Master of Learning Sciences and Technology

Research stream

This stream is intended for those who wish to do research in ICT-supported learning and are likely to progress to a PhD in the field. It includes degree core courses in the psychology and design of technology-supported learning, emerging educational technologies, and research frontiers. This stream includes a dissertation on a topic of your choice.

To qualify for the Master of Learning Sciences and Technology (Research) candidates must complete 48 credit points, including

  • 5 units of study (30 credit points) of core units; and
  • 1 unit of study (6 credit points) of elective units; plus
  • 2 units of study (12 credit points) of capstone units from the units of study table below.

Units of study table

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Learning Sciences and Technology - Research stream

Core units

EDPC5021
Foundations of Learning Sciences
6      Semester 1
EDPC5022
Design for Learning
6      Semester 1
EDPC5023
Innovations in Learning Tech & Practice
6      Semester 2
EDPC5024
Systems, Change and Learning
6      Semester 2
EDPC5025
Learning Technology Research Frontiers
6      Semester 2

Elective units

EDPC5012
Evaluating Learning Tech. Innovation
6      Semester 1
EDPK5003
Developing a Research Project
6      Semester 1
Semester 2

Capstone units

EDPZ6720
Dissertation
12   
Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
Semester 2
EDPZ6724
Dissertation Part 1
6    C EDPZ6725

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
Semester 2
EDPZ6725
Dissertation Part 2
6    P EDPZ6724
Semester 1
Semester 2

Units of study listing

Learning Sciences and Technology - Research stream

Core units

EDPC5021 Foundations of Learning Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Reimann, Dr Lina Markauskaite Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week- evening Assessment: 4x2000wd group projects (65%) and 1x2000wd short individual assignment (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit we build on work in the learning sciences (psychology, education, cognitive and neurosciences) as we look at psychological models of learning, cognition and motivation, especially as they relate to multimedia and computer-supported learning. Contemporary educational technology use will be analysed from a number of perspectives, including classical information theory, psychological media and communication theories, activity theory, socio-cultural learning theory, constructivist and models of distributed cognition.
EDPC5022 Design for Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Goodyear; Dr Kate Thompson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignments (2x25%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This course provides a framework for considering many of the core problems facing those who carry out the work of educational design. It offers a model of the architecture of learning situations and focuses on three main design components that influence the character and outcomes of learning: the design of good learning tasks, the design of physical and digital resources and spaces for learning, and design intended to evoke convivial learning relationships. The course does not aim to teach specific design techniques - for example, the steps in Instructional Systems Design (ISD). Rather, it suggests ways of identifying which tools and techniques, from the many now available, are most likely to be appropriate for a specific design challenge. The course therefore offers an overview of selected, contemporary approaches, techniques and tools of relevance to designing for other people's learning. It also provides an opportunity to review empirical research on how designers design and what knowledge they draw upon in design work.
EDPC5023 Innovations in Learning Tech & Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Jacobson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 2x1500wd short paper (2x25%) and presentation and 1x3000wd group project (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit explores how new views of learning and pedagogical practices interact and co-evolve with technological inventions and innovations in formal and informal learning settings. Course readings cover emerging theoretical and empirical research in the field of the learning sciences related to how people learn, how to teach, and how to assess higher order knowledge, skills, and dispositions, as well as recent technological developments such as virtual worlds and game environments, 3D computational modeling and visualization tools, mobile communication devices, and "Web 2.0" systems that are increasingly being augmented with intelligent agents and semantic web functionalities. A central themes of this course include how theoretical and research perspectives are used to ground new types of learning and teaching experiences enabled by advanced and emerging technologies, which in turn have the potential to better prepare students for the significant challenges and rapid changes of this century.
EDPC5024 Systems, Change and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lina Markauskaite Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignments (2x25%) and 1x3000wd group project and presentation (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this core unit we will use 'systems inquiry' as a conceptual framework to explore change and learning processes, on the individual, group and organisational level. We focus on a theory-based approach to change management and organisational learning, so that students can come to appreciate the complexity and non-linearity of bringing about change in schools, corporations and other organisations. Drawing on contemporary research in the learning sciences, we will explore group and individual learning and conceptual change processes. Students will apply modern conceptual change approaches to investigate their own learning process, and will gain hands-on experience as they apply systems inquiry concepts and methods to analyse change problems in their own professional environment.
EDPC5025 Learning Technology Research Frontiers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lina Markauskaite Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 1x3000wd weekly contributions to debates and learning technology forecasts (50%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is designed for students interested in the newest research developments in the area of learning technology, and those who want to gain a deeper understanding of research methods and techniques, appropriate to the fields of the learning sciences and technologies. It is ideal for those students who want to explore the newest topics of their interest and simultaneously learn about research design in a collaborative peer-supported learning environment. Students will learn to assess critically emergingdomains of learning technology innovation, understand different kinds of research methods and choose appropriate research methods for carrying out empirical studies. Students will participate in debates, research projects. The unit is student-led and involves proactive individual and collaborative exploration of topics.

Elective units

EDPC5012 Evaluating Learning Tech. Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lina Markauskaite Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week evenings Assessment: 2x1500wd short assignment (2x25%) and 1x3000wd final paper (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is intended to help students acquire the knowledge and skills needed to evaluate ICT-enhanced learning innovations. It provides an introduction to the theory and practice of evaluations, drawing principles and methods from best practice in program evaluation and the areas of ICT-enhanced learning. Attention is paid to a holistic approach to evaluation, stressing the need to plan, design and implement evaluation in context. It is suitable for those with an interest in formal education, corporate training and professional development.
EDPK5003 Developing a Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachel Wilson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x4.5 hr Saturday workshops, plus online lectures and activities Assessment: online exercises (40%) and class presentation (20%) and research proposal (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
This core unit is seen as the foundation unit in research methods and it provides an overview of the research process, with a focus on critical evaluation of research reports and the design of research projects. It covers a wide range of basic research techniques and introduces other research methods that are the focus of more in-depth study in other search methods units. Research design issues and various methods of data collection examined. Students explore the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches; various research strategies; observation, documents, questionnaires and assessments. The assessment in this unit is developed around students' own research interests and by the end of the unit students will have developed their own research proposal document.

Capstone units

EDPZ6720 Dissertation

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several meetings/discussions with supervisor. Assessment: 1x12000wd report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Method unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development.
EDPZ6724 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several meetings/discussions with supervisor Corequisites: EDPZ6725 Assessment: satisfactory progress during semester; students then must enrol in EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2 the following semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methods unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development. This unit is part one of the Dissertation which runs over two semesters; therefore, students must also enroll in EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2 in the following semester.
EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several meetings/discussions with supervisor Prerequisites: EDPZ6724 Assessment: 1x12000wd report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Supervision
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methods unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development. This unit is part two of the Dissertation which runs over two semester; therefore, students must have also enrolled in EDPZ6724 Dissertation Part 1 in the previous semester.