Units of study descriptions for Commerce coursework programs

The Business School website (sydney.edu.au/business/pgunits/) contains the most up to date information on unit of study availability or other requirements. Timetabling information for 2014 is also available on the faculty website (sydney.edu.au/business/timetable). Students should note that units of study are run subject to demand.

Please note: The following unit of study descriptions are listed alphanumerically by unit code and not by specialisation subject area.

ACCT - Accounting

ACCT5001 Accounting Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ron Day / Cornelia Beck (coordinate in alternative semesters) Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: Mid-semester examination (25%), individual and/or group assignment (25%), and final examination (50%)
This unit provides an introduction to the generally accepted accounting principles and practices underlying financial accounting and reporting. It is intended for both accounting and non-accounting majors. The unit aims to introduce students to the concepts and skills required to prepare, analyse, and interpret financial statements.
Textbooks
Carlon, S., Mladenovic, R., Palm, C., Kimmel, P.D., Weygandt, J.J. Financial Accounting: Building Accounting Knowledge, Wiley.
ACCT5002 Managerial Accounting & Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: Weekly in-class feedback of progressive performance in the development of concept and technique knowledge and its application and business practicals (40%), and final examination (60%)
The unit introduces students to the context and processes of management accounting, using financial and non-financial information to inform a resource-based view of the creation of stakeholder value. Critical business career skills of collaboration, problem solving, persuasive communication and ethical behaviour in difficult situations are fostered across the areas of cost accounting, business performance, and strategic value creation in management accounting. Students get real-world based experience through the application of management accounting techniques to organisational resourcing issues in their competitive and ethical context. The unit emphasises that management accountants have a leadership role in engendering organisational awareness of the value of organisational resources. Students become familiar with the many kinds of managerial accounting decisions concerning the recognition, augmentation, allocation, deployment, leveraging, development, performance and value of organisation resources that shape an organisation over time. The unit is completed with a capstone case study which consolidates learning and allows students to use their new knowledge and skills gained in identifying and addressing operational and strategic issues facing organisations following the global financial crisis.
ACCT6001 Intermediate Financial Reporting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: mid-semester test (35%), final examination (50%), and assignment (15%)
This unit is intended to provide an understanding of the contemporary Australian financial reporting environment. Particular attention is paid to accounting theory and concepts, mandatory reporting practices and reporting policies that reflect either a choice from among several mandated alternatives, or those areas where regulation has not occurred. The unit is intended for those who will be involved in the preparation or use of company financial statements. The unit provides an understanding of accounting techniques, both in terms of technical method and their relative impact on corporation's financial statements. The emphasis throughout is on both the 'techniques' and the related explanations for their use.
ACCT6002 International Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: Intensive - Summer and Winter School sessions Assessment: individual assignments (28%), group assignments (22%), and final examinations (50%)
Note: This unit of study is being run by the Discipline of International Business. All enquiries should be directed to the Discipline of International Business.
Many of the topics in an international accounting course have a domestic counterpart. However, new factors and complications arise in the international arena. Some of these are (1) diversity of laws, practices, customs, cultures, and competitive circumstances; and (2) risks associated with fluctuating exchange rates, differential rates of inflation, and unstable property rights. International accounting discusses issues from the perspective of companies that have internationalised their finance and/or their operations. It has a comparative aspect, comparing accounting across countries. It deals with corporate reporting and disclosure across national boundaries. It also deals with the harmonization of the worldwide diversity in financial reporting, in particular, convergence around International Financial Reporting Standards. It discusses foreign currency translation, a consolidations issue that arises from multinational operations. Finally, it aims to introduce the key issues relevant for undertaking cross-border analysis of financial statements.
ACCT6003 Financial Statement Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: Mid-semester exam (25%), group project (20%) and final exam (55%)
This unit helps students to develop an understanding of the techniques of financial statement analysis for the appraisal of equity investment, credit evaluation, risk analysis, prediction of corporate failure, competitor analysis and industry standing, and valuation for takeover/restructuring. A primary purpose of this unit is to develop an understanding of these techniques, as well as the inherent difficulties in their application, as well as their limitations. Emphasis is provided on the analysis of earnings quality and accounting-based valuation methods.
ACCT6005 Management Control Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: continuous assessment (40%), essay (30%), and final examination (30%)
This unit of study examines the design and operation of 'management control systems' (MCS), considering also the role of management accounting technologies in this. In doing so, a variety of research-based readings and theoretical frames are mobilised to help understand this important facet of organisational functioning and application of management accounting work. Topics to be covered include: typologies of MCS; arguments relating to the fit and effectiveness of MCS; the connection between strategy and MCS; the role of performance measures in MCS; MCS and hybrid organisational spaces; MCS and the management of intellectual capital; MCS and the New Economy; and the evolution of MCS.
ACCT6006 Advanced Managerial Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: seminar assignments (35%), seminar contribution (15%), and final examination (50%)
This unit examines a number of advanced topics in managerial accounting as they relate to the use of key analytic and calculative techniques for decision making and value creation. The topics are biased towards those that are relevant and even contentious to contemporary practice and include: the potential inconsistencies between management accounting and strategic decision making and control; yield management; executive compensation and reward systems; ethical issues in budget setting and performance management; the theory of the firm and outsourcing; issues in managing joint ventures and strategic alliances; intellectual capital management and development; performance measurement systems; and innovation and change in management accounting practice. An overview of each topic area is provided before exploring the topics more deeply by examining current research and/or working through case studies to provide insights into contemporary business practice.
ACCT6007 Contemporary Issues in Auditing

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Mid Semester examination (30%), individual and/or group case study assignment (20%), and final examination (50%)
This unit of study examines the process of auditing and the concepts which underlay the function, nature and procedures of public company auditing in the context of corporate financial reporting. It has particular regard to the business, legal and economic foundations than underpin the audit process. Recurrent reference is made to practical and policy matters of importance to auditing and auditors, especially as they relate to the function of auditing in the contemporary envirnonment. Attention is also given to the need for quality corporate financial statements and the role corporate governance plays in adding credibility to the published financial reports. A number of current corporate failures are reviewed to expose students to the complexities of the auditing process in today's contemporary environment.
ACCT6010 Advanced Financial Reporting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignment (15%), case study (15%), mid-semester examination (20%), and final examination (50%).
This unit is intended to provide students with a detailed understanding of more complex financial reporting issues. The topics examined include: group accounting issues such as the practical application of the control test; multiple subsidiaries; foreign currency translation; consolidated cash flow reporting; segment reporting; accounting for joint arrangements and associates; and related party disclosures. The unit builds on the knowledge base acquired from earlier accounting units with a strong emphasis on the application of technical skills. The unit has a substantial case component, using current examples to illustrate both appropriate technical solutions in accordance with accounting standards and guidelines, as well as the forces which determine the choice of methods. The course will help develop students' ability to read and analyse financial reports and to understand the financial reporting implications of management decisions relating to internal reporting and organisational structure.
ACCT6014 Designing Accounting Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: In class assessment (10%), individual assessment (20%), team assessment (30%), and final examination (40%).
This unit introduces students to the concepts, challenges and approaches associated with the evaluation, design, introduction, operation and improvement of accounting systems and reflect the differences in the needs of family-owned business, small and medium sized enterprise and multi-national business firms. Elements of those systems include methods of documenting transactions and events; internal control procedures designed to safeguard human physical and financial resources; manual, semi-automated or fully automated source data entry, transaction processing methods and financial and non-financial reports on operational activities. These issues are also considered with regard to the capabilities of contemporary industry-standard accounting and business application software such as spreadsheets, MYOB and SAP in a cost-effective and secure manner. Topics include the design of charts of accounts; in solutions context; internal controls and maintaining audit trails, records management; the identification of requirements and the use of selection criteria for the evaluation, introduction, configuration and operation of packaged accounting software solutions. It provides students with the hands-on skills in the design and implementation of an accounting system to a real-world medium sized organisation using an industry standard accounting software solution by integrating concepts, approaches, commercial realities and capabilities of contemporary enterprise resource planning systems. At the commencement, students are provided with review of business frameworks including cycles, systems, source documents and recording transactions which act as a common starting point on which the unit builds.
ACCT6015 Extended Performance Reporting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: group presentation (20%), individual projects (40%), and final examination (40%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
This unit will review the issues associated with sustainability reporting models which have been practised in the last decade and highlight current and possible future issues. These new reporting models claim to enhance understanding of organisational performance to a variety of stakeholders, and are based on new performance measurement technologies that arguably improve decision making. This unit of study is designed to provide a critical analysis of the issues surrounding organisation performance and will explore the key underlying issues associated with the emergence of these new reporting models. The unit will look at how the reporting of economic and non-economic performance will enable private, public and third sector organisations to provide an account of their value creation and sustainability performance. It will also explore the perspectives of significant bodies of research on reporting value-creating activities and non-economic performance.

BANK - Banking (Finance)

BANK6002 Bank Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid session exam (25%), group assignment (25%), and final examination (50%)
The unifying theme in this subject is the application of modern finance theory to financial decision making in the management of banks and non-bank financial institutions. The subject of bank and financial institution decision-making is approached from a risk perspective. The course objectives are: (i) To provide students with an understanding of the modern model of financial institutions and the economic functions that they perform; (ii) Identify the main types of risk confronted by financial institutions; (iii) Apply relevant techniques to measure and manage those risks; (iv) To provide students with the ability to critically assess the effectiveness of the techniques used by banks to manage their risks(v) To provide students with an understanding of international bank management and financial services.
BANK6003 Global Supervision of Bank Risks

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-semester exam (30%), group project & presentation (25%), and final exam (45%)
This course is aimed at students who wish to obtain a greater understanding of the central issues and principles underpinning recent developments in the global regulation and supervision of banking/financial institutions.
BANK6005 International Banking

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr workshop per week Assessment: mid-term 2.5 hr exam (45%), final 2.5 hr exam (45%), and workshop presentations (10%) OR mid-term 2.5 hr exam (35%), final 2.5 hr exam (35%), research project (20%), and workshop presentations (10%).
The major focus of this unit of study is in providing students with an understanding of international banking and finance in the contemporary international financial environment. Due to the dynamic nature of the international banking environment, it is necessary to develop skills to effectively identify and understand the effects of current developments. Firstly, the international banking functions are presented; followed by international trade financing, participation in the interbank foreign exchange and Euro currency markets, international investment banking services, and sovereign lending.Other important topicsinclude: international money laundering, international banking and debt crises, and offshore banking markets.

BUSS - Business School

BUSS5000 Critical Thinking in Business

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Lyn Carson Session: Classes: 1x 1 hr lecture and 1x 2 hour tutorial per week Assessment: critical thinking diagnostics (5%), critical decision assessments (30%), critical reports (50%), and participation (15%)
Critical thinking is central to effective data interpretation, problem-solving and other key aspects of contemporary business practice. Students who take this unit develop high level critical thinking capabilities; skills that are essential for effective postgraduate study in business disciplines and for success in the world of business, whatever the specialisation. Students engage with theoretical frameworks and concepts in order to practise robust methods of questioning and argument. Weekly classes are organised around a progressive series of interactive learning activities. These focus on analysis, reflection, inquiry and ethical, reasoned evaluation of arguments and ideas and the production of appropriate written and spoken responses.
BUSS5001 Firms, Markets and Business Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Sandra Peter Session: Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr seminar per week Assessment: case analyses (45%), class participation (15%) and final exam (40%)
This unit provides students with the tools to understand the impact of economic, socio-cultural, institutional, and technological factors on businesses' operations. Such considerations are crucial to understanding and solving the major problems and challenges facing the world today, such as global warming, poverty, development, and recession. They are also extremely useful for understanding how businesses make decisions and interact in the marketplace. The first part of unit provides an introduction to microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis and applications. In microeconomics we look at economic decision-making by individuals and firms, the determination of prices in different kinds of markets, and the application of game theory to business decisions. In macroeconomics we consider determination of the aggregate level of economic activity (GDP and inflation), the economic effects of government policies, and the link between interest rates and exchange rates and the level of economic activity. The economics in the unit is complemented by developing an understanding of the complexity of professional behaviour and ethical decision making. The final part of the unit investigates the social, cultural, institutional and technological environments in which firms operate. It examines theories, models and conceptual tools that help us understand and make decisions in relation to these factors.
BUSS5100 Communicating in Business A

Teacher/Coordinator: Sanri Le Roux Session: Classes: 1x1 hr seminar per week (wks 4-13) Assessment: class participation (20%), individual assignment (50%) and blog (30%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit.
This is a special supplementary unit, the primary aim of which is to support students in their first semester of study to manage their business communication skills more effectively. The unit is only available to students identified as needing additional support.
BUSS5101 Communicating in Business B

Session: Classes: 1x1 hr seminar per week (wks 4-13) Assessment: class participation (20%), individual assignment (50%) and blog (30%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit.
This is the second special supplementary unit, the primary aim of which is to support students in their first semester of study to manage their business communication skills more effectively. The unit is only available to students identified as needing additional support.
BUSS6000 Succeeding in Business

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Marc Jones Session: Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr seminar/workshop per week Assessment: critical thinking diagnostic (5%), debate (10%), group assignment (20%), individual assignment (35%) and final exam (30%)
This program-wide capstone unit must be taken by each student in their final semester of study within the Master of Commerce and Master of International Business and Law programs. Students work collaboratively with peers and advisors to integrate the discipline-specific knowledge acquired within their program to address 'real world' business challenges requiring cross-disciplinary and cross-functional insights, knowledge and skills. Assessment is designed to assure student proficiency in program learning goals. Students work in self-managing cross-functional teams to complete a semester-long project, preparing individual and group reports that will be assessed by peers and academic staff. Weekly seminars include action learning in business life cycle, data analysis, strategic decision-making, change management, business communication, and ethical awareness and reasoning in business practice. Learning activities will include short case studies, debates, and role plays.
BUSS6001 Energy and Environmental Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Leanne Piggott Session: Classes: Intensive - 8 days (4 x Saturday and Sunday) 10-4pm Assessment: class participation (15%), oral presentation (25%) and research report (60%)
This unit will examine the growing tension between energy and environmental security and the importance of both to business and society. It will assess the factors that have brought energy security and the sustainability of the environment to the forefront of concern including: the changing dynamics of energy markets in the wake of increasing demand from developing economies; population growth and food security; water scarcity; and climate change. It will consider the impact of increasing concern by a range of stakeholder groups on the way businesses are managing risks related to energy resources and other non-financial factors. The unit will also examine the effectiveness of government policies in response to these challenges, and consider the impact that new technologies might have in mitigating future risks. The unit will be taught intensively with a focus on developing applied business skills.
BUSS6500 Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zina O'Leary Session: Classes: Wks 1-3: 1x 3hrs pre-placement workshops; Wks 4-12: 3 ½ days a week internship; Wk 13: presentation. Assessment: learning contract (0%), reflective journal (20%), presentation (15%), and research report (65%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Int February,Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employment Relations Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au
This unit is available to outstanding students completing the Master of Commerce, Master of Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations, Master of Logistics Management, Master of Professional Accounting or Master of Transport Management program. It involves a professional placement with a business, government, or non-government organisation. It will include preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and report writing. Assessment will include a reflective journal and professional report and presentation based on the internship placement.
BUSS6504 Geneva Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Leanne Piggott Session: Classes: 3 x 3hr pre-placement workshops, 2 x 3hr weekly seminars (starting week 2) and Internship placement (Geneva) (6 weeks) Assessment: Learning contract (0%); Learning journal (25%), Research project (60%) and Final presentation (15%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Int July,Semester 2
This unit will be taken by students accepted into the Master of Commerce Geneva Industry Placement Program while they undertake a professional placement with a business or a government or nongovernment organisation that has a particular focus on business interests. It will include preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and concurrent coursework on research methods, report and other professional writing skills. Assessment will include a reflective journal, research report related to their work placement, and oral presentations all based on the internship placement and international work and study experience.
BUSS7000 Business Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Classes: research Assessment: dissertation (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
This is one of two (12 credit point) units that together (total of 24 credit points) provide outstanding students in the Commerce program with the opportunity to develop and complete a supervised research dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words, or equivalent, on an approved topic within the domain of business/commerce/management. Admission to the dissertation stream requires an average grade of at least 80% in a minimum of four Commerce program units (12 unit program) or a minimum of eight Commerce program units (16 unit program), interview by the Associate Dean Postgraduate, and a formal dissertation proposal agreed to by a nominated supervisor and the Associate Dean Postgraduate. Final approval will depend on the nature of the proposed topic and the availability of appropriate supervisory expertise. The dissertation will be marked by examiners nominated by the Associate Dean Postgraduate in consultation with the supervisor and other academics from the relevant discipline/s.
BUSS7001 Business Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Classes: research Assessment: dissertation (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
This is one of two (12 credit point) units that together (total of 24 credit points) provide outstanding students in the Commerce program with the opportunity to develop and complete a supervised research dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words, or equivalent, on an approved topic within the domain of business/commerce/management. Admission to the dissertation stream requires an average grade of at least 80% in a minimum of four Commerce program units (12 unit program) or a minimum of eight Commerce program units (16 unit program), interview by the Associate Dean Postgraduate, and a formal dissertation proposal agreed to by a nominated supervisor and the Associate Dean Postgraduate. Final approval will depend on the nature of the proposed topic and the availability of appropriate supervisory expertise. The dissertation will be marked by examiners nominated by the Associate Dean Postgraduate in consultation with the supervisor and other academics from the relevant discipline/s.
BUSS7002 Business Dissertation

Credit points: 24 Session: Classes: research Assessment: dissertation (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
This unit provides outstanding students in the Commerce program with the opportunity to develop and complete a supervised research dissertation of 15,000 to 20,000 words, or equivalent, on an approved topic within the domain of business/commerce/management. Admission to the dissertation stream requires an average grade of at least 80% in a minimum of four Commerce program units (12 unit program) or a minimum of eight Commerce program units (16 unit program), interview by the Associate Dean Postgraduate, and a formal dissertation proposal agreed to by a nominated supervisor and the Associate Dean Postgraduate. Final approval will depend on the nature of the proposed topic and the availability of appropriate supervisory expertise. The dissertation will be marked by examiners nominated by the Associate Dean Postgraduate in consultation with the supervisor and other academics from the relevant discipline/s.

CLAW - Business Law

CLAW5001 Legal Environment of Business

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Patty Kamvounias Session: Classes: Three hours of classes per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: case analysis (20%), tests (35%), and final examination (45%)
All business conduct is regulated by the law. Every transaction and every relationship is governed by an increasingly complex mix of statutory and judge-made laws. The ability to identify and manage legal risks, and knowledge of compliance and dispute resolution strategies, are essential business management skills. This unit examines the legal framework and regulatory regime within which all businesses operate in Australia and in a global economy. It introduces students to the legal implications of commercial conduct and provides an overview of the Australian legal system and threshold legal concepts of agreement, ownership, and civil and criminal liability. Key areas of substantive business law are examined including contracts, torts (in particular negligence and the economic torts), property and securities, and crime. The unit also provides students with an overview of areas of legal regulation with an increasingly significant impact on business operations including: privacy, intellectual property rights, competition law, consumer law (in particular advertising regulation, product liability and unfair contracts), misleading conduct and unconscionable conduct.
CLAW6002 Corporate Structures in Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Cary Di Lernia Session: Classes: One three hour class per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: homework assignments (30%), multiple choice tests (20%), and final exam (50%)
The corporation is the dominant structure adopted for business undertakings globally. This unit aims to demystify corporate regulation and its impact in the contemporary commercial context with a view to introducing students to the types of issues they will encounter in the real world of corporations. The unit reviews business structures (joint ventures, partnerships, trusts and companies) from a business perspective with a focus on the corporate form. The unit also examines the different options available for the conduct of businesses and the different stages of the corporate life cycle, including: how corporations are brought into existence and the characteristics attained upon incorporation; how corporations undertake certain activities (including entry into contracts, fundraising, issuing shares, paying dividends); how corporations are managed and power is distributed between participants, how the law places certain duties and obligations upon those who manage corporations; the consequences which may result from any breach of those duties and obligations; and managing corporations in financial distress, liquidation and de-registration. It takes an application-based approach which gives the unit a practical as opposed to theoretical orientation. Current issues in corporate regulation in Australia and internationally are discussed to provide students with an understanding of the types of issues which confront different types of corporations, and how these issues impact upon their management and the discharge of corporate responsibility.
CLAW6007 Issues in Law and International Business

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Gail Pearson Session: Classes: One 3 hour class per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: Mid-semester examination (35%); Group case study (30%); Final examination (35%)
Globalisation enables successful businesses to tap into the international economy to find new and bigger markets for their goods and services. Entering the global marketplace also means greater risk, as businesses deal with new customers, and are forced to operate in unfamiliar legal environments where the "normal" rules of business often don't apply. This unit is aimed at providing students with an understanding of how the global economy is regulated (if at all), and to provide the tools needed to use international business law to minimise the risks of doing business in the global economy. Questions the unit addresses include: What is international business law and what do I need to know?; What institutions ensure a level playing field for my business?; How do I make an agreement to sell my goods to foreign customers?; How do I protect those goods in transit?; How do I ensure payment for goods and services I provide?; How do I build a presence in a foreign market through local agents and distributors?; What considerations apply to entering and borrowing from foreign capital markets?; How can I safely do business online in the global virtual economy?; What if things go wrong?; and How do I fight foreign disputes by my rules and in my court?
CLAW6026 Taxation Law and Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antony Ting Session: Classes: One 3 hour class per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: Mid-semester exam (20%); Major assignment (30%); Class performance (10%); Final exam (40%)
Taxation is an inevitable reality for all individuals and businesses. The impact of taxation on business structures, transactions and decisions is both real and significant. An understanding of how taxation law works is not only vitally important for professional accountants but is also an essential management skill in an increasingly complex business environment. This unit introduces students to the principal forms of taxation within the Australian taxation system with a focus on concepts and principles of income tax law. Students will also learn how tax law is applied in practice. This unit covers key concepts of taxation in Australia (including the concepts of income, capital gains tax, deductions, and the residence and source principles) and examines the taxation of different entities (including partnerships, trusts and companies). The taxation of international business transactions is also considered.
CLAW6030 China's Legal Environment for Business

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Eva Huang Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Take home mid-term exam (35%), Proposal and presentation (15%), Research paper (50%)
China has recently become the second biggest economy in the world and is Australia's most important trading partner. Australian businesses are increasingly engaging with China. This Unit of Study addresses the frequently asked question of how to do business with China. It addresses China's unique business environment which has resulted from its unique culture, history and demography, and examines the business regulations, tax system, and the administrative and compliance issues businesses will face when carrying on business with China. The Unit first outlines the business environment in terms of culture, history, economics, demography, and government administration. It then provides students with an understanding of the legal environment that businesses will face in China. Through a hypothetical case study, different aspects of business regulation such as contract, entity structure, mergers and acquisition, property and intellectual property rights, the tax system, different tax types and associated international issues, and social insurance are analysed.
CLAW6031 International Financial Crime

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor David Chaikin Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignment (30%), Group assignment (20%), Final exam (50%)
International financial crime occupies a leading place on the international governance agenda. It has a devastating impact on national economies, international security and human development. This unit will examine key international financial crimes such as investment fraud, corruption, tax evasion, money laundering and terrorist financing. Students will gain an understanding of how these crimes are committed, detected and prosecuted. They will analyse the changing regulatory environment and the new risks facing businesses and the professions. The role of bank secrecy and tax havens in facilitating financial crime will also be studied. There will be a special focus on the prevention of financial crime, and the regime for tracing, freezing and recovery of illicit assets. The unit will draw on case studies from Australia, United States, Europe and Asia so as to gain a better appreciation of the national and international responses to international financial crime.
CLAW6032 Regulating Innovation and Distribution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Susan Carter Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Class participation and engagement (20%); Individual assignment (30%); Group assignment: Presentation (20%); Research paper (30%)
Business today operates in an increasingly complex and constantly changing environment in which success depends on the ability to innovate and compete. This unit of study examines three key legal frameworks - intellectual property, fair trading and competition law - within which innovation and contestability in markets takes place. Intellectual property regulation seeks to promote invention and creativity and to discourage imitation and free riding. Fair trading regulation provides standards of conduct for B2B and B2C transactions. Competition law promotes fair markets by prohibiting practices which damage competition. The unit focuses on franchising as a business model, to provide the context to examine how these regulatory frameworks operate and interact in a commercial environment.

ECMT - Econometrics (School of Economics)

ECMT5001 Principles of Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr (non compulsory) tutorial/week Assessment: quizzes (10%), group assignment (15%), mid-semester test (20%) and 1x2hr final exam (55%)
The unit develops the basic principles of data description and analysis, the idea of using the concept of probability to model data generation, and the statistical concepts of estimation and statistical inference, including hypothesis testing. It then develops these concepts and techniques in the context of the linear regression model to show how econometric models can be used to analyse data in a wide range of potential areas of application in economics, business and the social sciences. The unit combines theory and application. The emphasis is upon the interpretation of econometric estimation results and requires software for hands-on experience.
ECMT6002 Econometric Applications

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr lecture/week Assessment: group project (25%), mid-semester test (25%) and 1x2hr final exam (50%)
This unit illustrates how econometric methods can be applied to economic data to solve problems that arise in economics and business. Econometric theory provides the techniques needed to quantify the strength and form of relationships between variables. Applied econometrics is concerned with the strategies that need to be employed to use these techniques effectively; to determine which model to specify and whether the data are appropriate. Guidelines for undertaking applied work are discussed. Case studies drawn from economics, marketing, finance, and accounting are also discussed. The unit includes a major econometric modelling project.
ECMT6003 Applied Business Forecasting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr lecture/week Assessment: assignment (30%), mid-semester test (20%) and 1x2.5hr final exam (50%)
This unit aims to provide an introduction to the practice of forecasting in business. Forecasting requires both practical experience in model building and some statistical theory. To blend the theory and practice, many business forecasting examples are discussed. Excel is used to do useful preliminary calculations and plotting. At the end of this unit, students should be able to understand the major techniques of forecasting and be able to intelligently forecast actual business time series using Excel and its extensions. Topics covered include: the aims of forecasting and relation to time series analysis; types of time series; plotting and charting time series; practical examples of forecasting and forecasting issues; growth curve methods; least squares (what you need to know for forecasting); decomposition of time series; elementary exponential smoothing with Excel; serial correlation (and Durbin Watson statistic); applied ARIMA modelling and identifying seasonality and "hidden" periodicities.
ECMT6006 Applied Financial Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr lecture/week Assessment: assignments (30%), mid-semester test (20%) and 1x2hr final exam (50%)
This unit provides an introduction to some of the widely used econometric models designed for the analysis of financial data, and the procedures used to estimate them. Special emphasis is placed upon empirical work and applied analysis of real market data. The unit deals with topics such as: the statistical nature of financial data; the specification, estimation and testing of assets pricing models; the analysis of high frequency financial data; and the modelling of volatility in financial returns. Throughout the unit, students are encouraged (especially in assignments) to familiarise themselves with financial data and learn how to apply the models to these data.
ECMT6007 Analysis of Panel Data

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr lecture/week Assessment: group assignment (20%), mid-semester test (30%) and 1x2hr final exam (50%)
Recently, empirical research in economics, finance, marketing and accounting has been enriched by the increasing availability of new sources of data, known as panel data. A 'panel' refers to the pooling of observations on a cross section of households, countries, firms etc. over several time periods. Panel data sets possess several major advantages over conventional cross-sectional or time series data sets. This unit aims to offer a comprehensive treatment of the analysis of panel data, which will allow students to deal in a pragmatic way with fundamental issues, such as controlling for individual heterogeneity, reducing collinearity among regressors, addressing statistical hypotheses and identifying effects that are simply not detectable in pure cross-section or time series data.

ECON - Economics (School of Economics)

ECON5001 Microeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: on-line quizzes (10%) and mid-semester test (35%) and 2.5hr final exam (55%)
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level microeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Microeconomics studies how economic agents make choices in a variety of environments. The unit covers theory and applications of the principles of consumer choice, of firm behaviour, and of strategic interaction among economic agents. Equipped with these theories of decision making, students can address a range of interesting and important questions. Examples are: What market strategy should a firm adopt with its competitors? How might one create a market to deal with externalities such as pollution? What are the implications of different kinds of taxes? What compensation scheme will provide the right incentives to work?
ECON5002 Macroeconomic Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: online quizzes (20%), mid-semester test (30%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
This unit presumes no prior exposure to economics and aims, by the end of the unit, to bring a proficiency equivalent to that of students with an intermediate level macroeconomics unit in an Honours degree program. Many economic principles developed in this unit are routinely used in several other units in the program. Macroeconomics studies aggregate economic behaviour. The unit covers theories of the engines of long-run economic growth, of unemployment, of money, inflation, the interest rate and the exchange rate, as well as consumption, saving and investment behaviour. The unit also studies a number of applications of the theory and addresses contemporary macroeconomic problems and policy.
ECON6006 Market Structure and Strategic Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: mid-semester test (20%), group presentation (20%), essay (20%) and 2.5hr final exam (40%)
The purpose of this unit is to examine the nature of inter-firm rivalry in industries with market power. The unit begins with an exploration of the various ways in which firms can increase their market power by extracting more surplus from consumers by colluding with rivals or by excluding entrants. The topics for this part of the unit include price discrimination, product differentiation, advertising, research and development, predation and mergers. The unit also attempts to explain the various contractual and ownership linkages that exist between various stages of production. The latter involves a discussion of exclusive territories agreements, resale price maintenance, exclusive dealing, franchising and divisionalisation.
ECON6008 International Money and Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: mid-semester tests (30%) and essay (15%) and 2.5hr final exam (55%)
This unit covers the following topics: overview of the International Monetary System; foreign exchange markets, spot and future markets; swaps and options; arbitrage; covered and uncovered interest parity; exchange rate determination; forecasting exchange rate movements; exchange rate intervention; and the role of central banks.
ECON6009 Economics of the Labour Market

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: assignments (20%), mid-semester test (30%) and 3hr final exam (50%)
The purpose of this unit is to study some of the major issues in modern labour markets. Trends such as the increase in part-time work, the growing inequality in income and earnings, changes in the returns to education, and the simultaneous increase in hours of work and unemployment are addressed. The material consists of both empirical facts relating to the labour markets and the theories which are used to understand these facts. Part of the unit is devoted to the study of wage and employment contracts in the presence of uncertainty and other information problems. Imperfect information will have implications for the level of employment and unemployment, the structure of wages, and the use of particular forms of compensation such as bonuses, trust funds, and performance bonds.
ECON6010 Public Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: assignments (20%), mid-semester test (30%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Recent innovations in public economics have overturned previously accepted policy rules. This unit focuses on the modern treatment of public policies relating to taxation, pricing of public sector outputs and public investment. Emphasis is placed on how different informational capabilities and jurisdictions of the government impact on the design of policy. The areas of application in taxation include the design of efficient and equitable consumption taxes, the structure of income taxation and the appropriate mix of income and consumption taxes. In response to market failures, pricing and investment rules for public enterprises, the provision and pricing of public goods, and policy responses to externalities and information problems are covered.
ECON6016 Trade and Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: mid-semester test (20%), seminar paper and presentation (20%) and 1x2hr final exam (60%)
This unit is designed to highlight the relation between trade and development from an institutional and structural perspective, with appropriate modifications of received general economic principles, theories and policies. It closely studies the integration process of traditional segment of a developing society into its modern counterpart in countries selected from Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific regions. It examines role of the state and international institutions (like the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, World Trade Organization), rationale for trade, planning and market mechanisms in developing economies, and also socio-cultural preconditions and economic requirements for a market economy. It focuses on a wide range of developmental problems and issues (such as foreign aid, debt, investment, technology transfer) from both national and international points of view.
ECON6018 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: seminar paper & presentation (20%) and mid-semester test (20%) and 2hr final exam (60%)
In this unit of study emphasis is exclusively concerned with market failures that impact on the natural environment. Attention is given to why these market failures occur and what role there is for regulation and government policy. Topics covered include efficiency and markets, market failure, externalities (e.g. pollution), various methods of regulating pollution, and measuring the demand for environmental quality.
ECON6021 Financial Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: mid-semester test (40%) and 2hr final exam (60%)
This unit provides students with an understanding of the economic foundations of financial theory and the economic framework upon which that theory is based. Much of the work covered is an application of both microeconomic and macroeconomic theory to the special problems encountered in the study of the financial side of an economy. The relevance of these foundations is illustrated with empirical research using Australian and international data.
ECON6023 International Trade

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: mid-semester test (20%), written report (30%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
This unit develops the modern theory of international trade and commercial policy and examines some empirical applications. Topics covered include competitive trade theory; comparative advantage and theories of international trade patterns; the gains from trade; empirical evidence and methodology; imperfectly competitive trade theory and economies of scale, differentiated products, and technology; analysis of the effects of tariffs and trade quotas upon trade under competitive and imperfectly competitive market structures; the formation and design of regional trade agreements and the strategic behaviour of multinational enterprises. It will be suitable for those with an interest in international trade and business issues as well as those who may wish to pursue PhD research in these areas. It will be taught at a graduate level and so presumes knowledge of advanced undergraduate microeconomics.
ECON6024 Private Equity

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: assignments (20%), mid-semester test (30%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
As a source of private equity, venture capital (VC) plays a crucial role in the development of new business ventures and the promotion of innovation. Over the last twenty years, the VC industry has boomed. This course investigates how VC firms operate, analysing the key strategic issues they face during the fundraising, investing and exit stages of the VC cycle. Topics covered include: the determinants and types of VC fundraising, the organisational structure of VC firms and how venture capitalists are compensated. Next, the VC firm's investment decision is examined, as is its relationship with the investee company. The role of VC in the broader economy is also discussed. Regarding the exit stage of the VC cycle, the design of exit strategies (e.g. initial public offerings) is analysed. Finally, we introduce some of the ethical issues which venture capitalists face.
ECON6025 Strategic Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: mid-semester tests (40%), tutorial assignments and participation (10%) and 2hr final exam (50%)
Decision makers face two types of uncertainty: uncertainty about the state of nature (how much oil is in an oilfield) and uncertainty about the strategic behaviour of other decision makers (how many oil wells they will drill). This unit of study focuses on strategic uncertainty and the uses decision makers can make of the concepts of game theory to guide their decisions. Game theory studies situations where a) agents have conflicts of interests and b) agents can take actions that directly affect their payoffs and the payoffs of others. A very broad range of applications from business and economics fit the above description and therefore can be studied by the methods of game theory. Applications include, firm pricing and output decisions, market entry and exit, hold-up, collusion, bargaining, auctions, and signalling.
ECON6027 Experimental Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 6x1-hr laboratory sessions/semester Assessment: assignments (25%), class participation (10%), group project (40%) and 2hr final exam (25%)
This unit of study deals with the use of laboratory and field experiments in order to help assessing economic problems. Economic experiments are becoming a useful tool for the validation of theory, the development of new theory, the generation of advice to decision makers, and the design of new economic institutions. Economics aims to explain the 'real world' behaviour of agents. The lectures will provide opportunities to identify apparent contradictions between the predictions of economic models and experimental outcomes. The classes on experimental economics will follow a learning-by-doing approach. Most topics will be introduced in the experimental lab. Outcomes will be discussed in the following class and compared with theoretical predictions and previous experimental research.
ECON6101 Special Topic in Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: Depends on topic
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Students must seek written permission from the School of Economics Postgraduate Coordinator to enrol in this unit.
Study of a special topic in postgraduate Economics. Topics will vary from semester to semester according to staff availability and the presence of visitors. If taught in both semesters, the topic in Semester 2 will be different to that in Semester 1.

FINC - Finance

FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid semester-test (20%), major assignment (25%), and final examination (55%)
This unit provides an introduction to basic concepts in corporate finance and capital markets. It is designed to equip students to undertake further studies in finance. After reviewing some very basic ideas in finance and financial mathematics, the unit provides an introduction to the valuation of equity and debt securities and companies. The unit then examines issues related to pricing in capital markets and ends with a discussion of theory and practice related to capital structure and dividend policy.
FINC6000 Quantitative Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-term exam (20%), group assignment (20%), and final exam (60%)
The principle objective of this unit is to provide students with an introductory treatment of quantitative finance. Students are exposed to following key areas: consumption-based models; utility theory and mean-variance utility; choice under uncertainty; stochastic dominance; state-preference theory; theory of portfolio selection; risk neutral pricing; CAPM and arbitrage pricing theory (APT). Related mathematical tools are also covered by this course. A selection of special topics on practising financial theory in real life valuation or competition are also discussed.
FINC6001 Intermediate Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Class test (30%), practical exercises (10%), revision quiz (10%) and final examination (50%)
This unit extends some of the fundamental concepts introduced in FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance, and develops a rigorous framework for the analysis and understanding of key aspects of corporate financial decision making. Fundamental concepts in corporate finance are extended to more complex settings. The unit examines more advanced approaches to asset pricing and capital budgeting. New topics are covered in relation to derivative securities and real options applications in capital budgeting. The issues of the cost of capital, corporate capital structure, and corporate dividend policy, are extended to cover the interaction of corporate and personal taxation, agency problems, and information signalling.
FINC6003 Broking and Market Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-semester exam (15%), class participation (5%), multiple choice question construction (5%), individual article annotation (10%), major assignment (20%), and final exam (45%)
Brokers and market makers play a critical role in the operation of capital markets. In this unit, we start by providing an overview of capital markets around the globe and an outline of the financial product types available. We then address the functions of brokers and market makers, how their performance is evaluated, how they help to make markets more efficient and when their actions lower market quality. The ever changing role of brokers and market makers in a changing financial landscape is examined using academic research literature that focusses on issues that are important to these financial intermediaries. The course emphasises theory and empirical literature dealing with price formation, information dissemination and trading in limit order book markets, which are becoming the market design of choice. We also look in detail at the recent phenomena of market fragmentation and high frequency trading.
FINC6005 Advanced Asset Pricing

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: 2 x In class test (2x15%), assignment (20%), and final exam (50%)
Note: Only students with strong quantitative/mathematical skills should attempt this course
This unit covers the fundamentals of asset pricing and valuation, under equilibrium conditions and under no-arbitrage restrictions. The course will review the main themes in modern asset pricing, and introduce ideas of importance to the evolution of the discipline, and consequently of relevance to a practitioner's long term perspective. The course emphasises quantitative methods, so students are required to have fairly strong mathematical skills. Nevertheless, the mathematical tools needed in the course will be adequately reviewed.
FINC6007 Financial Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: individual assignment (20%), group assignment (30%), and final exam (50%)
This unit explores value investment principles used in investment strategies. Both investment strategies and company strategies are analysed to examine how to translate a company's strategy into shareholders' profit. The course also provides students the skill set of analysing and interpreting financial reports, identifying good investment and avoiding financial scandals. Great investment practitioners' (Benjamin Graham, Warren E. Buffett and Charles Munger) works are studied in detail in this course.
FINC6009 Portfolio Theory and its Applications

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: In class test (15%), individual assignment (15%), group assignment (20%), and final exam (50%)
This unit will cover several aspects of modern/post modern portfolio theory. An introduction to mathematical optimisation techniques in the presence of uncertainty will be covered and results from modern portfolio theory to the Capital Asset Pricing Model derived. We will also examine other popular models such as the Arbitrage Pricing Theory and Black-Litterman Model and conclude with some topical examples from industry. There is a degree of mathematical sophistication associated with this course and consequently students should be comfortable with a mathematical approach. However, the required mathematical tools will be covered in the course.
FINC6010 Derivative Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: applied project: group assignment (10%), assignment presentation (5%), mid-semester test (25%), and final examination (60%)
This unit provides an introduction to the rapidly-growing area of options, futures and swaps. These securities are derived from fundamental securities such as equities and bonds. The unit examines the nature of each of type of derivative security before a thorough treatment of the pricing and use of these securities for investment management and risk management purposes.
FINC6013 International Business Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Intra-semester test 1 (15%), intra-semester test 2 (15%), group project (20%), and final examination (50%)
In our highly globalised and integrated world economy, understanding international dimensions of financial management is essential for businesses. This unit provides a greater understanding of the fundamental concepts and the tools necessary for effective financial decision making by business enterprises, within a global setting.
FINC6014 Fixed Income Securities

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), group assignment (25%), and final exam (50%)
This unit covers the concepts required for investment in fixed income securities, managing bond bond portfolios and understanding debt markets. Topics coverd include duration, convexity , interest rate risk, bond volatility and the term structure of interest rates. The more complex types of debt securities studied include mortgage backed securities , corporate bonds with embedded options such as convertible bonds and interest rate derivatives.
FINC6015 Global Trading

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-semester exam (30%), 2x group assignments (2x10%), and final exam (50%)
Global Trading is concerned with the processes which turn orders into trades in securities markets, and the forces which mould and effect both order flow and order execution. This unit of study is an introduction to fundamental market design and structure ideas. The increased worldwide emphasis on capital markets and stock exchanges have brought the market microstructure specialisation of financial economics into the limelight. Global Trading will provide insights into how we with the help of securities market microstructure can gain a better understanding of today's global financial markets; to be able to make better financing and investment decisions, to understand when, where and how to transact in financial instruments and how to make better use of the ever increasing flow of market information. As we increase our intuitive familiarity with today's diverse financial markets we are able to develop successful trading strategies in different instruments and across many markets, today and in the future.
FINC6016 Financial Instruments and Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: 2x mid-term exams (2x15%), assignment (20%), and final exam (50%)
This unit provides students with an introduction to Australian financial markets and an evaluation of the institutions, instruments and participants involved in the industry. The main markets evaluated include the equity, money, bond, futures, options, and foreign exchange markets. The relationship between the economic environment and these markets is examined.
FINC6017 Mergers and Acquisitions

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Mid semester exam (20%), group project (30%), and final exam (50%)   
Mergers and acquisitions have become perhaps the most important activity of investment banks today. They provide a fundamental way for businesses to secure growth. To analyse mergers and acquisitions, most tools from modern financial economics are needed. The unit commences with a review of how existing businesses are valued, continues with an analysis of capital structure decisions, considers management incentives and examines issues in corporate control. We next examine the motives for mergers and acquisitions. Some acquisitions are motivated by value improvements created by correcting incentive problems, some acquisitions however are motivated by bad incentives that decrease value.
FINC6019 Financial Modelling

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: In class test (15%), assignment (25%), essay (10%), and final exam (50%)
It is important for practitioners of finance, at all levels, to be able to evaluate the applicability of a range of models for a given problem and to effectively implement and use the model that is selected. This unit will present methods for model design, implementation and evaluation in the context three fundamental financial models; the discounted cash flow valuation model, the portfolio selection model and the options pricing models. Spreadsheet engineering methods for designing, building, and testing spreadsheet models and for performing model-based analysis will be presented. There will be a concise coverage of optimization, sensitivity analysis and simulation featuring a strong spreadsheet orientation and a modelling emphasis.
FINC6021 Corporate Valuation

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: lab work (5%), group assignment (30%), reflective journal (5%), and final 3hr exam (60%)
This subject unit applies all aspects of finance theory to the general problem of valuing companies and other financial assets. This requires a synthesis of the fundamental concepts of present value, cost of capital, security valuation, asset pricing models, optimal capital structures, derivative pricing and some related accounting concepts. The subject aims to reach a level of practical application that allows students to understand both the theoretical frameworks and institutional conventions of real world corporate valuations. Basic valuation concepts from accounting will be reconciled with the finance theory on which firm value ultimately stands. Students will be asked to make extensive use of Excel or similar software in valuation exercises.
FINC6022 Behavioural Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-term exam (30%), group assignment (20%), and final exam (50%)
Behavioural finance examines how individual financial decision making and behaviour affect outcomes in financial markets. The subject begins with a review of the foundations of efficient markets, and then draws comparisons between the efficient ('economically rational') market and the less understood but possibly more realistic behavioural ('partially rational' or 'irrational') understanding of markets. The philosophy of the subject is that both viewpoints have advantages and each adds something new to our understanding of investor behaviour, both at the level of individual traders and at the level of the market interpreted as a mechanism for aggregating opinion and attitudes to risk.
FINC6023 Financial Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Lab exercises (20%), group project (20%), mid semester exam (20%), and final exam (40%)
Risk is an integral part of financial decisions. Following the rapid evolution of the discipline of financial risk management, analysts must be prepared to access the level of risk in the marketplace. This unit explores the basic concepts of modelling, measuring and managing financial risks within the regulatory framework. Topics covered include market risk (value-at-risk and expected loss), credit risk (single name, portfolio, ratings and market based models, credit derivatives), liquidity risk and operational risk. To overcome the rather quantitative nature of the topics, the unit relies heavily on practical based lab exercises with emphasis on simulations, real life examples and case studies.

IBUS - International Business

IBUS5002 Strategy, Innovation & Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: individual assignments (40%), group assignment (30%), and final exam (30%)
This foundation unit will provide an introduction to the essential concepts and frameworks relevant to the fields of strategy, innovation and entrepreneurship. Topics covered will include the key elements of business strategy, including developing a business mission, understanding the external environment, reviewing internal resources and capabilities, and business and corporate strategy. The importance of entrepreneurial activity and the challenges faced by startup ventures, as well as examples of successful and unsuccessful business innovations, will be highlighted. The emphasis of the unit will be on understanding the strategic activity of both startup and established businesses and will focus on issues relevant to entrepreneurs as well as business managers.
IBUS5003 Global Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Group assignments (30%), group presentations (10%), final exam (30%), mid term exams (15%), and in class quiz and participation (15%)
This unit focuses on the application of strategic thinking in key business contexts with a particular focus on the global nature of business. Specific attention is given to: (i) the identification and managing of new business opportunities both for entrepreneurial start-ups and for new ventures that emerge within a corporate setting; (ii) business model innovation as a basis for new ventures and business growth; (iii) the identification and managing of the specific challenges and risks presented by operating in a global business environment.
IBUS6001 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 2 hr lecture and 1x 1hr seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignments (70%) and group assignments (30%)
This unit analyses how multinational firms leverage their capabilities and competencies to create competitive advantages in international and global markets. Topics include assessing foreign market attractiveness; understanding the impact of differences in legal, cultural, political and economic regimes; evaluating international political and economic risk; building and operating global networks, including entry mode choice; understanding how managers design organisational architecture and implement internal control and incentive mechanisms; and assessing the challenges of global citizenship, ethical behaviour and social responsibility for international business. Problem-based learning, with case study workshops, is an integral part of the Unit.
IBUS6002 Cross-Cultural Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: Group research projects (35%), final exam (30%), individual written assignment (25%), and participation (10%)
An understanding of cultural differences and how to manage such differences is critical to effective management in international and multi-cultural business environments. The aim of this unit of study is to provide conceptual frameworks and evidence from practice that will develop an understanding of the ways in which cultures differ, how these differences can impact on management, and how cultural issues can limit organisational effectiveness. Major topics include the significance of culture in international management, the meaning and dimensions of culture, comparative international management and leadership styles, managing communication across cultures, ethics and social responsibility in global management, cross-cultural negotiation and decision-making, forming and managing global teams, and developing the international and global manager.
IBUS6003 Managing International Risk

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: Group case study (20%) and individual learning modules (80%)
This unit introduces students to the multi-level risk environments encountered by multinational enterprise and the processes and strategies that can be employed to identify, assess, manage and mitigate risk. Topics that are covered include multinational enterprise and expropriation, sovereign risk and corruption, political and regulatory risk, brand and corporate reputation risk management, managing anti-globalization protests and consumer boycotts, terrorism risk, and executive risk and risk management and a short introduction to financial risk and risk management. The unit will also introduce students to the various analytical approaches involved in designing risk identification systems, reporting and monitoring protocols, and how risk is able to be assessed, prioritized and effectively managed. The unit will emphasize a problem case based approach to learning using workshops and simulation exercises.
IBUS6004 International Business Alliances

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3 hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignments (20%), group assignments (40%), mid term exam (20%), and final exam (20%)
Collaboration to achieve competitive advantage is one of the most commonly recommended cross border strategies. However, international alliances can take many different forms, and they can serve many different purposes. Managing international alliances raises a series of different issues for the alliance partners to manage. This unit examines the issues raised and considers the reasons for success and failure of international alliances. It looks at the forms that partnerships can take, it examines the methods for choosing among potential partners, it examines the potential forms of collaboration and the level of resources each may require. Managing the partnership for maximum advantage, avoiding possible risks, and deciding how and when to end the partnership, all are further issues that managers must consider. The unit considers these questions in the framework of general theoretical approaches, and pays particular attention to discussion of individual cases.
IBUS6005 Ethical International Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week from week 1 to week 13 Assessment: Group assignments (40%), final exam (30%), and individual assignments (30%)
In order to succeed in international business, both corporations and individuals need broad decision-making abilities. Business decision-making tools yield more coherent and justifiable results when used with an understanding of the ethical, social and environmental aspects of the process. This applies to various situations in the international business setting including business relations with government, customers, employees, and NGOs. This unit is designed to look at these non-financial elements in the decisions made within the international business context. Following the completion of this unit, students will have enhanced skills and knowledge relevant to the understanding of ethical issues and ethical decisions making in international business organisations.
IBUS6006 Comparative International Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr class per week Assessment: Group research project (40%), participation (5%), individual written assignments and exams (55%)
The triad regions, Japan, the United States, and the European Union, together are the homes of almost all of the world's largest 500 corporations. They account for a large majority of world exports. They provide most of the world's outward flows of foreign direct investment, and in addition, they are the recipients of most of inward FDI flows. However, they are very different, in firm structure, in regulatory environment, and in the relations between private firms and government agencies. Dealing with them as competitors, customers, suppliers, or partners requires international managers to be aware of these differences and to vary their strategy accordingly. This unit compares the structure and operations of triad firms, and the ways that government agencies frame the operating environment in each region. We look first at the ways firms in each region seek competitive advantage, and how governments have supported them. We then look at a series of cases where firms have moved from their home region into another, at the ways in which they have attempted to transfer their competitive advantage, and at the reasons for their successes and failures. In addition to the specific knowledge of the habits and tendencies of Japanese, United States, and European firms, the techniques of analysis developed in this unit are applicable to a wide range of competitive situations across the global economy.
IBUS6008 Export Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: C. Welch Session: Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: individual learning journal (70%) and final exam (30%)
Exporting is a key international business activity, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). This unit covers both the theory and practice of export management. The main areas covered in the unit are: 1) preparing to export (export stimulation, export readiness and planning), 2) forming and maintaining relationships with intermediaries (including legal considerations), 3) managing risks and export finance, 4) filling export orders. The unit therefore covers both the operational and strategic challenges associated with the exporting process.
IBUS6011 New Business Opportunities and Startups

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3 hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: Individual assessment (70%), group assignment (10%), and group presentation (20%)
For small open economies such as Australia's, new business opportunity identification and exploitation are often critical to firms' long-term growth and survival. Identifying new markets, developing new products and implementing new business models are highly-regarded and valuable skills for entrepreneurs and business managers alike. In addition to exploring the special problems (and advantages) associated with entrepreneurial start-ups, the unit will explore commercialisation and corporate venturing. Topics include opportunity recognition, strategy development, business planning and investor documentation, venture capital and other funding sources, as well as entrepreneurial and creative leadership. The unit is structured around your learning from engaged practice, and requires you to work with startup and early stage businesses.
IBUS6012 Business Growth and Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3 hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignments (55%), group project (30%), and group presentation (15%)
The business landscape is changing, with increasingly global business models and rapidly changing competitive environments buffeting established businesses.  Businesses that have 'survived' startup are immediately challenged to build sustainable business models that continually leverage into new markets and products. This unit centres on business- and corporate-level strategy, focussing on the development of skills and knowledge required to spark and cope with rapid business growth. Topics will include harnessing and leveraging resources and capabilities, internationalising ventures, forming alliances, mergers and acquisitions and avoiding the pitfalls of rapid growth.  You will also explore the processes involved in strategy formulation, including decision-making and design thinking.  The unit is structured around your learning from engaged practice, and requires you to work with businesses in their search for growth options and their appropriate funding.  
IBUS6013 Business Restructuring and Renewal

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr lecture/seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignment (55%), group project (30%), and group presentation (15%)
Entrepreneurial business opportunities do not always relate to early-stage or start-up businesses. Later-stage business investments, whether buying existing businesses or turning around failing enterprises, are a significant and growing focus of entrepreneurial activity. This unit explores the process of acquiring and reinvigorating established businesses and how to secure private equity funds (leveraged buy-outs) or corporate funding. The focus is on opportunity evaluation, business model innovation, management and revitalisation rather than financial structuring. You will have the opportunity to apply the functional skills learned in core strategy, finance, marketing, and management units to real opportunities. As well as being of interest to those wishing to acquire and manage their own business, the unit is appropriate for those working in 'big' business and the financial markets.
IBUS6014 Intellectual Property Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr seminar/wk Assessment: Individual assessment (30%), group assignment (15%), group presentation (15%), and final exam (40%)
Intellectual property (IP) represents the property of your mind, intellect, and proprietary knowledge. There are a number of means of protecting your IP, including patents, copyright and trademarks.  Creating IP does not necessarily mean you own the rights to use it, as most forms require you to take formal steps to register your IP and obtain the legal rights of ownership (both in Australia and internationally).  This unit of study will cover aspects including the concept of IP, how to identify and protect it in a local and international context, creating the conditions to encourage and leverage IP in a commercial context, how to manage a portfolio of IP, and enforcement scenarios. The unit concentrates on how to utilise IP to create, control and exchange value, with particular attention paid to the practice of open innovation. 
IBUS6016 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week and 1x 1hr reading and/or case per week for 12 weeks Assessment: individual assignments (55%), group assignment (30%) and group presentation (15%)
Social entrepreneurs are committed to furthering a social mission through enterprises that rank social, environmental or cultural impact on a par with, or even above, profit. Intersecting the business and not-for profit worlds, social entrepreneurship addresses many complex local and global problems. This unit will critically introduce the concept and develop frameworks for understanding social entrepreneurship (also referred to as social enterprise and social innovation). Teaching and learning will utilise case studies, and include the opportunity to apply real-world experiences. Topics will include creating innovative social enterprises, sustainable business models, philanthropy and funding, impact assessment, and leadership. The unit is structured around your learning from engaged practice, and requires you to work with social enterprises.
IBUS6018 Business Negotiations

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Assessment: In-class exercises (33%), assignment (33%), and final exam (34%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
The purpose of this course is to help you understand the theory of negotiation as it is practiced in a variety of strategic settings. The aim is to help you feel more comfortable and confident with the negotiation process. The course is designed to be relevant to the broad spectrum of negotiation problems that are faced by managers but we use specific examples from international strategy such as M&A and joint ventures. The course will provide participants with an opportunity to develop skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytic frameworks. Considerable emphasis will be placed on role-playing exercises and case studies.
Note: this unit will require your participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of your grade, will require time-pressured reading of material in class.
IBUS6019 Strategy and Emerging Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1X 3 hour lecture/seminar per week Assessment: group project (30%), in-class activity & quiz (10%), tutorial participation (10%), mid-term exam (20%), and final exam (30%)
Do you have an Emerging Market Strategy? This is a question that an increasingly large number of company managers, especially in the developed western world, are trying to answer. This unit of study will lay the foundations of strategy making in emerging markets, with an emphasis on four of the largest emerging markets of the world today - Brazil, Russia, India and China - often termed as the BRIC countries. Utilising frameworks from mainstream strategy and international business disciplines, this unit will analyse emerging markets from the perspective of primarily two simultaneous phenomena - multinationals from developed markets trying to tap into emerging markets, and companies from emerging markets globalising their operations and consequently changing the global competitive landscape.
IBUS6020 Enterprise Management in China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Hans Hendrischke Session: Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignment (20%); Group Project (30%),Take-home exam 2000 words (40%); Class participation (10%)
This unit focuses on China's globalising business environment from an enterprise perspective by analysing the way in which enterprises are embedded in a dynamic economic, legal and political environment and the consequences that arise for enterprise management and entrepreneurship. The unit combines theoretical analysis of the interrelationship of markets, firms and institutions with detailed, practical case studies of domestic and transnational business activities. Students will be able to familiarise themselves with different types of enterprises including the local private sector, state-owned enterprises and foreign owned enterprises operating in China as well as Chinese enterprises expanding into global markets through joint ventures, strategic alliances and mergers and acquisitions.

INFS - Business Information Systems

INFS5001 Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: group assignment (25%), individual assignment (30%), and final exam (45%)
Based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) this unit will introduce you to the end-to-end project management lifecycle. You will learn how to select appropriate projects based on their alignment with an organisation's strategy and then how to manage those projects successfully from initiation through execution to completion. You will learn the essential components of effective project management and how to apply them in an integrated manner. You will be exposed to both the technical and behavioural aspects of project management - including Microsoft Project - and will gain experience in critically analysing the application of concepts in specific project contexts. As organisations increasingly structure their activities on a project basis, the unit will be of value to a range of discipline specialisations. The unit can also contribute to you achieving internationally recognised accreditation from the Project Management Institute (PMI).
INFS6001 Managing Information and Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid-semester test (30%), tutorial work (10%), research (group) essay (25%), and final exam (35%)
This unit introduces you to the organisational foundations of information systems and their emerging strategic role. You will develop an understanding of critical information management and systems issues in organisations. The unit provides you with a solid understanding of the senior management decisions relating to organisational information and systems and how various information technologies work together to create infrastructure for electronic commerce and electronic business. You will explore the role of information systems in capturing and distributing organisational knowledge and in enhancing management decision making. You will gain a deep understanding into how the information systems function or processes in organisations can be managed. Finally, you will have the opportunity to explore the special management challenges and opportunities created by the pervasiveness and power of information systems.
INFS6002 Strategic Information Systems Sourcing

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: individual assignment (25%), individual assignment (35%), and final exam (40%)
Strategic Information Systems Sourcing has at its core the cost-effective sourcing and delivery of IS solutions with the aim of supporting and enabling business strategy. It covers the procurement of in-house systems, outsourcing strategies and third-party IS sourcing (for example from 'the cloud'). The focus of this UoS will be on managerial decisions regarding the design, implementation and delivery of an IS sourcing strategy, and the governance of IS sourcing solutions. You will develop knowledge of the concepts, tools and methodologies used in the negotiation and development of an IS sourcing strategy.
INFS6004 Business Transformation Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: individual research assignment (15%), individual problem-based assignment (35%), and group problem-based assignment (50%)
The forces that currently drive business transformation, such as globalization, the IT revolution and environmental sustainability, require businesses to be in a constant state of change to stay competitive in turbulent markets. However, as companies need to maintain their current revenue streams, they need to progress through a series of integrated business transformation projects. In this unit you will learn how to analyse an organisation within a local and global context and develop your knowledge of techniques required for managing technology-enabled business transformation projects. Topics covered include: the drivers of business transformation, managing change as a process, analysing information and processes, and planning, leading, sustaining, diffusing and learning from transformational projects.
INFS6012 Enterprise Systems Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: midsemester test (35%), individual enterprise system portfolio (35%), and group report (30%)
Note: This is a defined elective unit of study in both the Master of Professional Accounting and the Master of Commerce programs.
In this unit you will explore the strategic managerial issues that arise from the implementation and use of Enterprise Systems as a means of integrating data and standardising processes. You will use a combination of practical sessions with an Enterprise System, such as SAP, and analyses based on readings of case studies to explore the long-term effects of strategic implementation decisions, and issues with regard to Enterprise System implementation projects. You will also explore the emergence and implications of cloud-based Enterprise Systems, and the part that Enterprise Systems play in an organisation's broader information infrastructure.
INFS6015 Business Process Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: individual assignment (35%), group assignment (25%), and final exam (40%)
This unit provides students with an overview of the business process architecture and life cycle from a management perspective. It provides a detailed understanding of the concepts, strategies, tools and technologies required for modelling, analysis, design, improvement, integration, performance measurement and governance of business processes (both intra- and inter-enterprise) in any organisational and/or value chain context and relevant industry standards. The unit also develops practical skills in modelling, redesigning and improving business processes using various business process management software tools/suites.
INFS6016 Technology Enabled Business Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: individual research assignment (15%), individual problem-based assignment (35%), and group problem-based assignment (50%)
This unit will assist you to develop knowledge and skills in innovative, technology-enabled business models and strategies from a management perspective. It will enable you to better understand and apply the concepts, strategies, tools and technologies necessary for undertaking business innovation. From basic knowledge of business models and essential business processes, this unit will increase your awareness and understanding of stakeholders, their capabilities and their limitations in the strategic convergence of technology and business. It will increase your insights into the technology and infrastructure required to support commerce in the 21st Century and will support development of your capabilities to analyse, develop and evaluate innovative technology-enabled business strategies and models.
INFS6018 Managing Business Intelligence

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: tutorial work (10%), mid-session exam (30%), practical assignment (20%), and final exam (40%)
Business Intelligence (BI), increasingly known as Business Analytics, is a major source of competitive advantage in the Information Age and is therefore a leading business priority globally. In recent times, this field has evolved from a technology topic to a management priority, creating an unprecedented demand for new management skills. Taking a business rather than technology perspective, this unit covers all aspects of the enterprise BI ecosystem in the context of strategic and operational BI, including all five stages of BI evolution. Topics include assessment and management of organisational data quality, multidimensional data modelling and integration, management of structured and unstructured data (including those created by social media), business aspects of data warehousing, innovation through advanced analytics, BI driven performance management, business process intelligence, active enterprise intelligence, and management of complex BI projects. Participation in the unit will give you access to the largest world-wide community of BI academics and industry practitioners called TUN (www.TeradataUniversityNetwork.com). The hands-on experience in using a commercial BI platform, combined with in-depth analytical skills, will enable you to help any organization (regardless of its size and industry domain) to derive more intelligence from its data and compete on analytics. This unit does not require programming experience; it is suitable for both current and aspiring BI practitioners as well as general business practitioners from any functional area interested to learn how to start and lead BI-related initiatives.
INFS6020 BIS Innovation, Transformation & Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: presentation and individual project (100%)
Note: Students must seek permission from the Discipline of Business Information Systems to enrol in this unit.
The unit serves as a capstone for the extended (6 unit) MCom (BIS) major and is structured around a semester long business innovation project. This project will consolidate learning from prior Business Information Systems units of study, integrate learning from other units of study in the degree, and extend knowledge, skills and capabilities to contribute to business innovation, transformation and change. The project will allow you to demonstrate your ability to critically synthesise and apply BIS tools, methods, models and frameworks with cross-disciplinary business analysis, communication and research skills. The overarching capability is to prepare a full business case for innovation to address a business problem or to seize a business opportunity. Knowledge and skills will include critical analysis of business problems in an organisation, specification of requirements, identification of options and the creative design of practical, technology-enabled business innovations to implement selected options. The business case will include planning for project implementation, management of change, risk management and evaluation of project outcomes.
INFS6021 Information Governance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: group project (30%), individual research essay (30%) and final exam (40%)
Information governance is a major business imperative in the digital information society, as the volume, velocity and variety of information grows. Designing and implementing an effective information governance program to improve business operations and decision-making, to protect critical and sensitive information and to meet audit, litigation and compliance obligations involves multiple stakeholders and encompasses different information formats, technologies and domains. This unit of study examines the different stakeholders, standards, processes, technologies, methods and tools required in information governance. It covers a wide range of applications including the development of a business case, assessing current information needs and requirements, establishing standards and policies, as well as developing the necessary capabilities for effective information governance.
INFS6030 Project Management in Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Group assignments (10% and 20%) and individual assessments (20% and 50%)
Note: This is a compulsory unit for the Project Management Specialisation in the Master of Commerce program.
Drawing upon the knowledge and skills you have developed from other units in the project management specialisation you will examine the different requirements for strategy and operations oriented projects. You will enhance your understanding and experience of real work projects by undertaking structured assessments of historical projects in a variety of contexts based upon the components of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). You will also learn how PMBOK is applied currently in industry - including a presentation from a project management expert practitioner. The unit culminates in you developing a project charter and undertaking project planning in a business setting of relevance to your interests.
INFS6101 Information Systems Research A

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: Research supervision meetings as required Assessment: dissertation (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Students must seek permission from the Discipline of Business Information Systems to enrol in this unit.
This unit is intended for students wishing to complete their degree with a significant research component. Students complete a research project design in a special topic of interest related to Information, Systems, or Process Management. This unit provides the opportunity for students to complete intensive study in Business Information Management. In the absence of formal classes, students are required to conduct an in-depth literature review, understand select justify an appropriate research methodology, and produce a research protocol/design for the topic of interest. Students taking this unit will be supervised by an academic member of staff in an area of contemporary relevance.
INFS6106 Information Systems Research B

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: dissertation (80%) and poster presentation (20%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Students must seek permission from the Discipline of Business Information Systems to enrol in this unit.
This unit is intended for students wishing to complete their degree with a significant research component within the BIS major. This unit provides the opportunity for students to complete intensive study in Business Information Management. Students taking this unit will have successfully completed INFS6101. Students will conduct desk research in a special topic of interest related to Information, Systems, or Process Management, and based upon the results of their work in INFS6101. In the absence of formal classes, students are required to conduct secondary research, report on and analyse the data that they collect, and produce relevant and critical research findings for the topic of interest. Students will produce a dissertation and poster presentation of their research. Students taking this unit will be supervised by an academic member of staff in an area of contemporary relevance.

ITLS - Institute of Transport and Logistics Studies

ITLS5000 Foundations of Supply Chain Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Alan Win Session: Classes: 12 x 3.5 hour lectures, 6 x 3 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual report (35%), group report (15%), quiz (10%), group presentation (10%), exam (30%)
Note: This is the foundation unit for all logistics and supply chain management programs and should be completed in the first period of study. Students demonstrating extensive practical experience in the logistics industry may apply to substitute an alternative logistics management unit of study for this unit. Students should send their resume with a covering email outlining their experience to the Postgraduate Coordinator for Logistics Management, Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya: jyotirmoyee.bhattacharjya@sydney.edu.au
Managing an organisation's logistics and supply chain management was for many years a neglected management activity. As a result of an article in Fortune in 1962 written by Peter Drucker, businesses became aware that 50 percent of each dollar consumers spent on goods financed activities that occur after the goods leave the factory, thus focusing attention on the potential efficiency savings that managing these activities could achieve. In the 50 years that has passed, business has seen massive changes; a complete management discipline has been built resulting in the integration and coordination of materials flows into, through, and out of, manufacturing facilities achieving exceptionally high levels of productivity. Logistics and supply chain management now plays a major role in implementing organisational strategy and in many industries has sole responsibility for managing customer service. An understanding of the role of this activity within an organisation and how an understanding of logistics and supply chains can assist business managers to better respond to market opportunities is essential for business students. Students undertaking this unit will be given a solid grounding in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management, and how knowledge of these concepts can contribute towards a strategically effective and operationally efficient organisation or network of organisations.
Textbooks
Pienaar WJ and Vogt JJ (2009) Business logistics management: A supply chain perspective
ITLS5200 Quantitative Logistics & Transport

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Geoffrey Clifton Session: Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 6 x 3.5 hour computer laboratory. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: In-class quizzes (20%), computer exams (2) (50%), final exam (30%)
Successful logistics, transport and infrastructure management relies on the ability to analyse and transform data into usable information to support decision making. This course teaches both the theory and practice of quantitative analysis. Students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making but emphasis is placed on how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis. Computer based workshops complement the lectures and provide students with highly marketable skills in MS Excel.
Textbooks
Rose J and Beck M (2007) Basic Quantitative Analysis for Management
ITLS6001 Value Chain Costing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor David Walters Session: Classes: 8 x 3.5 hours lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: In-class exams (4) (40%), presentation (20%), essay (10%), exam (30%)
Networked organisations are becoming a significant organisational structure in manufacturing and distribution. This unit develops students' understanding of the finance and accounting activities that need to be undertaken during the value adding processes that a business must fulfil. Emphasis is placed on the network aspects of costing processes and activities but relevant financial topics that impact on value chain network structures will also be introduced, such as financial and operational gearing, alternative methods of financing the operations activities, and risk management. Of importance is the notion of added value and how its quantitative value may be calculated as the aggregate added value accumulated within the value chain network; for example a cell phone may cross a number of international borders during manufacture and distribution, value is added by each process but what is the total value added and how much? This introduces another topic; how do we share the value generated by a network organisation among the network members? Answers to these questions need to be resolved to ensure the long-term growth and survival of the value chain network.
Textbooks
Hansen D and Mowen M (2013) Cornerstones of Cost management; Walsh C (2008) Key Management Ratios
ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Collins Session: Classes: 7 x 3.5 hour lectures, 5 x 3.5 hour computer laboratory. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Assignments (60%), exams (40%)
This unit provides a detailed coverage of various analytical tools, techniques and software which are used both strategically and operationally in a wide range of logistics and supply chain contexts. Emphasis in the unit is on which tools to use and when to use them in order to improve overall performance and reduce costs in operating within supply chains. All techniques are implemented practically, and in addition, students are exposed to the SAP enterprise resource planning tool. Topics covered include inventory control, the optimisation of transportation flows, facility location, project management, and the role of ERP and other software in solving these problems. The unit is taught in lecture and laboratory formats.
Textbooks
Magal SR and Word J (2012) Integrated Business Processes with ERP Systems
ITLS6003 Contemporary Procurement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya Session: Classes: 8 x 3.5 hour lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quiz (x2) (60%), individual report (20%), group report (20%)
Globalisation of supply markets and changing regulatory environments pose new challenges for strategic procurement. This unit explores the role that procurement departments in both manufacturing and service sectors can play in generating cost savings for companies competing in volatile global marketplaces. Students will gain practice-based insights into internal and external relationship management issues, category-specific sourcing strategies, sourcing risks, and, spend management and contract management strategies. The unit will draw on a number of international cases to illustrate key concepts. The content is suitable for both early career procurement professionals as well as students considering procurement as a future career option.
Textbooks
Sollish F and Semanik J (2011) Strategic Global Sourcing Best Practices; Sollish F and Semanik J (2012) The Procurement and Supply Manager's Desk Reference; Monczka RM, Handfield RB, Guinipero LC and Patterson JL (2011) Purchasing and Supply Chain Management
ITLS6004 Warehouse & Inventory Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya Session: Classes: 8 x 3.5 hour lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quiz (x2) (60%), individual report (20%), group report (20%)
Warehouses play an important role in supply chain management and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. This unit provides students with an in depth understanding of key topics in warehouse and inventory management including warehouse design, warehouse processes, stock counting, costs, performance, outsourcing, and environmental impacts. Warehouses also continue to evolve with advances in technology. The unit examines the role of evolving technologies and the GS1 standard in the context of warehouse and inventory management. Case studies and software packages will be used to aid learning wherever applicable.
Textbooks
Richards G (2011) Warehouse Management: a complete guide to improving efficiency and minimizing costs in the modern warehouse
ITLS6005 Production, Retail & Reverse Logistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya Session: Classes: 8 x 3.5 hour lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quizzes (x2) (60%), individual report (20%), group report (20%)
Globalisation of customer and supplier markets, technological innovations, consumer demand volatility and sustainability concerns have led to increasing focus on production, retail and reverse logistics processes. Interactions between retailers and end-customers inform retail strategy and operational decisions such as merchandising, sourcing and customer service. These decisions, in turn, influence manufacturing approaches and reverse logistics planning. Manufacturing logistics decision making processes include sales and operations planning, raw material sourcing, manufacturing planning and control and green manufacturing/re-manufacturing decisions. Government regulations and the potential for achieving competitive advantage within a particular industry sector have served to increase the importance of closed-loop supply chain/reverse logistics planning. This unit highlights the interconnection between these dimensions of supply chain decision-making using illustrative case studies.
Textbooks
Emmett S and Sood V (2010) Green supply chains: an action manifesto
ITLS6006 Supply Chain Organisational Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Lok Session: Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 3 x 3.5 hour seminars, 3 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Group debate (20%), individual assignment (40%), final class test (40%)
This unit provides an integrated approach to both micro and macro aspects of organisational behaviour in relation to the supply chain industry. This unit examines actions at three different levels of analysis: the individual, the group and the organisation and is presented in three parts. Part 1 covers the strategic thinking and the general environment affecting the work place. It also examines the fundamentals of individual at work. Part 2 focuses on leadership, work teams, and power and conflict in organisations. Part 3 attends to organisational structure, culture and strategic change management. The integration of these three parts will provide students with effective leadership behaviour and management competencies which will enable students to participate more successfully within the supply chain industry. Case study analysis will provide students with a realistic exposure to the organisational issues currently existing in supply chain management.
ITLS6007 Disaster Relief Operations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jersey Seipel Session: Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 6 x 3.5 hours workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual essay (25%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%)
Large scale, sudden onset disasters strike with little or no warning. In their wake they leave shattered infrastructure, collapsed services and traumatised populations, while the number of dead, injured and homeless often reaches staggering proportions. Humanitarian aid organisations, such as the Red Cross, Doctors without Borders or Oxfam, to name just a few, are usually amongst the first responders, but depend on extremely agile supply chains to support their worldwide operations. Successful disaster relief missions are characterised by the ability of professionals to cope with time pressure, high uncertainty and unusual restrictions. This unit is designed as an introduction to the coordination and management of humanitarian aid and emergency response logistics. Case studies of real events, such as the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake provide the framework for analysis and research, while discussion of operational factors, simulations, workshops and group exercises offer students an interactive learning environment.
Textbooks
Christopher M and Tatham P (2011) Humanitarian Logistics
ITLS6100 Logistics & Transport Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor John Rose Session: Classes: 9 x 3.5 hour lectures, 3 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: In-class quizzes (x4) (20%), final report (25%), final presentation (30%), take home exam (25%)
Economic concepts within a setting of logistics and transport systems are part of the essential toolkit necessary to inform efficient and effective strategic and policy outcomes. Markets and the regulatory process define key elements of how an economy can influence the performance of logistics and transport businesses. This unit focuses on identifying frameworks and concepts drawn from the mainstream economics discipline that are of especial relevance to the study of the structure, conduct and performance of logistics and transport businesses in both the private and public sectors, as well as the passenger and freight sectors. Major themes include the regulatory and institutional environment, the role of markets and competition, understanding demand for services, the role of pricing, and how to establish appropriate costs in service provision.
ITLS6101 Global Freight Logistics Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rico Merkert Session: Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 3 x 3.5 hour seminars, 3 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual report (30%), quiz (x2) (30%), exercise (40%)
This unit seeks to give students an understanding of the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit will discuss underlying drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different freight transport modes, as well as industry structure, regulatory environment (customs, etc.) and market access. Building on this background the unit will highlight the implications for profitable air cargo and shipping operations. Particular focus will be given to fleet and network planning, revenue and cost management. The material covered in the unit will take into account recent developments in global and regional economic activity and discuss implications for the various sectors of the air, sea and intermodal freight businesses. This unit covers operators, customers and investors perspectives and strategies and intermodal freight businesses.
Textbooks
Morrell P (2011) Moving Boxes By Air: The Economics of International Air Cargo
ITLS6107 GIS for Transport Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Stephen Greaves Session: Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 6 x 3.5 hour computer laboratory. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual tutorial exercises using GIS software (25%), team project using GIS software with group and individual component (35%), team presentation with group and individual component (15%), final exam (25%)
The efficient and effective management, display and analysis of spatial information are integral skills for contemporary transportation, logistics and infrastructure professionals. Meeting these requirements has been revolutionised by the development of Geographical Information Systems (GIS). This unit introduces students to the theory and practice of GIS, with a particular focus on applications in transportation, logistics and infrastructure management. The unit begins by introducing students to the 'building blocks' of GIS systems, including data structures, relational databases, spatial queries and analysis. We then focus on sources of spatial data including GPS, remote sensing, and web-based sources highlighting both the potential and challenges associated with integrating each data source within a GIS environment. The unit then takes a hands-on focus, using the latest GIS software to analyse several problems of interest (e.g., establishing demand for a new rail/bus service, planning a routing and scheduling service for a delivery firm, or identifying aircraft noise violations around an airport). Students completing the unit will be able to conduct and evaluate a GIS case study in terms of implementation of a data model, the use of appropriate GIS tools and techniques, benefits and barriers of the implemented system, and how the system could be improved. This unit will appeal to all students interested in the spatial impact of decision-making.
ITLS6300 Maritime Management & Logistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Bell Session: Classes: 7 x 3.5 hour lectures, 1 x 3.5 hour seminar, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quizzes (x5) (50%), presentation (10%), essay (40%)
This unit conveys the fundamentals of maritime logistics and positions each student to become a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods of maritime logistics. The unit commences with a review of world seaborne trade, trends and cycles in the industry. This includes a review of ship types, ship life cycles, and the markets for new and second hand ships. There is an analysis of competition and efficiency in maritime logistics, including the impact of vertical and horizontal integration, alliances, freight stabilisation agreements and conferences. Ship owning, financing, chartering and insurance are covered in detail. Ship certification, flag state control, and the role of the IMO are described. Intermodal supply chains are studied for both bulk and containerised freight. Tramp and liner shipping is covered, with a detailed look at routing and scheduling for liner operations. Presentations by maritime professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Review of Maritime Transport, 2011 and 2012
ITLS6301 Ports Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Bell Session: Classes: 7 x 3.5 hour lectures, 1 x 3.5 hour seminar, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quizzes (x5) (50%), presentation (10%), essay (40%)
This unit conveys the fundamentals of port management and thus develops each student into a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods for the port industry. The unit comprehensively covers all aspects of management from planning and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact for all types of port. Technological changes and their implications for the port industry, in particular container terminal automation, are studied. The role of ports in global supply chains is analysed. The relationship of ports with their hinterlands as well as the concept of port-centric logistics is looked at in detail. The port-city interface as well as waterfront redevelopment is covered, with examples drawn from a number of countries. Port policy and the importance of competition and/or regulation are presented. Talks by port professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Review of Maritime Transport, 2011 and 2012; World Bank (2011) World Bank Port Reform Toolkit
ITLS6302 Maritime Case Studies & Simulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaowen Fu Session: Classes: 7 x 3.5 hour lectures, 1 x 3.5 hour seminar, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual report (40%), group presentation (20%), individual assignments (40%)
This unit provides students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in previous units to real business problems in the maritime sector. The unit provides an overview of the maritime industry, identifying key opportunities and challenges in major economies and regions, and examines case studies related to shipping logistics and port management. Topics covered will include: shipping logistics, ship building market dynamics and fleet planning, the shipping industry business cycle, shipping conferences and alliances, shipping safety and insurance, port management and development, including labour relations management, hinterland access and inter-port competition, port congestion management and policy, port productivity benchmarking, port security and state control, port city and urban development. The unit emphasises problem-based learning, peer learning, group analysis and debate. Students taking this unit will have the opportunity to enhance their skills in business analysis and industry report evaluation.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; McCarthy SP (2001) Transportation Economics - theory and practice: a case study approach
ITLS6400 Airline Strategy and Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rico Merkert Session: Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 3 x 3.5 hour seminars, 3 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Assignments (50%), quiz (10%), presentation (20%), exam (20%)
Aviation is an international growth industry offering extensive commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, banks, consultancies and other players along the aviation supply chain. This unit covers all aspects of international business and management along the aviation value chain from consumer, producer and investor perspectives. Students develop an understanding of the economics of operating airlines and other aviation entities, including implications of competitive strategies for the development of hubs and networks. The growth in air traffic particularly in the Asia/Pacific region is placing strains on aviation capacity and the unit thus covers forecasting and the role of the private sector in airline/airport development. The unit also examines the management and logistics of air services in remote regions. As a result of our strategic partnership with CAPA, students will have access to industry data bases, company information and aviation contacts/networks.
Textbooks
Doganis R (2010) Flying Off Course
ITLS6401 Airport Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaowen Fu Session: Classes: 5 x 3.5 hour lectures, 2 x 3.5 hour seminars, 5 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Essay (40%), quiz (20%), group presentation (20%), exam (20%)
Airports play an integral role in the aviation system, and contribute significantly to the economic growth of a region, or even a country. This unit covers major aspects of airport management, operation and public policy. The unit's learning objectives are two-fold. Firstly, it provides students with the core knowledge and insights concerning the key issues and decisions involved in the operation and management of airports in a rapidly changing regulatory environment. Secondly, it develops the skills for applying various applied economics and management knowledge to the airport industry. The unit assists students to understand more fully the business related problems encountered by commercial, industrial and public organisations in the airport industry. It also develops an ability to interpret results from relevant economic / management studies.
Textbooks
De Neufville R, Odoni A, Belobaba P and Reynolds T (2013) Airport Systems; Planning, Design and Management; Ashford N, Stanton M, Moore C, Coutu P and Beasley J (2012) Airport Operations; Belobaba P, Odoni A and Barnhart C (2009) The Global Airline Industry
ITLS6402 Aviation Case Studies & Simulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rico Merkert Session: Classes: 1 x 3.5 hour lecture, 5 x 3.5 hour seminars, 6 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual assignment (30%), group airline simulation (30%), group case study presentation (20%), individual quiz (20%)
Aviation is an international growth industry offering extensive commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, banks, consultancies and other players along the aviation supply chain. This unit builds on the knowledge gained in previous aviation units relating the key themes to real world industry examples. Students are required to test their understanding in case studies, workshops and an airline simulation updated weekly and to do so both on an individual level but also in team work environments. The learning content is supplemented by presentations from senior managers from the aviation industry.
Textbooks
Doganis R (2010) Flying Off Course; Wensveen JG (2011) Air transportation - A management perspective; Morrell PS (2011) Moving boxes by air; Morrell PS (2007) Airline finance
ITLS6500 Decision Making on Mega Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Beck Session: Classes: 8 x 3.5 hour lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quiz (15%), essay (30%), group (25%), exam (30%)
In the majority of instances, infrastructure projects involve significant levels of investment in assets that are crucial to the economic performance of public or private entities. In this unit, students are introduced to the concept of infrastructure and develop an understanding of infrastructure as a system of interrelated physical components and how those components affect, and are affected by, society, politics, economics, and the environment. They will gain an understanding of the role of management characteristics, planning, innovation, competition, risk and uncertainty, and the private versus public sector in the decision making process with respect to mega projects.
Textbooks
Priemus H, Flyvberg B and van Wee B (2008) Decision Making on Mega-Projects; Flyvberg B, Bruzelius N and Rothengatter W (2003) Megaprojects and Risk: An Anatomy of Ambition; Penn MR and Parker PJ (2012) Introduction to Infrastructure: An Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering; Brett M and Frischmann BM (2012) Infrastructure: The Social Value of Shared Resources

MIBS - International Business

MIBS6007 International Business Project

Credit points: 12 Session: Assessment: Project report and presentation (60%) and assurance learning portfolio (40%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Int December,Int July
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The International Business Project is completed at the end of the Master of International Business program or International Business specialisation within the Master of Commerce. Students will engage in a real life miniconsulting project where they will work on a project brief provided by participating companies and designed in consultation with academic staff. Students will work in small groups of approximately three to five students, and supervised by an academic member of staff. Project work is expected to be completed over a cumulative twelve-week period, and will aim primarily at defining and solving problems related to the relevant international dimensions of the participating company's operations. Projects may be with companies based in Australia or overseas. Overseas projects may include an international study tour that the Discipline may organize from time to time. While most projects will be sourced and organized by the Discipline of International Business, under exceptional circumstances, the Unit Coordinators and / or the Program Director
may also allow students to work on their own projects. On completion of the project, students will be expected to demonstrate that they have achieved the program learning goals.

MKTG - Marketing

MKTG5001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: case analysis presentation (10%), in-class discussion (8%), mid-term exam (20%), team presentation (15%), team marketing plan (25%), final exam (20%), and research participation (2%)
This unit introduces students to the basic principles and language of marketing theory and practice. Marketing principles are examined in relation to a wide variety of products and services, in both commercial and non-commercial domains. A strong emphasis is placed on strategy planning and the marketing decision process. Students learn via the analysis of case studies drawn from the Asia-Pacific region, as well as the USA. The unit is presented in four sections. These are: (a) introduction to marketing and the marketing management process, (b) strategic issues in marketing - focusing on the preliminary analyses that are required before a marketing decision can be made, (c) the marketing mix - a detailed look at the components that make up a marketing plan, and (d) marketing planning, implementation and control processes. Students gain practical experience in analysing marketing situations and developing a comprehensive marketing plan.
MKTG6001 Marketing Research Concepts

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: group term project (38%), 2 x exams (48%), research participation (4%), and class participation (10%)
This unit provides an introduction to marketing research and an overview of the industry. The major components of marketing research projects are discussed and students gain an insight into understanding and structuring research problems. The unit also gives an overview of primary, secondary and internal sources of data as well as advanced methods and techniques of research.
MKTG6003 Marketing Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: in-class participation & blackboard discussion (15%), case study analysis (20%), foundation business simulation (20%), computer simulation presentation (10%), and final exam (35%)
A survey of marketing strategy and planning. Topics include: environmental and situational analyses; SWOT analysis; alternative identification and evaluation; marketing research to inform strategic decision making; selection of alternatives and implementation of strategy; the role of the marketing mix elements in marketing strategy; sustainable and non-sustainable advantages; competitive intelligence; the strategic role of quality; monitoring customer satisfaction; problem and opportunity identification.
MKTG6004 New Product Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: group case analysis (35%), group presentation (15%), exam (30%), individual participation (10%), and participation portfolio (10%)
New products and services are crucial to successful growth and increased profits in many industries. Students are introduced to the development and marketing of new products and services in both the private and public sectors. A product development assignment is carried out to reinforce the material covered and to provide realistic examples of how new products are designed, tested and launched.
MKTG6005 Marketing Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: Intensive - 6 days, 9:30am-5pm Assessment: in-class participation (18%), individual assignments (20%), research component (2%), group project (30%), and final exam (30%)
This unit provides a theoretical and practical perspective on the role of marketing communications in the marketing process, planning and implementation. The unit focuses on the role of different media (television, radio, print, outdoor, cinema, Internet) and covers various aspects of advertising and promotions management including: mass media advertising, in-store advertising, sales promotion, public relations, sponsorships, and personal selling.
MKTG6006 Creative Communications in Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: Block intensive - 6 days, 9am - 4:30pm Assessment: individual participation (13%), two individual assignments (2x25%), research component (2%), and one group project (35%)
There has been a steady shift in the focus of creative communication decisions away from traditional advertising agencies to specialist creative services providers. Alternative ways to produce, implement and monitor creative communications have been developed. This unit explores changes that have taken place and focuses on new principles of developing and evaluating creative communications. Topics include: developments in media and modes of delivery; implications of the shift from ownership towards access; the role of the visual in cross cultural marketing; attitudinal monitoring; identifying creative issues and developing creative marketing material; the client relationship; examining areas of contention in creative communications and working with creative strategies.
MKTG6007 Consumer Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignment (20%), Group assignment (30%), Presentation of group assignment (10%), Tutorial preparation portfolio (15%), and Final exam (25%)
This unit explores the processes that govern why consumers buy (and don't buy), and what possessions mean to them. Students learn to apply the concepts, principles, and theories from various social sciences to the study of factors that influence the acquisition and consumption of products, services and ideas. Specifically, principles from economics, psychology, sociology, social psychology, cultural anthropology and human geography are used to describe and explain consumer behaviour.
MKTG6013 International and Global Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: participation (20%), exam (30%), final assignment written project (30%), final assignment presentation (18%), and research component (2%)+M26
This unit introduces students to international marketing using the marketing concept. It firstly considers environmental factors and then studies how marketing strategies are affected by those environmental factors. It aims to give students an awareness and understanding of international marketing concepts and highlight their importance in a rapidly changing global economy. Additionally it aims to develop student skills in designing and implementing marketing strategies in diverse international and global contexts. Topics such as Market size assessment, foreign market selection, and strategies; International and global products, services and brands, Funding, financing, budgeting, and pricing for int'l markets; Int'l distribution channels and logistics; and Int'l promotions (global vs multinational approaches) will be specific to international marketing. Yet, some topics/chapters covered in this unit may overlap with topics in various International Business units (IBUS) relating to international environment, internationalisation of firms, culture and foreign market entry strategies.
MKTG6015 Digital and Social Media Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: Intensive - 6 days 9am-5pm Assessment: lab exercises (25%), group project presentation (25%), individual reflections (25%), and final 3hr exam (25%)
This subject introduces students to emerging interactive technologies, most notably social media tools, and discusses ways in which these technologies can be exploited by businesses to more effectively serve markets. We examine how marketing-related functions are changed by the potential of these technologies, and how these new technologies can become key components of the organization's strategic marketing efforts. This course starts from the premise that savvy consumers are increasingly participating in brands rather than merely receiving their messages, and explores how marketers can stoke conversations, co-create experiences and stories, and build engaging relationships with consumers.
MKTG6016 Brand Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: contribution/participation (10%), brand audit/s (15%), branding topic paper (25%), brand plan presentation (15%), and brand plan (35%)
The most important intangible asset of any business is its brand. The company's name, symbols and slogans along with their underlying associations, perceived quality, name awareness, customer base and related proprietary resources form the basis for brand equity. Most new brands that are introduced, fail because of the lack of proper market research and analysis about positioning. The core of successfully establishing a brand lies in accurate positioning strategies. This unit helps students understand the concept of brand equity and the management of brand assets by learning to strategically create, position, develop and protect brand equity.
MKTG6020 Business Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: Block intensive - 6 days, 9am - 4:30pm Assessment: participation (20%), case study assignment (30%), and group assignment (50%)
Business marketing is concerned with the marketing of products and services to other businesses and institutions. It involves selecting, developing and managing customer relationships in line with the skills, resources, strategy and objectives of both the supplier and customer companies. Traditionally, business marketing was approached using the '4P's' framework. This unit exposes students not only to the traditional view but contrasts that approach with the interactions, relationships and networks approach to business marketing. The unit aims to develop students into more complete marketers, capable of operating within the dynamic business marketing environment.
MKTG6103 Services Marketing

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Participation (20%), exam (30%), final assignment written project (30%), final assignment presentation (18%), and Research component (2%)
Today's economy is dominated by service industries. Service industries account for almost 80 per cent of Australia's GDP and will generate virtually all the growth in new jobs. It is likely that students will spend most of their career in organisations that create or deliver services. This unit is designed to prepare students for senior marketing roles in today's "new" economy. It explores the unique characteristics of service organisations and distinctive marketing approaches required for success. It is acknowledged that there are significant differences between services marketing and goods marketing. Services are by nature different from products, and therefore lead to a set of different marketing challenges faced by service-based organisations such as those in tourism, hospitality, health care, aviation, banking, financial, accounting, medical and legal services industries. Most traditional marketing texts primarily focus on the marketing of physical goods. While these texts obviously provide valuable learning and insight, they are inadequate in preparing students for the marketing skills required in today's dynamic and service-based economies. The unit focuses on those aspects of services that require differential understanding and execution than in a product-marketing environment. Customer care, quality dimension, complaint management, relationship marketing, pricing, and how to use service as a competitive advantage are the other primary areas of interest covered by the unit.
MKTG6104 The Psychology of Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: major assignment (34%), mid session examination (15%), minor assignment (15%), class participation (4%), final examination (30%), and research component (2%)
Given limitations in their ability to process information, humans adopt a variety of heuristics or "rules of thumb" when making judgements or decisions regarding business problems, product choice and consumption options, and in their personal lives. The evolution of these heuristics over time has ensured that they produce generally good outcomes across a variety of contexts. However, they also lead to systematic, and sometimes substantial, errors in certain cases. This unit of study will help students understand biases in human decision making, and how they influence business and consumer decisions in everyday life. For each decision domain, the psychological heuristic is contrasted with the logical rule for producing an optimal outcome.

QBUS - Business Analytics

QBUS5001 Quantitative Methods for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: Basic skills assessment (5%), weekly online problem (10%), assignments (20%), midsemester exam (25%), and final exam (40%)
This unit highlights the importance of statistical methods and tools for today's managers and analysts, and demonstrates how to apply these methods to business problems using real-world data. The quantitative skills that students will learn in this unit will be useful in all areas of business. Through taking this unit students will learn how to model and analyse the relationships within business data; how to identify the appropriate statistical technique in different business environments; how to compute statistics by hand and using special purpose software; how to interpret results in the context of the business problem; and how to forecast using business data. The unit will be taught through data-driven examples, exercises and business case studies.
QBUS6310 Business Operations Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial Assessment: Individual assignment (20%), mid-semester exam (30%), and final exam (50%)
Business operations are the activities that businesses carry out to create value. This unit provides the models needed to analyse business operations of a company or organisation and make management decisions on operational issues. It covers business operations in both manufacturing and service industries, looking at processes, supply chains and quality issues. Topics covered may include the modelling of manufacturing operations and related group technologies, the modelling of financial service operations (e.g. brokerage operations), and the operations implications of internet technologies.
QBUS6320 Management Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: Individual assignment (30%), mid-semester exam (20%), and final exam (50%)
The unit introduces models and tools for decision analysis and their application in managerial settings. The unit will focus on the use of formal decision methods for management decisions in business. The main goal of this unit is to show how these decision models can improve the decision process by helping the decision maker to understand the structure of decisions; use subjective probabilities for measuring risk; analyse sensitivity of decisions to changing decision parameters; quantify outcomes in accordance with risk attitudes; and estimate the value of information. Special attention will be paid to informal interpretations of formal decision approaches.
QBUS6810 Statistical Learning and Data Mining

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: Group project (25%), in class seminars (25%), and final exam (50%)
It is now common for businesses to have access to very rich information data sets, often generated automatically as a byproduct of the main institutional activity of a firm or business unit. Data Mining deals with inferring and validating patterns, structures and relationships in data, as a tool to support decisions in the business environment. This unit offers an insight into the main statistical methodologies for the visualization and the analysis of business and market data. It provides the tools necessary to extract information required for specific tasks such as credit scoring, prediction and classification, market segmentation and product positioning. Emphasis will be given to business applications of data mining using modern software tools.
QBUS6820 Business Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr class per week Assessment: individual assignment (30%), mid-semester exam (20%), and final exam (50%)
This unit provides the basic knowledge and tools needed to understand and manage risk. It includes business cases to illustrate the nature of risk and risk management strategies. The main focus of the unit is on quantitative approaches to analysing risk through understanding the probability distributions involved. Topics covered include: Value at Risk calculations; Prospect theory for decisions under risk; Extreme value theory; Monte-Carlo simulation; Stochastic optimization; Credit scoring; Real options and Hedging strategies.
QBUS6830 Financial Time Series and Forecasting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial Assessment: Individual assignment (15%), mid-semester exam (15%), group assignment (40%), and final exam (30%)
Time series and statistical modelling is a fundamental component of the theory and practice of modern financial asset pricing as well as financial risk measurement and management. Further, forecasting is a required component of financial and investment decision making. This unit firstly provides an introduction to the time series models used for the analysis of data arising in financial markets. Second, it considers methods for forecasting, testing and sensitivity analyses, in the context of these models. Topics include: the properties of financial return data; the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM); financial return factor models, with known and unknown factors, in panel data settings; modelling and forecasting conditional volatility, via ARCH and GARCH; forecasting market risk measures such as Value at Risk. Emphasis will be placed on applications involving the analysis of many real market datasets. Students will be encouraged to undertake hands-on analysis using an appropriate computing package.
QBUS6840 Predictive Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial Assessment: Assignment (30%), Mid-semester exam (30%), and Final exam (40%)
To be effective in a competitive business environment, a business analyst needs to be able to use predictive analytics to translate information into decision and to convert information about past performance into reliable forecasts. An effective analyst also should be able to identify the analytical tools and data structures to anticipate market trends. In this course, students gain skills required to succeed in today's highly analytical and data-driven economy. This course introduces the basics of data management, business forecasting, decision trees, logistic regression, and predictive modelling. The course features corporate case studies and hands-on exercises to demonstrate the concepts presented. the course makes use of SAS software.

WORK - Work and Organisational Studies

WORK5003 Management and Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mark Westcott Session: Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: quiz (10%), case Study (20%), essay (40%), and Either exam OR critical reflection (30%)
This unit aims to introduce students to the nature and context of management. It explores the functions and processes of management and encourages students to critically reflect on management theory and practice. It can be taken as a standalone unit for students enrolled in various specialist masters programs and also prepares students for further study in strategic management, organisational analysis and strategy and human resource management.
WORK6001 Organisational Analysis and Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Greg Patmore Session: Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: essay (40%), presentation (20%), and exam (40%)
This unit introduces students to the behaviour of people when acting as members of an organisation. The aim of the unit is to provide an understanding of the processes and structures that influence organisational behaviour, by drawing on ideas from psychology, sociology, management and anthropology. Topics covered include: personality and the self; learning and socialisation; motivation and commitment; group behaviour and dynamics; organisational design and boundaries; organisational culture, change and leadership.
WORK6002 Strategic Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Semester 1: Leanne Cutcher; Semester 2: Jane Le Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: Assignment (40%), exam (40%), and participation (20%)
The aim of this unit is to introduce the concept of strategy and explain its role in the management of organisations. The unit thus traces the development of strategic management as a field and examines different approaches to strategic management. WORK6002 introduces students to the classical strategy process of strategic analysis, strategy formulation and strategy implementation. This involves learning about and working with a range of strategy models and tools that can be used in the strategic management of organisations. In particular, a range of case studies is used to explore the practical application of these tools. The course also critically examines traditional views of strategy by introducing a range of current debates in the strategy field.
WORK6012 Industrial Relations Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Marian Baird Session: Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: policy analysis presentation (30%), policy report (30%), and essay (40%)
The aim of this unit is to provide an understanding of the policy debates in employment relations with an emphasis on laws, institutions and social processes. It combines theoretical and historical understandings of employment relations in Australia with a detailed examination of the current policies and strategies of the key employment relations players and the role of the state. Topics covered include: the regulatory framework, state and federal governments policies, union policy, employer policy, the practices of Australia's industrial tribunals and responses to current challenges, such as the quest for improved productivity and greater flexibility. Overarching themes include individualisation and decentralisation of employment relations policy in Australia and whether there are more suitable alternatives.
WORK6017 Human Resource Strategies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Semester 1: Angie Knox; Semester 2: Anna David Session: Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: essay (40%), presentation (20%), and exam (40%)
Note: Core unit for the MHRM&IR
This unit of study examines the theoretical foundations of strategic human resource management and then critically analyses the empirical evidence related to a range of HR strategies deployed in contemporary workplaces, both in Australia and internationally. In doing so, we will explore the issues underpinning emerging HR strategies, their implementation and the outcomes experienced within the organisation and the wider environment. The HR strategies studied will involve those that focus on managing a contemporary workforce and may include human resources strategies associated with: the management of front line workers, teams, non standard forms of employment, job quality and work-life balance, and gender and diversity at work, for example.
WORK6018 International Industrial Relations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Russell Lansbury Session: Classes: Intensive - 6 days, Fridays 6:00pm-9:00 pm and Saturdays 9:00am-6:00pm in Weeks 2, 3 and 6. Exam Friday 2 May. Assessment: essay (40%), seminar presentation and participation (20%), and in class test (40%)
This unit provides students with insights into the debate about the effect of globalisation on employment relations by using comparative analysis to identify the range of factors that account for similarities and difference in national patterns of industrial relations. The unit focuses on providing an understanding of the nature of industrial relations patterns in developed and developing market economies and invites students to compare a range of developments across these countries.
WORK6026 Organisational Change and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Maurizio Floris Session: Classes: Intensive - 6 days 10-5pm Assessment: assignment (50%), and exam (50%)
This unit seeks to develop diagnostic and prescriptive skills in relation to the management of organisational change while also encouraging the adoption of a critical perspective of the field. Part 1 (Organisational Change and the Nature of Organisations) introduces the fields of organisational change, explains its relevance to organisation performance and strategy and examines key change management models. Part 2 (Diagnosis and Intervention) examines the utility of key organisational change models and techniques and identifies factors that may impact on the effectiveness of the change management process. Part 3 (Key Areas of Intervention) analyses the application of organisational change practices and initiatives to a number of specific organisational issues.
WORK6030 Performance and Rewards

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Shields Session: Classes: 13 contact hrs per week x 3 weeks Assessment: performance management case analysis 2000 words (40%); in class quiz (20%); final 2 hour exam (30%); class participation (10%)
This unit examines the processes and practices associated with contemporary performance and reward management. Results-based, behaviourally-based and competency-based methods of performance management are examined, along with processes of performance review, planning and developing. Coverage of reward management issues includes: job- and person-based approaches to building base pay structures; methods for rewarding individual performance; work group incentives such as gainsharing, goal-sharing and team pay; methods of rewarding employees for organisational performance, including employee share ownership; and performance-related rewards for executives. The unit also examines approaches to developing strategically integrated performance and reward management systems.
WORK6117 Managing HR and Knowledge Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kristine Dery Session: Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: Essays (30%), Lab Exercise (20%) and exam (50%)
The application of computer-based information systems to virtually all facets of Human Resource Management (HRM) is currently transforming the way in which medium-sized to large-scale organisations are managing their Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS). This unit considers the nature, purpose and promise of HRIS, the managerial, technological and organisational factors driving its adoption, and its relationship to organisational knowledge, learning and decision-making.
WORK6118 Managing Communication in Organisations

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: virtual team exercise (30%), report (35%), and exam (35%)
This unit of study is designed to introduce students to the theory and practical application of the management of communication in organisations. Advances in technology have had a dramatic impact on communication in recent years and this course will pay particular attention to the impact of these technologies and the implications for management. By the end of this course students will have a good understanding of organisational communications theory including a comprehensive knowledge of the differing styles, channels and content of communication. In addition, they will have a sound understanding of the technological channels available to manage communication and the associated benefits and challenges that this brings to contemporary organisations. A significant amount of the course will be devoted to practical applications of communication strategies including case study analysis and experiential learning using virtual discussion boards.
WORK6119 The Innovative Firm

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Greg Patmore Session: Classes: Intensive - 6 days 10-5pm Assessment: case study reports (50%), seminar participation (10%) and exam (40%)
The aim of this course is to examine long run changes in the organisation and management of business enterprises. Against a background of an introduction of business history, the major themes to be covered include business strategy, marketing, employment relations, financing, governance and technology. While there is no precise chronological period, the main concentration will be on the growth of large-scale corporations from the nineteenth century to the present day. A major preoccupation of the course is to explore the factors that make an innovative firm. Some of these factors include the nature of the market, the regulatory environment, new technology and business leadership. The course will employ historical case studies and a comparative methodology and will also evaluate the way in which firms are classified as innovative by business and corporate historians.
WORK6120 Research Essay

Credit points: 6 Session: Assessment: research essay (100%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Available only to students who have achieved 75% or better in at least four WORK (or equivalent) units studied; and have the Discipline's permission to take the unit.
This unit provides high-performing with the opportunity to undertake supervised reading and research for a major essay of 5,000 words on an approved topic of special interest in work and organisational studies. The unit centres on supervised individual reading and research rather than on class-based teaching and learning. Enrolment is limited to students who (a) have achieved 75% or better in at least four WORK (or equivalent) units studied; and (b) have the Discipline's permission to do so. Approval is subject to supervisor availability. Students contemplating enrolment in this unit must first seek approval from the Work and Organisational Studies Postgraduate Coursework Coordinator. Approval will depend on the nature of the proposed essay topic and the availability of appropriate supervisory expertise.
WORK6130 Leadership in Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Eric Knight Session: Classes: 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: essays (30%), case studies (30%) and exam (40%)
This unit of study is designed to encourage you to consider the role and significance of leadership in various organisational contexts. The unit introduces you to the major streams of leadership theory and traces the development of our understanding about leadership. We will explore how these theories allow us to understand leadership in practice and in what ways leadership is linked to different aspects of organisational effectiveness. We will examine the 'good, the bad, and the ugly' sides of leadership, e.g. positive forms (transformational, charismatic) and negative forms (narcissistic and Machiavellian). We will explore leading for diversity and diversity in leadership (e.g. based on gender, culture and ethnicity) and the role of leaders in constituting ethical and socially responsible organisations. The critical role of leaders in effecting organisational change will be explored and we will examine the leadership of top management teams, and leadership succession. We will also examine leadership development programs and instruments and you will have an opportunity to reflect on factors that might influence your own leadership style.