Analysis, History and Culture Studies Core Units

Subject details

The following is ordered alphabetically by area, and contains the non-principal study core units of study for all undergraduate degrees and diplomas. Many of these core units of study can also be taken as electives.

Analysis, History and Culture Studies

Foundation Units

MCGY2611 Music from the Middle Ages to Baroque

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alan Maddox Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2hr lecture/1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: Assumed Knowledge: Ability to read musical notation Prohibitions: MCGY1013, MCGY1014 Assessment: Tutorial assignments (20%), essay (40%), exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, history & culture studies.
This unit explores major topics in the history of Western art music from the 9th century through to c. 1750 in a broad historical context. Beginning with Gregorian chant and the invention of music education notation, we investigate a wide range of genres, and styles, developments in musical instruments, and innovations of the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque eras, as well as innovations including the development of music printing, developments in musical instruments, and the emergence of opera, sonata and concerto. Among Musical works for analysis and discussion are include examples by Hildegard of Bingen, Machaut, Dufay, Josquin, Palestrina, Monteverdi, Frescobaldi, Lully, Purcell, Vivaldi, Handel and J.S. Bach.
Textbooks
J. P. Burkholder and C. V. Palisca. Norton Anthology of Western Music, vol. 1, 6th ed. (2010)
MCGY2612 Music in the Classical and Romantic Eras

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Larkin Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2-hour lecture and one 1-hour tut/week Prerequisites: Assumed Knowledge: Ability to read musical notation Prohibitions: MCGY3012, MCGY2013 Assessment: Essay (30%); Tutorial assignments and participation (20%); In-Class tests (20%); 2-hour exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, history & culture studies.
This unit will survey the main lines of musical development between 1750 and 1890, with primary focus on the composition of music, and how this relates to the social and aesthetic currents of the time. The overview given in the lecture series will be reinforced by detailed focus on individual works in the tutorials from both historical and analytical perspectives. Topics will include the emergence and codification of classical form and syntax; style and genre in the works of the first Viennese School; Beethoven's 'heroic' and 'late' styles; national opera traditions; symphonic poem and music drama; nationalism and exoticism; and the conflict between progress and tradition.
Textbooks
J. P. Burkholder, D. J. Grout, and C. V. Palisca: A History of Western Music. 8th ed. (2010).
MCGY2613 Music in Modern Times

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Rachel Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1hr tut/week Prerequisites: Assumed Knowledge: Ability to read musical notation Prohibitions: MCGY2009, MCGY2008 Assessment: 1500 word essay (40%), mid-semester test (20%), 2 hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, history & culture studies.
Traces the essential developments in Western art music from the very end of the 19th century to the start of the 21st, and relates them to broad socio-historical and artistic changes. The overview given in the lectures is reinforced by the analysis of key works in tutorials. Areas covered include Late Romanticism, Impressionism, Expressionism, Free Atonality, Rhythmic Innovation, Neo-classicism, Serial Music, Political Music, American Experimentalism, Electro-Acoustic Music, Chance composition, Textural Composition, Minimalism, influences from Popular Music, Collage and Polystylism, East-West Encounters, Neo-Romanticism, Post Modernism and Spectralism. Works analysed include compositions by Andriessen, Bartok, Cage, Debussy, Ligeti, Messiaen, Part, Schoenberg, Strauss, Stravinsky, Stockhausen and Webern.
Textbooks
Griffiths P, Modern music and after, Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2011
MCGY2614 Musical Worlds of Today

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Rachel Campbell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture and 1hr tut/week Assessment: 2000 word essay (40%), 1 tutorial report (20%), tutorial participation (20%), Listening test (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a Foundation unit in Analysis, history & culture studies.
Embracing popular music and examples of traditional and contemporary music in Australia and Asia, this unit offers an introduction not only to the genres themselves, but to the themes prevalent in the work of contemporary music scholars. These may include gender and race, ownership and appropriation, reception and transmission, technology and globalisation, music as social behaviour, and music and place. Such themes are considered across the three topic modules: Popular Music (including contemporary Aboriginal music); Traditional Music (Australia, Japan, Melanesia) and Australian Music (place and identity, from colonialism to the present day).
Textbooks
Weekly readings from a range of disciplines, available on eReserve

Jazz History

JAZZ1021 Jazz History 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Andrew Dickeson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture per week Assessment: In-class Presentation (30%); Transcription/Performance (30%); Listening Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Non Jazz Majors need to seek departmental approval in order to enrol.
Jazz History 1 provides the student with a practical understanding of the roots of jazz and the music developed, played and composed from the late 1800s - early 1930s and the historical context in which it was created. The classes will be structured around the use of sound recordings and by practical application. Students will be expected to be able to recognise, write about and discuss the major musical contributors of this period and their music, the cultural and socio-economic influences upon and of this music. Aural examinations will be of the 'Blindfold Test' variety. Students will transcribe notable performances from recordings and will direct ensemble performances of these. A recommended listening list, reading list and audio examples will be provided.
JAZZ1022 Jazz History 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Andrew Dickeson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture per week Prerequisites: JAZZ1021 Assessment: In-class Presentation (30%); Transcription/Performance (30%); Listening Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Non Jazz Majors need to seek departmental approval in order to enrol.
Jazz History 2 provides the student with a practical understanding of the Jazz styles developed, played and composed from the early 1930s to the mid-1940s and the historical context in which it was created. The classes will be structured around the use of sound recordings and by practical application. Students will be expected to be able to recognise, write about and discuss the major musical contributors of this period and their music, the cultural and socio-economic influences upon and of this music. Aural examinations will be of the 'Blindfold Test' variety. Students will transcribe notable performances from recordings and will direct ensemble performances of these. A recommended listening list, reading list and audio examples will be provided.
JAZZ2018 Jazz History 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Andrew Dickeson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lec/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1022 Assessment: In-class Presentation (30%); Transcription/Performance (30%); Listening Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Non Jazz Majors need to seek departmental approval in order to enrol.
Jazz History 3 provides the student with a practical understanding of the Jazz styles developed, played and composed from the mid-1940s through to 1960 and the historical context in which it was created.
The classes will be structured around the use of sound recordings and by practical application. Students will be expected to be able to recognise, write about and discuss the major musical contributors of this period and their music, the cultural and socio-economic influences upon and of this music. Aural examinations will be of the 'Blindfold Test' variety. Students will transcribe notable performances from recordings and will direct ensemble performances of these. A recommended listening list, reading list and audio examples will be provided.
JAZZ2019 Jazz History 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Andrew Dickeson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lec/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ2018 Assessment: In-class Presentation (30%); Transcription/Performance (30%); Listening Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Non Jazz Majors need to seek departmental approval in order to enrol.
Jazz History 4 provides the student with a practical understanding of the Jazz styles developed, played and composed from the early 1960s onwards and the historical context in which it was created.
The classes will be structured around the use of sound recordings and by practical application. Students will be expected to be able to recognise, write about and discuss the major musical contributors of this period and their music, the cultural and socio-economic influences upon and of this music. Aural examinations will be of the 'Blindfold Test' variety. Students will transcribe notable performances from recordings and will direct ensemble performances of these. A recommended listening list, reading list and audio examples will be provided.
JAZZ3618 Jazz Musicology and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Phillip Slater Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hr tut/week Prerequisites: JAZZ2017 or JAZZ2624 Prohibitions: JAZZ3019, JAZZ3018 Assessment: Essay (50%), Seminar Presentation (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study will introduce key analytic concepts and terminology pertinent to contemporary jazz practice, culture and aesthetics. The aim of the Unit of Study is to explore issues relating to the way artists and audiences create and consume jazz music, and how themes such as ideology, race, gender, globalism, media and cultural studies, economics, modernism and postmodernism, structuralism and poststructuralism affect and reflect jazz culture.

Research Seminar

MCGY4601 Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Mitchell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour seminar/week Assessment: Assignments include poster presentation, literature review, seminar presentation, written project proposal (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is a prerequisite for all Performance/Composition students intending to pursue Honours.
This seminar is designed to prepare students for undertaking their own research projects in music in the Honours Program. It will introduce and develop students' awareness of recent musical scholarship and research methodologies and equip students with skills to design and conduct research across a wide variety of musical topics. Students will develop strategies for locating and reviewing information efficiently and effectively and begin exploration of their chosen research topic. The seminars culminate with a series of student presentations, in which students present their research proposals to students and staff for discussion.