Units of study for Professional Accounting coursework programs

The Business School website (sydney.edu.au/business/pgunits) contains the most up-to-date information on unit of study availability or other requirements. Timetabling information for 2014 is also available on the Business School website (sydney.edu.au/business/timetable). Students should note that units of study are run subject to demand.

Table of postgraduate units of study: Professional Accounting

I. Master of Professional Accounting

Unit of study Credit points P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Core units of study

(i) Foundation
Students must complete the foundational core units, ACCT5001 and BUSS5000, in their first semester of study.
ACCT5001
Accounting Principles
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
BUSS5000
Critical Thinking in Business
6    N ECOF5010
Semester 1
Semester 2
BUSS5001
Firms, Markets and Business Management
6    N ECON5003, ECON5001, ECON5002
Semester 1
Semester 2
CLAW5001
Legal Environment of Business
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
FINC5001
Capital Markets and Corporate Finance
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
Summer Early
INFS5000
Accounting Information Systems
6   

This unit of study is only offered in the Professional Accounting programs.
Semester 1
Semester 2
QBUS5002
Quantitative Methods for Accounting
6    N ECMT5001, QBUS5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
(ii) Advanced
ACCT5002
Managerial Accounting & Decision Making
6    P ACCT5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ACCT6001
Intermediate Financial Reporting
6    P ACCT5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ACCT6007
Contemporary Issues in Auditing
6    P ACCT6001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ACCT6010
Advanced Financial Reporting
6    P ACCT6001
Semester 1
Semester 2
CLAW6002
Corporate Structures in Practice
6    P CLAW5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
CLAW6026
Taxation Law and Practice
6    P CLAW5001
N CLAW5002
Semester 1
Semester 2
(iii) Capstone
Students must complete the capstone unit in their final semester of study.
ACCT6120
Corporate Governance and Accountability
6    P ACCT6010
Semester 1

Elective units of study

Students must complete 12 credit points in elective units of study selected from the following options.
ACCT6002
International Accounting
6    P ACCT5001


This unit of study is being run by the Discipline of International Business. All enquiries should be directed to the Discipline of International Business.
Semester 2
Summer Early
Winter Main
ACCT6003
Financial Statement Analysis
6    P ACCT5001 and FINC5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ACCT6005
Management Control Systems
6    P ACCT5002
Semester 1
ACCT6006
Advanced Managerial Accounting
6    P ACCT5002
Semester 2
ACCT6014
Designing Accounting Systems
6    P ACCT5001
Semester 1
ACCT6015
Extended Performance Reporting
6    P ACCT5001
C ACCT6001

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
BUSS6500
Industry Placement
6    P 8 units with a WAM of 65%
N ECOF6500, ECOF6501, ECOF6502, BUSS6501, BUSS6502

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employment Relations Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au
Int February
Int July
Semester 1
Semester 2
CLAW6030
China's Legal Environment for Business
6      Semester 2
CLAW6031
International Financial Crime
6      Semester 2
FINC6001
Intermediate Corporate Finance
6    P FINC5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
Summer Main
FINC6013
International Business Finance
6    P FINC5001
Semester 1
FINC6016
Financial Instruments and Markets
6      Semester 2
IBUS5003
Global Business
6    N IBUS5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
INFS6012
Enterprise Systems Management
6   

This is a defined elective unit of study in both the Master of Professional Accounting and the Master of Commerce programs.
Semester 1
INFS6031
Project Management and Accounting
6   

This is a defined elective unit of study in the Master of Professional Accounting program.
Semester 1
ITLS6001
Value Chain Costing
6    C ITLS5000 (or TPTM5001) or ACCT5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS6501
Infrastructure Financing
6    C ITLS5200 (or TPTM6495) or QBUS5002
Semester 1
QBUS6310
Business Operations Analysis
6    P ECMT5001 or QBUS5001 or QBUS5002
N ECMT6008
Semester 2
WORK5003
Management and Organisations
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
WORK6030
Performance and Rewards
6      Winter Main

II. Graduate Diploma in Professional Accounting

Unit of study Credit points P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Core units of study

(i) Foundation
ACCT5001
Accounting Principles
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
CLAW5001
Legal Environment of Business
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
FINC5001
Capital Markets and Corporate Finance
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
Summer Early
(ii) Advanced
ACCT5002
Managerial Accounting & Decision Making
6    P ACCT5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ACCT6001
Intermediate Financial Reporting
6    P ACCT5001
Semester 1
Semester 2

Elective units of study

ACCT6007
Contemporary Issues in Auditing
6    P ACCT6001
Semester 1
Semester 2
ACCT6010
Advanced Financial Reporting
6    P ACCT6001
Semester 1
Semester 2
BUSS5000
Critical Thinking in Business
6    N ECOF5010
Semester 1
Semester 2
BUSS5001
Firms, Markets and Business Management
6    N ECON5003, ECON5001, ECON5002
Semester 1
Semester 2
CLAW6002
Corporate Structures in Practice
6    P CLAW5001
Semester 1
Semester 2
CLAW6026
Taxation Law and Practice
6    P CLAW5001
N CLAW5002
Semester 1
Semester 2
INFS5000
Accounting Information Systems
6   

This unit of study is only offered in the Professional Accounting programs.
Semester 1
Semester 2
QBUS5002
Quantitative Methods for Accounting
6    N ECMT5001, QBUS5001
Semester 1
Semester 2

Unit of study descriptions for Professional Accounting coursework programs

Please note: These unit of study descriptions are listed alphanumerically by unit code.

ACCT5001 Accounting Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ron Day / Cornelia Beck (coordinate in alternative semesters) Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: Mid-semester examination (25%), individual and/or group assignment (25%), and final examination (50%)
This unit provides an introduction to the generally accepted accounting principles and practices underlying financial accounting and reporting. It is intended for both accounting and non-accounting majors. The unit aims to introduce students to the concepts and skills required to prepare, analyse, and interpret financial statements.
Textbooks
Carlon, S., Mladenovic, R., Palm, C., Kimmel, P.D., Weygandt, J.J. Financial Accounting: Building Accounting Knowledge, Wiley.
ACCT5002 Managerial Accounting & Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: Weekly in-class feedback of progressive performance in the development of concept and technique knowledge and its application and business practicals (40%), and final examination (60%)
The unit introduces students to the context and processes of management accounting, using financial and non-financial information to inform a resource-based view of the creation of stakeholder value. Critical business career skills of collaboration, problem solving, persuasive communication and ethical behaviour in difficult situations are fostered across the areas of cost accounting, business performance, and strategic value creation in management accounting. Students get real-world based experience through the application of management accounting techniques to organisational resourcing issues in their competitive and ethical context. The unit emphasises that management accountants have a leadership role in engendering organisational awareness of the value of organisational resources. Students become familiar with the many kinds of managerial accounting decisions concerning the recognition, augmentation, allocation, deployment, leveraging, development, performance and value of organisation resources that shape an organisation over time. The unit is completed with a capstone case study which consolidates learning and allows students to use their new knowledge and skills gained in identifying and addressing operational and strategic issues facing organisations following the global financial crisis.
ACCT6001 Intermediate Financial Reporting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: mid-semester test (35%), final examination (50%), and assignment (15%)
This unit is intended to provide an understanding of the contemporary Australian financial reporting environment. Particular attention is paid to accounting theory and concepts, mandatory reporting practices and reporting policies that reflect either a choice from among several mandated alternatives, or those areas where regulation has not occurred. The unit is intended for those who will be involved in the preparation or use of company financial statements. The unit provides an understanding of accounting techniques, both in terms of technical method and their relative impact on corporation's financial statements. The emphasis throughout is on both the 'techniques' and the related explanations for their use.
ACCT6002 International Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: Intensive - Summer and Winter School sessions Assessment: individual assignments (28%), group assignments (22%), and final examinations (50%)
Note: This unit of study is being run by the Discipline of International Business. All enquiries should be directed to the Discipline of International Business.
Many of the topics in an international accounting course have a domestic counterpart. However, new factors and complications arise in the international arena. Some of these are (1) diversity of laws, practices, customs, cultures, and competitive circumstances; and (2) risks associated with fluctuating exchange rates, differential rates of inflation, and unstable property rights. International accounting discusses issues from the perspective of companies that have internationalised their finance and/or their operations. It has a comparative aspect, comparing accounting across countries. It deals with corporate reporting and disclosure across national boundaries. It also deals with the harmonization of the worldwide diversity in financial reporting, in particular, convergence around International Financial Reporting Standards. It discusses foreign currency translation, a consolidations issue that arises from multinational operations. Finally, it aims to introduce the key issues relevant for undertaking cross-border analysis of financial statements.
ACCT6003 Financial Statement Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: Mid-semester exam (25%), group project (20%) and final exam (55%)
This unit helps students to develop an understanding of the techniques of financial statement analysis for the appraisal of equity investment, credit evaluation, risk analysis, prediction of corporate failure, competitor analysis and industry standing, and valuation for takeover/restructuring. A primary purpose of this unit is to develop an understanding of these techniques, as well as the inherent difficulties in their application, as well as their limitations. Emphasis is provided on the analysis of earnings quality and accounting-based valuation methods.
ACCT6005 Management Control Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: continuous assessment (40%), essay (30%), and final examination (30%)
This unit of study examines the design and operation of 'management control systems' (MCS), considering also the role of management accounting technologies in this. In doing so, a variety of research-based readings and theoretical frames are mobilised to help understand this important facet of organisational functioning and application of management accounting work. Topics to be covered include: typologies of MCS; arguments relating to the fit and effectiveness of MCS; the connection between strategy and MCS; the role of performance measures in MCS; MCS and hybrid organisational spaces; MCS and the management of intellectual capital; MCS and the New Economy; and the evolution of MCS.
ACCT6006 Advanced Managerial Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr class per week Assessment: seminar assignments (35%), seminar contribution (15%), and final examination (50%)
This unit examines a number of advanced topics in managerial accounting as they relate to the use of key analytic and calculative techniques for decision making and value creation. The topics are biased towards those that are relevant and even contentious to contemporary practice and include: the potential inconsistencies between management accounting and strategic decision making and control; yield management; executive compensation and reward systems; ethical issues in budget setting and performance management; the theory of the firm and outsourcing; issues in managing joint ventures and strategic alliances; intellectual capital management and development; performance measurement systems; and innovation and change in management accounting practice. An overview of each topic area is provided before exploring the topics more deeply by examining current research and/or working through case studies to provide insights into contemporary business practice.
ACCT6007 Contemporary Issues in Auditing

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Mid Semester examination (30%), individual and/or group case study assignment (20%), and final examination (50%)
This unit of study examines the process of auditing and the concepts which underlay the function, nature and procedures of public company auditing in the context of corporate financial reporting. It has particular regard to the business, legal and economic foundations than underpin the audit process. Recurrent reference is made to practical and policy matters of importance to auditing and auditors, especially as they relate to the function of auditing in the contemporary envirnonment. Attention is also given to the need for quality corporate financial statements and the role corporate governance plays in adding credibility to the published financial reports. A number of current corporate failures are reviewed to expose students to the complexities of the auditing process in today's contemporary environment.
ACCT6010 Advanced Financial Reporting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignment (15%), case study (15%), mid-semester examination (20%), and final examination (50%).
This unit is intended to provide students with a detailed understanding of more complex financial reporting issues. The topics examined include: group accounting issues such as the practical application of the control test; multiple subsidiaries; foreign currency translation; consolidated cash flow reporting; segment reporting; accounting for joint arrangements and associates; and related party disclosures. The unit builds on the knowledge base acquired from earlier accounting units with a strong emphasis on the application of technical skills. The unit has a substantial case component, using current examples to illustrate both appropriate technical solutions in accordance with accounting standards and guidelines, as well as the forces which determine the choice of methods. The course will help develop students' ability to read and analyse financial reports and to understand the financial reporting implications of management decisions relating to internal reporting and organisational structure.
ACCT6014 Designing Accounting Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: In class assessment (10%), individual assessment (20%), team assessment (30%), and final examination (40%).
This unit introduces students to the concepts, challenges and approaches associated with the evaluation, design, introduction, operation and improvement of accounting systems and reflect the differences in the needs of family-owned business, small and medium sized enterprise and multi-national business firms. Elements of those systems include methods of documenting transactions and events; internal control procedures designed to safeguard human physical and financial resources; manual, semi-automated or fully automated source data entry, transaction processing methods and financial and non-financial reports on operational activities. These issues are also considered with regard to the capabilities of contemporary industry-standard accounting and business application software such as spreadsheets, MYOB and SAP in a cost-effective and secure manner. Topics include the design of charts of accounts; in solutions context; internal controls and maintaining audit trails, records management; the identification of requirements and the use of selection criteria for the evaluation, introduction, configuration and operation of packaged accounting software solutions. It provides students with the hands-on skills in the design and implementation of an accounting system to a real-world medium sized organisation using an industry standard accounting software solution by integrating concepts, approaches, commercial realities and capabilities of contemporary enterprise resource planning systems. At the commencement, students are provided with review of business frameworks including cycles, systems, source documents and recording transactions which act as a common starting point on which the unit builds.
ACCT6015 Extended Performance Reporting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: group presentation (20%), individual projects (40%), and final examination (40%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
This unit will review the issues associated with sustainability reporting models which have been practised in the last decade and highlight current and possible future issues. These new reporting models claim to enhance understanding of organisational performance to a variety of stakeholders, and are based on new performance measurement technologies that arguably improve decision making. This unit of study is designed to provide a critical analysis of the issues surrounding organisation performance and will explore the key underlying issues associated with the emergence of these new reporting models. The unit will look at how the reporting of economic and non-economic performance will enable private, public and third sector organisations to provide an account of their value creation and sustainability performance. It will also explore the perspectives of significant bodies of research on reporting value-creating activities and non-economic performance.
ACCT6120 Corporate Governance and Accountability

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Essay (25%), group case study (25%), and exam (50%)
Corporate governance has been defined as 'the system by which companies are directed and controlled' (Cadbury 1992). As the capstone unit for the MPAcc this unit assures the learning from prior management, audit, financial reporting and analysis accounting units by exploring how accounting information is used (and at time abused) in enabling the accountability through which the governance of the corporation is affected.  The course will introduce students to some of the core theories which are drawn upon to understand corporate governance; agency, stakeholder, stewardship and transaction cost theories. It will then explore the key relationships and practices upon which effective governance depends; relationships between a CEO and chairman, executive and non-executive directors, the board and its risk, audit, remuneration and nominations sub-committees, board members and their external auditors and other advisors, and relationships between the board, financial analysts,  investors and shareholders.  Whilst these issues will be explored in relation to the Anglo-American system of corporate governance which privileges the interests of shareholders, the course will also explore alternative stakeholder systems of corporate governance in Germany and Japan, as well as the development of governance frameworks and institutions in the transitional economies of Russia and China. Wider issues of corporate social responsibility in relation to the globalisation of product and capital markets will also be examined.
BUSS5000 Critical Thinking in Business

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Lyn Carson Session: Classes: 1x 1 hr lecture and 1x 2 hour tutorial per week Assessment: critical thinking diagnostics (5%), critical decision assessments (30%), critical reports (50%), and participation (15%)
Critical thinking is central to effective data interpretation, problem-solving and other key aspects of contemporary business practice. Students who take this unit develop high level critical thinking capabilities; skills that are essential for effective postgraduate study in business disciplines and for success in the world of business, whatever the specialisation. Students engage with theoretical frameworks and concepts in order to practise robust methods of questioning and argument. Weekly classes are organised around a progressive series of interactive learning activities. These focus on analysis, reflection, inquiry and ethical, reasoned evaluation of arguments and ideas and the production of appropriate written and spoken responses.
BUSS5001 Firms, Markets and Business Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Sandra Peter Session: Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr seminar per week Assessment: case analyses (45%), class participation (15%) and final exam (40%)
This unit provides students with the tools to understand the impact of economic, socio-cultural, institutional, and technological factors on businesses' operations. Such considerations are crucial to understanding and solving the major problems and challenges facing the world today, such as global warming, poverty, development, and recession. They are also extremely useful for understanding how businesses make decisions and interact in the marketplace. The first part of unit provides an introduction to microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis and applications. In microeconomics we look at economic decision-making by individuals and firms, the determination of prices in different kinds of markets, and the application of game theory to business decisions. In macroeconomics we consider determination of the aggregate level of economic activity (GDP and inflation), the economic effects of government policies, and the link between interest rates and exchange rates and the level of economic activity. The economics in the unit is complemented by developing an understanding of the complexity of professional behaviour and ethical decision making. The final part of the unit investigates the social, cultural, institutional and technological environments in which firms operate. It examines theories, models and conceptual tools that help us understand and make decisions in relation to these factors.
BUSS6500 Industry Placement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zina O'Leary Session: Classes: Wks 1-3: 1x 3hrs pre-placement workshops; Wks 4-12: 3 ½ days a week internship; Wk 13: presentation. Assessment: learning contract (0%), reflective journal (20%), presentation (15%), and research report (65%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Int February,Int July,Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: Permission is required to enrol in this unit. Contact the Careers and Employment Relations Office for details: business.placements@sydney.edu.au
This unit is available to outstanding students completing the Master of Commerce, Master of Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations, Master of Logistics Management, Master of Professional Accounting or Master of Transport Management program. It involves a professional placement with a business, government, or non-government organisation. It will include preparatory coursework in reflective, professional practice and report writing. Assessment will include a reflective journal and professional report and presentation based on the internship placement.
CLAW5001 Legal Environment of Business

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Patty Kamvounias Session: Classes: Three hours of classes per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: case analysis (20%), tests (35%), and final examination (45%)
All business conduct is regulated by the law. Every transaction and every relationship is governed by an increasingly complex mix of statutory and judge-made laws. The ability to identify and manage legal risks, and knowledge of compliance and dispute resolution strategies, are essential business management skills. This unit examines the legal framework and regulatory regime within which all businesses operate in Australia and in a global economy. It introduces students to the legal implications of commercial conduct and provides an overview of the Australian legal system and threshold legal concepts of agreement, ownership, and civil and criminal liability. Key areas of substantive business law are examined including contracts, torts (in particular negligence and the economic torts), property and securities, and crime. The unit also provides students with an overview of areas of legal regulation with an increasingly significant impact on business operations including: privacy, intellectual property rights, competition law, consumer law (in particular advertising regulation, product liability and unfair contracts), misleading conduct and unconscionable conduct.
CLAW6002 Corporate Structures in Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Cary Di Lernia Session: Classes: One three hour class per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: homework assignments (30%), multiple choice tests (20%), and final exam (50%)
The corporation is the dominant structure adopted for business undertakings globally. This unit aims to demystify corporate regulation and its impact in the contemporary commercial context with a view to introducing students to the types of issues they will encounter in the real world of corporations. The unit reviews business structures (joint ventures, partnerships, trusts and companies) from a business perspective with a focus on the corporate form. The unit also examines the different options available for the conduct of businesses and the different stages of the corporate life cycle, including: how corporations are brought into existence and the characteristics attained upon incorporation; how corporations undertake certain activities (including entry into contracts, fundraising, issuing shares, paying dividends); how corporations are managed and power is distributed between participants, how the law places certain duties and obligations upon those who manage corporations; the consequences which may result from any breach of those duties and obligations; and managing corporations in financial distress, liquidation and de-registration. It takes an application-based approach which gives the unit a practical as opposed to theoretical orientation. Current issues in corporate regulation in Australia and internationally are discussed to provide students with an understanding of the types of issues which confront different types of corporations, and how these issues impact upon their management and the discharge of corporate responsibility.
CLAW6026 Taxation Law and Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Antony Ting Session: Classes: One 3 hour class per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Assessment: Mid-semester exam (20%); Major assignment (30%); Class performance (10%); Final exam (40%)
Taxation is an inevitable reality for all individuals and businesses. The impact of taxation on business structures, transactions and decisions is both real and significant. An understanding of how taxation law works is not only vitally important for professional accountants but is also an essential management skill in an increasingly complex business environment. This unit introduces students to the principal forms of taxation within the Australian taxation system with a focus on concepts and principles of income tax law. Students will also learn how tax law is applied in practice. This unit covers key concepts of taxation in Australia (including the concepts of income, capital gains tax, deductions, and the residence and source principles) and examines the taxation of different entities (including partnerships, trusts and companies). The taxation of international business transactions is also considered.
CLAW6030 China's Legal Environment for Business

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Eva Huang Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Take home mid-term exam (35%), Proposal and presentation (15%), Research paper (50%)
China has recently become the second biggest economy in the world and is Australia's most important trading partner. Australian businesses are increasingly engaging with China. This Unit of Study addresses the frequently asked question of how to do business with China. It addresses China's unique business environment which has resulted from its unique culture, history and demography, and examines the business regulations, tax system, and the administrative and compliance issues businesses will face when carrying on business with China. The Unit first outlines the business environment in terms of culture, history, economics, demography, and government administration. It then provides students with an understanding of the legal environment that businesses will face in China. Through a hypothetical case study, different aspects of business regulation such as contract, entity structure, mergers and acquisition, property and intellectual property rights, the tax system, different tax types and associated international issues, and social insurance are analysed.
CLAW6031 International Financial Crime

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor David Chaikin Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Individual assignment (30%), Group assignment (20%), Final exam (50%)
International financial crime occupies a leading place on the international governance agenda. It has a devastating impact on national economies, international security and human development. This unit will examine key international financial crimes such as investment fraud, corruption, tax evasion, money laundering and terrorist financing. Students will gain an understanding of how these crimes are committed, detected and prosecuted. They will analyse the changing regulatory environment and the new risks facing businesses and the professions. The role of bank secrecy and tax havens in facilitating financial crime will also be studied. There will be a special focus on the prevention of financial crime, and the regime for tracing, freezing and recovery of illicit assets. The unit will draw on case studies from Australia, United States, Europe and Asia so as to gain a better appreciation of the national and international responses to international financial crime.
FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: mid semester-test (20%), major assignment (25%), and final examination (55%)
This unit provides an introduction to basic concepts in corporate finance and capital markets. It is designed to equip students to undertake further studies in finance. After reviewing some very basic ideas in finance and financial mathematics, the unit provides an introduction to the valuation of equity and debt securities and companies. The unit then examines issues related to pricing in capital markets and ends with a discussion of theory and practice related to capital structure and dividend policy.
FINC6001 Intermediate Corporate Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Class test (30%), practical exercises (10%), revision quiz (10%) and final examination (50%)
This unit extends some of the fundamental concepts introduced in FINC5001 Capital Markets and Corporate Finance, and develops a rigorous framework for the analysis and understanding of key aspects of corporate financial decision making. Fundamental concepts in corporate finance are extended to more complex settings. The unit examines more advanced approaches to asset pricing and capital budgeting. New topics are covered in relation to derivative securities and real options applications in capital budgeting. The issues of the cost of capital, corporate capital structure, and corporate dividend policy, are extended to cover the interaction of corporate and personal taxation, agency problems, and information signalling.
FINC6013 International Business Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Intra-semester test 1 (15%), intra-semester test 2 (15%), group project (20%), and final examination (50%)
In our highly globalised and integrated world economy, understanding international dimensions of financial management is essential for businesses. This unit provides a greater understanding of the fundamental concepts and the tools necessary for effective financial decision making by business enterprises, within a global setting.
FINC6016 Financial Instruments and Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: 2x mid-term exams (2x15%), assignment (20%), and final exam (50%)
This unit provides students with an introduction to Australian financial markets and an evaluation of the institutions, instruments and participants involved in the industry. The main markets evaluated include the equity, money, bond, futures, options, and foreign exchange markets. The relationship between the economic environment and these markets is examined.
IBUS5003 Global Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: Group assignments (30%), group presentations (10%), final exam (30%), mid term exams (15%), and in class quiz and participation (15%)
This unit focuses on the application of strategic thinking in key business contexts with a particular focus on the global nature of business. Specific attention is given to: (i) the identification and managing of new business opportunities both for entrepreneurial start-ups and for new ventures that emerge within a corporate setting; (ii) business model innovation as a basis for new ventures and business growth; (iii) the identification and managing of the specific challenges and risks presented by operating in a global business environment.
INFS5000 Accounting Information Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: group assignment (30%), individual assignment (20%), and final exam (50%)
Note: This unit of study is only offered in the Professional Accounting programs.
Accountants are extensive users of business information systems (BIS). They also play a critical advisory and managerial role in relation to the design, adoption, evaluation and assurance of BIS to ensure that information and systems are properly governed, used ethically and contribute to business value. This unit provides an introduction to current and emerging information technologies (IT) that support and enable business processes, information management, decision-making and reporting of critical business information in accounting. In addition, associated governance, risk and compliance challenges are explored. Relationships between business processes and accounting information systems are examined to develop your understanding of the complex and changing business information environment from the perspective of different stakeholders. You will also learn how to use tools, frameworks and models that assist in identifying opportunities for business value creation through innovative applications of various BIS and managing business information, processes and systems to ensure that strategies and service providers meet business needs.
INFS6012 Enterprise Systems Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assessment: midsemester test (35%), individual enterprise system portfolio (35%), and group report (30%)
Note: This is a defined elective unit of study in both the Master of Professional Accounting and the Master of Commerce programs.
In this unit you will explore the strategic managerial issues that arise from the implementation and use of Enterprise Systems as a means of integrating data and standardising processes. You will use a combination of practical sessions with an Enterprise System, such as SAP, and analyses based on readings of case studies to explore the long-term effects of strategic implementation decisions, and issues with regard to Enterprise System implementation projects. You will also explore the emergence and implications of cloud-based Enterprise Systems, and the part that Enterprise Systems play in an organisation's broader information infrastructure.
INFS6031 Project Management and Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1x 3 hr seminar per week Assessment: individual critique (35%), individual project plan (50%), and individual review (15%)
Note: This is a defined elective unit of study in the Master of Professional Accounting program.
Accounting is critical to project management and project management to accounting. Accountants make specialised contributions to project management in areas such as business case development/evaluation, budgeting, cost control, risk management and procurement. At the same time the work of accountants is both increasingly project based and reliant upon the outputs from projects (such as business processes and their supporting information systems). This unit will introduce you to the concepts, frameworks, tools, techniques and methodologies that underpin projects. It will also examine the role of the accountant in each of the four global phases that define the life of a project (Initiation, Planning, Execution and Outcomes realisation). Amongst other things, the unit will explore the use of methodologies in the conduct of projects - particularly the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) —including a critical evaluation of its strengths and weaknesses.
ITLS6001 Value Chain Costing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor David Walters Session: Classes: 8 x 3.5 hours lectures, 4 x 3.5 hour tutorials. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: In-class exams (4) (40%), presentation (20%), essay (10%), exam (30%)
Networked organisations are becoming a significant organisational structure in manufacturing and distribution. This unit develops students' understanding of the finance and accounting activities that need to be undertaken during the value adding processes that a business must fulfil. Emphasis is placed on the network aspects of costing processes and activities but relevant financial topics that impact on value chain network structures will also be introduced, such as financial and operational gearing, alternative methods of financing the operations activities, and risk management. Of importance is the notion of added value and how its quantitative value may be calculated as the aggregate added value accumulated within the value chain network; for example a cell phone may cross a number of international borders during manufacture and distribution, value is added by each process but what is the total value added and how much? This introduces another topic; how do we share the value generated by a network organisation among the network members? Answers to these questions need to be resolved to ensure the long-term growth and survival of the value chain network.
Textbooks
Hansen D and Mowen M (2013) Cornerstones of Cost management; Walsh C (2008) Key Management Ratios
ITLS6501 Infrastructure Financing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Beck Session: Classes: 9 x 3.5 hour lectures, 3 x 3.5 hour workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: Quiz (15%), essay (30%), group (25%), exam (30%)
Infrastructure is the backbone of every economy. Investment in infrastructure has the capacity to enhance productivity and generate growth, and has multiplier effects that are not only economic but also social and environmental. The cost of infrastructure projects, however, can be substantial and funding these projects represents a significant challenge. In this unit, students explore various forms of infrastructure financing and funding in order to achieve an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of each method and to appreciate when particular approaches are more or less suitable than others. Students are also introduced to the concepts of procurement strategies, tendering and contract theories.
Textbooks
Weber B Infrastructure as an Asset Class - Investment Strategies, Project Finance and PPP; Pretorius F Project Finance for Construction and Infrastructure - Principles and Case Studies; Tan W Principles Of Project And Infrastructure Finance; Yescombe ER Public-Private Partnerships: Principles of Policy and Finance.
QBUS5002 Quantitative Methods for Accounting

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial Assessment: assignments (15%), quizzes (15%), mid-semester exam (20%), and final exam (50%)
Accountants in the workplace need to be familiar with effective techniques for dealing with business data. This unit uses spreadsheet tools and accounting examples to introduce the most important data analysis methods. The unit will help students understand variability and detect when variation is random and when something significant is going on. This unit will also enable students to uncover the relationships between variables that can be hidden in business data. Students will learn how to look at accounting data and use it to forecast business performance. Students will also be given examples of the misuse of statistics in an accounting context. The unit will be taught through data- driven examples, exercises and business case studies.
QBUS6310 Business Operations Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial Assessment: Individual assignment (20%), mid-semester exam (30%), and final exam (50%)
Business operations are the activities that businesses carry out to create value. This unit provides the models needed to analyse business operations of a company or organisation and make management decisions on operational issues. It covers business operations in both manufacturing and service industries, looking at processes, supply chains and quality issues. Topics covered may include the modelling of manufacturing operations and related group technologies, the modelling of financial service operations (e.g. brokerage operations), and the operations implications of internet technologies.
WORK5003 Management and Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mark Westcott Session: Classes: 1 x 3 hour seminar/tutorial per week Assessment: quiz (10%), case Study (20%), essay (40%), and Either exam OR critical reflection (30%)
This unit aims to introduce students to the nature and context of management. It explores the functions and processes of management and encourages students to critically reflect on management theory and practice. It can be taken as a standalone unit for students enrolled in various specialist masters programs and also prepares students for further study in strategic management, organisational analysis and strategy and human resource management.
WORK6030 Performance and Rewards

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Shields Session: Classes: 13 contact hrs per week x 3 weeks Assessment: performance management case analysis 2000 words (40%); in class quiz (20%); final 2 hour exam (30%); class participation (10%)
This unit examines the processes and practices associated with contemporary performance and reward management. Results-based, behaviourally-based and competency-based methods of performance management are examined, along with processes of performance review, planning and developing. Coverage of reward management issues includes: job- and person-based approaches to building base pay structures; methods for rewarding individual performance; work group incentives such as gainsharing, goal-sharing and team pay; methods of rewarding employees for organisational performance, including employee share ownership; and performance-related rewards for executives. The unit also examines approaches to developing strategically integrated performance and reward management systems.