Business Economics

Through the Business Economics specialisation, students build a strong understanding of the economic analysis of business decision-making and the economic environment in which businesses operate. The specialisation covers core microeconomic principles with applications to business behaviour, and the analysis of theories explaining trends in critical macroeconomic variables including long-run economic growth, inflation and the exchange rate. The specialisation builds on these fundamental economic insights to give students a deep understanding of strategic business behaviour, of financial and foreign exchange markets, and of how government policy can influence and constrain business decision-making.

Requirements for a Business Economics specialisation

To achieve a specialisation in Business Economics within the Master of Commerce, students must complete 30 credit points in units of study comprising:

  • 6 credit points in foundational units of study;
  • 6 credit points in compulsory units of study; and
  • 18 credit points in elective units of study.

A sample pathway for the Business Economics specialisation (spread over two years of the Master of Commerce degree) is listed below.

Year Session Units of study
First Semester 1 Foundational: ECON5040 Microeconomics for Business
Semester 2 Compulsory: ECON5002 Macroeconomics Theory
Second Semester 1 Elective for specialisation Elective for specialisation
Semester 2 Elective for specialisation

Please Note. This sample progression is meant as an example only. Depending on unit prerequisites, students may be able to complete these units in a different sequence to that displayed in the table above.

For details of the foundational, compulsory and elective units required for the specialisation please refer to the Business Economics section of the Table of postgraduate units of study: Commerce in this handbook.

Further information

For further information regarding study in Business Economics in the Commerce coursework programs, please contact the School of Economics.