Units of study for the Transport Management coursework programs

The Business School website (sydney.edu.au/business/pgunits/) contains the most up-to-date information on unit of study availability and other requirements. Timetabling information for the current year is also available on the Business School website (sydney.edu.au/business/timetable). Students should note that units of study are run subject to demand.

Table of postgraduate units of study: Transport Management

(i) Master of Transport Management

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Core units of study

(1) Foundation
ITLS5100 must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
ITLS5100
Transport and Infrastructure Foundations
6    N TPTM6241


This is the foundation unit for all transport and infrastructure management programs and should be completed in the first period of study.
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS5200
Quantitative Logistics and Transport
6    A Basic familiarity with Excel and some knowledge of simple arithmetic is required in this unit. However, resources are made available online before the start of semester for students who need extra assistance in this area.
C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N QBUS5001 or TPTM6495
Semester 1
Semester 2
(2) Advanced
ITLS6101
Global Freight Logistics Management
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N TPTM6440
Semester 2
ITLS6102
Strategic Transport Planning
6    C ITLS5200 or TPTM6495
N TPTM6350
Semester 2
ITLS6103
Sustainable Transport Policy
6      Semester 1
ITLS6106
Infrastructure Appraisal
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
Semester 1
(3) Capstone - Master's students only
Master's degree students must complete the following capstone unit in their final semester of study.
ITLS6190
Transport and Infrastructure Systems
6    P ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
C (ITLS5200 or TPTM6495) and (ITLS6101 or TPTM6440) and (ITLS6102 or TPTM6350) and ITLS6103 and (ITLS6100 or TPTM6130 or ITLS6106)
N TPTM6450


This is the capstone unit for the Master of Transport Management and should be completed in the last period of study.
Semester 1
Semester 2

Elective units of study

Master's students complete 18 credit points in elective units.
ITLS6105
Traffic and Mobility Management
6    N TPTM6360
Semester 2
ITLS6107
Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics
6    N TPTM6180


This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
Semester 2
Summer Main
ITLS6300
Maritime Management and Logistics
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N TPTM6200
Semester 1
ITLS6301
Ports Management
6      Summer Main
ITLS6400
Airline Strategy and Supply Chains
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N TPTM6160
Semester 2
ITLS6401
Airport Management
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
Semester 1
ITLS6403
Cases in Global Transport and Logistics
6    C ITLS6101 and (ITLS6300 or ITLS6301 or ITLS6400 or ITLS6401 or TPTM6160 or TPTM6200)
N ITLS6302 or ITLS6402
Semester 2
ITLS6500
Decision Making on Mega Projects
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 or INFS5001
Semester 1
ITLS6501
Infrastructure Financing
6      Intensive July
ITLS6900
Research Case Study I
6    P (ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241) and (ITLS5200 or TPTM6495)
N TPTM6300

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is a research unit which requires special permission from the department, please contact: business.itlsinfo@sydney.edu.au
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS6901
Research Case Study II
6    C ITLS6900 or ITLS6300
N TPTM6330

Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is research based, there is 1 x 3.5 hr introductory lecture
Semester 1
Semester 2

(ii) Graduate Diploma in Transport Management

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Core units of study

(1) Foundation
ITLS5100 must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
ITLS5100
Transport and Infrastructure Foundations
6    N TPTM6241


This is the foundation unit for all transport and infrastructure management programs and should be completed in the first period of study.
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS5200
Quantitative Logistics and Transport
6    A Basic familiarity with Excel and some knowledge of simple arithmetic is required in this unit. However, resources are made available online before the start of semester for students who need extra assistance in this area.
C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N QBUS5001 or TPTM6495
Semester 1
Semester 2
(2) Advanced
ITLS6101
Global Freight Logistics Management
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N TPTM6440
Semester 2
ITLS6106
Infrastructure Appraisal
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
Semester 1

Elective units of study

Students complete 12 credit points in elective units.
ITLS6102
Strategic Transport Planning
6    C ITLS5200 or TPTM6495
N TPTM6350
Semester 2
ITLS6103
Sustainable Transport Policy
6      Semester 1
ITLS6104
Public Transport

This unit of study is not available in 2017

6    C ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
Semester 1
ITLS6105
Traffic and Mobility Management
6    N TPTM6360
Semester 2
ITLS6107
Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics
6    N TPTM6180


This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
Semester 2
Summer Main
ITLS6108
Management and Operation of Railways

This unit of study is not available in 2017

6    N TPTM6222
Intensive July
ITLS6300
Maritime Management and Logistics
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N TPTM6200
Semester 1
ITLS6301
Ports Management
6      Summer Main
ITLS6400
Airline Strategy and Supply Chains
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N TPTM6160
Semester 2
ITLS6401
Airport Management
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
Semester 1
ITLS6403
Cases in Global Transport and Logistics
6    C ITLS6101 and (ITLS6300 or ITLS6301 or ITLS6400 or ITLS6401 or TPTM6160 or TPTM6200)
N ITLS6302 or ITLS6402
Semester 2
ITLS6500
Decision Making on Mega Projects
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 or INFS5001
Semester 1
ITLS6501
Infrastructure Financing
6      Intensive July

(iii) Graduate Certificate in Transport Management

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Core units of study

ITLS5100 must be completed in a student's first semester of study.
ITLS5100
Transport and Infrastructure Foundations
6    N TPTM6241


This is the foundation unit for all transport and infrastructure management programs and should be completed in the first period of study.
Semester 1
Semester 2
ITLS5200
Quantitative Logistics and Transport
6    A Basic familiarity with Excel and some knowledge of simple arithmetic is required in this unit. However, resources are made available online before the start of semester for students who need extra assistance in this area.
C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N QBUS5001 or TPTM6495
Semester 1
Semester 2

Elective units of study

You must complete 12 credit points in elective units.
ITLS6101
Global Freight Logistics Management
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N TPTM6440
Semester 2
ITLS6102
Strategic Transport Planning
6    C ITLS5200 or TPTM6495
N TPTM6350
Semester 2
ITLS6103
Sustainable Transport Policy
6      Semester 1
ITLS6105
Traffic and Mobility Management
6    N TPTM6360
Semester 2
ITLS6106
Infrastructure Appraisal
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
Semester 1
ITLS6107
Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics
6    N TPTM6180


This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
Semester 2
Summer Main
ITLS6300
Maritime Management and Logistics
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N TPTM6200
Semester 1
ITLS6301
Ports Management
6      Summer Main
ITLS6400
Airline Strategy and Supply Chains
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
N TPTM6160
Semester 2
ITLS6401
Airport Management
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241
Semester 1
ITLS6403
Cases in Global Transport and Logistics
6    C ITLS6101 and (ITLS6300 or ITLS6301 or ITLS6400 or ITLS6401 or TPTM6160 or TPTM6200)
N ITLS6302 or ITLS6402
Semester 2
ITLS6500
Decision Making on Mega Projects
6    C ITLS5000 or TPTM5001 or ITLS5100 or TPTM6241 or INFS5001
Semester 1
ITLS6501
Infrastructure Financing
6      Intensive July

Unit of study descriptions for the Transport Management coursework programs

Note: These unit of study descriptions are listed alphanumerically by unit code.

ITLS5100 Transport and Infrastructure Foundations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudine Moutou Session: Classes: 8 x 3.5 hr lectures, 5 x 3.5 hr tutorials, 1 x 3.5hr field study Assessment: individual annotated bibliograpahy (20%), individual report (35%), group presentations (15%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: This is the foundation unit for all transport and infrastructure management programs and should be completed in the first period of study.
This unit provides a comprehensive introduction to the role of transportation and infrastructure within the economy. The key concepts and theories needed for management of transport and infrastructure are introduced and each of the key transport and infrastructure industries are considered from a market intelligence perspective. In providing the foundational knowledge for students in transport and infrastructure, the unit also introduces students to the professional communication skills needed for success as a student and as a manager. Examples and case studies are drawn from all modes of transport and infrastructure.
Textbooks
Annema JA and Banister D (2013) The Transport System and Transport Policy; Bliemer, MCJ & Mulley C and Moutou CJ (eds) (2016) Handbook on Transport and Urban Planning in the Developed World.
ITLS5200 Quantitative Logistics and Transport

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Geoffrey Clifton Session: Classes: 12 x 3.5 hr computer labs, 1 x 3.5 hr workshop. Assessment: computer exam (30%), individual report (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Supply chain management as well as logistics, transport and infrastructure management relies on the ability to make effective decisions based on the information provided by careful analysis of data. Students undertaking this unit will develop a strong understanding of the basic techniques underpinning quantitative analysis and will develop highly marketable skills in spreadsheet modelling and the communication and presentation of data to support management decision making. This unit emphasises the practical aspects of quantitative analysis with computer based workshops. Students are guided through the basic theories used in decision making but emphasis is placed on how the theories are applied in practice, drawing on real world experience in quantitative analysis. The unit covers demand forecasting, spreadsheet modelling, optimisation of production and transportation using linear programming, simulation and basic statistics and linear regression techniques.
Textbooks
Winston, W.L. and Albright, S.C. 2012, Practical Management Science, 5th edition, Cengage, Boston; Selvanathan, E. A., Selvanathan, S. And Keller, G. 2014, Business Statistics: Australia and New Zealand 6th edition, Cengage Learning Australia, Melbourne.
ITLS6101 Global Freight Logistics Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Rico Merkert Session: Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 3 x 3.5 hr seminars, 3 x 3.5 hr workshops. Assessment: individual report (20%), quiz (10%), presentation (individual 40%, group 10%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit seeks to give students an understanding of the management of international freight, including express, freight forwarding, air freight and ocean shipping. The unit will discuss underlying drivers of international trade flows and the demand for capacity in different freight transport modes, as well as industry structure, regulatory environment (customs, etc.) and market access. Building on this background the unit will highlight the implications for profitable air cargo and shipping operations. Particular focus will be given to fleet and network planning, revenue and cost management. The material covered in the unit will take into account recent developments in global and regional economic activity and discuss implications for the various sectors of the air, sea and intermodal freight businesses. This unit covers operators, customers and investors perspectives and strategies and intermodal freight businesses.
Textbooks
Morrell P (2011) Moving Boxes By Air: The Economics of International Air Cargo
ITLS6102 Strategic Transport Planning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michiel Bliemer Session: Classes: 7 x 3.5 hr lectures, 7 x 3.5 hr computer labs Assessment: 2x quizzes (30%), 2x individual reports (40%), group report (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Strategic transport planners advise the government on where to plan new infrastructure, where to expand existing infrastructure, or where to introduce or expand public transport services. When deciding on such large long?term investments in infrastructure and transit services, all government bodies ? federal, state, and local ? rely on forecasts of the effects of these investments on traffic flows, congestion, toll revenues and impacts on the environment. This unit provides a basic understanding of the main principles underlying strategic transport models for forecasting, and the knowledge to critically assess forecasts of transport strategies made by transport planners. Students acquire knowledge of strategic forecasting models used by government and consultants as well as the methods to capture travel behaviour such as mode choice and route choice. Simple mathematical models will be discussed in detail, along with numerical examples and applications in the Sydney Metropolitan Area, which are used to illustrate the principles of the methods. The unit equips students to build simple transport models in the computer lab using specialised transport planning software used by governments and consultants.
Textbooks
Ortuzar J de D and Willumsen LG (2011) Modelling Transport
ITLS6103 Sustainable Transport Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Corinne Mulley Session: Classes: 10 x 3.5 hr lectures/tutorials, 1x full day field trip Assessment: 3x individual assignments (65%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Transport policy decisions shape contemporary life around the world and the connections between transport and land use are instrumental in designing effective policy in this domain. The unit provides an introduction to the context for policy making, how decisions are made, relationships with short- and long-term strategic planning, and how policy has become intertwined with broader sustainability concerns. The unit will then develop the student¿s ability to assess contemporary issues in sustainable transport policy such as liveable environments, climate change, the role of the built environment in sustainable cities, social inclusion, parking policy, human health and safety, active travel, the challenges of low density transport, the regulation of public transport, fare policies for public transport and other contemporary issues. Each issue will consider the problem and assess the success of existing policy and/or the need for new policy and what this might look like. The unit is particularly suited to students with broad interest in transport, urban planning, and environmental/sustainability issues.
Textbooks
van Wee B. and Banister D. (ed.s) (2013) The Transport System and Transport Policy, An Introduction (ISBN: 978 1 78195 204 7);
ITLS6105 Traffic and Mobility Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michiel Bliemer Session: Classes: 8 x 3.5 hr lectures, 4 x 3.5 hr computer labs Assessment: 2x quizzes (40%), 2x individual report (50%), individual presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Road traffic and related congestion problems have existed for many years across a range of cities around the world. It is clear that just building new road infrastructure is not the solution. Instead, attention has focussed on the more effective management of travel demand and existing traffic, such that the current infrastructure is more efficiently utilised. Understanding traffic flows is essential in managing traffic. This unit provides a basic understanding of traffic flow theory and how to influence traffic operations and impacts by means of traffic control, mobility management, and information provision. Students acquire knowledge of traffic flow theory and traffic operations in urban and motorway settings. Traffic management strategies (such as traffic controls), travel demand and mobility strategies (such as road pricing), and traveller information strategies will be discussed in detail, as well as their impacts on traffic conditions. The unit also gives students access to traffic management solutions using specialised traffic simulation software used by governments and consultants. Students will be able to experience traffic management by driving in simulators in the new driving simulation laboratory.
ITLS6106 Infrastructure Appraisal

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Corinne Mulley Session: Classes: 12x 3.5hr letures/tutorials Assessment: 2x individual assignments (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The provision and implementation of infrastructure involves a choice between alternative ways of using scarce resources. Infrastructure appraisal is a process which provides an evidence base for decision-makers to make informed and rational choices on investment strategies. This unit uses cases studies to investigate the evaluation of infrastructure investment whether funded by the private or public sector, where the critical difference is between the viewpoint of the investor with private investors being interested in the return to their own business, and public investment needing to be concerned with the costs and benefits to society as a whole. The unit also examines the implications for appraisal in the increasingly-important public-private financing investment setting. The unit considers the rationale of appraisal and its underlying value judgements before addressing issues of reference case and elements for appraisal identification. Uncertainty is a crucial element associated with evaluating investments which occur in the future, as is the valuation of resources, when there is no market to guide value. The unit goes beyond financial appraisal and cost benefit analysis to include themes that are assuming growing importance in today's evaluation processes, such as the wider economy impacts and economic impact analysis.
Textbooks
Boardman, A.E, Greenberg, D.H., Vining, A.R. and Weimer, D.L. (2011) (4th ed) Cost-Benefit Analysis: Concepts and Practice, Pearsons
ITLS6107 Applied GIS and Spatial Data Analytics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrian Ellison and Dr Richard Ellison Session: Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr computer labs. Assessment: individual projects (40%); group project (20%); group presentation (10%); final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This unit assumes no prior knowledge of GIS; the unit is hands-on involving the use of software, which students will be trained in using.
The world is increasingly filled with systems, devices and sensors collecting large amounts of data on a continual basis. Most of these data are associated with locations that represent everything from the movement of individuals travelling between activities to the flow of goods or transactions along a supply chain and from the location of companies to those of their current and future customers. Taking this spatial context into account transforms analyses, problem solving and provides a powerful method of visualising the world. This is the essence of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and this unit. This unit starts by introducing students to the 'building blocks' of GIS systems, including data structures, relational databases, spatial queries and analysis. The focus then moves on to sources of spatial data including Global Positioning System (GPS), operational systems such as smartcard ticketing and transaction data along with web-based sources highlighting both the potential and challenges associated with integrating each data source within a GIS environment. The unit is hands-on involving learning how to use the latest GIS software to analyse several problems of interest using real 'big data' sources and to communicate the results in a powerful and effective way. These include identifying potential demand for new services or infrastructure, creating a delivery and scheduling plan for a delivery firm or examining the behaviour of travellers or consumers over time and locations. This unit is aimed at students interested in the spatial impact of decision-making and on the potential for using large spatial datasets for in-depth multi-faceted analytics.
ITLS6190 Transport and Infrastructure Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Stephen Greaves Session: Classes: 4 x 3.5 hr lectures, 4 x 3.5 hr workshops, 4 x 3.5 hr tutorials. Assessment: Individual proposal (20%), individual presentation (10%), individual report (60%), group peer review (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: This is the capstone unit for the Master of Transport Management and should be completed in the last period of study.
This unit covers advanced concepts related to all aspects of transport and infrastructure analysis, policy, and decision making, covering facets related to maritime and aviation transport, urban public and private transport, and transport planning and design. The unit is based on case studies in transport and infrastructure. The case studies will be used as a basis for a formal procedure of requests for qualifications, requests for proposals, preparation of written and oral proposals, undertaking of a case study with interim written report, and written and oral final reports.
Textbooks
Stopher PR and Stanley J (2014) Urban Transport: A Public Policy View
ITLS6300 Maritime Management and Logistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Bell Session: Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual assignment (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit conveys the fundamentals of maritime logistics and positions each student to become a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods of maritime logistics. The unit commences with a review of world seaborne trade, trends and cycles in the industry. This includes a review of ship types, ship life cycles, and the markets for new and second hand ships. There is an analysis of competition and efficiency in maritime logistics, including the impact of vertical and horizontal integration, alliances, freight stabilisation agreements and conferences. Ship owning, financing, chartering and insurance are covered in detail. Ship certification, flag state control, and the role of the IMO are described. Intermodal supply chains are studied for both bulk and containerised freight. Tramp and liner shipping is covered, with a detailed look at routing and scheduling for liner operations. Presentations by maritime professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Review of Maritime Transport, 2013 and 2014
ITLS6301 Ports Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Bell Session: Classes: 20 x 1.5 hr lectures, 4 x 1.5 hr seminars, 4 x 1.5 hr workshops Assessment: quiz (10%), individual presentation (10%), individual essay (40%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit conveys the fundamentals of port management and thus develops each student into a competent practitioner with an understanding of the key concepts, techniques and management methods for the port industry. The unit comprehensively covers all aspects of management from planning and operation to security, efficiency and mitigation of environmental impact for all types of port. Technological changes and their implications for the port industry, in particular container terminal automation, are studied. The role of ports in global supply chains is analysed. The relationship of ports with their hinterlands as well as the concept of port-centric logistics is looked at in detail. The port-city interface as well as waterfront redevelopment is covered, with examples drawn from a number of countries. Port policy and the importance of competition and/or regulation are presented. Talks by port professionals will complement the lectures and provide students with windows on the workings of the industry.
Textbooks
Stopford M (2009) Maritime Economics; UNCTAD (United Nations Conference on Trade and Development), Review of Maritime Transport, 2013 and 2014; World Bank (2011) World Bank Port Reform Toolkit
ITLS6400 Airline Strategy and Supply Chains

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rico Merkert Session: Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 3 x 3.5 hr seminars, 3 x 3.5 hr workshops. Assessment: individual assignment (50%), quiz (10%), presentation (30%), final exam (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
International growth in the airline industry offers extensive commercial and employment opportunities not only for airlines but also for the airports, banks, consultancies and other players that form the aviation supply chain. This unit covers all aspects of international business and management for airlines and along the aviation value chain from consumer, producer and investor perspectives. Students develop an understanding of the economics of the operation of airlines and suppliers to the airline industry, including financial analysis, risk management and implications of competitive strategies for the development of hubs and global alliances. The growth in air traffic particularly in the Asia/Pacific region is creating significant opportunities for airline development and the unit thus covers forecasting and the role of the private sector in this development. The unit also examines the management and logistics of regional aviation. As a result of our strategic partnership with CAPA and a number of airlines and airports, students have access to industry data bases, company information and aviation contacts/networks.
Textbooks
Doganis R (2010) Flying Off Course;
ITLS6401 Airport Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaowen Fu Session: Classes: 5 x 3.5 hr lectures, 2 x 3.5 hr seminars, 5 x 3.5 hr workshops. Assessment: individual report (40%), quiz (20%), group presentation (20%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Airports play an integral role in the aviation system, and contribute significantly to the economic growth of a region, or even a country. This unit covers major aspects of airport management, operation and public policy. The unit's learning objectives are two-fold. Firstly, it provides students with the core knowledge and insights concerning the key issues and decisions involved in the operation and management of airports in a rapidly changing regulatory environment. Secondly, it develops the skills for applying various applied economics and management knowledge to the airport industry. The unit assists students to understand more fully the business related problems encountered by commercial, industrial and public organisations in the airport industry. It also develops an ability to interpret results from relevant economic / management studies.
Textbooks
De Neufville R, Odoni A, Belobaba P and Reynolds T (2013) Airport Systems; Planning, Design and Management; Ashford N, Stanton M, Moore C, Coutu P and Beasley J (2012) Airport Operations; Belobaba P, Odoni A and Barnhart C (2009) The Global Airline Industry
ITLS6403 Cases in Global Transport and Logistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaowen Fu Session: Classes: 2 x 3.5 hr lectures, 5 x 3.5 hr seminars, 5 x 3.5 hr workshops. Assessment: individual report and presentation (40%), group presentation (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Global transport and logistics (aviation, shipping and multi-modal transportation) is one of the fastest growing international industry areas providing commercial and employment opportunities in airlines, airports, shipping lines, ports, freight forwarders, banks, consultancies, and other players in the global supply chain. In the current market environment it is not enough to have an understanding of the business fundamentals of the aviation and maritime industry. The most sought after skill is to be able to apply acquired knowledge and to be ready to do business. This unit builds on the material taught in the foundation maritime and aviations units with the aim to relate all of the key learning outcomes from those units to real world industry examples. Students are required to test their understanding in case studies and workshops both on an individual level and in team work environments. The course is enriched by a number of presentations from senior managers from the aviation and maritime industry.
Textbooks
Doganis, R., 2010, Flying Off Course, 4th ed., Routledge, London, New York; Stopford, M., 2009, Maritime Economics, Routledge, London, New York
ITLS6500 Decision Making on Mega Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Beck Session: Classes: 8 x 3.5 hr lectures, 4 x 3.5 hr workshops. Refer to timetable for full details. Assessment: 2x individual assignments (40%), group assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Infrastructure is crucial to economic performance; without it business cannot operate efficiently or competitively. Delivery of large infrastructure projects, however, is complex and despite many more megaprojects being undertaken than any time in history, the majority of these projects are completed significantly over?budget and longer than planned. In this unit students will be introduced to megaproject decision making. The sources of social and technical complexity are discussed, issues of risk management and governance explored, and human biases in decision making are also highlighted. Strategies to overcome weaknesses in mega?project decision making are also outlined.
Textbooks
Priemus H, Flyvberg B and van Wee B (2008) Decision Making on Mega-Projects; Flyvberg B, Bruzelius N and Rothengatter W (2003) Megaprojects and Risk: An Anatomy of Ambition; Penn MR and Parker PJ (2012) Introduction to Infrastructure: An Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering; Brett M and Frischmann BM (2012) Infrastructure: The Social Value of Shared Resources
ITLS6501 Infrastructure Financing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Beck Session: Classes: 9 x 3.5 hr lectures, 3 x 3.5 hr workshops. Assessment: 2x individual assignments (50%), group assignment (25%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Infrastructure is the backbone of every economy. Investment in infrastructure has the capacity to enhance productivity and generate growth, and has multiplier effects that are not only economic but also social and environmental. The cost of infrastructure projects, however, can be substantial and funding these projects represents a significant challenge. In this unit, students explore the distinction between infrastructure financing and funding and the challenges in raising private finance. Students are provided with an understanding of the principles of infrastructure finance and the use of special purpose vehicles and how to structure alternative financing plans. Students learn how to develop approaches to procurement and tendering and understand issues associated with the commercial and financial structuring of Public Private Partnerships.
Textbooks
Weber B Infrastructure as an Asset Class - Investment Strategies, Project Finance and PPP; Pretorius F Project Finance for Construction and Infrastructure - Principles and Case Studies; Tan W Principles Of Project And Infrastructure Finance; Yescombe ER Public-Private Partnerships: Principles of Policy and Finance.
ITLS6900 Research Case Study I

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Collins Session: Classes: This unit is research based, there is 1 x 3.5 hr introductory lecture Assessment: individual proposal (15%), individual presentation (20%), individual report (65%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: This is a research unit which requires special permission from the department, please contact: business.itlsinfo@sydney.edu.au
This unit involves a semester long research project, on a single transport, logistics or infrastructure topic. The topic may either be selected from a list proposed by the academic staff at ITLS, or negotiated with a staff member, based on the students personal or professional interests. The research can take a number of forms. An existing research finding or methodology may be refined or investigated in a different context. Academically strong and ambitious students may seek to obtain more original results. Another alternative is a critical investigation of a case study, or a critical comparison of a range of approaches to a problem, that are either implemented in industry or proposed in academia. Through this unit, students will develop skills in critical thinking, independence of thought and action, and management of a complex, uncertain project. The unit is ideally suited to the strong student who is seeking a competitive edge over others within their profession, or to students who may be interested in future, research based study.
ITLS6901 Research Case Study II

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Collins Session: Classes: This unit is research based, there is 1 x 3.5 hr introductory lecture Assessment: individual proposal (15%), individual presentation (20%), individual report (65%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1,Semester 2
Note: This unit is research based, there is 1 x 3.5 hr introductory lecture
This unit provides the opportunity for coursework students who have successfully completed the Research Case Study I unit to investigate an additional topic in the transport/logistics/infrastructure field or to further their existing research into a particular topic. The unit involves a semester long research project, on a single transport, logistics or infrastructure topic. The topic may either be selected from a list proposed by the academic staff at ITLS, or negotiated with a staff member, based on the students personal or professional interests. The research can take a number of forms. An existing research finding or methodology may be refined or investigated in a different context. Academically strong and ambitious students may seek to obtain more original results. Another alternative is a critical investigation of a case study, or a critical comparison of a range of approaches to a problem, that are either implemented in industry or proposed in academia. Through this unit, students will develop skills in critical thinking, independence of thought and action, and management of a complex, uncertain project. The unit is ideally suited to the strong student who is seeking a competitive edge over others within their profession, or to students who may be interested in future, research based study.