Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Corequisites have changed for the following unit:

ITLS6400 Airline Strategy and Supply Chains
The corequisite ITLS6101 has been removed

12/12/2018
2.

Assessment has changed for the following units:

ITLS6400 Airline Strategy and Supply Chains
Assesment is now: individual assignment (50%), presentation (30%), final exam (20%)

ITLS6101 Global Freight Logistics Management
Assesment is now: Individual report (25%); case discussion (15%); individual presentation (30%); final exam (30%)

12/12/2018
3.

Assessment has changed for the following unit:

ITLS6003 Contemporary Procurement Asssessment: Quiz (30%), group presentation (25%), final exam (45%)

20/12/2018

The units of study listed in the following table are those available for the current year. Students may also include any units of study, which are additional to those currently listed, which appear under these subject areas in the Business School handbook/website in subsequent years (subject to any prerequisite or prohibition rules).

Students should refer to the Business School website for timetabling information for each unit of study, which is currently offered.

Table of postgraduate units of study: Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Students must complete 60 credit points in units of study, comprising:
(i) 36 credit points in core units of study
(ii) 18 credit points in elective units of study.
(iii) a 6 credit point capstone unit of study
Units of study for this degree are as follows:

Core units of study

The core unit, ITLS5000, must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
Students who can demonstrate prior knowledge of quantitative analysis (in particular mathematical knowledge and MS Excel solver proficiency) may apply to waive the prerequisite requirement for ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning and Design. Students should outline their knowledge of quantitative analysis when applying for Special Permission to waive the prerequisite requirement.
ITLS5000 Foundations of Supply Chain Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 13 x 1.5 hr lectures, 12 x 1.5 hour tutorials Prohibitions: TPTM6155 or TPTM5001 Assessment: Individual report (20%); group report (20%); group presentation (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Logistics and supply chain management functions can account for as much as half of the total costs of running a business. The success of a firm's logistic and supply chain management not only impacts on the profitability of a firm but also has a significant and growing impact on customer experience and satisfaction. Logistics and supply chain management plays a major role in implementing organisational strategy and in many industries has sole responsibility for managing customer service. An understanding of the role of this activity within an organisation and how improving logistics and supply chains can assist business managers to better respond to market opportunities is essential for business students. Students undertaking this unit are given a solid grounding in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management, and how knowledge of these concepts contributes towards a strategically effective and operationally efficient organisation or network of organisations.
ITLS5200 Quantitative Logistics and Transport

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr computer workshop per week Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 Prohibitions: TPTM6495 Assessment: computer exam (30%); team report (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Supply chain management as well as logistics, transport and infrastructure management relies on the ability to make effective decisions based on the information provided by careful analysis of data. Students undertaking this unit will develop a strong understanding of the basic techniques underpinning quantitative analysis and will develop highly marketable skills in spreadsheet modelling and the communication and presentation of data to support management decision making. This unit emphasises the practical aspects of quantitative analysis with computer based workshops. Students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making but emphasis is placed on how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis. The unit covers demand forecasting, spreadsheet modelling, optimisation of production and transportation using linear programming, simulation and basic statistics and linear regression techniques.
ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr computer labs. Prerequisites: ITLS5200 or TPTM6495 or STAT5002 Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or TPTM6155 Prohibitions: TPTM6190 Assessment: 2x computer exams (40%), assignments (40%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Successful supply chain management relies upon informed decision making. This unit explores a range of important decisions, and equips students with a toolkit of models and analytical methods that can assist in making informed decisions. The first set of decisions concern supply chain design and strategy, and includes network design and facility location. These decisions provide structure to the supply chain, set the boundaries within which planning decisions will be made, and impact on supply chain performance over the long term. In contrast, planning decisions provide value over the medium and short term. Here, this unit will cover aggregate planning, sales and operations planning, and inventory control. Special attention will be placed on how to handle uncertainty and risk within the supply chain.
ITLS6003 Contemporary Procurement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 x 3 hr lectures, 8 hr workshop, 1 x 3 hr industry forum Corequisites: ITLS5200 or QBUS5001 Prohibitions: TPTM6400 Assumed knowledge: Basic ability to work with Excel is assumed. Assessment: quiz (30%), group presentation (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Procurement practitioners have to be able to generate insights from large volumes of transactional, aggregate, structured and unstructured data resulting from growing stakeholder needs, the globalisation of supply markets, evolving regulatory environments and relevant technological changes. This unit explores challenges in procurement practice using real procurement spend data from organisations with different strategic priorities. Students gain an appreciation of spend analysis techniques involving large datasets and an understanding of how the insights are applied in the context of category strategies, sourcing risk management, negotiations and ethical sourcing. The usefulness of large volumes of both structured and unstructured data for input to procurement strategy is explored. The unit includes an industry-led workshop and certificate component and is suitable for both early career procurement professionals as well as students interested in the application of data analytics in procurement.
ITLS6008 Production and Operations Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3hr lectures, 4x 3hr tutorials Corequisites: ITLS5000 Assessment: quiz (30%); group presentation (20%); final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Production and operations management designs, operates, and improves the processes and systems through which products are made and delivered. Firms can improve their productivity and gain competitive advantage through effective and innovative production and operations management. This unit offers a thorough examination of various production and operations management concepts from a supply chain perspective. The key teaching topics include operations planning hierarchy, resource management, capacity planning, quality management, retail operations, sustainable/green operations, and reverse logistics. Students learn about the successful production and operations management practices that have helped organisations improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their supply chains and create competitive advantage.
ITLS6101 Global Freight Logistics Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 7 x 3 hr lectures, 6 x 3 hr workshops Prohibitions: TPTM6440 Assessment: Individual report (25%); quiz (30%); group presentation (30%); individual case discussion (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides students with an understanding of the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, rail, trucking, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit covers underlying supply chain drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different freight transport modes, as well as industry structure, institutional environment (customs, etc.) and market access. Building on this background the unit highlights the implications for profitable international logistics operations. The unit focuses on corporate strategies around fleet and network planning as well as revenue and cost management. The material covered in the unit takes into account recent developments in global and regional economic activity and discusses implications for the various sectors of the air, sea and intermodal freight businesses. This unit involves case studies and industry presentations, and analysis from the perspectives of shippers, carriers, end customers, regulatory bodies and investors.

Elective units of study

BUSS6500 Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive March,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 hours of pre-placement workshops; 210 hours internship; 2 hour debrief workshop. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points with a minimum credit average (65%) Prohibitions: ECOF6500 Assessment: Performance objectives (0%), report (70%), presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employability Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au.
This unit is available to outstanding students completing the Master of Commerce, Master of Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations, and Master of Professional Accounting program. It involves a professional placement with a business, government, or non-government organisation. It includes preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and report writing. Assessment includes a reflective journal and professional report and presentation based on the internship placement. Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Further information and application process is outlined at http://sydney.edu.au/business/study/opportunities/industry_placement_program
BUSS6514 Industry Self-Sourced Placement

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 5 hours preparation workshop; 210 hours internship; 1 x 2 hours debrief workshop Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points. Assumed knowledge: A sound understanding of business and strong written and oral communication skills Assessment: performance objectives (0%); self reflection (1) (25%); self reflection (2) (25%); critical reflective report (50%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is available to outstanding students and involves a self-sourced professional placement with a business, government, or non-government organisation. It includes preparatory coursework in reflection learning, professional practice and report writing.
ITLS6007 Disaster Relief Operations

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr workshops. Prohibitions: TPTM6390 Assessment: Individual essay (25%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Large scale, sudden onset disasters strike with little or no warning. In their wake they leave shattered infrastructure, collapsed services and traumatised populations, while the number of dead, injured and homeless often reaches staggering proportions. Humanitarian aid organisations, such as the Red Cross, Doctors without Borders or Oxfam, to name just a few, are usually amongst the first responders, but depend on extremely agile supply chains to support their worldwide operations. Successful disaster relief missions are characterised by the ability of professionals to cope with time pressure, high uncertainty and unusual restrictions. This unit is designed as an introduction to the coordination and management of humanitarian aid and emergency response logistics. Case studies of real events, such as the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake provide the framework for analysis and research, while discussion of operational factors, simulations, workshops and group exercises offer students an interactive learning environment.
ITLS6107 Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 7 x 2 hr lectures, 7 x 4 hr computer labs Prohibitions: TPTM6180 Assessment: individual projects (40%); group project (20%); group presentation (10%); final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
The world is increasingly filled with systems, devices and sensors collecting large amounts of data on a continual basis. Most of these data are associated with locations that represent everything from the movement of individuals travelling between activities to the flow of goods or transactions along a supply chain and from the location of companies to those of their current and future customers. Taking this spatial context into account transforms analyses, problem solving and provides a powerful method of visualising the world. This is the essence of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and this unit. This unit starts by introducing students to the 'building blocks' of GIS systems, including data structures, relational databases, spatial queries and analysis. The focus then moves on to sources of spatial data including Global Positioning System (GPS), operational systems such as smartcard ticketing and transaction data along with web-based sources highlighting both the potential and challenges associated with integrating each data source within a GIS environment. The unit is hands-on involving learning how to use the latest GIS software to analyse several problems of interest using real 'big data' sources and to communicate the results in a powerful and effective way. These include identifying potential demand for new services or infrastructure, creating a delivery and scheduling plan for a delivery firm or examining the behaviour of travellers or consumers over time and locations. This unit is aimed at students interested in the spatial impact of decision-making and on the potential for using large spatial datasets for in-depth multi-faceted analytics.
ITLS6300 Maritime Management and Logistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Bell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 Prohibitions: TPTM6200 Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual assignment (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit conveys the fundamentals of maritime logistics and positions each student to become a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods of maritime logistics. The unit commences with a review of world seaborne trade, trends and cycles in the industry. This includes a review of ship types, ship life cycles, and the markets for new and second hand ships. There is an analysis of competition and efficiency in maritime logistics, including the impact of vertical and horizontal integration, alliances, freight stabilisation agreements and conferences. Ship owning, financing, chartering and insurance are covered in detail. Ship certification, flag state control, and the role of the IMO are described. Intermodal supply chains are studied for both bulk and containerised freight. Tramp and liner shipping is covered, with a detailed look at routing and scheduling for liner operations. Presentations by maritime professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Review of Maritime Transport, 2013 and 2014
ITLS6301 City Logistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit conveys the fundamentals of city logistics, which is the pickup, storage, transport and delivery of freight in urban areas. All aspects of city logistics from planning, management and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact are covered for cities of all types. The relationships between land use, transport and city logistics are described. Traffic engineering concepts like 'link' and 'place' are explored and the implications for location and design of loading zones and docks as well as underground service networks are considered. Forms of urban freight consolidation centre are looked at along with the role of alternative transport modes, like public transport, cycles, electric vehicles and drones. Ecommerce and fulfilment models are also studied. The implications for city logistics of new technologies, apps and the 'sharing economy' are considered. International case studies are covered. Seminars by city logistics professionals complement the lectures. Students have an opportunity to develop city logistics solutions for themselves through a group design project.
ITLS6400 Airline Strategy and Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 3 x 3.5 hr seminars, 3 x 3.5 hr workshops. Corequisites: ITLS6101 Prohibitions: TPTM6160 Assessment: individual assignment (50%), quiz (10%), presentation (30%), final exam (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Aviation is an international growth industry offering extensive commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, logistic providers, banks, consultancies and other players of the aviation supply chain. This unit covers all aspects of international business and management along the aviation value chain and analysis from the perspectives of consumers (passengers and cargo), producers, distributors, brokers and investors. Students develop industry skills and an understanding of the strategic management and economics of operating airlines and other aviation entities, including financial analysis, risk management, sustainability, logistics, innovations and implications of competitive strategies for the development of hubs and alliances both in the global and regional/remote context. The growth in air traffic (i.e. in the Asia/Pacific region) creates endless opportunities and the unit thus also covers forecasting, entrepreneurship and the role of the private sector in airline/airport business development. As a result of our strategic partnership with CAPA and a number of airlines and airports, students have access to industry data bases, guest lecturers, company information and aviation contacts/networks.
ITLS6401 Airport Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August Classes: 5 x 3.5 hr lectures, 2 x 3.5 hr seminars, 5 x 3.5 hr workshops. Assessment: individual report (30%); group presentation (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Airports play an integral role in the aviation system, and contribute significantly to the economic growth of a region, or even a country. This unit covers major aspects of airport management, operation and public policy. The unit's learning objectives are two-fold. Firstly, it provides students with the core knowledge and insights concerning the key issues and decisions involved in the operation and management of airports in a rapidly changing regulatory environment. Secondly, it develops the skills for applying various applied economics and management knowledge to the airport industry. The unit assists students to understand more fully the business related problems encountered by commercial, industrial and public organisations in the airport industry. It also develops an ability to interpret results from relevant economic / management studies.
ITLS6500 Decision Making on Mega Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 8 x 3.5 hr lectures, 4 x 3.5 hr workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 or INFS5001 Assessment: 2x individual assignments (40%), group assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Infrastructure is crucial to economic performance; without it business cannot operate efficiently or competitively. Delivery of large infrastructure projects, however, is complex and despite many more megaprojects being undertaken than any time in history, the majority of these projects are completed significantly over-budget and longer than planned. In this unit students will be introduced to megaproject decision making. The sources of social and technical complexity are discussed, issues of risk management and governance explored, and human biases in decision making are also highlighted. Strategies to overcome weaknesses in mega project decision making are also outlined.

Capstone unit of study

The capstone unit must be completed in a student's final semester of study.
ITLS6090 Logistics and Supply Chain Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 7 x 3.5 hr progress report meetings Prerequisites: completion of at least 30 credit points Corequisites: ITLS5200 and ITLS6002 and ITLS6003 and (ITLS6004 or ITLS6008) Prohibitions: TPTM6170 Assessment: group preliminary project report (20%), group presentation (20%), group final project report (40%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: This is the capstone unit for the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and should be completed in the last period of study.
This capstone unit consolidates and integrates the knowledge and skills that students have gained in the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program. Taken in the last semester of study, the unit provides students with the opportunity to explore real world and/or scenario-based logistics and supply chain management problems and to reinforce competencies in the area of their interest and expertise. The projects are assigned to students based on their experience and professional needs in one or more of the following areas: design and planning of global supply chains, supply chain risk analysis and mitigation strategies, sustainable logistics and supply chains, performance measurement and management, warehouse and inventory management, production planning and control, strategic procurement, and supply chain challenges facing Australian businesses. Students manage the project investigation and carry it to completion within a specified time period and to a professional standard. Through the project, students identify the problems and existing bottlenecks, explore the potential solutions to these problems, critically analyse the situation, document their progress, communicate findings with their mentor and other students, reflect on their learning, and prepare a formal project report describing the work performed as well as the resulting conclusions and recommendations.

Graduate Diploma in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Students must complete 36 credit points in units of study, comprising:
(i) 24 credit points in core units of study
(ii) 12 credit points in elective units of study.
Units of study for this degree are as follows:

Core units of study

The core unit, ITLS5000, must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
ITLS5000 Foundations of Supply Chain Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 13 x 1.5 hr lectures, 12 x 1.5 hour tutorials Prohibitions: TPTM6155 or TPTM5001 Assessment: Individual report (20%); group report (20%); group presentation (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Logistics and supply chain management functions can account for as much as half of the total costs of running a business. The success of a firm's logistic and supply chain management not only impacts on the profitability of a firm but also has a significant and growing impact on customer experience and satisfaction. Logistics and supply chain management plays a major role in implementing organisational strategy and in many industries has sole responsibility for managing customer service. An understanding of the role of this activity within an organisation and how improving logistics and supply chains can assist business managers to better respond to market opportunities is essential for business students. Students undertaking this unit are given a solid grounding in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management, and how knowledge of these concepts contributes towards a strategically effective and operationally efficient organisation or network of organisations.
ITLS5200 Quantitative Logistics and Transport

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr computer workshop per week Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 Prohibitions: TPTM6495 Assessment: computer exam (30%); team report (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Supply chain management as well as logistics, transport and infrastructure management relies on the ability to make effective decisions based on the information provided by careful analysis of data. Students undertaking this unit will develop a strong understanding of the basic techniques underpinning quantitative analysis and will develop highly marketable skills in spreadsheet modelling and the communication and presentation of data to support management decision making. This unit emphasises the practical aspects of quantitative analysis with computer based workshops. Students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making but emphasis is placed on how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis. The unit covers demand forecasting, spreadsheet modelling, optimisation of production and transportation using linear programming, simulation and basic statistics and linear regression techniques.
ITLS6003 Contemporary Procurement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 x 3 hr lectures, 8 hr workshop, 1 x 3 hr industry forum Corequisites: ITLS5200 or QBUS5001 Prohibitions: TPTM6400 Assumed knowledge: Basic ability to work with Excel is assumed. Assessment: quiz (30%), group presentation (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Procurement practitioners have to be able to generate insights from large volumes of transactional, aggregate, structured and unstructured data resulting from growing stakeholder needs, the globalisation of supply markets, evolving regulatory environments and relevant technological changes. This unit explores challenges in procurement practice using real procurement spend data from organisations with different strategic priorities. Students gain an appreciation of spend analysis techniques involving large datasets and an understanding of how the insights are applied in the context of category strategies, sourcing risk management, negotiations and ethical sourcing. The usefulness of large volumes of both structured and unstructured data for input to procurement strategy is explored. The unit includes an industry-led workshop and certificate component and is suitable for both early career procurement professionals as well as students interested in the application of data analytics in procurement.
ITLS6008 Production and Operations Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3hr lectures, 4x 3hr tutorials Corequisites: ITLS5000 Assessment: quiz (30%); group presentation (20%); final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Production and operations management designs, operates, and improves the processes and systems through which products are made and delivered. Firms can improve their productivity and gain competitive advantage through effective and innovative production and operations management. This unit offers a thorough examination of various production and operations management concepts from a supply chain perspective. The key teaching topics include operations planning hierarchy, resource management, capacity planning, quality management, retail operations, sustainable/green operations, and reverse logistics. Students learn about the successful production and operations management practices that have helped organisations improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their supply chains and create competitive advantage.

Elective units of study

ITLS6002 Supply Chain Planning and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr computer labs. Prerequisites: ITLS5200 or TPTM6495 or STAT5002 Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or TPTM6155 Prohibitions: TPTM6190 Assessment: 2x computer exams (40%), assignments (40%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Successful supply chain management relies upon informed decision making. This unit explores a range of important decisions, and equips students with a toolkit of models and analytical methods that can assist in making informed decisions. The first set of decisions concern supply chain design and strategy, and includes network design and facility location. These decisions provide structure to the supply chain, set the boundaries within which planning decisions will be made, and impact on supply chain performance over the long term. In contrast, planning decisions provide value over the medium and short term. Here, this unit will cover aggregate planning, sales and operations planning, and inventory control. Special attention will be placed on how to handle uncertainty and risk within the supply chain.
ITLS6007 Disaster Relief Operations

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr workshops. Prohibitions: TPTM6390 Assessment: Individual essay (25%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Large scale, sudden onset disasters strike with little or no warning. In their wake they leave shattered infrastructure, collapsed services and traumatised populations, while the number of dead, injured and homeless often reaches staggering proportions. Humanitarian aid organisations, such as the Red Cross, Doctors without Borders or Oxfam, to name just a few, are usually amongst the first responders, but depend on extremely agile supply chains to support their worldwide operations. Successful disaster relief missions are characterised by the ability of professionals to cope with time pressure, high uncertainty and unusual restrictions. This unit is designed as an introduction to the coordination and management of humanitarian aid and emergency response logistics. Case studies of real events, such as the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake provide the framework for analysis and research, while discussion of operational factors, simulations, workshops and group exercises offer students an interactive learning environment.
ITLS6101 Global Freight Logistics Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 7 x 3 hr lectures, 6 x 3 hr workshops Prohibitions: TPTM6440 Assessment: Individual report (25%); quiz (30%); group presentation (30%); individual case discussion (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit provides students with an understanding of the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, rail, trucking, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit covers underlying supply chain drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different freight transport modes, as well as industry structure, institutional environment (customs, etc.) and market access. Building on this background the unit highlights the implications for profitable international logistics operations. The unit focuses on corporate strategies around fleet and network planning as well as revenue and cost management. The material covered in the unit takes into account recent developments in global and regional economic activity and discusses implications for the various sectors of the air, sea and intermodal freight businesses. This unit involves case studies and industry presentations, and analysis from the perspectives of shippers, carriers, end customers, regulatory bodies and investors.
ITLS6107 Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 7 x 2 hr lectures, 7 x 4 hr computer labs Prohibitions: TPTM6180 Assessment: individual projects (40%); group project (20%); group presentation (10%); final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
The world is increasingly filled with systems, devices and sensors collecting large amounts of data on a continual basis. Most of these data are associated with locations that represent everything from the movement of individuals travelling between activities to the flow of goods or transactions along a supply chain and from the location of companies to those of their current and future customers. Taking this spatial context into account transforms analyses, problem solving and provides a powerful method of visualising the world. This is the essence of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and this unit. This unit starts by introducing students to the 'building blocks' of GIS systems, including data structures, relational databases, spatial queries and analysis. The focus then moves on to sources of spatial data including Global Positioning System (GPS), operational systems such as smartcard ticketing and transaction data along with web-based sources highlighting both the potential and challenges associated with integrating each data source within a GIS environment. The unit is hands-on involving learning how to use the latest GIS software to analyse several problems of interest using real 'big data' sources and to communicate the results in a powerful and effective way. These include identifying potential demand for new services or infrastructure, creating a delivery and scheduling plan for a delivery firm or examining the behaviour of travellers or consumers over time and locations. This unit is aimed at students interested in the spatial impact of decision-making and on the potential for using large spatial datasets for in-depth multi-faceted analytics.
ITLS6300 Maritime Management and Logistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Bell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 Prohibitions: TPTM6200 Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual assignment (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit conveys the fundamentals of maritime logistics and positions each student to become a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods of maritime logistics. The unit commences with a review of world seaborne trade, trends and cycles in the industry. This includes a review of ship types, ship life cycles, and the markets for new and second hand ships. There is an analysis of competition and efficiency in maritime logistics, including the impact of vertical and horizontal integration, alliances, freight stabilisation agreements and conferences. Ship owning, financing, chartering and insurance are covered in detail. Ship certification, flag state control, and the role of the IMO are described. Intermodal supply chains are studied for both bulk and containerised freight. Tramp and liner shipping is covered, with a detailed look at routing and scheduling for liner operations. Presentations by maritime professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Review of Maritime Transport, 2013 and 2014
ITLS6301 City Logistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Summer Main Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit conveys the fundamentals of city logistics, which is the pickup, storage, transport and delivery of freight in urban areas. All aspects of city logistics from planning, management and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact are covered for cities of all types. The relationships between land use, transport and city logistics are described. Traffic engineering concepts like 'link' and 'place' are explored and the implications for location and design of loading zones and docks as well as underground service networks are considered. Forms of urban freight consolidation centre are looked at along with the role of alternative transport modes, like public transport, cycles, electric vehicles and drones. Ecommerce and fulfilment models are also studied. The implications for city logistics of new technologies, apps and the 'sharing economy' are considered. International case studies are covered. Seminars by city logistics professionals complement the lectures. Students have an opportunity to develop city logistics solutions for themselves through a group design project.
ITLS6400 Airline Strategy and Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 3 x 3.5 hr seminars, 3 x 3.5 hr workshops. Corequisites: ITLS6101 Prohibitions: TPTM6160 Assessment: individual assignment (50%), quiz (10%), presentation (30%), final exam (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Aviation is an international growth industry offering extensive commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, logistic providers, banks, consultancies and other players of the aviation supply chain. This unit covers all aspects of international business and management along the aviation value chain and analysis from the perspectives of consumers (passengers and cargo), producers, distributors, brokers and investors. Students develop industry skills and an understanding of the strategic management and economics of operating airlines and other aviation entities, including financial analysis, risk management, sustainability, logistics, innovations and implications of competitive strategies for the development of hubs and alliances both in the global and regional/remote context. The growth in air traffic (i.e. in the Asia/Pacific region) creates endless opportunities and the unit thus also covers forecasting, entrepreneurship and the role of the private sector in airline/airport business development. As a result of our strategic partnership with CAPA and a number of airlines and airports, students have access to industry data bases, guest lecturers, company information and aviation contacts/networks.
ITLS6401 Airport Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive August Classes: 5 x 3.5 hr lectures, 2 x 3.5 hr seminars, 5 x 3.5 hr workshops. Assessment: individual report (30%); group presentation (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Airports play an integral role in the aviation system, and contribute significantly to the economic growth of a region, or even a country. This unit covers major aspects of airport management, operation and public policy. The unit's learning objectives are two-fold. Firstly, it provides students with the core knowledge and insights concerning the key issues and decisions involved in the operation and management of airports in a rapidly changing regulatory environment. Secondly, it develops the skills for applying various applied economics and management knowledge to the airport industry. The unit assists students to understand more fully the business related problems encountered by commercial, industrial and public organisations in the airport industry. It also develops an ability to interpret results from relevant economic / management studies.
ITLS6500 Decision Making on Mega Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 8 x 3.5 hr lectures, 4 x 3.5 hr workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 or INFS5001 Assessment: 2x individual assignments (40%), group assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Infrastructure is crucial to economic performance; without it business cannot operate efficiently or competitively. Delivery of large infrastructure projects, however, is complex and despite many more megaprojects being undertaken than any time in history, the majority of these projects are completed significantly over-budget and longer than planned. In this unit students will be introduced to megaproject decision making. The sources of social and technical complexity are discussed, issues of risk management and governance explored, and human biases in decision making are also highlighted. Strategies to overcome weaknesses in mega project decision making are also outlined.

Graduate Certificate in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Students must complete 24 credit points in core units of study.
Units of study for this degree are as follows:

Core units of study

The core unit, ITLS5000, must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
ITLS5000 Foundations of Supply Chain Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 13 x 1.5 hr lectures, 12 x 1.5 hour tutorials Prohibitions: TPTM6155 or TPTM5001 Assessment: Individual report (20%); group report (20%); group presentation (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Logistics and supply chain management functions can account for as much as half of the total costs of running a business. The success of a firm's logistic and supply chain management not only impacts on the profitability of a firm but also has a significant and growing impact on customer experience and satisfaction. Logistics and supply chain management plays a major role in implementing organisational strategy and in many industries has sole responsibility for managing customer service. An understanding of the role of this activity within an organisation and how improving logistics and supply chains can assist business managers to better respond to market opportunities is essential for business students. Students undertaking this unit are given a solid grounding in the language, concepts, techniques and principles that underlie the field of logistics and supply chain management, and how knowledge of these concepts contributes towards a strategically effective and operationally efficient organisation or network of organisations.
ITLS5200 Quantitative Logistics and Transport

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr computer workshop per week Corequisites: ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 Prohibitions: TPTM6495 Assessment: computer exam (30%); team report (30%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Supply chain management as well as logistics, transport and infrastructure management relies on the ability to make effective decisions based on the information provided by careful analysis of data. Students undertaking this unit will develop a strong understanding of the basic techniques underpinning quantitative analysis and will develop highly marketable skills in spreadsheet modelling and the communication and presentation of data to support management decision making. This unit emphasises the practical aspects of quantitative analysis with computer based workshops. Students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making but emphasis is placed on how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis. The unit covers demand forecasting, spreadsheet modelling, optimisation of production and transportation using linear programming, simulation and basic statistics and linear regression techniques.
ITLS6003 Contemporary Procurement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 x 3 hr lectures, 8 hr workshop, 1 x 3 hr industry forum Corequisites: ITLS5200 or QBUS5001 Prohibitions: TPTM6400 Assumed knowledge: Basic ability to work with Excel is assumed. Assessment: quiz (30%), group presentation (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Procurement practitioners have to be able to generate insights from large volumes of transactional, aggregate, structured and unstructured data resulting from growing stakeholder needs, the globalisation of supply markets, evolving regulatory environments and relevant technological changes. This unit explores challenges in procurement practice using real procurement spend data from organisations with different strategic priorities. Students gain an appreciation of spend analysis techniques involving large datasets and an understanding of how the insights are applied in the context of category strategies, sourcing risk management, negotiations and ethical sourcing. The usefulness of large volumes of both structured and unstructured data for input to procurement strategy is explored. The unit includes an industry-led workshop and certificate component and is suitable for both early career procurement professionals as well as students interested in the application of data analytics in procurement.
ITLS6008 Production and Operations Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 8 x 3hr lectures, 4x 3hr tutorials Corequisites: ITLS5000 Assessment: quiz (30%); group presentation (20%); final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Production and operations management designs, operates, and improves the processes and systems through which products are made and delivered. Firms can improve their productivity and gain competitive advantage through effective and innovative production and operations management. This unit offers a thorough examination of various production and operations management concepts from a supply chain perspective. The key teaching topics include operations planning hierarchy, resource management, capacity planning, quality management, retail operations, sustainable/green operations, and reverse logistics. Students learn about the successful production and operations management practices that have helped organisations improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their supply chains and create competitive advantage.