective journal and professional report and presentation based on the internship placement. Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Further information and application process is outlined at http://sydney.edu.au/business/study/opportunities/industry_placement_program
BUSS6504 Europe Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 9 hours of pre-placement workshops; 210 hours internship; 2 hour debrief workshop Prerequisites: 48 credit points with a minimum credit average (65%). Assessment: Performance objectives (0%), report (70%), presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employability Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au.
This unit is taken by students accepted into the Europe Industry Placement Program while they undertake a professional placement with a business, government or non-government organisation that has a particular focus on business interests. It includes preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and concurrent coursework on research methods, report and other professional writing skills. Assessment includes a reflective journal, research report related to the work placement, and oral presentations all based on the internship placement and international work and study experience. Further information and application process is outlined at http://sydney.edu.au/business/study/opportunities/industry_placement_program
BUSS6506 China Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive March Classes: 9 hours of pre-placement workshops; 210 hours internship; 2 hour debrief workshop Prerequisites: 48 credit points with a minimum credit average (65%). Assessment: performance objectives (0%), report (70%), presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employability Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au.
This unit is available to students accepted into the china Industry Placement Program while they undertake a professional placement with a business or a government organisation that has a particular focus on business interests. It includes preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and concurrent coursework on research methods, report and other professional writing skills. Assessment includes a reflective journal, a research report related to their work placement, and an oral presentation on the internship placement and international work and study experience. Further information and application process is outlined at http://sydney.edu.au/business/study/opportunities/industry_placement_program
BUSS6511 South America Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 9 hours of pre-placement workshops; 210 hours internship; 2 hour debrief workshop. Prerequisites: 48 credit points with a minimum credit average (65%) Assessment: performance objectives (0%), report (70%), presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employability Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au.
This unit will be taken by students accepted into the Master of Commerce South America Industry Placement Program while they undertake a professional placement with a business or a government or nongovernment organisation that has a particular focus on business interests. It will include preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and concurrent coursework on research methods, report and other professional writing skills. Assessment will include a reflective journal, research report related to their work placement, and oral presentations all based on the internship placement and international work and study experience. Further information and application process is outlined at http://sydney.edu.au/business/study/opportunities/next_innovation_program.
(ii) Community Placement Program (CPP) units of study
BUSS6508 Community Placement Program (Intensive)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Rachael Hains-Wesson Session: Intensive August,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive March Classes: Up to 4 weeks full-time or equivalent placement plus 9 hours pre-placement workshops; 2 hours mid-placement workshop; 2-hour end of placement de-brief workshop. Prerequisites: 48 credit points with a minimum credit average (65%) Prohibitions: BUSS6507 Assessment: learning journal (20%), social business report (25%), project presentation (group)(10%), project presentation (individual) (15%), critical appraisal report (30%) Mode of delivery: Field experience, Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Further information and application process is outlined at http://sydney.edu.au/business/study/opportunities/community_placement_program.
This unit is designed to consolidate students' knowledge and skills in social business while conducting a community-based project placement. During the community placement, students may be involved in a variety of projects, which will afford the opportunity to apply business skills and theories from prior learning. This will provide first-hand experience that demonstrates how these skills and theories can support solving business problems in a practical business and community-engaged context, identifying opportunities, developing strategies and designing processes, procedures and management practices in order to enable a community project to fully realise its mission. Assessed tasks are designed to allow students to demonstrate their ability to apply and synthesise social business concepts while engaged in practical business development.
Dissertation units of study
BUSS7000 Business Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: research Prerequisites: 48 credit points of prior study in the Master of Commerce program with a grade average of at least 80%. Assessment: dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of two (12 credit point) units that together (total of 24 credit points) provide outstanding students in the Commerce program with the opportunity to develop and complete a supervised research dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words, or equivalent, on an approved topic within the domain of business/commerce/management. Admission to the dissertation stream requires an average grade of at least 80% in a minimum of four Commerce units (12 unit program) or a minimum of eight Commerce units (16 unit program), interview by the Program Director, and a formal dissertation proposal agreed to by a nominated supervisor and the Program Director. Final approval is dependent on the nature of the proposed topic and the availability of appropriate supervisory expertise. The dissertation is marked by examiners nominated by the Program Director in consultation with the supervisor and other academics from the relevant discipline/s.
BUSS7001 Business Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: research Prerequisites: 48 credit points of prior study in the Master of Commerce program with a grade average of at least 80%. Assessment: dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is one of two (12 credit point) units that together (total of 24 credit points) provide outstanding students in the Commerce program with the opportunity to develop and complete a supervised research dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words, or equivalent, on an approved topic within the domain of business/commerce/management. Admission to the dissertation stream requires an average grade of at least 80% in a minimum of four Commerce units (12 unit program) or a minimum of eight Commerce units (16 unit program), interview by the Program Director, and a formal dissertation proposal agreed to by a nominated supervisor and the Program Director. Final approval is dependent on the nature of the proposed topic and the availability of appropriate supervisory expertise. The dissertation is marked by examiners nominated by the Program Director in consultation with the supervisor and other academics from the relevant discipline/s.
BUSS7002 Business Dissertation

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: research Prerequisites: 48 credit points of prior study in the Master of Commerce program with a grade average of at least 80%. Assessment: dissertation (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides outstanding students in the Commerce program with the opportunity to develop and complete a supervised research dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words, or equivalent, on an approved topic within the domain of business/commerce/management. Admission to the dissertation stream requires an average grade of at least 80% in a minimum of four Commerce units (12 unit program) or a minimum of eight Commerce units (16 unit program), interview by the Program Director, and a formal dissertation proposal agreed to by a nominated supervisor and the Program Director. Final approval is dependent on the nature of the proposed topic and the availability of appropriate supervisory expertise. The dissertation is marked by examiners nominated by the Program Director in consultation with the supervisor and other academics from the relevant discipline/s.