Units of study for Logistics Management coursework programs

The Business School website (sydney.edu.au/business/pgunits/) contains the most up to date information on unit of study availability or other requirements. Timetabling information for 2014 is also available on the Business School website (sydney.edu.au/business/timetable). Students should note that units of study are run subject to demand.

Table of postgraduate units of study: Logistics Management

I. Master of Logistics Management

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session
Core units of study
(i) Foundation units
All student must complete the following core units of study. ITLS5000 must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
ITLS5000
Foundations of Supply Chain Management
6    N TPTM6155, TPTM5001


This is the foundation unit for all logistics and supply chain management programs and should be completed in the first period of study. Students demonstrating extensive practical experience in the logistics industry may apply to substitute an alternative logistics management unit of study for this unit. Students should send their resume with a covering email outlining their experience to the Postgraduate Coordinator for Logistics Management, Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya: jyotirmoyee.bhattacharjya@sydney.edu.au
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS5200
Quantitative Logistics & Transport
6    A Basic familiarity with MS Excel and basic mathematical knowledge.
C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6495
Semester 1
Semester 2
(ii) Advanced units
ITLS6001
Value Chain Costing
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ACCT5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS6002
Supply Chain Planning Systems
6    C (ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and ITLS6001
N TPTM6190
Semester 2
ITLS6003
Contemporary Procurement
6    C ITLS5200 or TPTM6495
N TPTM6400
Semester 1
ITLS6004
Warehouse & Inventory Management
6    C (ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and ITLS6001
Semester 2
(iii) Capstone unit
The capstone unit must be completed in a student's final semester of study.
ITLS6090
Global Value Chain Networks
6    P ITLS5200 or TPTM6495
C ITLS6002 and ITLS6003 and ITLS6004
N TPTM6170


This is the capstone unit for the Master of Logistics Management and should be completed in the last period of study.
Semester 1
Semester 2
Elective units of study
ITLS6005
Production, Retail & Reverse Logistics
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001
N TPTM6210, TPTM6380
Semester 2
ITLS6006
Supply Chain Organisational Management
6    N TPTM6115
Int January
ITLS6007
Disaster Relief Operations
6    N TPTM6390
Int July
ITLS6100
Logistics & Transport Economics
6    C ITLS5200 or TPTM6495
N TPTM6130
Semester 1
ITLS6101
Global Freight Logistics Management
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6440
Int January
Semester 2
ITLS6107
GIS for Transport Supply Chains
6    A This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6180
Semester 1
ITLS6300
Maritime Management & Logistics
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6200
Semester 1
ITLS6301
Ports Management
6    C ITLS6300 or TPTM6200
Semester 1
ITLS6302
Maritime Case Studies & Simulation
6    C ITLS6301
Semester 2
ITLS6400
Airline Strategy and Supply Chains
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6160
Semester 2
ITLS6401
Airport Management
6    C ITLS6400 or TPTM6160
Semester 1
ITLS6402
Aviation Case Studies & Simulation
6    C ITLS6400 or TPTM6160
Semester 2
ITLS6500
Decision Making on Mega Projects
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241) or INFS5001
Semester 1
ITLS6900
Research Case Study I
6    P ITLS5200 or TPTM6495
N TPTM6300

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit requires special permission from the Unit Coordinator please contact Dr Andrew Collins: andrew.collins@sydney.edu.au
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS6901
Research Case Study II
6    P ITLS6900
N TPTM6300

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit requires special permission from the Unit Coordinator please contact Dr Andrew Collins: andrew.collins@sydney.edu.au
Semester 1
Semester 2
BUSS6500
Industry Placement
6    P 8 units with a WAM of 65%
N ECOF6500, ECOF6501, ECOF6502, BUSS6501, BUSS6502

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employment Relations Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au
Int February
Int July
Semester 1
Semester 2

II. Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate in Logistics Management

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session
Core units of study
Students in both the Graduate Diploma and Graduate Certificate must complete all four of the following core units (24 credit points).
(i) Foundational units
All student must complete the following core units of study. ITLS5000 must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
ITLS5000
Foundations of Supply Chain Management
6    N TPTM6155, TPTM5001


This is the foundation unit for all logistics and supply chain management programs and should be completed in the first period of study. Students demonstrating extensive practical experience in the logistics industry may apply to substitute an alternative logistics management unit of study for this unit. Students should send their resume with a covering email outlining their experience to the Postgraduate Coordinator for Logistics Management, Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya: jyotirmoyee.bhattacharjya@sydney.edu.au
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS5200
Quantitative Logistics & Transport
6    A Basic familiarity with MS Excel and basic mathematical knowledge.
C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6495
Semester 1
Semester 2
(ii) Advanced units
ITLS6001
Value Chain Costing
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ACCT5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS6002
Supply Chain Planning Systems
6    C (ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and ITLS6001
N TPTM6190
Semester 2
Elective units of study (Graduate Diploma students)
Students in the Graduate Diploma complete two elective units (12 credit points) from the following options.
ITLS6003
Contemporary Procurement
6    C ITLS5200 or TPTM6495
N TPTM6400
Semester 1
ITLS6004
Warehouse & Inventory Management
6    C (ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and ITLS6001
Semester 2
ITLS6005
Production, Retail & Reverse Logistics
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001
N TPTM6210, TPTM6380
Semester 2
ITLS6006
Supply Chain Organisational Management
6    N TPTM6115
Int January
ITLS6007
Disaster Relief Operations
6    N TPTM6390
Int July
ITLS6100
Logistics & Transport Economics
6    C ITLS5200 or TPTM6495
N TPTM6130
Semester 1
ITLS6101
Global Freight Logistics Management
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6440
Int January
Semester 2
ITLS6107
GIS for Transport Supply Chains
6    A This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6180
Semester 1
ITLS6300
Maritime Management & Logistics
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6200
Semester 1
ITLS6301
Ports Management
6    C ITLS6300 or TPTM6200
Semester 1
ITLS6302
Maritime Case Studies & Simulation
6    C ITLS6301
Semester 2
ITLS6400
Airline Strategy and Supply Chains
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241)
N TPTM6160
Semester 2
ITLS6401
Airport Management
6    C ITLS6400 or TPTM6160
Semester 1
ITLS6402
Aviation Case Studies & Simulation
6    C ITLS6400 or TPTM6160
Semester 2
ITLS6500
Decision Making on Mega Projects
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ITLS5100 (or TPTM6241) or INFS5001
Semester 1

Unit of study descriptions for the Logistics Management coursework programs

Please note: These unit of study descriptions are listed alphanumerically by unit code.

BUSS6500 Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zina O'Leary Session: Int February,Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Wks 1-3: 1x 3hrs pre-placement workshops; Wks 4-12: 3 ½ days a week internship; Wk 13: presentation. Assessment: learning contract (0%), reflective journal (20%), presentation (15%), and research report (65%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employment Relations Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au
This unit is available to outstanding students completing the Master of Commerce, Master of Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations, Master of Logistics Management, Master of Professional Accounting or Master of Transport Management program. It involves a professional placement with a business, government, or non-government organisation. It will include preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and report writing. Assessment will include a reflective journal and professional report and presentation based on the internship placement.
ITLS5000 Foundations of Supply Chain Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Alan Win Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 12 x 3.5 hour lectures, 6 x 3 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual report (35%), group report (15%), quiz (10%), group presentation (10%), exam (30%)
Note: This is the foundation unit for all logistics and supply chain management programs and should be completed in the first period of study. Students demonstrating extensive practical experience in the logistics industry may apply to substitute an alternative logistics management unit of study for this unit. Students should send their resume with a covering email outlining their experience to the Postgraduate Coordinator for Logistics Management, Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya: jyotirmoyee.bhattacharjya@sydney.edu.au
Managing an organisation's logistics and supply chain management was for many years a neglected management activity. As a result of an article in Fortune in 1962 written by Peter Drucker, businesses became aware that 50 percent of each dollar consumers spent on goods financed activities that occur after the goods leave the factory, thus focusing attention on the potential efficiency savings that managing these activities could achieve. In the 50 years that has passed, business has seen massive changes; a complete management discipline has been built resulting in the integration and coordination of materials flows into, through, and out of, manufacturing facilities achieving exceptionally high levels of productivity. Logistics and supply chain management now plays a major role in implementing organisational strategy and in many industries has sole responsibility for managing customer service. An understanding of the role of this activity within an organisation and how an understanding of logistics and supply chains can assist business managers to better respond to market opportunities is essential for business students. Students undertaking this unit will be given a solid grounding in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management, and how knowledge of these concepts can contribute towards a strategically effective and operationally efficient organisation or network of organisations.
Textbooks
Pienaar WJ and Vogt JJ (2009) Business logistics management: A supply chain perspective
ITLS5200 Quantitative Logistics & Transport

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Geoffrey Clifton Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 6 x 3.5 hour computer laboratory. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: In-class quizzes (20%), computer exams (2) (50%), final exam (30%)
Successful logistics, transport and infrastructure management relies on the ability to analyse and transform data into usable information to support decision making. This course teaches both the theory and practice of quantitative analysis. Students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making but emphasis is placed on how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis. Computer based workshops complement the lectures and provide students with highly marketable skills in MS Excel.
Textbooks
Rose J and Beck M (2007) Basic Quantitative Analysis for Management
ITLS6001 Value Chain Costing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor David Walters Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3.5 hours lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: In-class exams (4) (40%), presentation (20%), essay (10%), exam (30%)
Networked organisations are becoming a significant organisational structure in manufacturing and distribution. This unit develops students' understanding of the finance and accounting activities that need to be undertaken during the value adding processes that a business must fulfil. Emphasis is placed on the network aspects of costing processes and activities but relevant financial topics that impact on value chain network structures will also be introduced, such as financial and operational gearing, alternative methods of financing the operations activities, and risk management. Of importance is the notion of added value and how its quantitative value may be calculated as the aggregate added value accumulated within the value chain network; for example a cell phone may cross a number of international borders during manufacture and distribution, value is added by each process but what is the total value added and how much? This introduces another topic; how do we share the value generated by a network organisation among the network members? Answers to these questions need to be resolved to ensure the long-term growth and survival of the value chain network.
Textbooks
Hansen D and Mowen M (2013) Cornerstones of Cost management; Walsh C (2008) Key Management Ratios
ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Collins Session: Semester 2 Classes: 7 x 3.5 hour lectures, 5 x 3.5 hour computer laboratory. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Assignments (60%), exams (40%)
This unit provides a detailed coverage of various analytical tools, techniques and software which are used both strategically and operationally in a wide range of logistics and supply chain contexts. Emphasis in the unit is on which tools to use and when to use them in order to improve overall performance and reduce costs in operating within supply chains. All techniques are implemented practically, and in addition, students are exposed to the SAP enterprise resource planning tool. Topics covered include inventory control, the optimisation of transportation flows, facility location, project management, and the role of ERP and other software in solving these problems. The unit is taught in lecture and laboratory formats.
Textbooks
Magal SR and Word J (2012) Integrated Business Processes with ERP Systems
ITLS6003 Contemporary Procurement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya Session: Semester 1 Classes: 8 x 3.5 hour lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quiz (x2) (60%), individual report (20%), group report (20%)
Globalisation of supply markets and changing regulatory environments pose new challenges for strategic procurement. This unit explores the role that procurement departments in both manufacturing and service sectors can play in generating cost savings for companies competing in volatile global marketplaces. Students will gain practice-based insights into internal and external relationship management issues, category-specific sourcing strategies, sourcing risks, and, spend management and contract management strategies. The unit will draw on a number of international cases to illustrate key concepts. The content is suitable for both early career procurement professionals as well as students considering procurement as a future career option.
Textbooks
Sollish F and Semanik J (2011) Strategic Global Sourcing Best Practices; Sollish F and Semanik J (2012) The Procurement and Supply Manager's Desk Reference; Monczka RM, Handfield RB, Guinipero LC and Patterson JL (2011) Purchasing and Supply Chain Management
ITLS6004 Warehouse & Inventory Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3.5 hour lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quiz (x2) (60%), individual report (20%), group report (20%)
Warehouses play an important role in supply chain management and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. This unit provides students with an in depth understanding of key topics in warehouse and inventory management including warehouse design, warehouse processes, stock counting, costs, performance, outsourcing, and environmental impacts. Warehouses also continue to evolve with advances in technology. The unit examines the role of evolving technologies and the GS1 standard in the context of warehouse and inventory management. Case studies and software packages will be used to aid learning wherever applicable.
Textbooks
Richards G (2011) Warehouse Management: a complete guide to improving efficiency and minimizing costs in the modern warehouse
ITLS6005 Production, Retail & Reverse Logistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jyotirmoyee Bhattacharjya Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3.5 hour lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quizzes (x2) (60%), individual report (20%), group report (20%)
Globalisation of customer and supplier markets, technological innovations, consumer demand volatility and sustainability concerns have led to increasing focus on production, retail and reverse logistics processes. Interactions between retailers and end-customers inform retail strategy and operational decisions such as merchandising, sourcing and customer service. These decisions, in turn, influence manufacturing approaches and reverse logistics planning. Manufacturing logistics decision making processes include sales and operations planning, raw material sourcing, manufacturing planning and control and green manufacturing/re-manufacturing decisions. Government regulations and the potential for achieving competitive advantage within a particular industry sector have served to increase the importance of closed-loop supply chain/reverse logistics planning. This unit highlights the interconnection between these dimensions of supply chain decision-making using illustrative case studies.
Textbooks
Emmett S and Sood V (2010) Green supply chains: an action manifesto
ITLS6006 Supply Chain Organisational Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Lok Session: Int January Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 3 x 3.5 hour seminars, 3 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Group debate (20%), individual assignment (40%), final class test (40%)
This unit provides an integrated approach to both micro and macro aspects of organisational behaviour in relation to the supply chain industry. This unit examines actions at three different levels of analysis: the individual, the group and the organisation and is presented in three parts. Part 1 covers the strategic thinking and the general environment affecting the work place. It also examines the fundamentals of individual at work. Part 2 focuses on leadership, work teams, and power and conflict in organisations. Part 3 attends to organisational structure, culture and strategic change management. The integration of these three parts will provide students with effective leadership behaviour and management competencies which will enable students to participate more successfully within the supply chain industry. Case study analysis will provide students with a realistic exposure to the organisational issues currently existing in supply chain management.
ITLS6007 Disaster Relief Operations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jersey Seipel Session: Int July Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 6 x 3.5 hours workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual essay (25%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%)
Large scale, sudden onset disasters strike with little or no warning. In their wake they leave shattered infrastructure, collapsed services and traumatised populations, while the number of dead, injured and homeless often reaches staggering proportions. Humanitarian aid organisations, such as the Red Cross, Doctors without Borders or Oxfam, to name just a few, are usually amongst the first responders, but depend on extremely agile supply chains to support their worldwide operations. Successful disaster relief missions are characterised by the ability of professionals to cope with time pressure, high uncertainty and unusual restrictions. This unit is designed as an introduction to the coordination and management of humanitarian aid and emergency response logistics. Case studies of real events, such as the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake provide the framework for analysis and research, while discussion of operational factors, simulations, workshops and group exercises offer students an interactive learning environment.
Textbooks
Christopher M and Tatham P (2011) Humanitarian Logistics
ITLS6090 Global Value Chain Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor David Walters Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3.5 hours lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: In-class assessment (x2) (30%), final assessment (30%), group presentation (x2) (20%), individual report (x2) (20%)
Note: This is the capstone unit for the Master of Logistics Management and should be completed in the last period of study.
Global businesses have established value chain networks to work within the emerging business environment. This unit explores the concepts of this rapidly growing business model using examples and case studies. The model integrates design and development, production, sales and marketing, and distribution activities in a holistic business model. Products and services now have multiple applications and business organisations are redefining their core capabilities and processes. Many products become services as they move through their life cycles as manufacturers address new stakeholder expectations. In the traditional business model companies competed with each other; in the developing business model "global value chain networks" are competing with each other. At the industry level value chains can be seen as business network structures, or confederations, that are developing from traditional corporations. A number of academics and practitioners have developed the business ecosystem as the basis of a business model capable of understanding how organisations are working in this new business environment unit assessments use current business problems and responses in actual organisations. In this climate of change Australian businesses often have to cope with being small but essential components in business ecosystems/global value chain networks; often they are not identified and the end-user customer has no knowledge of them, however they are integral to the success of the total network.
Textbooks
Friedman T (2005) The World is Flat: A Brief History of the 21st Century
ITLS6100 Logistics & Transport Economics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor John Rose Session: Semester 1 Classes: 9 x 3.5 hour lectures, 3 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: In-class quizzes (x4) (20%), final report (25%), final presentation (30%), take home exam (25%)
Economic concepts within a setting of logistics and transport systems are part of the essential toolkit necessary to inform efficient and effective strategic and policy outcomes. Markets and the regulatory process define key elements of how an economy can influence the performance of logistics and transport businesses. This unit focuses on identifying frameworks and concepts drawn from the mainstream economics discipline that are of especial relevance to the study of the structure, conduct and performance of logistics and transport businesses in both the private and public sectors, as well as the passenger and freight sectors. Major themes include the regulatory and institutional environment, the role of markets and competition, understanding demand for services, the role of pricing, and how to establish appropriate costs in service provision.
ITLS6101 Global Freight Logistics Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rico Merkert Session: Int January,Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 3 x 3.5 hour seminars, 3 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual report (30%), quiz (x2) (30%), exercise (40%)
This unit seeks to give students an understanding of the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit will discuss underlying drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different freight transport modes, as well as industry structure, regulatory environment (customs, etc.) and market access. Building on this background the unit will highlight the implications for profitable air cargo and shipping operations. Particular focus will be given to fleet and network planning, revenue and cost management. The material covered in the unit will take into account recent developments in global and regional economic activity and discuss implications for the various sectors of the air, sea and intermodal freight businesses. This unit covers operators, customers and investors perspectives and strategies and intermodal freight businesses.
Textbooks
Morrell P (2011) Moving Boxes By Air: The Economics of International Air Cargo
ITLS6107 GIS for Transport Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Stephen Greaves Session: Semester 1 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 6 x 3.5 hour computer laboratory. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual tutorial exercises using GIS software (25%), team project using GIS software with group and individual component (35%), team presentation with group and individual component (15%), final exam (25%)
The efficient and effective management, display and analysis of spatial information are integral skills for contemporary transportation, logistics and infrastructure professionals. Meeting these requirements has been revolutionised by the development of Geographical Information Systems (GIS). This unit introduces students to the theory and practice of GIS, with a particular focus on applications in transportation, logistics and infrastructure management. The unit begins by introducing students to the 'building blocks' of GIS systems, including data structures, relational databases, spatial queries and analysis. We then focus on sources of spatial data including GPS, remote sensing, and web-based sources highlighting both the potential and challenges associated with integrating each data source within a GIS environment. The unit then takes a hands-on focus, using the latest GIS software to analyse several problems of interest (e.g., establishing demand for a new rail/bus service, planning a routing and scheduling service for a delivery firm, or identifying aircraft noise violations around an airport). Students completing the unit will be able to conduct and evaluate a GIS case study in terms of implementation of a data model, the use of appropriate GIS tools and techniques, benefits and barriers of the implemented system, and how the system could be improved. This unit will appeal to all students interested in the spatial impact of decision-making.
ITLS6300 Maritime Management & Logistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Bell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 7 x 3.5 hour lectures, 1 x 3.5 hour seminar, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quizzes (x5) (50%), presentation (10%), essay (40%)
This unit conveys the fundamentals of maritime logistics and positions each student to become a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods of maritime logistics. The unit commences with a review of world seaborne trade, trends and cycles in the industry. This includes a review of ship types, ship life cycles, and the markets for new and second hand ships. There is an analysis of competition and efficiency in maritime logistics, including the impact of vertical and horizontal integration, alliances, freight stabilisation agreements and conferences. Ship owning, financing, chartering and insurance are covered in detail. Ship certification, flag state control, and the role of the IMO are described. Intermodal supply chains are studied for both bulk and containerised freight. Tramp and liner shipping is covered, with a detailed look at routing and scheduling for liner operations. Presentations by maritime professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Review of Maritime Transport, 2011 and 2012
ITLS6301 Ports Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Bell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 7 x 3.5 hour lectures, 1 x 3.5 hour seminar, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quizzes (x5) (50%), presentation (10%), essay (40%)
This unit conveys the fundamentals of port management and thus develops each student into a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods for the port industry. The unit comprehensively covers all aspects of management from planning and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact for all types of port. Technological changes and their implications for the port industry, in particular container terminal automation, are studied. The role of ports in global supply chains is analysed. The relationship of ports with their hinterlands as well as the concept of port-centric logistics is looked at in detail. The port-city interface as well as waterfront redevelopment is covered, with examples drawn from a number of countries. Port policy and the importance of competition and/or regulation are presented. Talks by port professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Review of Maritime Transport, 2011 and 2012; World Bank (2011) World Bank Port Reform Toolkit
ITLS6302 Maritime Case Studies & Simulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaowen Fu Session: Semester 2 Classes: 7 x 3.5 hour lectures, 1 x 3.5 hour seminar, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual report (40%), group presentation (20%), individual assignments (40%)
This unit provides students with the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in previous units to real business problems in the maritime sector. The unit provides an overview of the maritime industry, identifying key opportunities and challenges in major economies and regions, and examines case studies related to shipping logistics and port management. Topics covered will include: shipping logistics, ship building market dynamics and fleet planning, the shipping industry business cycle, shipping conferences and alliances, shipping safety and insurance, port management and development, including labour relations management, hinterland access and inter-port competition, port congestion management and policy, port productivity benchmarking, port security and state control, port city and urban development. The unit emphasises problem-based learning, peer learning, group analysis and debate. Students taking this unit will have the opportunity to enhance their skills in business analysis and industry report evaluation.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; McCarthy SP (2001) Transportation Economics - theory and practice: a case study approach
ITLS6400 Airline Strategy and Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rico Merkert Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hour lectures, 3 x 3.5 hour seminars, 3 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Assignments (50%), quiz (10%), presentation (20%), exam (20%)
Aviation is an international growth industry offering extensive commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, banks, consultancies and other players along the aviation supply chain. This unit covers all aspects of international business and management along the aviation value chain from consumer, producer and investor perspectives. Students develop an understanding of the economics of operating airlines and other aviation entities, including implications of competitive strategies for the development of hubs and networks. The growth in air traffic particularly in the Asia/Pacific region is placing strains on aviation capacity and the unit thus covers forecasting and the role of the private sector in airline/airport development. The unit also examines the management and logistics of air services in remote regions. As a result of our strategic partnership with CAPA, students will have access to industry data bases, company information and aviation contacts/networks.
Textbooks
Doganis R (2010) Flying Off Course
ITLS6401 Airport Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaowen Fu Session: Semester 1 Classes: 5 x 3.5 hour lectures, 2 x 3.5 hour seminars, 5 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Essay (40%), quiz (20%), group presentation (20%), exam (20%)
Airports play an integral role in the aviation system, and contribute significantly to the economic growth of a region, or even a country. This unit covers major aspects of airport management, operation and public policy. The unit's learning objectives are two-fold. Firstly, it provides students with the core knowledge and insights concerning the key issues and decisions involved in the operation and management of airports in a rapidly changing regulatory environment. Secondly, it develops the skills for applying various applied economics and management knowledge to the airport industry. The unit assists students to understand more fully the business related problems encountered by commercial, industrial and public organisations in the airport industry. It also develops an ability to interpret results from relevant economic / management studies.
Textbooks
De Neufville R, Odoni A, Belobaba P and Reynolds T (2013) Airport Systems; Planning, Design and Management; Ashford N, Stanton M, Moore C, Coutu P and Beasley J (2012) Airport Operations; Belobaba P, Odoni A and Barnhart C (2009) The Global Airline Industry
ITLS6402 Aviation Case Studies & Simulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rico Merkert Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3.5 hour lecture, 5 x 3.5 hour seminars, 6 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Individual assignment (30%), group airline simulation (30%), group case study presentation (20%), individual quiz (20%)
Aviation is an international growth industry offering extensive commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, banks, consultancies and other players along the aviation supply chain. This unit builds on the knowledge gained in previous aviation units relating the key themes to real world industry examples. Students are required to test their understanding in case studies, workshops and an airline simulation updated weekly and to do so both on an individual level but also in team work environments. The learning content is supplemented by presentations from senior managers from the aviation industry.
Textbooks
Doganis R (2010) Flying Off Course; Wensveen JG (2011) Air transportation - A management perspective; Morrell PS (2011) Moving boxes by air; Morrell PS (2007) Airline finance
ITLS6500 Decision Making on Mega Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Beck Session: Semester 1 Classes: 8 x 3.5 hour lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quiz (15%), essay (30%), group (25%), exam (30%)
In the majority of instances, infrastructure projects involve significant levels of investment in assets that are crucial to the economic performance of public or private entities. In this unit, students are introduced to the concept of infrastructure and develop an understanding of infrastructure as a system of interrelated physical components and how those components affect, and are affected by, society, politics, economics, and the environment. They will gain an understanding of the role of management characteristics, planning, innovation, competition, risk and uncertainty, and the private versus public sector in the decision making process with respect to mega projects.
Textbooks
Priemus H, Flyvberg B and van Wee B (2008) Decision Making on Mega-Projects; Flyvberg B, Bruzelius N and Rothengatter W (2003) Megaprojects and Risk: An Anatomy of Ambition; Penn MR and Parker PJ (2012) Introduction to Infrastructure: An Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering; Brett M and Frischmann BM (2012) Infrastructure: The Social Value of Shared Resources
ITLS6900 Research Case Study I

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Collins Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: This unit is research based and has no class requirements Assessment: Proposal (15%), final presentation (20%), final report (65%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit requires special permission from the Unit Coordinator please contact Dr Andrew Collins: andrew.collins@sydney.edu.au
This unit involves a semester long research project, on a single transport, logistics or infrastructure topic. The topic may either be selected from a list proposed by the academic staff at ITLS, or negotiated with a staff member, based on the student's personal or professional interests. The research can take a number of forms. An existing research finding or methodology may be refined or investigated in a different context. Academically strong and ambitious students may seek to obtain more original results. Another alternative is a critical investigation of a case study, or a critical comparison of a range of approaches to a problem, that are either implemented in industry or proposed in academia. Through this unit, students will develop skills in critical thinking, independence of thought and action, and management of a complex, uncertain project. The unit is ideally suited to the strong student who is seeking a competitive edge over others within their profession, or to students who may be interested in future, research based study.
ITLS6901 Research Case Study II

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Collins Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: This unit is research based and has no class requirements Assessment: Proposal (15%), final presentation (20%), final report (65%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit requires special permission from the Unit Coordinator please contact Dr Andrew Collins: andrew.collins@sydney.edu.au
This unit provides the opportunity for coursework students who have successfully completed the Research Case Study I unit to investigate an additional topic in the transport/logistics/infrastructure field or to further their existing research into a particular topic. The unit involves a semester long research project, on a single transport, logistics or infrastructure topic. The topic may either be selected from a list proposed by the academic staff at ITLS, or negotiated with a staff member, based on the student's personal or professional interests. The research can take a number of forms. An existing research finding or methodology may be refined or investigated in a different context. Academically strong and ambitious students may seek to obtain more original results. Another alternative is a critical investigation of a case study, or a critical comparison of a range of approaches to a problem, that are either implemented in industry or proposed in academia. Through this unit, students will develop skills in critical thinking, independence of thought and action, and management of a complex, uncertain project. The unit is ideally suited to the strong student who is seeking a competitive edge over others within their profession, or to students who may be interested in future, research based study.