Music Skills

Subject details

Music Skills

Music Theory and Aural Skills

MCGY1000 Aural Perception 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 1hr Lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Assessment: Weekly Lab assignment (15%); Non-Western Music Transcription assignment (15%); Solfege class work assessment (15%); 1hr written examination (30%): 10 min Solfege examination (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Completion of a Music Skills Test is essential prior to commencement. Conservatorium of Music students who did not do the test during the audition period and non-Conservatorium of Music Students should contact the unit of study coordinator before the start of semester.
Students work on dictation and sightsinging exercises using diatonic pitch materials in all major and minor keys, and simple and compound metres, including rhythms using triplets and duplets. Sight singing exercises use both moveable-'do' sol-fa and letter-names systems. Dictation exercises emphasise the aural identification of tonic, pitch collection and metre.
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007)
MCGY1001 Aural Perception 1A

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 1hr lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Assessment: Weekly Lab tests (25%); weekly Lab assignments (15%); Solfege tutorial assessment (15%); 1hr Lab examination (25%); 5 min Solfege examination (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Completion of a Music Skills Test is essential prior to commencement. Conservatorium of Music students who did not do the test during the audition period and non-Conservatorium of Music Students should contact the unit of study coordinator before the start of semester.
Students work on dictation and sightsinging exercises using diatonic pitch materials in all major and minor keys, and simple and compound metres. Sight singing exercises use both moveable-'do' sol-fa and letter-names systems. Dictation exercises emphasise the aural identification of tonic, pitch collection and metre.
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007)
MCGY1002 Aural Perception 1B

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1hr Lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Prerequisites: MCGY1001 Assessment: Weekly Lab assignment (15%); 1hr mid-semester written test (15%); Solfege class work assessment (15%); 1hr written examination (30%): 10 min Solfege examination (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students continue to working on dictation and sightsinging exercises using diatonic pitch materials in all major and minor keys, and rhythms using triplets and duplets. Sight singing exercises use both moveable-'do' sol-fa and letter-names systems. Dictation exercises emphasise the aural identification of tonic, pitch collection and metre..
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007)
MCGY1003 Aural Perception 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One 1hr Lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Prerequisites: MCGY1000 or MCGY1002 Assessment: Weekly Lab assignment (15%); 1hr mid-semester written test (15%); Solfege class work assessment (15%); Transcription assignment (30%): 10 min Solfege examination (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Materials studied include diatonic harmony, species counterpoint, modes and rhythms using sub- and supertriplets.
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007)
MCGY2004 Aural Perception 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One 1hr Lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Prerequisites: MCGY1003 Assessment: Weekly Lab assignment (15%); Transcription assignment (15%); Solfege class work assessment (15%); 1hr Written examination (30%): 10 min Solfege examination (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Materials studied include more complex tonal melodies, chromatic tonal harmony, and rhythms using irregular division and small divisions.
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007)
MCGY2005 Aural Perception 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: One 1hr Lab and one 1hr Solfege tut/wk Prerequisites: MCGY2004 Assessment: Weekly Lab assignment (15%); Transcription assignment (15%); Solfege class work assessment (15%); 1hr written examination (30%); 10 min Solfege examination (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Materials studied include more complex chromatic tonal harmony, atonal melodic and harmonic materials, and more complex rhythmic materials including irregular and mixed metres.
Textbooks
Gary S. Karpinski and Richard Kram: Anthology for Sight Singing, New York; Norton (2007). Gary S. Karpinski: Manual for Ear Training and Sight Singing, New York, Norton (2007) Additional textbooks as advised by the lecturer or on the course website.
MCGY1008 Harmony and Analysis 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Lewis Cornwell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 lecture,1 tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MUSC2699 Assumed knowledge: Ability to read musical notation including treble and bass clefs, and knowledge of scales, intervals and triads in tonal music. Assessment: Assignments (40%), examination (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Completion of a Music Skills Test is essential prior to commencement. Students who have not completed the test should contact the unit of study coordinator before the start of semester.
An understanding of the materials of tonal music is fundamental to all aspects of a student's musicianship. The acquisition of practical skills in harmony provides a means of examining in their essence issues of musical structure and technique that apply throughout the tonal repertoire. In the first semester students gain fluency in writing four-part harmonisations using diatonic vocabulary, learning the basic chord functions and voice-leading patterns that will provide a framework for later elaboration. Exercises in species counterpoint are included to assist in the comprehension of voice leading principles, and the linear conception of music is further explored through introductory exercises in analysis.
Textbooks
Gauldin Robert, Harmonic practice in tonal music. 2nd ed. NY: Norton, 2004.
MCGY1009 Harmony and Analysis 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Lewis Cornwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 lecture,1 tutorial/wk Prerequisites: MCGY1008 Assessment: Assignments (40%), examination (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Having acquired basic skills in voice leading and an understanding of diatonic chord functions, students are introduced to more advanced concepts that are encountered frequently in the tonal repertoire. These include modulation, diatonic sequences and techniques for working with instrumental textures. Counterpoint studies are continued, both in practice and in analysis, where some aspects of Baroque musical forms are considered.
Textbooks
Gauldin Robert. Harmonic practice in tonal music. 2nd ed NY: Norton, 2004
MCGY2010 Harmony and Analysis 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Lewis Cornwell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 lecture,1 tutorial/wk Prerequisites: MCGY1009 Assessment: Assignments (50%), Examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Harmony and Analysis 1 and 2: some separation is maintained between studies in counterpoint and harmony but the emphasis here is upon drawing together those two aspects. An ideal model for this approach is offered by the chorales of J.S. Bach, which form a focus in Harmony and Analysis 3. Each topic is, however, extended to embrace later styles and assignments include the writing of short piano pieces, along with chorale settings and figured-bass exercises. With the benefit of a broader harmonic vocabulary, students will also investigate some aspects of fugal technique and sonata forms.
Textbooks
Gauldin, Robert. Harmonic Practice in Tonal Music. 2nd Ed NY: Norton, 2004. Gauldin, Robert. Workbook for Harmonic Practice in Tonal Music. 2nd Ed NY: Norton, 2004.
MCGY2011 Harmony and Analysis 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Lewis Cornwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 lecture,1 tutorial/wk Prerequisites: MCGY2010 Assessment: Assignments (50%), examination (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The study of pre-20th century tonal harmony is completed with a consideration of chromatic techniques, particularly those found in the music of the first half of the 19th century. An exhaustive study of later 19th century chromaticism is beyond the scope of a course at this level, but is intended that students will at least acquire the ability to look further into the music of that period as they encounter it. In keeping with the stylistic orientation of the course, emphasis is placed upon developing facility with instrumental textures and working with some of the smaller forms found in 19th century music.
Textbooks
Gauldin, Robert. Harmonic Practice in Tonal Music. 2nd Ed NY: Norton, 2004. Gauldin, Robert. Workbook for Harmonic Practice in Tonal Music. 2nd Ed NY: Norton, 2004.
JAZZ1621 Jazz Music Skills 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2 hr tuts/week Corequisites: JAZZ1601 or JAZZ1631 Prohibitions: MUSC2699 Assessment: Harmony and Arranging Module: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30%). Aural Module: Two tests (2x20%), one 2 hour exam (60%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Harmony and Arranging Module: This unit includes understanding the ranges of and transpositions for the various instruments, chord symbols, scale-chord relationships, rhythm section scoring and voicing techniques for small jazz combo arrangements ¿ featuring Trumpet, Alto Sax, Tenor Sax, Trombone + Rhythm section. This unit deals with the study of the harmony of standard jazz repertoire. Students will learn to understand and use basic harmonic rules and standard harmonic devices, diatonic progression and chord patterns. Legibility in engraving and copying is also an assessable aspect.
Aural Module: Offers a systematic study of all simple intervals up to and including one octave, triadic harmony, four note chords in closed position and voice leading within these concepts, focusing on common harmonic movements that occur in the jazz repertoire. N.B Both the Harmony and Aural Modules must be passed in order for the student to proceed to Jazz Music Skills 2.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"; Nestico, Sammy ¿The Complete Arranger¿
JAZZ1622 Jazz Music Skills 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 2 hr tuts/week Prerequisites: JAZZ1621 Corequisites: JAZZ1632 or JAZZ1602 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30%). Aural Module: Two class tests at 20% each, and end of semester exam at 60%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Harmony and Arranging Module: In semester two, the voicing techniques for two to four horns stressing the most effective registers, harmonisation of passing tones, clusters and other techniques will be introduced. Students may be organised into ensemble-like groups and may be expected to bring their instruments to perform the works presented.
Aural Module: Consolidates and expands upon concepts and skills introduced in Jazz Music Skills 1, and introduces compound intervals, open voicings, the addition of upper extensions to all chord types, and increasingly complex harmonic structures. N.B Both the Harmony and Aural Modules must be passed in order for the student to proceed to Jazz Music Skills 3.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"
JAZZ2623 Jazz Music Skills 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2 hr tuts/week Prerequisites: JAZZ1622 Corequisites: JAZZ2603 or JAZZ2633 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30%). Aural Module: Two class tests at 20% each, and end of semester exam at 60%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Harmony and Arranging Module: Concentrates on more complex harmonic material that forms the basis for Jazz Improvisation 3. Students will learn big band orchestration which will include ensemble scoring, sax soli, background writing, form and the related uses of counterpoint. There will be detailed analysis of scores of major composers and arrangers. Methods of reharmonisation of existing jazz and standard compositions will be explored further.
Aural Module: Consolidates and expands upon concepts and skills introduced in Jazz Music Skills 1 and 2, plus introducing advanced chord types, and increasingly complex harmonic structures. N.B Both the Harmony and Aural Modules must be passed in order for the student to proceed to Jazz Music Skills 4.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"; Nestico, Sammy ¿The Complete Arranger¿.
JAZZ2624 Jazz Music Skills 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 2 hr tuts/week Prerequisites: JAZZ2623 Corequisites: JAZZ2604 or JAZZ2634 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30%). Aural Module: Two class tests at 20% each, and end of semester exam at 60%. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Harmony and Arranging Module: Students learn big band orchestration including ensemble scoring, sax soli, background writing, form and the related uses of counterpoint. There will be detailed analysis of scores of major composers and arrangers. Selected arrangements will be rehearsed and recorded by a Big Band. Students may study contemporary techniques encompassing elements of polytonality, serial composition, extended instrumental effects and textural voicings. This subject also deals with the harmonic concepts used in Jazz Improvisation.
Aural Module: Consolidates all concepts from Jazz Music Skills 1, 2 and 3. By its conclusion, students will have systematically examined, over four semesters, aural concepts that are essential to creative musical interplay in jazz performance. N.B Both the Harmony and Aural Modules must be passed in order for the student to complete.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band", Nestico, Sammy ¿The Complete Arranger¿
JAZZ1015 Jazz Ear Training 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Assessment: Two tests (2x20%), one 2 hour exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
This unit offers a systematic study of all simple intervals up to and including one octave, triadic harmony, four note chords in closed position and voice leading within these concepts, focusing on common harmonic movements that occur in the jazz repertoire.
JAZZ1016 Jazz Ear Training 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1015 Assessment: Two tests (2x20%), one 2 hour exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
This unit consolidates and expands upon concepts and skills introduced in Jazz Ear Training 1, plus introducing compound intervals, open voicings, the addition of all upper extensions to all chord types, and increasingly complex harmonic structures.
JAZZ2038 Jazz Ear Training 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1016 Assessment: Two tests (2x20%), one 2 hour examination (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz degree students.
This unit consolidates and expands upon concepts and skills introduced in Jazz Ear Training 1 and 2, plus introducing advanced chord types, and increasingly complex harmonic structures.
JAZZ2039 Jazz Ear Training 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ2038 Assessment: Two tests (2x20%),one 2 hour examination (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz degree students
This unit consolidates all concepts from Jazz Ear Training 1, 2 and 3. By its conclusion, students will have systematically examined, over four semesters, aural concepts that are essential to creative musical interplay in jazz performance.
JAZZ1019 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 1

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30% total). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
This unit includes understanding the ranges of and transpositions for the various instruments, chord symbols, scale-chord relationships rhythm section scoring and voicing techniques for small jazz combo arrangements ¿ featuring Trumpet, Alto Sax, Tenor Sax, Trombone + Rhythm section. This unit deals with the study of the harmony of standard jazz repertoire. Students will learn to understand and use basic harmonic rules and the typicalstandard harmonic devices, diatonic progression and chord patterns. Legibility in engraving and copying is also an assessable aspect.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"; Nestico, Sammy ¿The Complete Arranger¿
JAZZ1020 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 2

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1019 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30% total). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
In this unit voicing techniques for two to four horns stressing the most effective registers, harmonisation of passing tones, clusters and other techniques will be introduced. The harmonic techniques explored are used as the theoretical basis for Jazz Improvisation.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"; Nestico, Sammy ¿The Complete Arranger¿
JAZZ2016 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 3

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ1020 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30% total) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
This unit concentrates on more complex harmonic material that forms the basis for Jazz Improvisation, as well as learning arranging techniques for five horns and more complex ensemble music. Methods of reharmonisation of existing jazz and standard compositions will be introduced. Students learn big band orchestration which includes ensemble scoring, sax soli, background writing, form and the related uses of counterpoint. There will be detailed analysis of scores of major composers and arrangers.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"; Nestico, Sammy ¿The Complete Arranger¿
JAZZ2017 Jazz Harmony and Arranging 4

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Craig Scott Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr tut/wk Prerequisites: JAZZ2016 Assessment: Written harmony test (30%), Classwork (15%) , End of Semester large arrangement (25%), 3 x smaller arrangements at 10% each (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: These units are only available to non-jazz students
Students learn big band orchestration including ensemble scoring, sax soli, background writing, form and the related uses of counterpoint. There will be detailed analysis of scores of major composers and arrangers. Selected arrangements may be rehearsed by a Big Band. Students may study contemporary techniques encompassing elements of polytonality, extended instrumental effects and textural voicings.
Textbooks
Lindsay, Gary (2005) "Jazz Arranging Techniques from Quartet to Big Band"; Nestico, Sammy ¿The Complete Arranger¿
JAZZ3301 Rhythm Awareness/Analysis

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Simon Barker Session: Semester 1 Classes: 12 x 2 hour lectures Assessment: Class assessment 1 (20%); Class assessment 2 (20%); Rhythmic analysis (40%); Class assessment 3 (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Non-Jazz degree students may take this unit after completion of their Principal Study 4 with the approval of the Unit Coordinator.
This unit of study is an elective course in rhythm that introduces students to a broad range of material, including case studies of influential local and international approaches to rhythm construction, and overviews of various rhythmic traditions from Asia, Latin America, the USA, Africa, and India. Without doubt, rhythm has become the primary organisational tool in contemporary jazz performance, with many of the world's most influential jazz artists now employing complex rhythmic structures, odd-time signatures, odd-rhythmic groupings, metric modulations, as well as rhythmic models from traditional music styles, as basic structural frameworks and improvisational prompts.
MUSC1501 Extended Fundamentals of Music

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1000 or MUSC1001 or MUSC1002 or MUSC1003 or MUSC1004 or MUSC1005 or MUSC1503 or MUSC1504 or MUSC2693 or MUSC2699 or MCGY1008 Assumed knowledge: (MUSC1503 and MUSC1504), or HSC Music 2 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students will take a diagnostic in Week 1 of semester to ensure they have the required level of music theory and aural skills.
Through an integrated and research-based approach to music composition and analysis, student's knowledge of music theory and compositional techniques is extended. Skills in this area cover a range of musical styles including classical music (past and present), jazz, popular music, film music and noise.
MUSC1503 Fundamentals of Music 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1000 or MUSC1001 or MUSC1002 or MUSC1003 or MUSC1004 or MUSC1005 or MUSC1501 or MUSC1502 or MUSC2699 or MCGY1008 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
An introduction to basic music literacy skills, including learning to read and write music, and an understanding of fundamental aspects of its structure and composition. The material covered in this unit of study concentrates upon the basics of music theory and listening to ensure that participants have a solid grounding for a firm understanding of music notation and organisation.
MUSC1504 Fundamentals of Music 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1501 or MUSC1502 or MUSC1000 or MUSC1001 or MUSC1002 or MUSC1003 or MUSC1004 or MUSC1005 or MUSC2699 Assumed knowledge: MUSC1503 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (60%), aural assessment (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A more advanced exploration of music literacy skills than MUSC1503. The material covered in this unit of study ranges from the broad to the specific: from an examination of musical elements and the way they are used in a variety of musical genres through to specific compositional aspects such as four-part writing. Analysis and compositional craft regarding melody, harmony and rhythm in classical and contemporary popular music are a central focus of this unit of study. Critical listening skills are developed in this unit of study.
MUSC2693 Fundamentals of Music 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Daniel Rojas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1hr lecture and 2 x 1hr tutorials (aural and written)/wk Prohibitions: MUSC1501 or MUSC2615 or MUSC2699 Assessment: Written and online music theory assessment (70%), aural assessment (30%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Through an integrated and research-based approach to music composition and analysis, student's knowledge of music theory and compositional techniques is extended. Skills in this area cover a range of musical styles including classical music (past and present), jazz, popular music, film music and noise.
OLET1801 Music Theory and Notation Essentials

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Humberstone Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: up to 3hrs of video lectures and online interactivity/week including 1hr online support Mode of delivery: Online
This Online Learning Environment unit (OLE) provides a means by which music notation, and thus music theory, can be taught to those without a background in these areas. The basic music theory covered in this unit relates to our contemporary western music notation system (s). An understanding of how music theory works is extermely useful to a range of diverse disciplines that engage with music. Examples include games and user interface designers, film and drama studies students and those who have learnt musical practice from an aural rather than notated tradition, such as contemporary popular musicians and singers.

Technology Skills

CMPN2006 Sound Recording Fundamentals

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ivan Zavada Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hr lect/wk, 1 hr lab class/wk Assessment: Stereo Recording (60%), Online Quiz (30%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Jazz students should have completed Jazz Performance 6 before enroling in this unit of study.
In this unit of study students will be introduced to a range of audio technologies and gain a basic proficiency in sound recording, editing and mixing. Students will experience working in the Conservatorium sound studios, and learn how to make good quality recordings with portable recording devices. This unit of study also examines microphone design, stereo microphone techniques, mixing console operation and digital audio recording. Students will experience prac-based recording sessions to gain a comprehensive understanding of the recording technology on offer at the Sydney Conservatorium.
Textbooks
Modern Recording Techniques 8th Ed, D. M. Huber, R.E. Runstein, Focal Press, 2013.
CMPN2007 Sound Recording Advanced

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Blinkhorn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr studio, workshop, class and student group focused projects Prerequisites: CMPN2006 Assumed knowledge: Proficiency in an industry standard DAW and the ability to understand basic microphone and recording techniques. Assessment: Class Attendance and Participation and presentation (20%), Recording Project 1 (35%), Recording Project 2 (45%), Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit follows on from Sound Recording Fundamentals with a variety of both theoretical and practical applications and aesthetics within the studio-based recording environment. Additional topics include frequency response/spectral range and shaping, dynamic range (to compress, or not to compress), DSP functionaility in pre- and post- production and analysis of audio mixdowns and concurrent mixing techniques.
MUED1002 Creative Music Technology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Benjamin Carey Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr lab/studio/wk Assessment: Creative Audio Assignment (70%), Formative Skills Assessment (20%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study students will be introduced to a range of music technologies and gain a basic proficiency in sound recording, editing and mixing. Students will learn to work with audio in a digital audio workstation, how to make good quality recordings with portable recording devices, and make use of these skills in service of a creative outcome. The unit will include an overview of software for notation/sequencing, as well as basic sound synthesis concepts. In the final assessment students will explore the creative possibilities of music technology by realising a sound work using either instrumental and/or environmental sound recorded and edited by them.
MUSC2653 Introduction to Digital Music Techniques

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damian Barbeler Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hr lecture/demonstration/wk Prerequisites: 18 Junior credit points Prohibitions: MUSC2053 Assessment: Sound recording and editing assignment (30%); creative assignments (60%); online assessments, attendance and participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: An ability to read music at a basic level and an understanding of fundamental musical terminology is an advantage in this unit of study.
This unit is an introduction to the use of digital sound and music in creative and multimedia contexts. It is a practical course in which students are introduced to tools of sound creation and manipulation. Students will undertake creative projects as a means to learning. In addition, participants will be exposed to a number of approaches to electroacoustic music across the 20th and 21st centuries.
OLET1803 Digital Communication: Sound

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Humberstone Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: up to 2hrs of video lectures/week, 1 x 1hr problem based learning/week Assessment: 4 x peer reviews to the equivalent of 250wds (40%), 1 x presentation (10%), 1 x project (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit focuses on how sound can be used to present information effectively. It deals with audio recording techniques, and the creation of original music to add emotional weight to presentations, using sampling and synthesis techniques.

Business Skills

JAZZ3631 Music Business Skills

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: David Theak Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lect/wk Assessment: Press Kit (35%), Tour Plan (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Music Business Skills is designed to prepare graduating students for the non-musical aspects of their forthcoming career. The unit is designed as an overview of the many different facets of the music industry, including setting up a small music business (including taxation overview and responsibilities), funding sources and alternatives, tour planning and budgeting, producing and designing promotional tools, dealing with record companies/music publishing, and other essential techniques and requirements of running a successful music business in today's competitive arts environment.